A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
The end of the list has been reached or no journals were found for your choice.
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Humanity & Society
Number of Followers: 4  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0160-5976 - ISSN (Online) 2372-9708
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1175 journals]
  • Living as Socially Marked Individuals: Two Stories on Stigma and Its
           Consequences

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Cindy Brooks Dollar, Grant Tietjen
      Abstract: Humanity & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Perceptions, applications, and consequences of stigma have been of interest to sociologists for centuries. Following criticisms of original labeling models, modified labeling theory (MLT) sought to reframe arguments about the consequences of negative labeling. MLT focuses on explaining how socialization teaches us the deleterious consequences of stigmatizing labels, and how anticipations of stigma are met with deliberate management to cope with expected stigma. MLT proposes three stigma management strategies: secrecy, withdrawal, and education. In the present paper, we use an autoethnographic, narrative sociology approach to share our personal experiences with stigma. The autoethnographic-storytelling approach effectively places our experiences within our cultural settings and demonstrates MLT’s applicability. Using one narrative of a designated “criminal offender” and the other of a “sexual assault victim,” we show how the politically charged labels of “offender” and “victim” while publicly framed as opposing, share similarities, thus emphasizing MLT’s explanatory potential. The narratives indicate, however, that stigma management may be more complex than present literatures capture. We propose the notion of a stigma management toolkit to help explain the availability, selection, and employment of certain stigma management practices and conclude by encouraging further theorization on stigma-related processes.
      Citation: Humanity & Society
      PubDate: 2022-11-05T11:46:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01605976221137714
       
  • The Shadow of Lives Lost in the Mediterranean Over Europe

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Martin Aidnik
      Abstract: Humanity & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Europe’s treatment of refugees provides growing evidence that the continent is losing its moral compass, and that Europe is increasingly callous – so-called Fortress Europe. Brute force, deterrence, including pushbacks and barbed wire fences have become the instruments with which European governments have responded to irregular migration and refugees. This article seeks to bring to the fore the contradiction between the EU’s self-proclaimed values — human dignity and human rights — and the callous policies of nation states and the EU’s migration regime. My main focus lies on the calamitous conditions of refugees and the thousands of deaths that have occurred in the Mediterranean Sea since 2015, the year that refugees fleeing Syria’s civil war started making their way to Europe. Importantly, the Mediterranean is the deadliest border in the world; it is the veritable global epicenter of lethal border crossings. Drawing on contemporary critical theory, I undertake a humanist critique of the European status quo. The EU, as a force for a better, more livable world, is on its way to becoming irrelevant, something that was evident well before the Covid-19 pandemic. This is what is principally at stake today.
      Citation: Humanity & Society
      PubDate: 2022-11-02T08:44:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01605976221120537
       
  • Understanding the Rise of Anti-Political Correctness Sentiment: The
           Curious Role of Education

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Andrew F. Baird, J Micah Roos, J. Scott Carter
      Abstract: Humanity & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The anti-politically correct (PC) stance has been a key defensive position held by many conservative Americans for more than three decades. This position holds that being forced to be politically correct hinders open dialogue and debate on important yet sensitive issues, especially those around race and racism. However, scholars have questioned this anti-PC orientation and tied it to political orientation and racism. One caveat that stands as the basis of this paper is the role of education in moderating the impact of racial emotions on various outcomes. While some scholars, such as Seymour Lipset, highlight the liberalizing impact of education, others question such impact. Accordingly, this research examines how educational attainment, racial resentment, and White guilt concerning racial injustice interact to impact the likelihood of White Americans taking an anti-PC stance. Our data is drawn from the American National Election Study 2016 pilot survey. In line with past research, we find that racial resentment and White guilt indeed predict views toward political correctness; however, we find educational attainment does not change the effect of these variables on views toward political correctness. We discuss the importance of these findings in relation to prominent social theories on race and social dominance.
      Citation: Humanity & Society
      PubDate: 2022-09-01T09:16:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01605976221120536
       
  • Theoretical Sociology of War and Structural Causes of the 2003 US Invasion
           of Iraq

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Randy La Prairie
      Abstract: Humanity & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, I present a theory of American military imperialism that combines three structural factors: the military-industrial complex (MIC); elite control of public policy; and elite, imperial ideology. I argue that because this theory is more plausible and empirically grounded than major Weberian and Marxist theories of war, it can provide a better explanation for specific US military interventions. As a theory of American military imperialism, it is also more nuanced than existing power elite theories. A case study of the 2003 Iraq War is presented to illustrate the utility of the theory. The case study shows that in invading Iraq, key Bush administration officials sought to expand the MIC and their own decision power making within it, and that these preferences were associated with their specific elite social backgrounds, and the hardline ideology they subscribed to. I conclude with suggestions for future research.
      Citation: Humanity & Society
      PubDate: 2022-08-11T07:41:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01605976221119997
       
