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  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
Showing 401 - 382 of 382 Journals sorted alphabetically
Rural China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Rural Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health     Partially Free   (Followers: 13)
Secuencia     Open Access  
Seminar : A Journal of Germanic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Sens public     Open Access  
Senses and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Serendipities : Journal for the Sociology and History of the Social Sciences     Open Access  
Sexuality Research and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Sexualization, Media, & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Signs and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Simmel Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Social Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Social Change Review     Open Access  
Social Currents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Social Dynamics: A journal of African studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social Forces     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 91)
Social Inclusion     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Social Networking     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Social Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Social Problems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 76)
Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Social Psychology Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Social Transformations in Chinese Societies     Hybrid Journal  
Sociální studia / Social Studies     Open Access  
Sociedad y Discurso     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sociedad y Economía     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sociedad y Religión     Open Access  
Sociedade e Cultura     Open Access  
Società e diritti     Open Access  
SocietàMutamentoPolitica     Open Access  
Societies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Society and Culture in South Asia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Society Register     Open Access  
Socio-Ecological Practice Research     Hybrid Journal  
Socio-logos     Open Access  
Sociolinguistic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Sociologia : Revista da Faculdade de Letras da Universidade do Porto     Open Access  
Sociologia del diritto     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Sociologia del Lavoro     Full-text available via subscription  
Sociología del Trabajo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sociologia della Comunicazione     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Sociologia e Politiche Sociali     Full-text available via subscription  
Sociologia e Ricerca Sociale     Full-text available via subscription  
Sociología Histórica     Open Access  
Sociologia Ruralis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Sociologia urbana e rurale     Full-text available via subscription  
Sociología y Tecnociencia     Open Access  
Sociologia, Problemas e Práticas     Open Access  
Sociológica     Open Access  
Sociological Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Sociological Focus     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Sociological Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Sociological Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Sociological Jurisprudence Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sociological Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Sociological Methods & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Sociological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Sociological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Sociological Research Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Sociological Science     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Sociological Spectrum: Mid-South Sociological Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sociological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Sociologie     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Sociologie du Travail     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Sociologie et sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
SociologieS - Articles     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sociologisk Forskning     Open Access  
Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 191)
Sociology : Thought and Action     Open Access  
Sociology and Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Sociology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Sociology Mind     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sociology of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Sociology of Islam     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Sociology of Race and Ethnicity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Sociology of Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Sociology of Sport Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Socius : Sociological Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Sojourn: Journal of Social Issues in Southeast Asia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Solidarity : Journal of Education, Society and Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sosiologi i dag     Open Access  
Sospol : Jurnal Sosial Politik     Open Access  
Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture, and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
South African Review of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Southern Cultures     Full-text available via subscription  
Soziale Probleme : Zeitschrift für soziale Probleme und soziale Kontrolle     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Spaces for Difference: An Interdisciplinary Journal     Open Access  
Sport in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Streetnotes     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Studia Białorutenistyczne     Open Access  
Studia Iranica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Studia Litteraria et Historica     Open Access  
Studia Socialia Cracoviensia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Studia Universitatis Babes-Bolyai Sociologia     Open Access  
Studies in American Humor     Full-text available via subscription  
Studies in American Naturalism     Full-text available via subscription  
Studies in Latin American Popular Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Studies of Transition States and Societies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sudamérica : Revista de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Surveillance and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Swiss Journal of Sociology     Open Access  
Symbolic Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Søkelys på arbeidslivet (Norwegian Journal of Working Life Studies)     Open Access  
Teaching Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Tecnología y Sociedad     Open Access  
TECNOSCIENZA: Italian Journal of Science & Technology Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Terrains / Théories     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
The British Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
The Philanthropist     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
The Social Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
The Sociological Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
The Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
The Tocqueville Review/La revue Tocqueville     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Tidsskrift for boligforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for Forskning i Sygdom og Samfund     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for ungdomsforskning     Open Access  
Tla-Melaua : Revista de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Todas as Artes     Open Access  
Tracés     Open Access  
Trajecta : Religion, Culture and Society in the Low Countries     Open Access  
Transatlantica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transmotion     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Transposition : Musique et sciences sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Travail et Emploi     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Treballs de Sociolingüística Catalana     Open Access  
TRIM. Tordesillas : Revista de investigación multidisciplinar     Open Access  
Universidad, Escuela y Sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Unoesc & Ciência - ACHS     Open Access  
Urban Research & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Valuation Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Variations : Revue Internationale de Théorie Critique     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Visitor Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Vlast' (The Authority)     Open Access  
Work, Aging and Retirement     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
World Cultures eJournal     Open Access  
World Future Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Religion, Gesellschaft und Politik     Hybrid Journal  
Социологический журнал     Open Access  

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Sociological Research Online
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.553
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 8  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1360-7804
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Book Review: Habit’s Pathways: Repetition, Power, Conduct

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      Authors: Gordana Angelichin-Zhura
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2024-02-22T09:35:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804241229000
       
  • Digital Therapeutic Cultures and Their New Regime of Psychological Truth

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      Authors: Rodrigo De La Fabián
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      The article focuses on contemporary digital therapeutic cultures’ new regime of truth. This entails describing and critically analysing the sociomaterial apparatuses that distinguish truth from false and produce specific modes of subjectivation. The article shows that the digital regime of psychological truth is heir to the behavioural mistrust of subjectivity and the epistemological shift from the causal-comprehensive model towards the probabilistic-predictive one. However, the psychological subject has not been excluded, but her role has changed. The article introduces the distinction between valuable and spurious truths to analyse this shift. Algorithms do not need the psychological subject to produce true outcomes, but they depend on her and psy-knowledges to distinguish significative from irrelevant truths. Following Maurizio Lazzarato, the article concludes that digital therapeutic cultures share one of the main features of contemporary capitalism: to produce value at the intersection of processes of subjectivation and de-subjectivation.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2024-02-22T06:45:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804241228458
       
  • Mediating Gender Norms Through the ‘Foodies’ Culture as
           Romantic Emotions

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      Authors: Wei-Ping Chen
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      This study explores how intimacy is shaped through mobile-mediated dating, which is seasoned with culinary preferences and gendered conventions. Drawing on the sociological concept of mediated intimacy and attending to emotionalised culinary experiences and gendered individualism, this study asks three questions. First, how is intimacy represented by dining-dating apps' Second, how do these dining-dating apps approach ‘being single’' Third, what gender relations and what contradictions between romance and consumerism can be identified in dating that is managed by an app and that trades in intimate commodities' By analysing the advertising text, testimonials, and reviews posted online, I demonstrate that individuals are not only invited to manage their intimate life through cultural consumption but are also compelled to adopt accelerated and mediated ways of engaging. I reveal that the limited and regulated access to communicative exchanges and the extended follow-up dinner dates in dining-dating apps is related to concerns about personal and relational investment. Furthermore, I argue that dining-dating apps participate in the mediation of emotions and gender relations by introducing intimate commodities that blur the borders between individualist aspiration and gendered and classed ways of experiencing intimacy. Together, these findings provide a particularly interesting context and open up new avenues for studying intimacy, gender, and cultural consumption in sociology and media studies.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2024-02-17T02:57:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804241227113
       
  • The Perceptions of Prostitution, Sex Work, and Sex Trafficking among Young
           People in Spain

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      Authors: Carmen Meneses-Falcón, Antonio Rúa-Vieites, Olaya García-Vázquez
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      This article analyses the viewpoints of Spanish youth regarding prostitution, sex workers, and their opinions on what the law surrounding sex work should be. Spain is currently in the grip of a great debate, tending to adopt the punishment of sex buyers. To investigate this issue, 3126 young participants aged 16–30 were surveyed through an online questionnaire in December 2020, which consisted of 21 questions. A factor analysis revealed three distinct perceptions of prostitution falling into three categories: ‘As a choice’ (22.8%), ‘as coercive’ (27.9%), and ‘as economic necessity’ (49.3%). Correspondingly, the legal positions on prostitution varied depending on the perceptions of paid sex: viewing prostitution ‘as coercive’ was associated with the criminalisation of prostitution, while considering sex work ‘as a choice’ was related to the regulation of prostitution. In conclusion, the young Spaniards surveyed do not consider all those who offer paid sex as victims of trafficking; instead, they differentiate based on the connection between trafficking and the sex industry. These diverse perceptions contribute to policy recommendations aimed at preventing the negative consequences of prostitution, implementing harm reduction measures to safeguard sex workers, and moving beyond dichotomous policies of criminalization and regulation.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2024-02-17T02:50:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231212306
       
  • Young People Experiencing Multiple Mobilities: In Search of an Oasis of
           Youth Across Europe

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      Authors: Ewa Krzaklewska, Valentina Cuzzocrea
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, we look at those young Europeans who have undertaken more than one Erasmus stay abroad during their higher education to reflect on spaces for youth development. On the basis of 18 qualitative interviews with such Erasmus students, we propose the concept of an ‘oasis of youth’ to highlight the potential for the exploration of the self that occurs through participation in mobilities. We revisit and reassess J.J. Arnett’s concept of emerging adulthood to reflect on spaces for exploration for young people in Europe. As the analysis suggests, this ‘oasis of youth’ may symbolise a niche in which young people live out a youthful lifestyle (being), while getting prepared for the transitions to adulthood (becoming). Beyond this particular case, the concept of an oasis of youth may serve to describe the diverse social spaces that express the social value of youth allowing them to live youth momentum while in education, despite growing uncertainty and harshened structural conditions.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2024-02-16T10:44:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231224998
       
  • The Psychologization of Student Subjectivity in the Finnish Academia

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      Authors: Antti Saari, Kristiina Brunila, Saara Vainio
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Public debate and media attention concerning mental health problems, stress, psycho-emotional vulnerabilities, and anxiety among university students has reached record level. Informed by media representations, student mental health guides, and our observations, we focus on the ethos of vulnerability as an articulation of psychologized student subjectivity in Finnish academia. We explore the multiple registers in which the ethos of vulnerability tends to operate as an assemblage to depict and govern student subjects.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2024-02-16T10:32:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231221949
       
