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Irish Journal of Sociology
Number of Followers: 2  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0791-6035 - ISSN (Online) 2050-5280
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1175 journals]
  • Closing the ranks: Bondedness, sense of self and moral injury during
           legacy case prosecutions

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      Authors: Kevin Hearty
      Abstract: Irish Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article represents an entry point for the sociological study of protests by British Army veterans opposed to legacy case prosecutions arsing out of the conflict in the North of Ireland. Acknowledging the lack of sociological analysis when compared with recent legal, criminological and political studies, it uses insights from military sociology, the sociology of emotions, and the social movement literature to understand how and why veterans have mobilised against these prosecutions. It argues that veterans have resorted to taking collective action for three reasons: out of loyalty to the handful of veterans currently facing prosecution; because these prosecutions challenge their self-image as peacekeepers; and because of their sense of betrayal by the British government. In making this argument, the article highlights how political and moral contestation over past political violence touches on collective and individual identities constructed during that violence, social solidarity within groups impacted by that violence, and different expectations of post-conflict justice in its aftermath.
      Citation: Irish Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-11-15T07:09:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07916035221138515
       
  • ‘City as Home’: Conducting walking interviews as biographical method
           with migrant men in Cork

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      Authors: Mastoureh Fathi
      Abstract: Irish Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This paper builds on the growing interest in using walking interviews and visual methods to understand stories of place-making in migration. Walking offers a mobile way of being in the space that combines and connects our sense of self to objects, spaces and people who inhabit them. In this paper, I am using the recent approach in walking methods developed by O’Neill and Roberts (2020) called the Walking Interview as Biographical Method (WIBM hereafter) to discuss my experiences of conducting walking interviews with young male migrants in Cork, Ireland. The paper explores how ‘city as home’ is understood from a female researcher's perspective of or when doing research with male participants, and approaches WIBM from four perspectives: WIBM as temporal, WIBM as embodied, WIBM as spatial and WIBM's tacit mode. The paper's contribution is to detail the potential of WIBM's modes as a method of place-making in urban settings among migrant groups.
      Citation: Irish Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-11-11T06:53:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07916035221133300
       
  • Walking, talking, [Re-]imagining socio-ecological sustainability: Research
           on the move/moving research

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      Authors: Gerard Mullally, Maggie O’Neill, Deirdre de Bhailís, Brendan Tuohy, Maggie Breen, Andrew Duggan, Elaine Ní Loinsigh
      Abstract: Irish Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Based on a series of walks undertaken on the Dingle Peninsula (Chorca Dhuibhne), South-West Ireland, in March 2020 as part of the ‘Walking Conversations’ symposium, a collaboration between Chorca Dhuibhne Creativity and Innovation Hub, Pobalscoil Chorca Dhuibhne and the Department of Sociology & Criminology at UCC, this paper explores walking as a non-conventional method and way of knowing and understanding in both social research and research led teaching; specifically in relation to transitions to sustainability. We argue that walking is an organic approach to research that engages the performative and sensing body; that values the importance of innovative ways of connecting and collaborating in co-productive ways; and offers embodied, relational, sensory, multi-modal ways to reimagine socio-ecological sustainability in current times. Moreover, as we demonstrate, walking, as research on the move, enables us to: access/say the unsayable and open a space for the role of imagination, and creativity that can facilitate a radical democratic imaginary. Indeed, based upon our experiences with co-walkers in Corca Dhuibhne, research-led walking methods offer a radical democratic transdisciplinary pedagogy, that underpins the Connected Curriculum at UCC.
      Citation: Irish Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-09-06T07:04:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07916035221118023
       
  • On being a dog-person: Meaning-making & dog-walking identities

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      Authors: Jessica Amberson
      Abstract: Irish Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This paper investigates the dog-walk as a sociologically significant site of inquiry, offering a reflective account of using walking-interviews to understand an intersubjectively-oriented construction of personal and social dog-walking identities. Taking a Human-Animal Studies perspective and drawing on data from fourteen interviews with dog-owners in Cork, this paper suggests that the dog-walk, although a mundane, daily activity, is a multifaceted and mutually meaningful practice. Reflecting on my use of walking-interviews, I explore the meanings that dog-owners ascribe to dog-walking, how it shapes their perception of self, and consider their construction of social identities as dog-people, hybridised beings comprising dog and owner, whose focus lies in issues of shared interest to such beings. I propose that mobile methods, such as walking-interviews, support enhanced epistemological and methodological insights into how being a dog-person is done.
      Citation: Irish Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T07:04:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07916035221118247
       
  • Troubling ambulant research: Disabled people's socio-spatial encounters
           with urban un/safety and the politics of mobile methods

