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  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
Showing 1 - 200 of 382 Journals sorted by number of followers
American Journal of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 340)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 283)
Annual Review of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 234)
Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 167)
Social Forces     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
Social Problems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 73)
Information, Communication & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Comparative Studies in Society and History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 56)
European Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Anthropological Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 54)
Critical Studies on Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Sociology of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Current Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
The British Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Qualitative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Sociological Methods & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
International Political Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
City & Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Critical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
AlterNative : An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 41)
Ageing & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
European Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Comparative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
The Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Poverty and Social Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Victorian Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Contemporary Sociology : A Journal of Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
International Journal of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Games and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Critical Discourse Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Complexity in Leadership and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
City: analysis of urban trends, culture, theory, policy, action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Sociological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
International Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Health and Social Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Judgment and Decision Making     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Design and Culture : The Journal of the Design Studies Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Urbanism: International Research on Placemaking and Urban Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
International Review for the Sociology of Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Sociolinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Ethnicities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
City, Culture and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Rural Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Family Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Social Psychology Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Sociology of Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Sociological Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Social Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Emotion Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Urban Research & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Journal of International and Intercultural Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
African and Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
The Sociological Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Studies in Sociology of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Family & Community History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Research in Organizational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Cities in the 21st Century     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
African Identities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Sociological Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Cognition and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Heritage & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
European Societies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Policy History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 15)
American Sociologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Social and Personal Relationships     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Public Relations Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Health Sociology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Comparative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Philosophy & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Historical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Sport in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Symbolic Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Berliner Journal für Soziologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Global Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Communication Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Family Relations     Partially Free   (Followers: 11)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Classical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Environnement Urbain / Urban Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Sojourn: Journal of Social Issues in Southeast Asia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Sociology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Sociological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Sociological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Review of Sociology / Revue Canadienne De Sociologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Advertising & Society Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
East Central Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Canadian Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Cultures & conflits     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal for the Study of Radicalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Studies in Latin American Popular Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Crime, Histoire & Sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Catalyst : A Social Justice Forum     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clio. Femmes, Genre, Histoire - Articles     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Sociologia Ruralis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Metaphor and Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Review of Education, Pedagogy, and Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Teaching Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Sociological Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Anthropologie et Sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Political Power     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Canadian Journal of Sociology / Cahiers canadiens de sociologie     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Caribbean Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
International Review of Sociology: Revue Internationale de Sociologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Sociological Research Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Bronte Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gender and Behaviour     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Race/Ethnicity : Multidisciplinary Global Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Chinese Sociology & Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Sociologie du Travail     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Cross-cultural Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Revista Mexicana de Sociologí­a     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Surveillance and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ateliers d'anthropologie     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Sexuality Research and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Nordic Journal of Migration Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Arabian Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Japanese Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture, and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Contexts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Genre, sexualité & société     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Senses and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Contemporary Pacific     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Cuban Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Critical Horizons     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Sociolinguistic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Critical Realism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Revista de Psicología Social, International Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Canadian Journal of Women and the Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Visitor Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Italian Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Mathematical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Études françaises     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ethnologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Meridians : feminism, race, transnationalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Studia Iranica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Group Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Contributions to Indian Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Aztlan : A Journal of Chicano Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
New Zealand Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Genre & histoire     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Public and Professional Sociology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sociological Spectrum: Mid-South Sociological Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
The Tocqueville Review/La revue Tocqueville     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Historical Pragmatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social Dynamics: A journal of African studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
The Social Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sociologie et sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Contemporary Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Good Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Islamic Law and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Criminologie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Lien social et Politiques     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Recherches féministes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Sociology Mind     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Sustainable Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Enfances, Familles, Générations     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transatlantica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Chrétiens et sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
SociologieS - Articles     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue de la régulation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Seminar : A Journal of Germanic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Landscapes of Violence     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
COnTEXTES     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Política y sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cahiers de l'Urmis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Loisir et Société / Society and Leisure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revue Internationale De Securite Sociale     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Ethnic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Caderno CRH     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Diversité urbaine     Full-text available via subscription  
Ciencia e Cultura     Open Access  
Studies in American Naturalism     Full-text available via subscription  
Southern Cultures     Full-text available via subscription  
Liinc em Revista     Open Access  
World Cultures eJournal     Open Access  
Spaces for Difference: An Interdisciplinary Journal     Open Access  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access  
Tracés     Open Access  
Socio-logos     Open Access  

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Sociological Research Online
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.553
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 8  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1360-7804
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1175 journals]
  • Rethinking Visual Arts–Based Methods of Knowledge Generation and
           Exchange in and beyond the Pandemic

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Helen Lomax, Kate Smith, Barry Percy-Smith
      Pages: 541 - 549
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Volume 27, Issue 3, Page 541-549, September 2022.
      This inaugural special issue of ‘Beyond the Text’ brings together a collection of visual arts (animation, creative and fine art, film, photographs, and zines) produced by children, young people, families, artists, and academics as part of co-created research during the 2020–2021 coronavirus pandemic. Our aim, in making these pieces available in this new publication format, is to illustrate the potential of visual arts as a form of co-creation and knowledge exchange which can transcend the challenges of researching ‘at a distance’, enable participants and co-researchers to share their stories, and support different ways of knowing for academic, policy, and public audiences. This is not to suggest that such methods offer transparent windows into participants’ worlds. As the reflections from the contributing authors consider, visual arts outputs leave room for audience interpretations, making them vulnerable to alternative readings, generating challenges and opportunities about how much it is possible to know about another and what is ethical to share. It is to these issues of ethics, representation, and voice that this special issue attends, reflecting on the possibilities of arts-based approaches for knowledge generation and exchange in and beyond the coronavirus pandemic.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-10-06T02:40:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221098757
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Stories Too Big for a Case File: Unaccompanied Young People Confront the
           Hostile Environment in Pandemic Times