  • Understanding Food Assistance Through Care: Theoretical Insights

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      Authors: Fábio Rafael Augusto
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Two theoretical perspectives have been extensively mobilized to understand the social role of food assistance initiatives, namely ‘food security’ and ‘political economy’. The main objective of this article is to develop an alternative theoretical approach that allows for more comprehensive analyses. Building on Thomas’s (1993) conceptual work on care, it is expected to encourage the development of studies that incorporate less-obvious elements that (also) characterize food assistance organizations, such as the various interactions and practices that are not directly related to food donations.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2024-02-09T03:06:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804241226768
       
  • Book Review: Cultural Representations of Gender Vulnerability and
           Resistance

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      Authors: Roshan K. Morve
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2024-01-18T06:17:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231215732
       
  • Developing ‘Age-Friendly’ Communities: The Experience of
           International Retired Migrants

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      Authors: Marion Repetti, Toni Calasanti, Chris Phillipson
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Over the past two decades, the need to create ‘age-friendly cities and communities’ (AFCC) has emerged as a major theme in policies aimed at improving old people’s physical and social environment. The World Health Organization (WHO) has driven this agenda through the launch in 2010 of the Global Network of Age-friendly Cities and Communities. Support for ageing in place has, at the same time, run alongside an increase in international retirement migration, with people choosing not to age in their existing neighbourhood but rather to relocate to another country. The growth of retirement migration has occurred in the context of specialized housing and leisure-orientated developments in cheaper countries targeting retirees from richer countries. This article draws on the narratives of retirees of the UK, Switzerland, France and the USA who have relocated to Spain, Costa Rica and Mexico on a permanent basis. It highlights the reasons migrants put forward to explain the advantages of living in their new home, and what we can learn about the conditions for an age-friendly living environment. This article begins with a review of the development of age-friendly cities and communities, then outlines the concept of ‘elective belonging’ which is used to provide a framework for understanding the growth of retirement migration. Following an overview of current knowledge on retirement migration and a discussion of the methodology of the study, we present the results from interviews with retired migrants about their experiences within their new communities. Finally, we discuss the implications of our study for developing research and policies which acknowledge how age as a social status may be used as a means of fostering the integration of older people within their communities.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T04:19:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231217788
       
  • Misbehaviour on Retreat: Rule-Breaking and the Labours of the Self

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      Authors: James Hodgson
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Current scholarship tends to frame retreat-going, and the practices carried out therein, as emblematic of late-modern forms of self-work, understanding retreats as part of broader personal life projects of self-mastery and self-knowledge. For this article, I draw on empirical data to suggest that, although work on the self is typically the central concern for retreat-goers, they also question or outright reject the discipline of the retreat space by breaking its ‘rules’. Borrowing insights developed in the context of organisation studies, I describe two kinds of such ‘misbehaviour’ on retreat. First, I explore how retreat-goers misbehave in regards to the rules around intimacy, since sexual and erotic desire is usually discouraged but nonetheless features in retreat-goers’ experiences. Then, I explore examples of collective misbehaviour and suggest that retreat-goers often work together to ensure the retreat’s success by collaboratively breaking the rules through practices like gossip. This article contributes an understanding of how wellbeing practices might be usefully made sense of as social accomplishments, situated within the greater swathe of everyday life. But I also map out one way in which the concept of ‘misbehaviour’ might be applied to activities outside of the workplace.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T04:14:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231215935
       
  • Constructing a Crisis: Mental Health, Higher Education and Policy
           Entrepreneurs

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      Authors: Ashley Frawley, Chloë Wakeham, Kenneth McLaughlin, Kathryn Ecclestone
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      In 2018, the UK Conservative government issued a ‘non-negotiable’ instruction for universities to make ‘positive mental health’ a strategic priority. This was responding to growing pressure from a variety of stakeholders including mental health organisations, student groups and higher education (HE) management who claimed a worsening crisis of student mental health in the UK. We conducted a qualitative media analysis (QMA) of public discussions of student mental health as a social problem in a sample of (a) newspapers and (b) policy documents produced in the UK between 2010 and 2019 using a contextual constructionist approach and Kingdon’s policy streams framework. It identifies expansive definitions of mental illness, assumptions that precede evidence-gathering, ‘professional exes’ as policy entrepreneurs, and solutions that spread risk across institutions. We conclude by discussing the shift away from autonomous subjectivity towards more heteronomous constructions. In so doing it provides an important contribution to sociological understandings of contemporary subjectivity and social policy regarding mental health in HE.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2024-01-13T06:40:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231215943
       
  • ‘It Feels Like a Big Performance’: Space, Performativity and
           Young Woman Skateboarders

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      Authors: Carrie Paechter, Lyndsey Stoodley, Michael Keenan, Chris Lawton
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we apply philosophical and sociological theory to consider how young women skateboarders interact with and are affected by performative aspects of skateboarding cultures. Drawing on findings from a qualitative study of three skateparks plus other skate spaces in and around two English cities, we argue that these spaces are performative in nature and that this is frequently problematic for young woman skateboarders. We suggest that, due to their comparative rarity in these spaces, young women are put under an immediate spotlight on entry, with an expectation that they perform a competent skateboarder identity while under scrutiny from other users of the space; we examine their experiences of this. We conclude by suggesting ways that skateparks and skatespaces can be designed and used to make them more accessible to woman and girl skaters, and to other groups marginalised in skateboarding cultures.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2024-01-13T06:32:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231214100
       
  • With God We Distrust! The Impact of Values in Conspiracy Theory Beliefs
           About Migration in Serbia

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      Authors: Türkay Salim Nefes, Jasna Milošević Đorđević, Milica Vdović
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Immigrants are a popular target of conspiracy theories. Despite the urgent relevance of the topic all around the world today, the number of studies on conspiracy theories about migrants and immigration is limited. Helping to fill this important gap in the academic literature, the research analyses conspiracy theory beliefs about migrants and immigration in contemporary Serbia through survey data from a nationally representative sample (N = 1199). Expanding on the Weberian theory of rationality, the study proposes that people’s values about national sovereignty, social conservatism, and religiosity influence their predispositions to believe in conspiracy theories about migrants and immigration. The findings corroborate the argument by showing a statistically significant link between people’s political, social, and religious values and responses to conspiracy theories. The article concludes that values could play a significant role in people’s adoption of conspiracy theories.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2024-01-13T06:28:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231212310
       
  • Transnational Affect and the Making of a Moral Public: The War on Drugs in
           the Philippines

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      Authors: Paul-François Tremlett
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      In 2019, IBON International and the Campaign for Human Rights in the Philippines UK (CHRP-UK) made preparations for some relatives of some of the victims of former Philippine President Duterte’s war on drugs to travel to meet members of the European Parliament as well as diasporic and other publics in Europe and the UK. At the same time, the play Tao Po! – ‘Is Anybody There'’ – a dramatic monologue exploring different perspectives of those involved in Duterte’s drug war including those of victims and perpetrators, was touring Europe. These affectively saturated actions and performances were accompanied by social media posts on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, among other platforms, using hashtags such as #Stopthekillingsph and #Warondrugsph. I juxtapose two very different interpretations of these actions and performances. On the one hand, I frame them as elements of a political strategy performed to solicit particular affective responses as a means of assembling a transnational public that could bring international political pressure to bear on the Duterte regime. On the other hand, I suggest that these actions were performed to cultivate a sense of belonging to a moral public. I conclude by arguing that the enactment of affects such as grief and loss – affects which are constitutive of the war on drugs – suggests a model of social and political change that works from the bottom-up, with affective experience as the primary catalyst.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-12-24T05:12:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231208852
       
  • ‘I’ve Wondered Why Am I Here'’ Expectations of Old Age and the
           Ageing Body in a Longitudinal Study of a Dance Group

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      Authors: Anna Goulding
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Mainstream expectations of older age place pressure on individuals––both negative discourses focused upon frailty and isolation and successful ageing narratives that emphasize physical and mental exercise. This article considers whether older people can challenge damaging narratives through participating in the practice of modern dance. Over the course of 4 years, action research and ethnographic-based methods were used as the author worked with a dance company of seven members aged 69 to 89 as they created a modern dance piece. Data included fieldnotes, transcripts of individual interviews and group discussions and a video of the performance. A thematic analysis was applied. Moving away from a health perspective, the literature on ageing and lifestyle is advanced by in examining how the group’s creativity should be understood and valued. Participants went from presenting as active agers to developing a more accepting attitude towards their ageing body. The performance refashioned the space as a site of intergenerational connectivity as the dancers and audience co-produced narratives around the artistry of the older body. An original contribution to the work on embodiment is made by revealing how older men and women use dance differently to negotiate the ageing body. Findings have wider implications for research on inclusion by showing how the embodied practice of dance helps subvert expectations of older age.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-12-24T05:08:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231207257
       
  • ‘Vulnerability’ at Work: Instrumental Vulnerabilities Among
           Software Professionals

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      Authors: Vanessa Ciccone
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      As a self-improvement discourse, ‘vulnerability’ brings a compelling promise for software workplaces around engendering productivity, innovation and creativity among employees. While critical studies have interrogated various self-improvement discourses, less is known about how workers respond to and negotiate these discourses in professional contexts. This article asks how workers of North American software companies construct vulnerability. It finds that constructions instrumentalize vulnerability in the workplace as the exposure of failures, mistakes and knowledge gaps to enact organizational resilience. Drawing from interviews, the article discusses the implications of these constructions.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-12-24T05:04:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231206949
       
  • The Persistence of the University Dream: Class and Social Mobility as
           Projected by Students at a Chilean University

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      Authors: Félix Rojo-Mendoza, Denisse Sepúlveda Sánchez, Fernando Baeza Rivas
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Higher education is considered an important dimension for building more egalitarian societies. However, despite the social value assigned to it, international evidence indicates that the social status of students’ families continues to prevent significant mobility in the social structure. In Chile, despite policies to increase access to higher education, the university system continues to reproduce inequalities of origin through selection, separating elite students from low-income students. In this context, little is known about the perception that university students have of the role that these institutions play in social mobility, especially for those of more disadvantaged social origins. This article explores and describes the persistence of the university dream among Chilean’s students at the Catholic University of Temuco, the Chilean educational institution with the highest percentage of poor students in the country, analyzing it on the understanding that aspirations represent idealist targets of the desired social class, while expectations represent realistic goals regarding the expected social class. Based on a statistical analysis of survey data from 209 students, results show that students’ family origin does not prevent them from projecting themselves as part of a higher class, with the university acting as an agent that dynamizes positions to favor greater homogeneity in the future social structure. In addition, postgraduate degrees are defined as a catalyst for future social mobility. Finally, the future tensions between the still-hegemonic meritocratic discourse and the reality of the social space that these students will occupy are discussed.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-12-24T05:02:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231212315
       