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      Authors: Claire Edwards, Nicola Maxwell
      Abstract: Irish Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This paper offers a critical reflection on the use of walking and mobile interviews in the context of research with disabled people whose diverse corporealities and cognitions challenge assumptions about walking as a normative bodily act associated with free, autonomous, mobility. While it has been suggested that mobile methods hold out the potential to open up dialogic and participative spaces of inquiry that capture embodied, affectual, and sensory knowledges in place, there has been less discussion of how social and bodily difference shapes the politics and practices of methods on the move. Drawing on research exploring disabled people's socio-spatial knowledges and experiences of urban un/safety in Ireland, we address this lacuna by reflecting on our use of ‘go-along’ interviews with people with diverse impairments and mobilities. Recognising the barriers that mediate disabled people's use of urban space, we interrogate both what go-along interviews can contribute to our understanding of disabled people's embodied encounters with urban un/safety, but also the limits, challenges and politics of mobile interviews as a form of methodological practice. We suggest there is a need to advance interdisciplinary social science scholarship which troubles ambulant research, and writes social and bodily difference into mobility studies and mobile methods.
      Citation: Irish Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-05-09T11:20:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07916035221098601
       
  • A portrait of the artist as a young teacher: James Joyce's walking-talking
           classroom

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      Authors: Kieran Keohane
      Abstract: Irish Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This paper traces a deep affinity between teaching and learning, talking and walking. This affinity runs as a red thread from the Greeks walking to Delphi; to Walter Benjamin’s (1992a) flâneur, the urban stroller in Paris and Burgess; to Jane Jacobs’ (1961) celebration of New York's ‘sidewalk ballet’; to Simmel’s (1971) discussion of the metropolis, mental life, and modernity's zeitgeist; to the Chicago and Birmingham schools’ ethnographies of street scenes and subcultures by Park and Burges (1925) and Hebdige (1979); to Maggie O’Neill's ( ) O‘Neill and Roberts (2019) use of ‘walking methods’ as a way into the fragile, precarious, liminal worlds of migrants, refugees, and sex-workers. O’Neill's renaissance of a deep tradition of walking-talking sociological methods resonates very well also with James Joyce's artistic, moral, political, and pedagogical method, whereby the author and his protagonists, (who are mostly people who have been crushed down and pushed to the margins by overwhelming global historical forces) and his readers (a literate, middle-class, cosmopolitan, general public) participate in and co-create a transformative walking-talking classroom convened and conducted through city streets, as exemplified in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man.
      Citation: Irish Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-05T06:40:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07916035221088409
       
  • Walking and talking with girls in their urban environments: A
           methodological meandering

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      Authors: Deirdre Horgan, Eluska Fernández, Karl Kitching
      Abstract: Irish Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Young people spend a lot of time in their neighbourhood, yet little is known about the relationship between wellbeing, belonging and place from their own perspective. Our study sought to understand how young people navigate their neighbourhood and perceive various aspects of its health environment in its broadest sense. In this article we reflect on the walking methodology we used as part of a Participatory Photo Mapping (PPM) exercise with 11-year-old girls from a working-class school community who were participants in the PEACH Project. It was through walk-along interviews that students were able to tell us where events that matter to them happen; what these experiences look like (via photos that they took while we walked); and how these experiences unfold (via narratives and stories that they shared with us along the way). We reflect on the use of walking methodologies as both an emplaced approach and dynamic exercise that allowed us to access and generate visual and verbal data that privileged these young girls’ community knowledge. We conclude that this method facilitated the discussion of sensitive and political issues, as well as the emergence of unexpected data on child cultures, family and community life, belonging, wellbeing and futures.
      Citation: Irish Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-03-21T08:25:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07916035221088408
       
  • On not knowing and paying attention: How to walk in a possible world

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      Authors: Tim Ingold
      Abstract: Irish Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Knowledge and wisdom often operate at cross-purposes. In particular, wisdom means turning towards the world, paying attention to the things we find there, while with knowledge we turn our backs on them. Knowledge thrives on certainty and predictability. But in a certain world, where everything is joined up, nothing could live or grow. If a world of life is necessarily uncertain, it also opens up to pure possibility. To arrive at such possibility, however, we have to rethink the relation between doing and undergoing, or between intentional and attentional models of action. I show how attention cuts a road longitudinally through the transverse connections between intentions and their objects. Where intention is predictive, attention is anticipatory. And if the other side of prediction is the failure of ignorance, the other side of anticipation is the possibility of not knowing. The idea that predictive knowledge demands explication perpetuates the equation of not-knowing with ignorance. Education, science and the state are powerful machines for the production of ignorance. I argue, however, that ignorance and not-knowing are entirely different things. In a world of life, not-knowing betokens not ignorance but the wisdom that lies in attending to things.
      Citation: Irish Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-03-17T02:00:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07916035221088546
       