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Aissatou, Evangelia Prokopiou, Lucy Leon, Musharraf Abdullayeva, Mirfat, Osman, Pauline Iyambo, Rachel Rosen, Rebin, Veena Meetoo, Zak
      Pages: 550 - 558
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Volume 27, Issue 3, Page 550-558, September 2022.
      What imagery best evokes the violence unaccompanied child migrants feel when asked, or made, to tell their story over and over, as well as the violence of not being asked nor being heard' How can we show both strength and struggle in difficult times and often uncaring places such as the UK’s hostile migration regime' Taking these questions as a jumping off point, this article offers three key responses, drawing on experiences of co-producing the research-based film, Stories too big for a case file, which accompanies this text. These reflections highlight the importance of participatory, change-oriented research that ‘cares’ for participants; the value of creative forms of knowledge production and aesthetic modes of expression for communicating the affective complexities of research material; and, the importance of turning the representational gaze outwards towards systems and institutions to avoid situating social inequities as individual failings and to, instead, invite viewers to ‘walk together’ in solidarity with research interlocutors.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-10-06T02:40:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804211064914
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Seeing as an Act of Hearing: Making Visible Children’s Experiences of
           the COVID-19 Pandemic Through Participatory Animation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Helen Lomax, Kate Smith
      Pages: 559 - 568
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Volume 27, Issue 3, Page 559-568, September 2022.
      ‘Our Voices’ is an animation co-created with children aged 9–11 during the 2020–2021 global pandemic. A short, stop-start animation of children’s visual, audio and textual representations of their experiences offers a visceral account of the pandemic in England from their perspectives. In making available the animation in this inaugural issue of ‘Beyond the Text’, we have two key aims. The first is to enable children, who have been barely seen and little heard during the pandemic, to voice their experiences in accordance with their aspirations. The second is to reflect upon the process of transforming creative data made by and with children into an animation that is representative of children’s diverse experiences and acknowledges their contributions in ways which enable audiences to engage through ‘seeing’. Accordingly, our accompanying text explores how, through a feminist ethics of care, we sought to co-produce an animation with children which delivers key messages from them and acknowledges their role as co-researchers while maintaining their anonymity. In describing our methodological and ethical practices, we aspire to make visible the relational, dialogic processes inherent in co-production, offering viewers a way of seeing the complexity of children’s experiences through the multi-layered affordances of participatory animation.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-10-06T02:40:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221087276
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Calais Again

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Anas, David Cường Nguyễn, Caitlin Nunn
      Pages: 569 - 573
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Volume 27, Issue 3, Page 569-573, September 2022.
      Calais Again is a digital story recounting a young man, Anas’ experience of returning to France for the first time after migrating to the United Kingdom as a separated asylum-seeking child. Produced using biographical narrative and participatory arts-based research approaches, Calais Again was created as a rare self-authored contribution to Anas’ personal archive of migration documents, and as a resource for communicating the multiple and multi-layered journeys of asylum-seeking young people. In the context of COVID-19, the story additionally highlights how the pandemic is just one of many forces of ontological insecurity and constrained mobility in the lives of young forced migrants. While the project was commenced pre-pandemic, the editing and launch of the digital story took place remotely, presenting ethical, methodological and relational challenges, but also unanticipated affordances. In particular, the spectrum of options for differentiated presence enabled by online events – from anonymous observation to co-presentation – offers unique opportunities for navigating safeguarding and agency for youth researchers.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-10-06T02:40:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804211066115
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • What Do Arts-Based Methods Do' A Story of (What Is) Art and Online
           Research With Children During a Pandemic

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Julie Spray, Hannah Fechtel, Jean Hunleth
      Pages: 574 - 586
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Volume 27, Issue 3, Page 574-586, September 2022.
      This comic draws viewers behind the final product and into the process of arts-based research. Specifically, we focus on research produced over Zoom during the Covid-19 pandemic. Based on a study of asthma caregiving, we illustrate how a 10-year-old study participant, Becca, and researcher Hannah connected in embodied, sensory and material-spatial ways across digital space through the making and unmaking of art forms using simple sensory-sculptural materials (pipe cleaners, play-doh, balloons). We consider what arts-based methods do: for the participant, the researcher, their relationship, and ethical knowledge production. And we show what research processes can look like as unpredictable, messy and patient communing.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-10-06T02:41:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804211055492
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Young People’s Perspectives on the Value and Meaning of Art during
           the Pandemic

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sara Rizzo, Ellie Knox, Naqi Azizi, Isra Sulevani, Charmaine Chia, Marie Leo, Micol Spina, Barry Percy-Smith, Chermaine Tay, Leanne Monchuk, Laurie Day
      Pages: 587 - 603
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Volume 27, Issue 3, Page 587-603, September 2022.
      This contribution draws on the voices and reflections from young people as co-researchers in the Growing-Up Under Covid-19 project – a longitudinal ethnographic action research project to document, share, and respond to impacts of the pandemic on different spheres of young people’s lives. The research was conducted entirely online over 18 months in seven countries and has involved youth-led approaches to research, including video diaries and the use of artefacts and visual material to convey their experiences and support reflection and dialogue across research groups and with external stakeholders. In this contribution, the young co-researchers reflect on their rationale for using different visual media and why this was important for them. They also reflect on the significance of the representations in the visual images and how these images communicate how young people’s understanding of COVID and its impact on young people has changed (or given new meaning to) and how this in turn has given rise to particular responses and opportunities for young people. The article draws on examples of different visual forms selected by young people in Singapore, Italy, Lebanon, and the UK nations, including video, drawing, photography, and crafts. These different media and links to videos were included in the accompanying document. The contribution explores the different narratives and meanings behind the visuals, using the words of young people themselves, interspersed with narration from the adult researchers.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-10-06T02:41:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221105282
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • It’s Our Story: Parents and Carers’ Experiences during the
           Pandemic