  • Hoof Work: The Feminisation of Donkeys in Ethiopia

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      Authors: Martha Rose Geiger
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores how gendered divisions of labour manifest across species lines. It applies a feminist, more-than-human intersectional approach, building on previous work on animal labour. The vital labour donkeys do with and for humans and their contributions to multispecies societies have been under-recognised and under-theorised. Drawing on empirical research conducted in central Ethiopia on the human-donkey relationship, findings reveal the multiple ways human gender and class coalesce to shape the kinds of labour performed and social relations among women, men, and donkeys across urban and rural environments. At the nexus of these intersecting forces, equivalence is drawn, by research participants themselves, between women and donkeys. Women and donkeys are aligned and othered, differentiated from men, a dynamic that results in the feminisation of donkeys and mutual marginalisation of women and donkeys and exposes male violence perpetrated on both groups. The article contributes empirical insights into human-donkey relations and interspecies labour and offers theoretical considerations of more-than-human intersectionality.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-12-15T08:13:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231213559
       
  • Reclaim the Night(Life) – Sexual Harassment in the Night-Time Economy:
           Zine Making as Method and Participant-Led Data Analysis

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      Authors: Ian R Lamond, Kate Dashper, Michelle Lanham, Hannah Rossmorris, Dan Lomax
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      This short reflective piece sets out the background to the Reclaim the (Night) Life project, an ongoing research project into sexual violence/harassment in the night-time economy of Leeds (UK). This initial output from the project, which has involved a team of five academics from the UK Centre for Event Management at Leeds Beckett University, is based on work produced at a co-creational zine-making workshop. The workshop involved a group of students, from the university, working with their lived experience and using the workshop to support them in undertaking some initial analysis of data captured from a prior online survey. Sociologically, the zine’s purpose is to share initial research findings in a way that could engage its target demographic (young women), give voice to some of their experiences, explore zine making as a form of data capture and participant-led data analysis, and act as a prevocational device for the next stages of the Reclaim the (Night)Life research project.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-12-14T10:28:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231211723
       
  • ‘Creating Poverty Chances’: Young People Confront Gambling
           Harms in Malawi

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      Authors: Otiyela Mtema, Isaac ‘Starlic’ Singano, Darragh McGee, Yamiko Yakobe, Junious Sichali, Mphatso Makamo, Gerda Reith, Christopher Bunn
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Commercialised gambling products have spread rapidly through African countries in recent years and have been woven into the everyday experiences of young people. Research to date has documented this phenomenon through conventional social science methodologies, establishing an important body of knowledge. Absent from this work is research that adopts participatory and creative methods, often argued to be particularly well suited to empowering marginalised groups to co-produce research. In this piece, we describe a co-creative participatory approach to working with 24 young people in Malawi to explore experiences of commercial gambling and its impacts on their communities. Our approach was co-developed with the young people and produced a substantial body of community interviews, photovoice pieces, and creative representations of the research findings. Here, we focus on a song written and recorded by one of the young people that draws on and represents themes of distress, addiction, poverty, and false hope, which were present in the data the young people generated across the study.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-12-14T10:28:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231207152
       
  • Independent Celebrant-Led Wedding Ceremonies: Translating, Tweaking, and
           Innovating Traditions

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      Authors: Sharon Blake, Rebecca Probert, Tania Barton, Rajnaara Akhtar
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores ceremonial design of independent celebrant-led wedding ceremonies in England and Wales. It draws on a qualitative study which involved focus groups with celebrants and interviews with individuals who have had an independent celebrant-led wedding ceremony. Six factors are described which influenced how couples translated and tweaked traditions or innovated ceremonial elements: faith, heritage, values, kin, informality, and temporality. In line with a bricolage process, it is suggested that the keeping of and minor adaption of traditions through the personalisation offered by independent celebrant-led wedding ceremonies may support inclusion of relationship practices such as interfaith couplings and blended families. Examples of kinship display-work and self-display-work were found throughout participant accounts of their wedding ceremonies. It is proposed that both may act as an important means by which the needs of individuals for whom a religious or belief framework is not prioritised over other contexts of identification can be met in a wedding ceremony. Further research is needed to explore the transferability of these findings to larger samples, as well as specific sub-populations.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-12-05T06:30:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231211443
       
  • Between Breaking Bad and Big Brother: Social Class and Television
           Preferences in Croatia

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      Authors: Krešimir Krolo, Željka Tonković, Dina Vozab
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      This article addresses TV preferences as a marker of class divisions both as a type of embodied cultural capital and as a pattern of consumption within the local and global cultural structure in Croatia. Data analysis is extracted from the survey ‘Social Stratification in Croatia: Structural and Subjective Aspects’, conducted on a nationally probabilistic sample of adult Croatian citizens. Factor analysis discovered two main dimensions of television preferences: reality spectacle and foreign fiction preferences, which were recognised as indicators of localised and globalised culture preferences. Further analysis established that these factors are also structured along the class positions of the respondents. Using multiple regression analysis, data suggest the conclusion that the working class prefers TV content in the domestic language and heavy on popular entertainment programming (soap operas, talent, and reality shows). However, the dominant class repudiate ‘lowbrow’ TV content, which highlights class divisions in the cultural field. The analysis sheds light not only on how class positions structure these preferences but also on the important role of age, gender, and music taste play in the formation of television preferences.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-11-18T04:41:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231207253
       
  • The Insp-AIR-ation (Art + Science Project)

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      Authors: Pam McKinlay
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      For many emerging into the realisation that the climate crisis is here and present and that we will all be affected, there is a feeling of being overwhelmed and the sense that we are standing on the edge of a precipice. In these times of uncertainty and fear, artist interventions have a capacity to engage with these embodied experiences and bring a sense of hope to the conversation through creative reflective engagement. The act of making can reduce anxiety and is a way for people to express themselves as they enter this phase of climate adaptation. As UK activist group, Culture Declares Emergency, puts it, ‘creativity is the antidote of despair’ (2019). Through the Insp-AIR-ation ArtScience community project, artist facilitators focused on perceptions of air quality. The ways in which we organise our collective lives are very influential on weather cycles and climate rhythms. Through the kaupapa (guiding process) in this emergent project, we sought to give voice to the concerns of community groups, their hopes, and aspirations. This arts project provided people with a space and platform to shape their feelings and express values. While science has been pivotal in highlighting the precariousness of our current way of living, the arts have never been more important than now in expressing who we are and shaping a positive response towards a liveable and just future for all. Commenting on the Climate Crisis, former US advisor, Gus Speth has called for a social response and culture as a necessary agent for bringing about transformational change. Basarab Nicolescu, in La transdisciplinarité: Manifeste (1996), talks about building bridges between science and our ways of being through symbolic language which is enriched by the originating values of the community. This project is one such response in building bridges.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-11-09T10:55:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231205168
       
  • Caring Masculinities in Theory and Practice: Reiterating the Relevance and
           Clarifying the Capaciousness of the Concept

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      Authors: Steven Roberts, Riikka Prattes
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      This article intends to stimulate conversation and critical thinking about the concept of ‘caring masculinities’ and its ongoing relevance to the field of critical studies of men and masculinities (CSMM). Caring masculinities is subject to debate around its theoretical premises, its potential as a feminist concept, and the limits of the empirical evidence base that underpins the concept and its associated implications. We respond to some of these ongoing critical conversations, in part by suggesting that the concept is sometimes deployed in ways that depart from or even possibly misconstrue the concept. Highlighting the nuance, capaciousness, and clarity of the concept, as theorised by Karla Elliott, we substantiate the argument by drawing on emerging data from our ongoing research with men in front-line, low paid care-work in Australia, thus, including men who have so far largely been excluded from studies on caring masculinities.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-11-06T10:47:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231205978
       
  • The Social Structures of Sleep: Effects of Work-Related and Family
           Constraints on Sleep Duration and Regularity Among French Workers

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      Authors: Capucine Rauch
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Previous research shows that sleep time is shaped by family constraints and paid work organisation. However, the impact of both work and family on sleep routines is relatively unknown. Using the 2009–2010 French Time Use Survey, this article examines how workers’ sleep routines are affected by paid work and family situation, and emphasises the social significance of sleep patterns. Paid work and family situation both structure the duration and regularity of sleep. Paid work reduces sleep time and has a disruptive effect on sleep routines, but to different degrees depending on socio-occupational category and work schedule. Having a small child has a negative effect on sleep on any given day, but works in favour of a regular sleep routine, as well as the tendency for spouses to synchronise. However, the regulating effect of family life accentuates the disruptive effect of paid work for the most atypical work schedules.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-11-02T09:09:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231201031
       
  • Sociological Research in the Digital Age: Where Have We Come From; Where
           Are We Going'

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      Authors: Tim Butcher, Edmund Coleman-Fountain, Rachela Colosi, Sam Hillyard, Christian Karner, James Pattison, Anna Tarrant, Laura Way
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-11-02T09:06:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231205697
       
  • Food Systems Under Pressure

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      Authors: Julie M Parsons, Alizon Draper
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-11-02T09:04:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231197326
       
  • ‘I am Lil’: Enabling Autistic Voices in Transitions from School to
           Adult Life through the Co-Creation of a Digital Story