  • Accessing healthcare services as a precarious worker in Ireland

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      Authors: Sinead Pembroke, Alicja Bobek, James Wickham
      First page: 225
      Abstract: Irish Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The growth and the nature of precarious work has become an important subject of research on contemporary employment. Equally, there has been an increased interest among researchers in understanding the social consequences of precarious employment. There is an increasing awareness of the negative affect on health posed by precarious work. However, a relatively unexplored issue is the extent to which access to healthcare depends on the form of both precarious work and of healthcare provision in a specific nation state. This article explores the social implications of precarious work, with a focus on access to healthcare services in Ireland. 40 qualitative interviews were conducted with precarious workers living in Ireland that took place between July and October 2017.These were part of a broader study called the Social Implications of Precarious Work Project. A thematic analysis was conducted, which revealed the following: precarious employment often makes access to basic healthcare problematic, so that many are often unable to access essential medical treatment. On the one hand they are unable to access means-tested public services, but on the other hand cannot afford the cost of private treatment and private health insurance. This has negative consequences for workers’ health. Many precarious workers are pushed into relationships of dependency, creating new forms of social inheritance, since only some can access better healthcare by using family resources. For precarious workers who do not have this, inequality is further exacerbated.
      Citation: Irish Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-09-22T04:46:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07916035221126695
       
  • ‘Prepped for prison’' Experiences of exclusionary school practices
           and involvement with the justice system

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      Authors: Lindsey Liston
      First page: 244
      Abstract: Irish Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Internationally, the link between punitive school disciplinary practices and increased risk of contact with the justice system has been chronicled via a substantial body of research on the school-to-prison pipeline. This research highlights some of the harmful effects of exclusionary school discipline for some students, including lower educational achievement, lower school completion rates and future contact with the justice system. Drawing on some of the findings from 50 in-depth interviews with former prisoners, educators, parents, and a range of key stakeholders, this paper builds on that research by identifying the informal ways that some groups of students are subjected to exclusion in schools. The findings suggest that to fully understand the factors that impact the path from school to involvement with the justice system, greater attention should be paid to the experience of informal school-based exclusionary practices.
      Citation: Irish Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-07-04T05:47:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07916035221108989
       
  • How to sign on and stay there: Snapshot of the feeling of belonging within
           the Irish Deaf Community

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      Authors: John Bosco Conama
      First page: 264
      Abstract: Irish Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article seeks to explore the notion and strength of community belonging amongst the deaf community in Ireland. The article outlines the results from the online and anonymous survey that took place in June 2020. Three hundred ninety-nine responses were made, and 270 out of them are fully completed and analysed before a commentary is made. Concepts such as the “community” and “deaf community” are briefly theorised to see if they are compatible with the community beliefs held by the respondents. Key issues that are perceived to unite or divide the deaf community include solidarity, cultural affinity, sense of belonging, lack of trustworthiness, feelings of exclusion and dissent regarding leadership. The theoretical concept of ‘sense of community’ adapted is that proposed by McMillian and Chavis (1986), who define it as “a feeling that members have of belonging, a feeling that members matter to one another and the group, and a shared faith that members’ needs will be met through their commitment to being together.” It is envisaged to have the research expanded into specific issues such as the long-term sustainability of the community.
      Citation: Irish Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-08-09T07:54:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07916035221118025
       
  • Probationary citizenship in science, technology, engineering and
           mathematics in an Irish university: A disrupted patriarchal bargain'

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      Authors: Pat O'Connor
      First page: 286
      Abstract: Irish Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The model for the creation of knowledge in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) involves the near total career dependence by probationary citizens on senior academics. In this article such probationary citizens include those at the early career stage, mainly but not exclusively post-doctoral researchers (postdocs). Traditionally, the implicit assumption was that senior academics would facilitate their access to a permanent position in return for a time limited period of exploitation as part of an organisational patriarchal bargain. This article is concerned with exploring how these probationary citizens came to access temporary positions, their experience of them and their perception of their future. Drawing on qualitative data from 13 probationary citizens, men and women, on two to five-year contracts in an Irish case study university, it shows that regardless of how they accessed probationary citizenship, their future was uncertain with no guarantee of a permanent academic position. The article raises questions about the valorisation of the highly dependent relationships between probationary citizens and permanent STEM academics as the main model for the creation of knowledge in STEM.
      Citation: Irish Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-09-07T07:01:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07916035221122157
       
 
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