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Katie Pybus, Jean McEwan, Kayleigh Garthwaite, Maddy Power, Ruth Patrick, Sydnie Corley
      Pages: 604 - 674
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Volume 27, Issue 3, Page 604-674, September 2022.
      Parents and carers taking part in the Covid Realities research programme came together to create a zine about their experiences during the pandemic, as well as focusing on what needs to change in the future and why. The zine was developed and designed collaboratively by participants and artist Jean McEwan, and supported by the research team, at a series of three virtual zine-making workshops during February and March 2021. The aim of the zine is to directly represent the voices of parents and carers, therefore giving power and expression to those with firsthand experience of living on a low income, who are frequently marginalised in broader policy-making conversations. Making zine pages together in small groups with the chance for conversation and discussion during the workshops also provided a source of social support for contributors. This is especially pertinent in the pandemic context, where it has been harder for people to find social spaces to connect.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-10-06T02:41:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804211066329
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Cocreating with Young Fathers: Producing Community-Informed Training
           Videos to Foster more Inclusive Support Environments

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Laura Way, Anna Tarrant, Linzi Ladlow, Jonah York, Adam Gorzelanczyk, Dylan Brown, Will Patterson
      Pages: 675 - 683
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Volume 27, Issue 3, Page 675-683, September 2022.
      Our contribution draws upon a collaborative project called ‘Diverse Dads’, which ran between October 2020 and April 2021, during the 2020–2021 COVID-19 pandemic. The team comprised members of the North East Young Dads and Lads (NEYDL) Project, advisors from support organisations that champion inclusivity, and the Following Young Fathers Further (FYFF) research team. ‘Diverse Dads’ sought to identify and address gaps in service provision for young minoritised dads in the North East, and to promote cross-sector conversations concerning inclusive support for young dads from diverse communities. With support provided remotely by the FYFF team, peer research was undertaken by three young men from NEYDL. Our work highlights how methods of coproduction and cocreation were achieved during the pandemic. NEYDL is also embarking on an ambitious new digital service journey with partners DigiDAD, producing digital outputs that are made by and for young fathers. Working collaboratively, the peer research team and DigiDAD produced a set of videos designed to support training for professionals in mainstream, family, and statutory services. Showcasing one of these creative outputs, our contribution will discuss the continued value of coproduction and cocreation with young people and using creative, digital methods to support productive discussions between young fathers, professionals, and researchers.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-10-06T02:41:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221090550
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • A Creative Conversation for Re-imagining Creative Visual Methods with
           Children and Young People in Pandemic Times and Beyond

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Amanda M Ptolomey, Elizabeth L Nelson
      Pages: 684 - 689
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Volume 27, Issue 3, Page 684-689, September 2022.
      In this project we forward insights about the importance of being in ‘the room where it happens’ – creating tactility and togetherness in the research encounter – for research with children and young people in times of the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond. Created in response to the intense uptake of digital methods catalysed by COVID-19, in this project we productively re-imagine moments from our creative visual research with children and young people from before the COVID-19 pandemic. This re-imagining began early in 2020 and has continued to evolve, incorporating our shifting perspectives and ‘thinking with’ the scholarship of leading creative methodologists. The creative output is in the form of a ‘Prezine’ which is our concept and is a portmanteau bringing together ‘Prezi’ a presentation tool, and ‘zine’. The Prezine charts our creative conversation, moving between four connected rhizomes of thinking about creative research with children and young people: ‘the room where it happens’, being in the encounter, spaces for the unexpected, and what we are calling ‘methodological alchemy’. The Prezine documents our experiment in thinking about research futures where we openly and creatively explore the process of making this reflective resource about research ‘becomings’.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-10-06T02:41:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221089681
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • ‘. . . staff here are just dropped in the deep end’: The Impact of
           Roles on Communication and Supervisor Support in Youth Custody

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Claire Paterson-Young
      Pages: 745 - 762
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Volume 27, Issue 3, Page 745-762, September 2022.
      Staff experience in youth custody are often categorised by strains, which are affected by communication and support. This research explores the association between staff roles, within a Secure Training Centre in the England, and the levels of communication and support. It enhances our understanding of the challenges faced by staff members working with young people in custodial settings and how levels of communication and support are dictated by staff roles. Through questionnaires (N = 74) and interviews (N = 15) with staff, statistically significant relationship between staff role and levels of communication and support was identified. Through triangulation, this article illustrates the effectiveness of the job demands–resources model in understanding staff experiences with communication and supervisory support in youth custody. It has wide-ranging implications by providing sociologists with an effective model for understanding job satisfaction and stress and by providing policy-makers and organisations delivering custodial services an understanding of the communication and support required to reduce stress and turnover.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-10-06T02:40:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221103608
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Going Public: Performing Dying in the Second Decade of the 21st Century

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Michael Brennan
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      It is now more than a decade since the death of celebrity television personality Jade Goody – a high water mark in public dying comparable to the watershed moment in public mourning marked by the death of Diana, Princess of Wales, a decade or so earlier. As Walter has noted in this journal, Goody’s very public and highly mediated dying will not be the last. With that in mind, this article analyses the sociological significance of public dying in the decade following Goody’s death – the ‘tens’ of the 21st century. It does so chiefly by focusing on a number of high-profile instances which gained significant media traction, using these to examine the ways in which dying is both performed and made meaningful in contemporary 21st century culture. The argument presented operates on the assumption, following Goffman, of life – and by extension, dying – as performance.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-12-01T12:45:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221119812
       
  • The Mode of Reflexive Practice among Young Indonesian Creative Workers in
           the Time of COVID-19