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      Authors: Asha Ward, Sarah Parsons, Hanna Kovshoff
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Autistic children’s voices are frequently overlooked, underestimated, and undermined in research and practice such that children are denied agency and their rights as capable knowers. Our digital storytelling work aims to challenge this status quo by co-creating ‘I am’ Digital Stories with and for autistic children and their families. ‘I am’ Digital Stories are short videos (c.3–5 minutes) that provide a strengths-based representation of a child or young person, incorporating their strengths, capabilities, likes, communication and interaction preferences, and how support can be provided. ‘I am’ Digital Stories enable children and young people to present their ‘best selves’ to people who may not know them, especially in transitions between education and other settings. This is Lil’s ‘I am’ Digital Story. Lil was making the move from special school to her adult life which included the possibility of volunteering at a community-based organisation. We worked with Lil to create an ‘I am’ Digital Story that she could share with the organisation. Lil worked closely with her father and the research team to plan, film, and create her Digital Story, which she described as a ‘cool project’. We think that anyone watching the video will get a strong sense of who Lil is, what she likes to do, her skills and interests, and happy personality. Lil is very proud of her Story and we are proud to be able to share her Story here.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-11-01T04:57:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231186856
       
  • Book Review: Travis Kong, Sexuality and the Rise of China: The Post-1990s
           Gay Generation in Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Mainland China

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      Authors: Tharika Thambidurai
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-10-27T11:05:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231205167
       
  • The Social Psychology of Framing: The Emotional Content of Finnish
           Anti-Wind Power Frames

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      Authors: Hanna-Mari Husu
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Protests against wind power have become increasingly common in Western countries and in Finland. This article explores various anti-wind farm frames and their emotional dynamics and content. The framing approach highlights cognitive and constructive rather than emotional aspects. However, social-psychological understanding of emotions enables us to recognise those types of emotions that give content to a specific frame and are essential to understanding individual motivations for building frames and joining protests. This article points out three anti-wind farm frames: Nimby (love, feelings of security, fear of disruption, and anger); populist (experience of helplessness, fear, grief and anger); and environmentalist (concern and respect). The frames reveal how online activisms oriented towards the same cause and goal arise from multiple emotional contents, indicating the actors’ concerns over the effects of wind turbines on their own well-being and reflecting their own different positions.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-10-21T10:44:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231192328
       
  • Understanding ‘Gender Equality’: First-Time Parent Couples’
           Practices and Perspectives on Working and Caring Post-Parenthood

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      Authors: Katherine Twamley, Charlotte Faircloth
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the ways couples making the transition to parenthood think about, practise, and assess ‘gender equality’. The analysis draws on data from two qualitative, longitudinal projects in the UK with 36 mixed-sex couples, grounded in the sociology of intimacy and parenting culture respectively. Both projects explore gender relations at the transition to parenthood, with recent changes in UK parental leave as a backdrop, to interrogate couples’ ideals and practices. In this article, we outline four configurations of equality articulated by couples: ‘symmetry’, ‘breaking gender stereotypes’, ‘fairness’, and ‘equality as respect’, which were developed through collaborative analysis. We explore how different configurations shape gendered practices in early parenthood. The analysis provides novel insights into the ways in which ‘gender equality’ is differentially defined and practised; shaped by the political and cultural context in which parents live; and relational in nature – thereby contributing to debates around equality in gendered divisions of paid and unpaid work.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-10-06T09:29:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231198619
       
  • Gender Preferences for Children and Gender Relations in Contemporary China

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      Authors: Yuling Wu
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      This study aims to investigate and compare the determinants of gender preference for children in rural and urban China under the values of children to parents (VOC) approach by focusing on the effects of attitudes to elder care and gender roles, and the attainment of insurance programs. Using pooled cross-sectional data from 2013 and 2015 of the Chinese General Social Surveys, we found that rural individuals expecting children responsible for old-age support exhibit daughter preference, followed by balance preference, whereas their urban counterparts show similar son preference and daughter preference. In addition, balance preference is associated with traditional gender role attitudes among rural individuals but correlated with more equal gender attitudes among urbanites. Furthermore, having more economic security decreases rural individuals’ preferences for having more daughters. The findings suggest that the prevalent balance preference and the rising preference for daughters have quite different implications on the gender relationship between rural and urban China, and traditionalism still drives gender preference in rural China. Policy implications are also discussed.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-10-06T09:26:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231196655
       
  • #TheAfricaTheMediaNeverShowsYou: An Afrodiasporic Subaltern Counterpublic

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      Authors: Edward Ademolu
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Media representations of African underdevelopment are central to the communicative potential and reach of international development in the mainstream public sphere, but they are not without sustained critique and confrontation. By conceptualising the humanitarian-themed campaign – #TheAfricaTheMediaNeverShowsYou on Twitter, as an Afrodiasporic Subaltern Counterpublic, this article considers how UK African diasporic communities have utilised this digitalised environment to oppose the popular but problematic ‘face of development’. Applying Nancy Fraser’s counterpublics theorisation and drawing on social media ethnography and multiple participant interviews, it shows how oppositional counter-discourses among these online diasporic communities challenge problematic African representation within ‘white media’. This is realised in three distinct but interrelated discursive practices: (1) Afrodiasporic solidaristic orientations; (2) Diasporic solidarism as an assemblage(d) response to development’s institutionalised whiteness; and (3) Countering Africa(n) misrepresentations.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-10-03T10:04:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231193959
       
  • Food on the Margins: A Creative Film Collaboration to Amplify the Voices
           of Those Living with Food Insecurity

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      Authors: Clare Pettinger, James Ellwood
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      ‘Food on the margins in Plymouth’ is a short ‘fly on the wall’-style documentary film which has captured the food stories of six individuals who are, for whatever reason, experiencing food insecurity. The film was inspired by a recent participatory food research project (Food as a Lifestyle Motivator) which aimed to explore creative methods to better understand the food experiences of vulnerable communities in Plymouth, UK. Our aim was to ‘co-produce’ a documentary film illustrating the realities of the lived experience of food insecurity that could be promoted by/to city leaders and policy-makers to catalyse food system change. The resulting documentary film successfully met its aim by presenting a work of public sociology that informs publics about food poverty. Here, within this ‘Beyond the Text’ companion piece, we critique and appraise what the film achieves, by proposing how and why film-making can engage publics through sharing food stories and conveying wider sociological discourses.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-09-26T11:28:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231182005
       
  • The Participatory Documentary ‘Age Is Just a Bingo Number’

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      Authors: Simona Palladino
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      The film ‘Age is Just a Bingo Number’ is a mid-length (40 minutes) participatory documentary exploring the experiences of a community of ageing Italians in Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. As a product of social science research, this documentary aims to bridge the gap between academia and the general audience, by disseminating research findings in creative ways, through art practices. This documentary constitutes an empirical contribution to the sociology of community studies, by exploring the social interactions of a small place-based group of older migrants. Hence, the documentary introduces the audience to a recreational centre in the heart of the city, where the participants gather on a weekly basis to play Bingo. This place, and the sense of community it conveys, aims at promoting social aspects of the environment for older people. Furthermore, by illustrating how older migrants can become closely attached to places, it aims at raising awareness of issues of ageing in the context of migration. In this sense, the film is an original contribution to the sociology of ageing and transnational migration.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-09-26T11:27:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231181761
       
  • Transnationalization of Educational Aspirations: Evidence from China

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      Authors: Yasemin Nuhoglu Soysal, Héctor Cebolla Boado
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      The international migration of students has garnered a lot of attention from researchers due to its growing popularity and significance. However, the current state of research in this field is limited. On one hand, there is a scarcity of high-quality, large-scale data, and existing studies primarily focus on students who are already abroad. On the other hand, the field predominantly revolves around Bourdieusian-inspired arguments that narrowly view international education as a strategic investment by parents and a means of perpetuating social advantage. This article addresses these limitations by utilizing nationally representative survey data from China, the largest single source of international students globally. Our findings challenge the existing literature by revealing that parental aspirations to send their children abroad are more widespread across diverse social backgrounds than previously suggested. Furthermore, we observe that exposure to transnational environments amplifies aspirations for international education across various parental backgrounds and mitigates differences in aspirations based on parental education levels. We argue that these empirical patterns reflect the global standardization and diffusion of models and ideals of self, of which international education has increasingly become a part within the context of the transnationalization of higher education itself.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-09-25T11:16:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231189626
       
  • Snapshots of Family: Family Representations and Practices of Mothering
           Displayed by Instamothers

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      Authors: Małgorzata Gawrońska, Małgorzata Sikorska
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      The article explores family representations and practices of mothering displayed by popular Polish Instamothers. We investigate how ‘proper’ motherhood is constructed also with regard to strategies of depicting children and making social class manifest. Janet Finch’s concept of ‘displaying families’ is applied as both a theoretical framework and a set of methodological assumptions. Considering sharing family images on Instagram as a form of display, we assume that published photographs both shape and are shaped by dominant norms and discourses. Relying on content analysis and on semiological analysis, we investigate 100 photographs published by 10 popular Instamothers. The ethical challenges in visual social media research are also discussed. As a solution to the data anonymization problem, we propose the usage of graphics based on photographs.The results identify a tendency to idealize family life and to promote the traditional family model with its strongly normative character. Simultaneously, elements of the family modernizing discourse are also present. Although limited to Poland, our case study has broader significance for examining the dynamic socio-cultural changes that occur in postmodern societies.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-09-22T06:31:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231195550
       
  • Connection Points: The Dynamics of Recruitment to Packaging-Free Shopping

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      Authors: Anne Müller
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Practice theorists have indicated the importance of understanding everyday life – how it changes and stays the same – in responding to current environmental problems, including the proliferation of food packaging waste. Focusing on individuals as carriers of practices who carry them out is essential for the diffusion of sustainable practices because the more carriers are recruited by less wasteful food consumption, such as packaging-free shopping, the more they are likely to spread. Thus far, however, insights regarding the dynamics of how practices recruit their carriers have been limited. Based on a focused ethnography in a recently opened packaging-free shop and its customers’ homes in Germany, this study specifies the dynamics of recruitment by introducing the concept of connection points. The presence of connection points enables a practice to recruit carriers, allowing them to maintain daily routines to a certain degree, while in the process of adopting a new practice that entails changing their everyday life. This reveals a paradoxical dynamic: continuity, in very diverse ways, seems to pave the way towards change.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-09-12T09:18:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231180055
       
  • The Impacts of Guanxi: Drug Policing Under Police Professionalisation in
           China