  • Maintaining Value: How University Janitors Gain Status on the Job

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Brandi Perri
      Abstract: Humanity & Society, Ahead of Print.
      A university campus is a critical site to analyze the day-to day experiences of custodial staff and to examine the practices janitors employ to manage the negative social attitudes commonly associated with their positions. Building on service work literature, this paper asks how janitors create more value and meaning within low-status jobs. With data collected from in-depth interviews, observations of worksites at a public university, and in the janitors’ local union office, I argue that within higher education institutions, janitors find ways to add value to their jobs in two ways: taking on non-compensated roles such as parental surrogates or university historians and participating in various types of resistance on a personal and/or community level. Participating in these processes, the janitors themselves report feeling more fulfilled in the job, and they establish the importance of their work, beyond the broom and mop.
      Citation: Humanity & Society
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T01:31:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01605976221111815
       
  • Diverse Perspectives to Support a Human Rights Approach to Reduce
           Indiana’s Maternal Mortality Rate

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Amelia E Clark, Erin Macey, Ashley Irby, Cynthia Stone, Mary Pell Abernathy, Jack E Turman
      Abstract: Humanity & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Maternal mortality in the United States of America is a human rights issue. This study gathered perspectives from Black women community members and from duty bearers in four fields (academic, special interest, government, and media) on barriers to maternal health in Indiana. Semi-structured interviews and an editing (data-based) analytic strategy revealed six themes regarding barriers to maternal health: lack of continuous, quality health care coverage; racism and implicit bias; trauma and lack of mental health services; lack of instrumental and emotional support systems; insufficient knowledge for self-advocacy; and lack of data transparency and reliability. Participants raised several strategies to address barriers, including continuous high-quality health care coverage, implicit bias training, mental health services, doulas, and grassroots-university partnerships. We discuss these barriers and solutions using a human rights-based approach to health (HRBA). These findings present a blueprint for duty bearers in Indiana to increase women’s ability to claim their right to health.
      Citation: Humanity & Society
      PubDate: 2022-06-23T08:47:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01605976221109785
       
  • Building Peace in Northern Ireland: Hopes for the Future

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sean Byrne, Karine Levasseur, Laura E. Reimer
      Abstract: Humanity & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Since the Good Friday Agreement of 1998, over 2 billion Euros have been poured into Northern Ireland for peacebuilding. This article presents the hopes and experiences of workers in CSOs funded by either or both funds, development officers, and civil servants employed by the funders. They confirm that peacebuilding and reconciliation projects funded by the European Union (EU) Peace and Reconciliation Fund and the International Fund for Ireland (IFI) have positively contributed to the peace process in Northern Ireland. Civil Society Organizational (CSO) projects support peacebuilding, reconciliation, and greater cooperation between the Protestant and Catholic communities. This study explored the perceptions of 120 respondents working with these funders. They indicated that designated peacebuilding funding promotes bridging, needs to be balanced, and is important to building the peace dividend and that local knowledge, practices, and skillsets should be built into the funding process. The politics of post-Brexit Northern Ireland means that understanding how to best fund peacebuilding and reconciliation is critical. At time of writing, tensions have risen.
      Citation: Humanity & Society
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T05:04:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01605976221107093
       
  • “There is Absolutely No Discrimination Based on that Allowed”:
           Marriage, Migration, and Equality Rhetoric as a Justification for Harm

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Amy Brainer
      First page: 571
      Abstract: Humanity & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article contrasts talk surrounding queer marriage and migration with the lived experiences of LGBTQ+ people who have petitioned for status in the United States based on their relationships. I find that people use the concept of equality or being “the same” to dismiss testimonies of harm, and to hold individuals instead of systems and laws responsible for harms when they are acknowledged. I place this rhetoric in the context of US family immigration as a colonial and racial project. Through a mixed methods analysis, the article draws a link between the interactions queer and trans people are having online, their personal and couple narratives, and the colonial history and harm endemic to this often idealized immigration pathway.
      Citation: Humanity & Society
      PubDate: 2022-01-04T07:19:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01605976211064178
       
  • Organizational Context and Student Activism: Assessing Similarities and
           Differences across a Secular and Religious College and University