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      Authors: Oki Rahadianto Sutopo, Gregorius Ragil Wibawanto, Ariane Utomo, Annisa R Beta, Novi Kurnia
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines reflexive practice among young creative workers in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, during COVID-19. Since March 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic has unleashed a series of relentless and overlapping crises across the Indonesian archipelago. In urban centres across Indonesia, the arts and creative sectors are among the key economic sectors severely afflicted by the pandemic. COVID-19 implies a lot more than the loss of income and livelihoods. Mobility restrictions, gig cancellations, venue closures, all entail the loss of connections, opportunities, and creative outlets. Yet despite such uncertain conditions, young creative workers remain reflexively creative in order to survive in everyday life. Building upon interviews and focus-group discussions with young creative workers in Yogyakarta, we found three modes of temporality-based reflexive practice: waiting, doing something and re-learning, which represent young creative workers’ active responses manifested in the practical and contradictory relationship to the diverse possibilities within hierarchical and heterogenous cultural fields in a pandemic era characterised by regular ruptures. The analysis of the data below contributes to the literature on reflexivity and habitus among young creative workers in a time of pandemic.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-11-26T06:01:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221115433
       
  • Performances of Legitimate Expertise Among Life Coaches: Three Rhetorical
           Strategies

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      Authors: Tamar Kaneh-Shalit
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      In the global crisis of expertise, experts are often viewed with skepticism. This article zooms in to this crisis to analyze how life coaches seek professional legitimacy and verbally perform their expertise by navigating a tension between asserting their authority and cultivating their clients’ agency. Performances of expertise are a range of verbal practices and rhetorical strategies that are co-produced and shaped through interacting with clients. Based on ethnographic fieldwork conducted at three life coaching training schools in Israel, I show that life coaches perform their expertise through the following strategies: (1) defining the problem that coaching addresses as simple, significant, and mendable; (2) using authoritative charismatic speech to define clients as powerful, independent agents who are their own life experts; and (3) creating reflexive experiences of self-revelation by using semi-intelligible jargon. Finally, the study advances the understanding of expertise as performances inextricable from clients’ sense of agency.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-11-19T04:52:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221128316
       
  • Risk Epistemologies and Aesthetic Reflexivity of a Disaster-Affected
           Community: Findings from Vietnam

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      Authors: Kien Nguyen-Trung
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Scholars and policymakers often use their expert knowledge to define the risk that laypeople face. Nonetheless, they have frequently overlooked how laypeople describe and explain the risks they face on a daily basis. Moreover, an emphasis on individualisation and reflexivity in Western societies has led to little understanding of how a non-Western community constructs its shared risk culture and how this culture associates aesthetic reflexivity and risk epistemologies. The purpose of this research is to fill these gaps by exploring how Vietnamese farmers reflexively define risk in their everyday lives, which in turn informs their risk-taking attitude and action. Drawing on a case study of disaster-prone farmers in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta, this research reveals a distinct set of farmers’ risk epistemologies through a process of hermeneutic reflexivity situated in their risk culture and a shared identity. They do not view risk as wholly negative but rather as an opportunity to attain the aim of surviving and profiting. They see cultivating a risky crop as a collective action of risking their lives, sharing with their community both the challenges and the opportunities that risk might offer. My article makes a case for sociological research into non-Western civilizations, where late modernity and reflexivity might not be accompanied by individualisation but rather with collectivism and tradition.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-11-11T05:00:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221133120
       
  • Mid- and Later Life Cross-Sex Friendships in Minority Ethnic Contexts:
           Insights From Scotland

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      Authors: Shruti Chaudhry
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      This article draws on qualitative research among older adults (50+ years) of South Asian heritage in Scotland to explore what cross-sex friendships reveal about the normative tenor of gender, sexualities, and intimate relationships in minority ethnic contexts. I argue that South Asian cultural norms work against the ‘patterning’ and maintenance of cross-sex friendships. When they do occur, they have to be managed with regard to familial ties and community expectations. The risks are greater for women who must deal with policing of their sexuality even as they age. Such friendships signal social change and agency within the diasporic communities. Yet they require negotiation of gendered and ethnic/cultural scripts and point to the continuing significance of kin and community.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-11-09T07:12:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221123334
       
  • Institutional Gap and Mobility–Immobility Transition: International
           Students’ Study-to-Work Experience in China

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      Authors: Mengwei Tu
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Individuals’ transnational mobility trajectories are shaped by personal life stages and intertwined with migration infrastructure. In the case of international student mobility, graduates may seek to ‘stay put’ in the host country for career mobility. However, this mobility–immobility transition is heavily mediated by regulatory institutions, especially in a relatively new migrant-receiving country like China. This article unpacks the process of study-to-work transitions in China. The preliminary findings from policy analysis and two case studies reveal that institutional gaps in China’s migration infrastructure can manifest in multiple forms, including intransparent information accessibility, administrative barriers, and institutional timeframe clashes. These gaps also have a temporal dimension and can shape graduates’ post-study mobility path as their transnational biographies develop. The human cost of individuals in navigating these gaps thus hinders their socio-economic mobility and entails questions regarding the implication of China’s ‘rise’ as an international student/migration destination.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-11-07T05:02:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221130362
       
  • Young People’s Aspirations in an Uncertain World: Taking Control of
           the Future'

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      Authors: Nicola Ansell, Peggy Froerer, Roy Huijsmans
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      The future for young people worldwide is characterised by multiple uncertainties, particularly perhaps in countries of the Global South. There is a growing and pervasive expectation that these uncertainties need to be responded to, both by institutions and individuals, so that young people are prepared for an unpredictable and changing world. ‘Raising aspirations’ is expected to play an instrumental role in preparing young people to confront a constantly changing world. Of the four articles that constitute this special section, two explore institutional efforts to shape young people’s aspirations to build new kinds of (national and individual) future, while the other two focus on the messier, more fluid ways in which young people reorient themselves in relation to unpredictable events. Together, they highlight how interventions designed to produce flexible creative individuals largely ignore how young people already live their lives in responsive and creative ways.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-11-07T04:33:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221133116
       
  • ‘You Can’t Delete a Memory’: Managing the Data Past on Social Media
           in Everyday Life