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      Authors: Haitao Shi
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Guanxi is a ubiquitous, intricate, and enduring characteristic of Chinese society and permeates virtually every aspect of Chinese life. Drug policing is no exception. This study attempts to clarify the concept of guanxi and illustrate how guanxi affects police professionalisation in China through observing drug policing conducted by two Anti-Drug Squads and one Anti-Drug Corps in Jixiang City in China and interviewing 25 anti-drug police officers. Thematic analysis was employed to analyse the data. This article defines guanxi as a long-term, interpersonal, and transmittable relationship that is connected by ganqing (affective bonds) and renqing (instrumental bonds). It involves mianzi (face and reputation) maintenance and social reciprocity. It highlights the importance of the Guanxi Base, which has often been omitted in previous literature. It argues that guanxi may result in unfair police management and give rise to renqing cases that undermine police professionalisation and the rule of law. Furthermore, it is argued that police professionalisation may bring about some resistance to political interference, particularly when it violates the law. However, guanxi operates smoothly within legal boundaries during drug policing.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-09-12T09:11:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231177501
       
  • Outcomes of Academic Tracking Among Young Adults in the United States: A
           Longitudinal Survey Analysis

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      Authors: Hyunsu Oh, Houa Vang
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, we assess the relationship between track placement in high school and long-term postsecondary and occupational outcomes among young adults in the United States. We find that young adults in the college-prep track are most likely to earn a college degree. Young adults in the vocational are more likely than those in the college-prep track to have a vocational premium for short-term earning levels. Otherwise, those in the vocational premium in earnings are eventually eclipsed by the academic premium. We also find that some personal characteristics, such as trace, gender, and social class, intersect with the relationship between track placement and our outcome variables. Our findings have theoretical and practical implications for academic tracking and long-term educational and labor market outcomes.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-09-12T09:05:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231197049
       
  • ‘Not Just Living in the Moment’: Constructing the ‘Enterprising’
           and Future-Oriented Self Through the Consumption of No-and-Low-Alcohol
           Drinks

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      Authors: Emily Nicholls
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      In contemporary, neoliberal contexts, individuals are compelled to display competent and ‘enterprising’ selves, to get ahead in ‘hustle culture’ and to prioritise their personal health/wellbeing and futures. Dominant drinking cultures that normalise binge drinking and ‘living in the moment’ sit at odds with such values, yet these tensions can be navigated through ‘responsible’ consumption, whereby consumers can continue to buy into dominant drinking cultures yet show restraint by drinking in moderation and/or participating in periods of abstinence. In recent years, an expanding market of ‘no-and low-alcohol’ (NoLo) drinks also presents increasing opportunities to negotiate new kinds of moderate drinking identities, take breaks from consumption or reconfigure relationships with alcohol entirely. Drawing on data from 15 interviews with regular NoLo drinkers, this article highlights the ways in which NoLo consumption is entangled with notions of the enterprising self in relation to health, choice/responsibility, productivity and the future. Using the consumption of NoLo drinks as a case study, the article contributes more widely to our understandings of how identities are negotiated and displayed through particular (non)consumption practices that take place in the present – but also construct the future self – in the face of neoliberal imperatives to be healthy and productive.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-09-11T06:39:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231191063
       
  • Raising ‘True Believers’: Anti-Abortion ‘Education’ for Primary
           Children in the UK

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      Authors: Pam Lowe, Sarah-Jane Page
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      In the UK, the vast majority of people accept abortion, whether or not they are religious. Holding an absolutist anti-abortion view is out of line with the general population. The overwhelming majority of anti-abortion activists are motivated by conservative Christian religious beliefs, not necessarily shared by others in their faith communities. Their minority position, and ageing population, poses issues for the continuance of the anti-abortion movement, creating a need for specific anti-abortion religious socialisation that is unavailable elsewhere. Drawing on data from a longitudinal ethnographic study of anti-abortion activism, this article highlights the ways in which anti-abortion activists seek to develop anti-abortion values among primary-aged children. It illustrates their conflict between the need to develop a strong anti-abortion identity and involving children in potentially controversial discussions on abortion. We use the framework of lived religion to argue that, while much attention has been given to the concerns about children in minority religions, this has resulted in a lack of attention to the diversity of practices within mainstream religious communities, and how controversial forms of socialisation are managed.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-08-18T09:30:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231175012
       
  • Broken (Again) – Making Sense of Ankle Fracture, Hospitalisation, and
           Early Recovery: An Autoethnography

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      Authors: Sally Dowling
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      There is little research on the experience of recovering from acute injury, with most first person accounts of illness about chronic ill health. Ankle fracture is a common, distressing injury with short- and long-term life-altering impacts. In this article, an autoethnographic approach is used to tell a story of ankle fracture, surgery, and subsequent early recovery. The story is told and examined from one person’s multiple perspectives – as a patient, healthcare worker, and healthcare educator – and thus reflects on both the delivery and organisation of healthcare, and the personal experience of receiving care. The impacts of ankle fracture and recovery are considered and related to other research on the experience. Common factors include pain, loss of independence, isolation, loneliness and depression, changed personal and social identities and engagement, and lack of understanding of the trajectory of recovery. Illness and injury narratives can provide valuable contributions to healthcare education and the delivery of care, as well as being used to support those living through similar experiences. This article argues that the combination of sociological thinking and patient experience has a valuable contribution to make to healthcare education.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-08-10T10:42:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231180151
       
  • ‘I’m Not Victim-Blaming, But . . .’: Young People’s Discourses in
           Understanding Sexual Violence Against Women

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      Authors: Robert Bolton, Claire Edwards, Máire Leane, Fiachra Ó Súilleabháin
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the discourses that young people (aged 18–24) in Ireland use in understanding men’s sexual violence against women (SVAW). Drawing on a two-part vignette used in interviews with young people to elicit a corpus of data, we deploy critical discourse analysis to unpack the nuanced argumentative structures, interpretive repertoires, and subject positions used in apportioning blame for SVAW. We find that when blame is placed solely on men as perpetrators, young people draw on critical discourses that recognise the socially constructed basis of SVAW. In contrast, those who in some way blame women for their victimisation draw on disclaimers and essentialist repertoires that discursively normalise SVAW. We also identify a ‘rights discourse’ that young people use in their attributions of blame and responsibility for SVAW.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-08-10T10:39:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231178673
       
  • Book Review: Howard Campbell, Downtown Juárez: Underworlds of
           Violence and Abuse

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      Authors: Murylo Sforcin Batista
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-08-10T10:36:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231177502
       
  • Nested Narratives: Biographical Accounts of Unlived Experience Across
           Three Narrative Orders

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      Authors: Susie Scott, Nina Lockwood
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Studies of narrative identity have focused on positive formation: stories of ‘becoming’ who we are because of events that happened, people we met, and things that we said, did, or had. However, identities can also be negatively defined by things that we miss, lose, choose against, or events that never happened. Drawing on the sociology of nothing, this paper explores some ways in which biographical subjects may story their unlived lives and paths to unbecoming. We demonstrate this by analysing the same extract of data through three interpretive lenses, revealing different narrative orders: the intrapersonal, intertextual, and performative. Respectively, these refer to how nothing is narrated: self-reflexively by the experiencing subject, regarding a particular instance; as a sequence of thematically connected episodes, contextually emplotted within a general life story; and as a communicative act of telling, directed towards an imagined audience.
      Authors can move between these narrative orders, taking different temporal perspectives and producing ‘nested’ stories of alternative non-selves.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-07-26T08:58:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231184353
       
  • Safety and Security Battles: Unpacking the Players and Arenas of the Safe
           Standing Movement in English Football (1989–2022)

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      Authors: Mark Turner, Jan Andre Lee Ludvigsen
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      This article advances recent debates on social movement (relational) fields, outcomes, and successes by suggesting that the analysis of such fields as a whole must be temporal. The relational interpersonal and intersubjective choices made by interdependent actors in social life take place in fields of interaction, but these interactions and their networks of social relations have a history. Hence, the social movement field is characterised by multiple temporal periods through which the actions of activists both shape and are shaped by the long-term socio-political environments in which they are embedded. To develop this analysis, we identify a football supporter-movement in England, ‘Safe Standing’, revealing the complex interplay of cultural and technological patterns of interaction across the compelling timeframes and orientations of a 30-year movement field. Adopting a theoretical framework which synthesises research on the strategic interactions of movement ‘players’ and ‘arenas’, and sport-focused security fields, we identify a series of compound and sub-players across the political, symbolic, mediatised, technological, and legislative arenas which constitute the security field of contention, in what is an under-researched lifeworld in sociology.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-07-17T06:36:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231183577
       
  • Keeping It Real in Chinese Hip-Hop: Everyday Authenticity and Coming From
           the Street

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      Authors: Yehan Wang
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      The status of hip-hop in China is being reshaped by the sudden popularity experienced by the genre in the last few years. An aspect that has been overlooked by scholarly research on Chinese hip-hop authenticity is that underground rappers may have to simultaneously assume multiple personal, professional, and social roles while attempting to maintain authenticity. This article provides an empirical account of how authenticity and the ‘keep it real’ motto are understood and negotiated by underground Chinese rappers. Drawing from in-depth interviews with 12 rappers, this article proposes the notion of everyday authenticity as a means for rappers to draw inspiration from unembellished daily realities while also using music to alleviate everyday hardships. The article also examines the challenges faced by underground rappers in the attempt to retain this type of authenticity in the mainstream, commercially driven environment. The tension is resolved by creating an autonomous realm for rappers that come ‘out of the street’, which allows rappers to claim legitimacy inside and outside the underground. This article provides an extension of the conceptualisation of authenticity in the Chinese hip-hop context, thus critically contributing to the global debate around hip-hop authenticity.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-07-15T06:44:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231178628
       
  • Ethical Reflexivity, Care, and Slippery Data: Lessons From Working With
           the Mass Observation Project

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      Authors: Corine van Emmerik
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      As part of a research project on the lived and everyday temporal experiences of British people in the Covid-19 pandemic, a Mass Observation directive was commissioned that asked volunteers about their changing rhythms, feelings, and imagined futures. The responses were rich and raw. Some of these reflections, however, expressed a risk of harm that raised ethical issues that were not anticipated beforehand. These issues were complicated by the interstitial character of the data, being not primary and not quite secondary. This Sociology in Action paper reflects on one diary that expressed risk of harm to think through the slipperiness of the data as well as the ethical responsibility researchers have towards the well-being of participants and that of their own. I suggest a proactive ethical framework for such interstitial data that includes an ethics of care towards the participants and stimulates ethical reflexivity that prepares the researcher for potential emotional ties and investments.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-07-13T03:29:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231164486
       