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gilbert F. Mireles
      First page: 594
      Abstract: Humanity & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Student activism is a well-researched phenomenon. However, student activism at religious institutions is less well known. This gap is significant given that religious colleges and universities comprise nearly 20% of all post-secondary schools in the United States (Digest of Educational Statistics). This study examines how student perceptions and behaviors associated with activism are shaped by organizational context. To answer this question, researchers interviewed students and administrators at two institutions: one secular, the other religious. We found that differences in perceptions and practices are influenced by the school administration. Additionally, we found that social change efforts at the religious institution were simultaneously nurtured and constrained by the administration. Two contributions emerge from these findings. First, an elaboration on activism at religious schools and second, the concept of embedded activism, which explains the way institutional context enables and constrains social change efforts on college and university campuses.
      Citation: Humanity & Society
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T05:00:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01605976221095494
       
  • Shifting our Focus in Professional Development Programs from Changing
           Individuals to Building Community: Lessons from Namibia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Katherine Carter, Judy Aulette
      First page: 619
      Abstract: Humanity & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigated what academics in Namibia view as barriers to publishing and what supports they believe would facilitate their work. Data for exploring these issues were collected in reflection papers written by university teachers during a semester-long workshop. Their comments fell into two categories, one of which focused on individual weaknesses and individualistic solutions. The other category of comments made us aware of a factor to which we had not given sufficient consideration: the necessity of building community among scholars as a way of making research more productive and creative. We consider these findings within Bourdieu's (1989) framework noting the symbolic power of discourse on academic writing and the way in which challenges to that framework include not only “learning the unwritten rules” but creating social networks of support to allow and sustain that learning and to challenge the practices that isolate scholars as individual competitors. We argue that Ubuntu (human interconnectedness) is an essential factor in academic life, and it is a critical for challenging the power relations of dominant discourse.
      Citation: Humanity & Society
      PubDate: 2022-02-10T06:45:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01605976211071059
       
  • Southern Identity and Serendipitous Opportunity in Qualitative Research
           Among Appalachians in Chicago

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Roger Guy
      First page: 636
      Abstract: Humanity & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In qualitative research, identity is often discussed in terms of being an outsider vis- à-vis the subjects and setting. While important, there are research situations that require instrumental demonstrations of identity rather than a cloaking of the outsider status. This article uses ethnographic work among urban Appalachians in Chicago as a backdrop to examine how identity is a conduit for enhancing serendipitous opportunities in research. While it is known that identity facilitates more access to subjects, I examine instances of when it is purposefully used to the advantage of the researcher among populations resistant to outsiders. I demonstrate instances of identity work as an interactive process between the researcher and subject that involves the use of shared meanings that convey authenticity and acceptance to facilitate inquiry.
      Citation: Humanity & Society
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T08:37:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01605976221095493
       
  • Community-Based Work in the Context of Digital Interaction and COVID

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: John W. Murphy
      First page: 652
      Abstract: Humanity & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In the Era of COVID-19, most research and clinical practice have been carried out through videoconferencing (Zoom meetings). This style of interaction, however, comes into conflict with community-based work, which depends heavily on local insights and community entrée. In this paper, some of the reasons for this basic conflict are examined, along with some limited remedies for the restrictions placed on community-based work by computer-mediated discourse.
      Citation: Humanity & Society
      PubDate: 2022-02-27T03:07:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01605976211067561
       
  • Inside-Out as Humanistic Pedagogy

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Matthew J. DelSesto, David L. Sellers
      First page: 665
      Abstract: Humanity & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Pedagogy can be a humanistic way of engaging social realities in the current era of persistent social marginalization, racial injustice, and political polarization. This article explores one particular community-based pedagogy known as Inside-Out, which brings incarcerated students together with students from a college campus to study together at a local prison or jail. From the student and instructor perspective, the article looks at the ways that Inside-Out catalyzes humanistic thought and action—from within the social-historical context of prisons and universities. It explores how, if processes of racism or criminalization position social groups against each other, a humanistic pedagogy has the potential to meaningfully bring people together across social divides to reckon with dehumanizing social realities. Conclusions are offered on some key elements of an Inside-Out pedagogy that embody a humanistic approach and are relevant to other pedagogical contexts.
      Citation: Humanity & Society
      PubDate: 2022-03-28T07:45:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01605976221080169
       
  • “Can We Have Class Outside'”

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jared Del Rosso
      First page: 687
      Abstract: Humanity & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Can we have class outside' This question raises issues about the conditions in which we teach and learn, as well as about the power relations of the classroom. This Final Thought makes a case for surrendering to the question. Can we learn to love it' Can we learn, even, to begin asking it to the people who learn with us in our courses'
      Citation: Humanity & Society
      PubDate: 2022-04-14T04:24:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01605976221083657
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.238.118.80
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-