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      Authors: Benjamin N Jacobsen
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores how the data past on social media, in the form of packaged ‘memories’, is managed by people in everyday life. Drawing on interview and focus group data, I examine how people make sense of data as ‘memories’ and how these are negotiated and managed when considered painful, awkward, or simply ‘out of place’. As such, the article outlines and discusses three specific ‘tactics’ used to manage the data past in everyday life. First, I explore the use of ‘deletion’ and how it foregrounds ways in which people seek to render certain aspects of their data past invisible, especially memories considered painful or inconsistent with the current view of self. Second, through the tactic of ‘delaying’, the article examines how some participants sought to delay emotional engagements with digital memories rather than to delete them. Finally, the tactic of ‘linking’ highlights the ways in which people sought to make sense of data as memories that were insufficiently contextualised, disjointed, or that felt simply out of place. As such, the article contributes to our understanding of the ways in which people make sense of data as well as some of the complex dynamics inherent in contemporary digital memory work.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-11-07T01:56:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221110237
       
  • A Young Disabled LGBT+ Researchers Group: Working Collaboratively to
           Explore the Lives of Young Autistic LGBT+ Persons

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      Authors: Alex Toft, Beth Ward
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores setting up a research group and outlines how we work together. The goal of the research group is to work collaboratively to conduct research on aspects of life for young disabled LGBT+ people that we think need more research. We hope to outline the aim of the group and what we want to achieve. It will also discuss our research principles and how we have conducted research together. We hope that the article provides insight on how to set up collaborative groups, how to work together, and what such groups can achieve. This article has been written collaboratively and this is reflected throughout.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-10-31T05:15:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221125233
       
  • Book Review: Social Construction and Social Development in Contemporary
           China

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      Authors: Yongjie Li, Muhammad Imran
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-10-28T05:02:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221125480
       
  • Swiping as a Single Mom: A First Look at the Experiences of Single Mothers
           Who Use Tinder

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      Authors: Maria Stoicescu, Cosima Rughiniș
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Single mothers who wish to find new dating partners must contend with a lack of free time and the demands of parenting. As online dating has become a more socially acceptable way to access social, romantic, and sexual opportunities, many single mothers are now considering the use of dating apps to pursue their goals. In this article, we explored the vocabularies of motive of single mothers who used the dating app Tinder. For this purpose, we applied the foundational theory of situated action and vocabularies of motive advanced by Mills, which explains how individuals justify their questioned choices and actions in relation to their identities and social contexts. We based our analysis on seven semi-structured interviews with single mothers and seven published accounts of single mothers’ online dating experiences. We identified four vocabularies of motive: (1) freedom and liberation; (2) entertainment; (3) cultivation of eroticism, intimacy, and a desired identity; and (4) temporal justifications. Based on our results, we determined that Tinder appeals to single mothers because of its popularity, potential for experimentation, and swift temporality, which allows these women to quickly access opportunities and synchronize complicated schedules.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-10-26T01:47:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221117835
       
  • Discourse Formation of Political Dissents via Twitter: Political Sociology
           of the Subversion Discourse in the Islamic Republic of Iran

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      Authors: Arash Beidollahkhani
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Four decades after the Islamic Revolution in Iran and the rise of the Islamic Republic (IR) system, several anti-IR groups have emerged. In the past, the disorganized structure of these groups, their flaws, and dissonance over a common criterion to support or oppose IR and its activities posed some obstacles to their unity. However, over the last decade, they have reached consensus over the subversion of the IR. As a decentralized and disorganized social movement emerging in the wake of 2017 and 2019 protests, this discourse has gained momentum among the political activists, and more people are joining this trend every day, and it is very popular on Persian language social media, especially on Twitter. Loss of faith in the reforms of the IR is one of the issues upon which this discourse movement has reached a general consensus. By exploring and describing the main signifiers of the disorganized subversion discourse in Iran, the article seeks to identify its major characteristics through the qualitative-descriptive analysis of Farsi Twitter content. The research method was the content analysis of Farsi Twitter hashtags of the most popular user accounts belonging to the subversive movement in Iran by extracting the main signifiers and their discourse analysis to examine the main characteristics of the subversion discourse in Iran after 2017.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-10-19T04:37:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221122462
       
  • Lost (and Found) in Translation – Queer
           ‘Wedding-Engagement’ Tactics in Poland

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      Authors: Agata Stasińska
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      In many Western countries, LGBTQ couples experience the ‘after marriage era’, allowing them to cherish their intimate bonds openly and legally. Meanwhile, Poland remains the biggest country in the European Union, refusing legal recognition. Some LGBTQ couples from Poland decide to get married or enter into a civil partnership abroad, which is not recognised by the Polish state. Many invent their own couple rituals to celebrate their relationships. The article critically engages with Western scholarship on queer weddings, commitment ceremonies, and couple rituals, mainly analysed through the polarised notions of subversion versus normativity. In contrast, the present article proposes to go beyond this dichotomy and apply a more tender and nuanced research approach. It maps a broader repertoire of naming, timing, and displaying tactics entangled in the local socio-political and cultural context where these couple rituals are developed. The article argues that these tactics are developed not only regardless of lack of legal recognition, but also that the socio-political context deeply influences how these rituals are shaped. It also demonstrates how notions of authenticity and agency transgress the dichotomy between subversion versus normativity often applied in analysing such rituals. The article concludes by sharing research implications and future paths for research on queer couple rituals. The article draws on 53 individual in-depth narrative interviews and a monthly ethnographic study conducted with 21 non-heterosexual families done within the Families of Choice in Poland research project.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-10-14T12:32:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221122461
       
  • Getting Under the Skin Trade: Towards a Global Sociology of
           Skin-Lightening Practices