  • Third-Sector Advocacy: An Exploration of the Work of Community Food
           Providers

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      Authors: Katy Gordon, Andrea Tonner, Juliette Wilson
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores advocative work of third-sector community food providers in Scotland. The article argues these organisations can contribute to tackling household food insecurity through their advocative work, recognising that state-led policy on household income is needed. Capturing the advocacy of these organisations, rather than focussing solely on their service provision can provide insight that is largely missing from existing community food scholarships. The research adopts a quasi-ethnographic qualitative approach with 16 grassroots community food providers and 5 meso-level support organisations. The findings identify advocacy practices undertaken, targeted at political and public audiences and national and local institutional layers. It highlights the tensions of this work, including fears of exacerbating a failing system. The findings also evidence a complementary, symbiotic, and reciprocally strengthening relationship between service provision and advocacy by third-sector organisations. These contributions demonstrate the potential of this sector to contribute to social change required to address the root causes of household food insecurity.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-06-28T07:14:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231169574
       
  • A Fish in Many Waters' Addressing Transnational Habitus and the Reworking
           of Bourdieu in Global Contexts

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      Authors: Garth Stahl, Hannah Soong, Guanglun Michael Mu, Kun Dai
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the operationalization of transnational habitus by scholars to understand how individuals experience mobilities across borders. Our scoping study of 21 scholarly publications focuses on the various ways in which transnational habitus is defined as well as the different approaches to theorizing a transnational habitus. In critically mapping the relatively short history of transnational habitus, we are interested in what about habitus appears particularly generative to scholars interested in migratory experiences. The study first charts the sociological scholarship to date on transnational habitus and how it is used to understand the ways in which transnational migrants negotiate and navigate their social and cross-border mobilities. Then, to critically appraise these theorizations, the analysis focuses on two key trends in the literature: treatment of clivé/adaptation and the role of time(lag)/temporality before addressing two key silences in the use of transnational habitus – specifically gender and consideration of differences in class background.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-06-23T05:36:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231180021
       
  • ‘Pollution’ and ‘Blaming’: A Sociological Analysis of the COVID-19
           Time Through Cultural Perspective

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      Authors: Antonio Camorrino
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      This article aims to highlight some peculiar aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic thanks to the theoretical tools of Cultural Theory and Cultural Sociology. For this purpose, first of all, I introduce the issue of the pandemic from a cultural perspective. In the second section, I analyze the phenomenon of the COVID-19 pandemic through the concept of ‘pollution’: in symbolic terms, the dimension of contagion is very close to that of ‘contamination’. From this particular theoretical perspective, however, ‘contamination’ is not understood only in its material but also in its symbolic meaning. The third section focuses on the different forms of ‘blaming’ that have been activated during the pandemic time: to protect and strengthen the social bond threatened by the anguish of contagion, different targets have been identified on which to ‘blame’ the spread of the virus. In the conclusions, I summarize the reasoning developed in the article in an overall way, trying to briefly show how Cultural Theory and Cultural Sociology can offer a useful contribution to the analysis of the pandemic catastrophe.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-06-02T11:23:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231174283
       
  • A Convergence of Opportunities: Understanding the High Elite University
           Progression of Disadvantaged Youth in an East London Locality

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      Authors: Joanne Davies
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      There is growing evidence that London’s disadvantaged youth have a better chance at progressing to elite universities than their counterparts outside the capital. Drawing on case study research in a disadvantaged East London locality, this article suggests that a convergence of structural factors that favour elite university progression may help explain this high progression. These factors include local schools’ valorisation of elite universities and their associated prioritisation of resources and strong framing of university choices to privilege Russell Group progression. Students’ apparent advantageous access to the widening participation provision of elite universities and to internship and networking opportunities arising from London’s corporate philanthropy also appear to play important roles. The article advocates for greater strategic planning by the regulator and further partnerships across all sectors of the economy to enable a fairer distribution of widening participation opportunities nationwide. It concludes with a call to reflect on the wisdom of privileging elite university progression at all costs and asks whether we should really be championing such a narrow vision of social mobility in the first place.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-06-02T11:18:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231174061
       
  • Book Review: The Flexibility Paradox: Why Flexible Working Leads to
           (Self-)Exploitation

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      Authors: Linna Sai
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-06-02T11:08:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231173778
       
  • Book Review: Narrative Inquiry: Philosophical Roots

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      Authors: Kate Carruthers Thomas
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-06-02T11:06:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231173777
       
  • The New Nones: An Empirical Study of Dual Religious and Political
           Non-affiliation

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      Authors: Kevin McCaffree, Anondah Saide, Michael Shermer
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      While political scientists have investigated political non-affiliation and religious scholars have investigated religious non-affiliation, no work has yet examined the correlates of those identifying as both religiously and politically non-affiliated. Across two separate studies, we investigate the personality, social network, and cultural engagement correlates of political and religious non-affiliates. Some statistically significant effects found in Study 1 fail to replicate in Study 2, though replicated findings provide interesting avenues for future work. Notably, compared to those who report being both politically and religiously affiliated, we find that dual non-affiliates are more socially liberal, more fiscally conservative, far less likely to vote, and less religious across several attitudinal and behavioral measures. Crucially, we find no consistent evidence that dual non-affiliates suffer from social isolation or a lack of social support.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-06-02T10:46:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231173776
       
  • Book Review: Advanced Introduction to Social Capital

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      Authors: Louisa VB Horne
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-06-02T10:43:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231170508
       
  • Critical Interpretation of Spatiality in Professional Korean Football
           Stadiums: Relph’s Theory of Placeness

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      Authors: Wanyoung Lee, Yoonso Choi
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      This research analyzes Korean professional soccer stadiums using Relph’s concept of placelessness to understand why Korean professional soccer has rapidly declined in popularity and become a minority fan sport. Qualitative research methods were used to conduct a narrative analysis. The interview content was analyzed, and four problems were identified. The findings show that these stadiums are (1) a uniform space that excludes local culture, (2) used as a profit-generating tool for large corporations, (3) spaces controlled by the state, and (4) maximizing economic efficiency. Therefore, they have been used as a uniform space for social, cultural, political, and economic purposes. The Korean national soccer team’s performance in international competitions seems to be satisfactory. However, the domestic professional soccer league is in a vulnerable condition. Thus, these stadiums should be established as true places by removing the element of placelessness in order to recover the popularity of Korean professional soccer.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-05-25T10:05:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231172035
       
  • Book Review

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      Authors: Meriç Kırmızı
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-05-22T12:42:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231169189
       
  • Book Review: The I.B. Tauris Handbook of Sociology and The Middle East

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      Authors: Abier Hamidi
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-05-18T05:46:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231172845
       
  • Czech Parents Under Lockdown: Different Positions, Different Temporalities

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      Authors: Radka Dudová, Alena Křížková
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Using an intersectional approach, we explore how parents in the Czech Republic coped with the increased demands of childcare and how their perceptions of childcare changed throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. Building on Nancy Fraser’s theory of the social contradiction of capitalism, we address the question of whether the pandemic situation can be viewed as an opportunity to increase recognition of care. Qualitative interviews with parents from various socioeconomic backgrounds conducted from spring 2020 to summer 2021 demonstrate ambivalent experiences of care during the COVID-19 pandemic. The first school closure in spring 2020 was perceived as a rather positive interruption to everyday affairs. As the pandemic became protracted, the long-term negative effects of care under lockdown arose, especially among mothers, which included weakening labour market position, deteriorating economic situation, and growing dependence on a male breadwinner or social welfare. Our research shows the temporality of the COVID-19 care crisis. In the first stage of the pandemic, care was (also) assessed as an opportunity, a source of purpose, and a new value. In the next period, the experiences and expectations were rather negative. Over time, gender inequality at home increased as women took on most of the increased care burden and the social inequalities deepened, with some using their resources to compensate for the risks associated with the care crisis and others facing further exhaustion and income losses. Overall, parental care did not win greater societal recognition during the pandemic.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-05-12T01:47:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231168249
       
  • How to Overcome the Secretiveness of a Group: Opportunities of Online
           Interviews

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      Authors: Inês Maia
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      In a pandemic, qualitative methodologies and in-person interviews, the key to understanding the experiences lived by participants in social phenomena, proved to be ill-suited. As a result of the restrictions imposed during this period, the challenge was even more considerable in the research of groups and practices marked by secretiveness and self-closing, in that our presence in the field, always marked by hurdles, was impracticable. In this text, we propose a reflection on the experience of conducting online interviews with university students (Porto, Portugal) involved in praxe (hazing), a complex and multidimensional social phenomenon that profoundly shapes academic life in Portuguese universities. We will discuss the differences between holding in-person interviews before the pandemic and online interviews during the lockdown. We draw attention to practical, methodological, and ethical considerations in adapting research to an online context and conclude that, despite the challenges, online interviews opened up surprising opportunities for collecting these students’ experiences.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-05-08T08:55:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231168253
       
  • Examining Professionalisation as a Strategy for Sex Worker Empowerment and
           Mobilisation

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      Authors: Nadine Gloss
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, I examine the concept of professionalisation in sex work as a strategy shaped by political activism that aims to empower and mobilise sex workers to fight for labour rights. Using a participant-based action research approach, I investigated one sex worker professionalisation programme in Germany to better understand how the design, training and goals of the programme reflected ideas and priorities from the Association for Erotic and Sexual Service Providers, a nationwide sex worker rights organisation in Germany. Through my analysis, I found that the programme for professionalisation was mainly oriented around criticism against the new German Prostitute Protection Act (2017), framing data protection as a sex worker rights issue, and encouraging critical resistance to authorities enforcing the Act. Based on these themes, I offer two new perspectives on the aims of the programme in relation to empowering and destigmatising sex workers. First, the tools of resistance offered through the programme as a way of empowering sex workers were confounded by sex workers’ individual situations that limited their ability to practice resistance. Second, the politics of funding for the programme, guided by the goal of ensuring sex workers are less of a public health risk, may interfere with the broader goal of destigmatising sex work.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-05-08T08:47:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231170520
       