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      Authors: Steve Garner, Somia Bibi
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Skin lightening cuts across multiple and intersecting areas of interest to sociologists. These include consumerism, capital, the body, femininities, masculinities, the power of the media in shaping people’s imaginations, constructions of beauty, and racialised and gendered social relations and representations, with the legacies of colonial pasts playing out in the present. Here, we set out some key themes, patterns, and frames observed in the multidisciplinary work published on skin lightening, and advocate for the addition of other frames for strategic reasons, which we argue in the second half of the article. Foucault’s technologies of self is recommended as a platform for critiquing individualism and the framing of choice; a political economy approach would help establish that skin lightening is a global business and grasp industry-wide patterns. Finally, a shift to looking at discourse and counter-discourse would reframe women as active agents in cultural resistance and change, and not just the relatively passive dupes of the colonial legacy. We thus map out a broad research agenda that would transform skin lightening into an object of broad, sustained sociological research.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-10-14T12:30:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221104494
       
  • Class Identification, Deferred Elimination, and Social Reproduction in
           Education: ‘Ontological Ambivalences’ Experienced by Working-Class
           Students at Elite Universities in China

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      Authors: Jin Jin
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      China’s transition from a redistributive economy to a market economy has created an evolving and intensifying social class structure that requires a class perspective and class analysis tools to capture reconfigured social relations and new patterns of social inequalities. Drawing on a three-year life-story study of working-class students at elite universities in China and working with Bourdieu’s theoretical tools, this article highlights the emotional costs of class mobility and two associated forms of ‘ontological ambivalences’. The findings show ‘mundane reflexivity’ in class struggles against classifications but more importantly, demonstrate the symbolic violence involved therein and indicate the difficulties of individual agency to achieve politically effective resistances. Although based on the specific context of China, this article contributes to reflections on neoliberal policies elsewhere by shedding light on how neoliberalism relates to and enhances class struggles and the significance of adopting a relational class perspective to understand and address social inequalities.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-09-22T04:32:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221104491
       
  • Data Protection in Sociological Health Research: A Critical Narrative
           about the Challenges of a New Regulatory Landscape

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      Authors: Hélder Raposo, Sara Melo, Catarina Egreja
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      The recent implementation of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) establishes a set of formal requirements that reinforce personal data protection, namely, those concerning the collection, treatment, and dissemination of data on research participants. With the application of this new legal provision at the European level, new types of restrictions are emerging, whose nature and reach intensify the tension between demands for privacy and scientific freedom in research. In this article, we take as a reference an ongoing research taking place in Portugal, in the field of Sociology of Health, concerning the consumption of medicines by professionals exposed to high-performance pressure. Our main objective is to identify and analyse the implications of regulatory challenges faced in the research process and how the researchers managed and overcame them. We present a critical narrative that sheds light on the nature of the choices taken while also assessing the practical implications for the operationalisation of the research. We conclude by noting that, despite the benefits that may flow from the application of GDPR, the new requirements regarding the protection of personal data may override the ethical principles of scientific research and strengthen regulatory restrictions on conducting research. In the research concerned, the significant practical implications were indirect access to participants, a more time-consuming process in terms of participant adherence and a temporal discrepancy between the different stages of recruitment.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-09-17T05:13:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221107676
       
  • Book Review: The Human Network: How We’re Connected and Why It
           Matters

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      Authors: Nupur Pattanaik
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-08-29T08:23:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221115742
       
  • Looking Within: A Call for Greater Reflexivity in Expatriate Research

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      Authors: Alexandra Ridgway, Kate Lowe
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Self-examinations of researcher positionality are central to understanding how scholars engage with research populations and vice versa. Discussions of how researchers are positioned are considered particularly important when studying groups whose vulnerability is well-accepted. Less is known, however, about the role of researcher positionality when interviewing participants deemed privileged, such as expatriates. Researchers who study expatriates overwhelmingly omit to discuss their positionality and how this shaped their research processes and outcomes. In response, our article calls for a turn in expatriate scholarship towards greater, and more public, examinations of researchers’ social locations and their effects. Drawing upon our research experiences in Hong Kong, we explore the complexities of conducting reflective practice when investigating expatriate life and highlight an over-reliance on the field to trigger considerations of positionality. In response, we suggest that expatriate researchers should be more proactive in their reflexivity and offer some prompts for these self-assessments. Beyond this, we advocate for more conducive research environments, including systems of peer support, to enable expatriate researchers to deepen understandings of their own positionalities while also holding each other reflexively accountable. These suggestions also hold potential benefit for other sociologists such as those studying elite populations and/or the globally mobile.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-08-20T05:07:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221107677
       
  • Kelly Needs a New Coat: Views on Compensating Altruistic Surrogacy in
           Aotearoa New Zealand

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      Authors: Rhonda M Shaw, Hannah Gibson
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      There is little research documenting the experience of surrogate mothers in Aotearoa New Zealand, and no published studies to date have asked surrogates about the significance of financial benefit or compensation for their moral decision-making. In this article, we draw on qualitative data from in-depth interviews with 20 traditional and gestational surrogates, 20 intended parents, and 46 experts in the field of assisted reproduction about their views and experiences of surrogacy both within the national boundaries of the New Zealand fertility clinic setting and offshore. While altruistic procurement of reproductive materials and services is legally mandated in New Zealand, compensation and payment is prohibited. To support our analysis, we draw on the concept of bio-intimacy to discuss the production and management of relational work involved in altruistic surrogacy arrangements. We conclude that the economic circumstances for surrogates, where compensation for direct and indirect costs is absent or insufficient, need to be reconsidered.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-08-10T04:53:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221104492
       
  • Redistributive State in Iran, Fiscal Sociology, and the Attitude of Two
           Generations of Students Toward State Revenue and Expending

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      Authors: Hamzeh Nozari
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      The Iranian state is the state of redistribution of oil and gas resources by a wide bureaucracy. Inequitable redistribution of resources and bureaucratic corruption have caused drastic movements in Iran over the past decade and raised the issue of public attitudes toward state funding and spending. Although previous studies in the literature have extensively addressed the rentier Iranian government, the issue of the public attitudes toward redistribution has been largely neglected. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the attitudes of two generations of students toward state financing and expenditure practices in Iran. The data were collected by conducting two surveys in 2003 and 2016. The findings demonstrated that from the perspective of Iranian students, economic corruption is the most important factor leading to economic crisis.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-08-06T04:25:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221102963
       
  • Book Review: The Integration of the Second Generation in Germany: Results
           

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      Authors: Titas Biswas
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-08-06T04:24:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221106202
       
  • Public Demand for State Support in the Post-Communist Welfare State: The
           Case of Russia

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      Authors: Vasiliy A Anikin, Yulia P Lezhnina, Svetlana V Mareeva, Ekaterina D Slobodenyuk
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      This study explores the roots and details of the Russian population’s demand for broad state interventions in three areas: labour market, social investment, and material support. Demands in labour market policy are the most frequent among the Russian population and stem from the need to eliminate inequalities in access to ‘good’ jobs and ensure fair remuneration of skilled labour. In Russia, unlike in Europe, needs in social investment policy do not stem from individualistic interests and the imperative to compensate for market failure. Instead, they result from state failure, leading in particular to growing inequality of life chances in healthcare and worsening health of the broader society. These impacts are perceived as a fundamental adverse effect of unsuccessful social policy changes, and this type of demand for state support is growing alongside household income. At the same time, wealthy Russians also hardly believe in state efficiency in the labour market, show less demand for employment policy interventions, and generally prefer ‘state escapism’. The study argues that an individualistic mindset per se is a cornerstone of the absence of request for state support in any form. These findings support the concept of bottom-up sociocultural modernisation while helping explain state escapism in post-communist welfare regimes. In general, the study provides empirical contributions to the literature on diversity of statist expectations in post-communist welfare regimes.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-07-28T04:27:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221091572
       
  • Loners, Criminals, Mothers: The Gendered Misrecognition of Refugees in the
           British Tabloid News Media

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      Authors: Hannah Ryan, Katie Tonkiss
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Misrecognition has been conceptualised as an act of recognition that is ‘distorted’ or ‘incomplete’, and can be used to capture the differentiated experience of social and/or political phenomena by different individuals. In this article, we apply the concept of misrecognition to the visual representation of refugees in the British tabloid news media. The article presents a novel two-step analysis which combines visual analysis of a representative sample of British tabloid newspaper coverage of refugees with an analysis of a representative sample of this coverage by two focus groups of tabloid newspaper readers. In taking this approach, we capture the role of audiences in constructing the meanings of the images, a perspective largely absent from the literature to date. The findings show that a gendered misrecognition shapes the visual construction of refugees by this media and its audience, with women more likely to be recognised as refugees and (mis)recognised as vulnerable mothers, and men more likely to be misrecognised as loners and criminals and less likely to be recognised as refugees. Reflecting on the findings, we argue that misrecognition is a critical concept in understanding the politics of marginalisation constructed by the tabloid news media.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T06:33:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221100555
       
  • Chinese Square-Dancing: A Description of Group Cultural Life

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      Authors: Jun Yang, Tianli Qin
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      In recent years, square-dancing has produced a widespread social influence in China and has led to the emergence of a new type of ‘cultural life’. This article focuses on the emergence and significance of Chinese square-dancing as group cultural life. Square-dancing is a kind of public fitness activity with both fitness and spirit-enriching functions. It is an important carrier of social communication. Individuals enter the square space through ‘guanxi (relationship and connections with others)-seeking’ and spontaneous interest. Through role stratification and interactions among small groups, ‘dance teachers’ – ‘backbone members’ – ‘ordinary members’ interactive circle community life is formed inside the square-dancing group. This group activity, on one hand, awakens the memory of the individual’s collective life and realizes the inheritance of the collective culture; on the other hand, it realizes the reconstruction of collective ritual through the form of group performance.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-06-10T06:36:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221096687
       
  • The Extent of Résumé Whitening

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      Authors: Didier Ruedin, Eva Van Belle
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Persistent hiring discrimination as demonstrated by correspondence experiments incites immigrant job candidates and their descendants to modify their résumé to hide their immigrant status, that is, résumé whitening. To date, we have little to no empirical evidence on how common this is in practice. We test the extent of résumé whitening with a representative survey of immigrants in Switzerland (N = 7659). Around 9% of the immigrants used some résumé whitening. Immigrants appear to use résumé whitening strategically when experiencing or anticipating discrimination. Future correspondence experiments should take this into account to maximize external validity.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-06-09T08:45:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221094625
       
  • Racialization within Antitrafficking Interventions Targeting Migrant Sex
           Workers: Findings from the SEXHUM Research Project in France

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      Authors: Calogero Giametta, Nicola Mai, Jennifer Musto, Calum Bennachie, Anne E Fehrenbacher, Heidi Hoefinger, PG Macioti
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      This article draws on the findings of the research project Sexual Humanitarianism: Migration, Sex Work, and Trafficking (SEXHUM), a study investigating migration, sex work, and human trafficking in Australia, France, New Zealand, and the US. In this article, we focus on how racialized categories are mobilized in antitrafficking practices in France. Since April 2016, the French government has enforced a prohibitionist and neo-abolitionist law criminalizing the demand for sexual services. This coincided with the targeting of Chinese and Nigerian cis-women and with the neglect of Latina trans women working in the sex industry according to racialized and sex-gendered understandings of victimhood. Whereas Chinese women tend to be presented by humanitarian rhetoric as silent victims of Chinese male-dominated mafias, Nigerian women have come to embody the ultimate figure of the victim of trafficking by an overpowering Black male criminality. Meanwhile, (sexual) humanitarian actors have neglected Latina trans women’s ongoing experiences of extreme violence and marginalization.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T10:29:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221090354
       
  • Youth Shifting Identities, Moving Aspirations, Changing Social Norms, and
           Positive Uncertainty in Ethiopia and Nepal