  • Vulnerability to Food Insecurity among Older People: The Role of Social
           Capital

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      Authors: Wendy Wills, Angela Dickinson
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Food insecurity is a public health issue in Western countries, including the UK. Being food-insecure means older adults may not access sufficient nutritious, safe, and socially acceptable food, leading to a higher risk of malnutrition. We conducted a qualitative study of 25 households with men and women aged 60–95 years to investigate how older adults access food and to explore social capital, which might contribute to food security or prevent malnutrition. We conducted participant-led kitchen tours, interviews, photo, and video elicitation across multiple household visits. In addition, we brought stakeholders together from a range of sectors in a workshop to explore how they might respond to our empirical findings, through playing a serious game based on scenarios drawn from our data. This was a successful way to engage a diverse audience to identify possible solutions to threats to food security in later life. Analysis of the data showed that older people’s physical and mental health status and the local food environment often had a negative impact on food security. Older people leveraged social capital through reciprocal bonding and bridging social networks which supported the maintenance of food security. Data were collected before COVID-19, but the pandemic amplifies the utility of our study findings. Many social elements associated with food practices as well as how people shop have changed because of COVID-19 and other global and national events, including a cost-of-living crisis. To prevent ongoing adverse impacts on food security, focus and funding should be directed to re-establishment of social opportunities and rebuilding bridging social capital.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-05-08T08:45:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231170516
       
  • Book Review: What Is Cultural Sociology'

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      Authors: Isabel Watts
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-04-28T12:48:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231168455
       
  • What and How are we Measuring When we Research Gendered Divisions of
           Domestic Labor' Remaking the Household Portrait Method into a Care/Work
           Portrait

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      Authors: Andrea Doucet, Janna Klostermann
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      The porous and shifting boundaries within and between care and work concepts, and practices and their related measurement complexities call for innovative conceptual and methodological approaches to research on work and care. This article details how we reconfigured the Household Portrait – a qualitative, participatory, visual, creative method that engages couples in mapping and discussing their household and care tasks and responsibilities – into a Care/Work Portrait. Informed by conceptual shifts in care theories, the Care/Work Portrait offers theoretical and methodological advantages for studying gendered divisions and relations of household work and care. It attends to unpaid care work/paid work/paid care work intra-connections, moves outside the household to include community-based work, deepens distinctions between tasks and responsibilities, and considers wider forms and contexts of care. This method goes beyond who does what tallies to bring forth relational, temporal, spatial stories about people’s complex care/work configurations and the specific contexts, constraints, supports, and structuring conditions of their lives.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-04-10T10:24:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231160740
       
  • Trajectories of Vulnerability and Resistance Among Independent Indoor Sex
           Workers During Economic Decline

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      Authors: Laura Jarvis-King
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Economic decline, such as we have witnessed in recent years, has disproportionately affected women and evidence demonstrates how financial hardship encourages entry to the sex industry. This worsens the working conditions within sex industry markets but, despite this, evidence documenting the effects of recent austerity measures on the sex industry is lacking. This article draws on qualitative longitudinal research following the 2007–2008 financial crisis to explore work trajectories and experiences of vulnerability through time among independent indoor sex workers in the UK. Participants’ experiences demonstrate worsening conditions in the mainstream labour market, particularly for women and, within this constraining context, sex work represents a choice to mitigate economic vulnerability. Yet this creates increased competition in the sex industry alongside declining demand, which compromises economic security and worker wellbeing. Exploring sex workers’ experiences over time contributes to a deeper understanding of the relationship between women’s work practices and vulnerability during economic decline, which is necessary to inform policy responses.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-03-25T06:35:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231162757
       
  • ‘What Can I Plan at This Age'’ Expectations Regarding Future and
           Planning in Older Age

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      Authors: Jaroslava Hasmanová Marhánková, Eva Soares Moura
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Time has become one of the most researched topics in the field of sociological, but especially psychological, research. While broad attention has been paid to the impact of chronological age on planning and the perception of time, much less is known about these processes in (advanced) old age. Drawing on 30 in-depth qualitative interviews with people aged above 70 years (half of which are conducted with people aged above 80 years), this article explores the type of plans people make in older age and how they relate to the idea of planning face-to-face the shortening time perspective. This research indicates the significant ambivalences in how older people relate to plans and the future. While making short-term plans represents an essential part of their lives, the participants problematise the idea of planning as unreasonable concerning their chronological age. Two dominant approaches to formulating plans are identified: (1) framing future plans referring to the future achievement of a loved one and (2) emphasising ‘living in the present’. The findings also indicate that the social imaginary of the fourth age plays a vital role in how older adults frame the time ahead of them. In conclusion, we summarise our findings and argue that mortality represents just one of the horizons accompanied by other possible milestones structuring the time remaining and redefining the meanings attached to such time.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-03-25T06:28:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231158989
       
  • Explaining Regularities or Individual Outcomes: Chance and the Limits of
           Social Science

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      Authors: Judith Glaesser
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Can we explain individual outcomes by referring to patterns observed in populations' Social scientists generally assume that we can, at least to a certain degree, and they study populations partly with that goal in mind. However, while patterns can be observed on the population level, which suggest that, on average, certain segments of the population are more likely to experience some outcome, it is impossible, on the individual level, to predict who will actually experience the outcome, even if the individual’s relevant characteristics are known. Thus, an interesting tension emerges: on the one hand, individual action and experience produces population-level patterns, while on the other hand, individual experience appears to be ‘inherently underdetermined’ and partly or largely due to luck or chance. Accordingly, this article considers the relationship between regularities and individual outcomes and to what extent it is desirable to construct models which can explain all the variance in outcomes, and the roles of true chance and what one might call ‘as-if’ chance in this. An empirical demonstration based on ALLBUS data explores these issues further. It uses the example of the graduate premium to discuss that, while there is a pattern where, on average, graduates earn more than non-graduates, there is a certain degree of individual-level deviation from this pattern (even after taking account of other relevant factors) which is partly due to chance. Patterns identified in data can provide the upper and lower bounds within which chance plays its part. The article closes with a discussion of implications for research and policy, and for the understanding of research findings by the general public.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-03-25T06:24:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231158504
       
  • Discounts as a Barrier to Change in Our Food Systems

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      Authors: Lisa Jack
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the wealth of discussion and ideas on how food systems might change, and all the plans and schemes created to provide solutions to unsustainable food systems, very few researchers have examined the accounting practices that define socio-economic relationships around food. In this article, I show that the imperative for each entity in food supply networks to obtain a discount on costs involved in food supply to survive on very thin margins, inhibits large-scale change. The approach here is introductory, providing an explanation of the accounting issues involved for a non-accounting audience, and an illustrative case study is used to show the embeddedness of always ‘getting a discount’. The case study is drawn from interview data with those involved in intermediary companies and in alternative food distribution in Canada and the USA. The difficulties faced by organisations distributing food on a more local level and the lack of lasting and widespread change despite their endeavours, is shown to linked to the inevitability that they too need to ‘get discounts’ to survive. This interdisciplinary study is important to provide context for sociological thinkers and activists seeking to understand the barriers to change in food behaviours and food strategies.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-03-25T06:12:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231155260
       
  • Superficial Allies: The Role of Legal Inclusion and Social Obedience in
           Stigma Processes

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      Authors: Shahin Davoudpour
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      While the power of legal exclusion in stigmatisation is undeniable, its impact on ally behaviour has never been explored. This gap in stigma, law, and allyship is the focus of the present study. More specifically, this study shows how exclusion of the stigmatised from a legal system increases prejudicial attitudes expressed by allies. Using sexual prejudice, negative attitudes towards sexual minorities, as a proxy for stigma, this study explores ‘Superficial Allies’ or those who express full support for sexual minorities while refusing neighbouring proximity to them. Using attitudinal data from the Integrated Values Surveys (1981–2016), a large international (113 countries/regions) cross-sectional time-series survey, this study investigates the role of legal inclusion and social obedience in sexual prejudice expressed by those who fully support sexual minorities and those who fully reject them. The results of logistic regression models suggest that the absence of legal recognition and protection for sexual minorities at the national level increases expression of sexual prejudice among both allies and the stigmatisers. While social obedience plays a significant role in stigmatisers’ expression of sexual prejudice, it shows no significance for the ally population. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-02-25T12:44:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231156296
       
  • The Social Production of the Dead Human Body in the Practice of Teaching
           Anatomy Through Cadaveric Dissection

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      Authors: Jennifer Burr, Nigel Russell-Sewell
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this study is to explore how the dead human body is socially produced through the practices of those involved in teaching anatomy through cadaveric dissection. The perspectives of anatomists learning to teach offer a novel perspective on the existing literature. The study draws on data from interviews with students and teaching staff involved in practical cadaveric dissection during a UK postgraduate anatomy education programme. Interviews addressed participants’ experiences, reflections, and emotional responses during practical dissection of donor bodies. Findings address five areas: anticipation and the ‘imagined body’, ontology and the latent human, detachment, dissociation, and reconciliation, preparation and intentionality, and gratitude and immortalisation. The findings suggest that during the course of practical dissection sessions, anatomists learn to normalise the transgressive activity of human dissection via processes of reconciliation. The transgressive elements are resolved through the agency of the person once living and through a configuration of the anatomist and the donor body in a network of scientific knowledge, pedagogic practice and personal influence.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-02-25T12:39:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231156121
       
  • Critical Reflections on the COVID-19 Pandemic from the NHS Frontline

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      Authors: Anthony Lloyd, Daniel Briggs, Anthony Ellis, Luke Telford
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic fundamentally changed the way we live, work, and interact with each other. Nowhere was the pandemic more profoundly experienced than on the frontline of healthcare. From overwhelmed Intensive Care Units to shortages of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and clap for carers, the UK’s National Health Service (NHS) became the focal point for the pandemic response. Utilising data from online survey responses (N = 16) complemented by four online interviews and one face-to-face interview (N = 5) with NHS workers primarily during the height of the pandemic, this article offers a preliminary analysis on the challenges the UK’s healthcare workers faced through working in conditions of crisis management. The article particularly addresses NHS workers’ amplification of fear, anxiety, and exhaustion; the absence of widespread solidarity; and implications of the absence of coherent governmental messaging upon the workforce. We situate this discussion within a critical account of neoliberal political economy, the theoretical framework of social harm, and the absence to explicate the harmful conditions of the pandemic’s frontline. While the data are confined to the UK’s NHS workers, its findings are relevant to other countries across the world that enacted similar responses to deal with COVID-19.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-02-23T05:18:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231156293
       
  • Creating Time for LGBT+ Disabled Youth: Co-production Outside
           Chrononormativity

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      Authors: Harvey Humphrey, Edmund Coleman-Fountain
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores how ‘chrononormative’ constructions of time shape research and offers an approach to co-production and research involvement that draws on insights from trans, queer, and disability studies. The article presents early reflections on an NIHR School for Social Care–funded research study, approved prior to but developed under the context of the Covid-19 pandemic, investigating personal support, sexuality, and gender in young disabled adults’ lives. This project has been supported by a Participatory Advisory Group (PAG) of LGBT+ young disabled adults and we reflect on how engagement with the PAG has shaped our understanding of debates around time and involvement in co-production discourse. Our engagement with trans, queer, and disability theory allows us to think about the constraints on time that such involvement has pushed against as we have sought to account for the diverse needs of the body-minds of the PAG in pandemic times. We suggest that this may speak to opening up the diversity and accessibility of co-production across other research contexts and intend this piece to encourage these conversations. The article thus offers a critical exploration of themes of time, embodiment, and identity in the way in which co-production is enacted in funded research.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-02-23T05:16:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804231155001
       
  • The Re-enchantment of Food: An Introduction

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      Authors: John Coveney
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      To say that humans have a profound relationship with the food they produce and eat is a mere truism. What is new derives from the recognition that in Western cultures, over time, our deep relationship with food has been replaced by a scientistic version of what we eat, and what we should eat. In many ways, this has dis-enchanted our relationship with food, in that it has rendered food as the sum total of a calculus based on vitamins, minerals, and energy content. The movements that are now growing around food – ethical, plant based, provenance aware – speak to new understandings of food which acknowledge that food is actually more than its sum of parts. These new movements share a common goal and that is to seek a re-enchantment with food. This article, which speaks very much from an anglo-tradition, discusses this ways in which dis- and re-enchantment of food has developed.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-02-16T10:59:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221128028
       
  • Cultural Capital in China' Television Tastes and Cultural and Cosmopolitan
           Distinctions Among Beijing Youth

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      Authors: Yang Gao, Giselinde Kuipers
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      How does television taste function as cultural capital in contemporary China' This study shows how Chinese youth engage with global television fiction to mark their positions in China’s changing social and cultural hierarchies. Using multiple correspondence analysis (N = 422) and interviews (N = 48) with college students in Beijing, we identify three taste dimensions: (1) disengaged versus discerning viewers; (2) TV lovers versus TV dislikers; and (3) ‘Western’ versus ‘Eastern’ TV taste. Dimensions 1 and 3 are cultural capital dimensions; they differ in criteria and type of cultural knowledge used to make distinctions and in connection with economic capital. Highlighting cosmopolitan capital as a distinct form of cultural capital, we analyse shifting global systems of cultural distinction, from a Chinese vantage point. Our analysis expands theories of culture and inequality by showing that (and how) tastes reflect and reinforce social stratification in the previously unexplored Chinese context, but with distinctive Chinese characteristics.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-02-07T12:47:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221149796
       
  • Gendered Interaction and Practices of Intimacy Among Emirati Young
           Spouses: Exploring the Experiences of Wives

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      Authors: Mohammed Abdel Karim Al Hourani
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      This study aims to explore the practices of intimacy among Emirati spouses in a society where gender discrimination persistently governs the private space of family relationships. Participants include 41 young Emirati working wives aged 24–30 who have jobs and are enrolled in graduate studies and research degrees (PhD and MA). In-depth interviews were used to collect data. Line-by-line coding, thematic coding, and constant comparison method were employed to analyze and interpret data. Analyses revealed seven interrelated categories associated with the gendered practices of intimacy. They were influenced by factors such as the wives’ status, the gap of age, and the wives’ religiosity. These themes are suppressed self-disclosure, restricted self-disclosure of wives, not sharing responsibilities, not sharing time, unequal mutual reciprocity, not solving problems, and not thinking together. Narratives highlighted gendered interaction and low quality of intimacy between spouses. The findings of this study show that empowering women in the public sphere has not impacted their position in the patriarchal structure of the family, which is reproduced by traditions and religious interpretations. This study’s findings can inform social policymakers aiming at bridging empowerment between the public and private spheres.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-02-02T05:45:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221148836
       
  • Using a Range of Communication Tools to Interview a Hard-to-Reach
           Population

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      Authors: Orlanda Harvey, Edwin van Teijlingen, Margarete Parrish
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Online communication tools are increasingly being used by qualitative researchers; hence it is timely to reflect on the differences when using a broad range of data collection methods. Using a case study with a potentially hard-to-reach substance-using population who are often distrustful of researchers, this article explores the use of a variety of different platforms for interviews. It highlights both the advantages and disadvantages of each method. Face-to-face interviews and online videos offer more opportunity to build rapport, but lack anonymity. Live Webchat and audio-only interviews offer a high level of anonymity, but both may incur a loss of non-verbal communication, and in the Webchat a potential loss of personal narrative. This article is intended for sociologists who wish to broaden their methods for conducting research interviews.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2023-02-02T05:43:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221142212
       
 
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  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
Showing 401 - 382 of 382 Journals sorted alphabetically
Rural China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Rural Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health     Partially Free   (Followers: 13)
Secuencia     Open Access  
Seminar : A Journal of Germanic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Sens public     Open Access  
Senses and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Serendipities : Journal for the Sociology and History of the Social Sciences     Open Access  
Sexuality Research and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Sexualization, Media, & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Signs and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Simmel Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Social Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Social Change Review     Open Access  
Social Currents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Social Dynamics: A journal of African studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social Forces     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 91)
Social Inclusion     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Social Networking     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Social Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Social Problems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 76)
Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Social Psychology Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Social Transformations in Chinese Societies     Hybrid Journal  
Sociální studia / Social Studies     Open Access  
Sociedad y Discurso     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sociedad y Economía     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sociedad y Religión     Open Access  
Sociedade e Cultura     Open Access  
Società e diritti     Open Access  
SocietàMutamentoPolitica     Open Access  
Societies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Society and Culture in South Asia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Society Register     Open Access  
Socio-Ecological Practice Research     Hybrid Journal  
Socio-logos     Open Access  
Sociolinguistic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Sociologia : Revista da Faculdade de Letras da Universidade do Porto     Open Access  
Sociologia del diritto     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Sociologia del Lavoro     Full-text available via subscription  
Sociología del Trabajo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sociologia della Comunicazione     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Sociologia e Politiche Sociali     Full-text available via subscription  
Sociologia e Ricerca Sociale     Full-text available via subscription  
Sociología Histórica     Open Access  
Sociologia Ruralis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Sociologia urbana e rurale     Full-text available via subscription  
Sociología y Tecnociencia     Open Access  
Sociologia, Problemas e Práticas     Open Access  
Sociológica     Open Access  
Sociological Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Sociological Focus     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Sociological Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Sociological Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Sociological Jurisprudence Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sociological Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Sociological Methods & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Sociological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Sociological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Sociological Research Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Sociological Science     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Sociological Spectrum: Mid-South Sociological Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sociological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Sociologie     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Sociologie du Travail     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Sociologie et sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
SociologieS - Articles     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sociologisk Forskning     Open Access  
Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 191)
Sociology : Thought and Action     Open Access  
Sociology and Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Sociology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Sociology Mind     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sociology of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Sociology of Islam     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Sociology of Race and Ethnicity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Sociology of Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Sociology of Sport Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Socius : Sociological Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Sojourn: Journal of Social Issues in Southeast Asia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Solidarity : Journal of Education, Society and Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sosiologi i dag     Open Access  
Sospol : Jurnal Sosial Politik     Open Access  
Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture, and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
South African Review of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Southern Cultures     Full-text available via subscription  
Soziale Probleme : Zeitschrift für soziale Probleme und soziale Kontrolle     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Spaces for Difference: An Interdisciplinary Journal     Open Access  
Sport in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Streetnotes     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Studia Białorutenistyczne     Open Access  
Studia Iranica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Studia Litteraria et Historica     Open Access  
Studia Socialia Cracoviensia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Studia Universitatis Babes-Bolyai Sociologia     Open Access  
Studies in American Humor     Full-text available via subscription  
Studies in American Naturalism     Full-text available via subscription  
Studies in Latin American Popular Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Studies of Transition States and Societies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sudamérica : Revista de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Surveillance and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Swiss Journal of Sociology     Open Access  
Symbolic Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Søkelys på arbeidslivet (Norwegian Journal of Working Life Studies)     Open Access  
Teaching Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Tecnología y Sociedad     Open Access  
TECNOSCIENZA: Italian Journal of Science & Technology Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Terrains / Théories     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
The British Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
The Philanthropist     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
The Social Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
The Sociological Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
The Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
The Tocqueville Review/La revue Tocqueville     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Tidsskrift for boligforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for Forskning i Sygdom og Samfund     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for ungdomsforskning     Open Access  
Tla-Melaua : Revista de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Todas as Artes     Open Access  
Tracés     Open Access  
Trajecta : Religion, Culture and Society in the Low Countries     Open Access  
Transatlantica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transmotion     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Transposition : Musique et sciences sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Travail et Emploi     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Treballs de Sociolingüística Catalana     Open Access  
TRIM. Tordesillas : Revista de investigación multidisciplinar     Open Access  
Universidad, Escuela y Sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Unoesc & Ciência - ACHS     Open Access  
Urban Research & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Valuation Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Variations : Revue Internationale de Théorie Critique     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Visitor Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Vlast' (The Authority)     Open Access  
Work, Aging and Retirement     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
World Cultures eJournal     Open Access  
World Future Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Religion, Gesellschaft und Politik     Hybrid Journal  
Социологический журнал     Open Access  

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Heriot-Watt University
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Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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