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      Authors: Vicky Johnson, Andy West
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores uncertainty and aspiration in the everyday lives of marginalised youth in fragile and conflict-affected areas of Ethiopia and Nepal. The concept referred to as ‘positive uncertainty’ was developed through analysis of 300 qualitative case-study interviews with marginalised young people (15–25 years) across rural and urban research sites as part of the Youth Uncertainty Rights (YOUR) World Research (2016–2019). Six exemplary cases illustrate youth creativity in the face of uncertainty. Drawing on Bauman’s theories of community, insecurity, and liquid modernity, the research investigated how youth lived with uncertainty in domains of their everyday lives: how youth felt about their relationships with peers and families and how these relationships were influenced by highly gendered social norms and intersecting aspects of marginalisation in communities. Analysis revealed that youth demonstrate creativity as they navigate uncertainty, negotiate intergenerational power dynamics, and shift their aspirations as they strive to meet adult expectations in contexts of growing unemployment, environmental fragility, and political change across both countries. The analysis of marginalised youth responses to uncertainty, relationships, and norms in fragile environments presented goes beyond the application of Bauman’s theories to identify ‘positive uncertainty’ and further extends understandings of the role of uncertainty in navigating intergenerational relationships.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T01:17:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221087754
       
  • Resistance to Change: Intergenerational Class Mobility in Hungary,
           1973–2018

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      Authors: Ákos Huszár, Ágnes Győri, Karolina Balogh
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this study is to describe long-term changes in intergenerational social mobility in Hungary between 1973 and 2018 and to provide an overview of the current situation that has not been examined previously. Our main questions are whether trends of the earlier periods continued and whether previous gender differences persisted at the end of the 2010s. According to our results total mobility continued to decline and it hit its lowest point in decades at the end of the 2010s. In addition, decreasing proportion of the population move upwards compared with their fathers and an increasing proportion experience the deterioration of their social position. While earlier research found that structural changes in society triggered upward mobility the polarising class structure after 1990 set into motion contrary trends. In this period, structural mobility increasingly typically meant downward mobility. As regards relative mobility chances associated with working in high and low occupational positions, we concluded that the ceiling seems to be stickier than the floor as a rule, that is, the role of origin is more decisive in keeping a favourable social position than in the transmission of a disadvantaged position across generations. The odds for someone born into unfavourable circumstances to rise are greater than for those of someone who was brought up in privileged circumstances to slide down.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T01:16:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221084727
       
  • Work-Related Practices: An Analysis of Their Effect on the Emergence of
           Stable Practices in Daily Activity Schedules

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      Authors: Máté János Lőrincz, José Luis Ramírez-Mendiola, Jacopo Torriti
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Despite its ‘wordless’ and hidden characteristics, it is within the everyday tasks, routines, and rhythms that consumption takes place, from getting up every morning, having breakfast, going to work or school, having lunch, going home, having dinner, reading a book, surfing the Internet, watching TV, and probably doing similar things again and again. This study examines this routinized daily use of time of employed individuals based on the 2014–2015 UK Time-Use Survey data. In doing this, we focus on individual’s day-to-day activities and how they are routinized or how they are formed into stabilized practices. Starting from the definition of stable practices, we apply a relatively new method of social network analysis to visualize stable practices during workdays. We then analyse the cohesion between practices based on work hours and connections and coordination between practices. Our results suggest that work arrangements create stable practices that by themselves are stone pillars of daily routines. This implies that the removal (or ‘unlocking’) of stable practices during these time periods could produce some – albeit marginal – decongestion of routinized activities.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T01:15:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221084344
       
  • ‘. . . It Makes Me Want to Shut Down, Cover Up’: Female Bartenders’
           Use of Emotional Labour While Receiving Unwanted Sexual Attention at a
           Public House

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      Authors: James Frederick Green
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      This article seeks to provide a detailed account of emotional labour adopted by female bartenders when faced with unwanted sexual attention at work. In the field, I implemented an ethnographic research design and maximised opportunities for data collection through the use of interviews with eight participants and participant observations while employed at the same venue. Drawing on previous theoretical thought, the data gathered will outline the learnt, and most common, forms of display rules barstaff demonstrate while engaging with unwanted interactions, and, from the viewpoint of the female barstaff, the expected display rules envisioned by some male customers. I also detail the collapse of display rules during some unwanted scenarios (e.g. infrequent) and the inevitable impact of implementing emotional labour under the duress of unwanted encounters–emotional dissonance and burnout. I conclude with a suggestion that there is a potential for a multitude of display rules that are adopted by barstaff dependent on the customer interaction (e.g. aggressive, sickness due to intoxication) in a public house.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-05-28T06:28:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221091573
       
  • Ageing in Place Over Time: The Making and Unmaking of Home

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      Authors: Ruth Webber, Vanessa May, Camilla Lewis
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      ‘Ageing in place’ is a key component of UK policy, aimed at supporting older people to remain living in their own homes and communities for as long as possible. Although wide-ranging, the scholarly literature in this field has not sufficiently examined the interconnections between ageing in place and the changing experience of ‘home’ over time. This article addresses this gap in a novel way by bringing together qualitative secondary analysis of longitudinal data with critical literature on ‘home’ and Mason’s cutting-edge concept of ‘affinities’ to understand the multi-dimensionality of home in relation to ageing in place. The article makes significant methodological, empirical, and theoretical contributions to the field of scholarship on home, by demonstrating how homes are made and unmade over time. Discussions of home emerged organically in the longitudinal data that focused on people’s travel and transport use, allowing our qualitative secondary analysis approach to look anew at how experiences of home are dynamically shaped by people’s potent connections inside and outside the dwelling. Presenting an empirical analysis of four case studies, the article suggests that future discussions in the field of ageing in place should pay closer attention to the factors that shape experiences of the un/making of home over time, such as how deteriorating physical and mental health can shape how people experience their dwelling and neighbourhood as well as their relationships across these settings.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T09:59:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221089351
       
  • How the First COVID-19 Lockdown Worsened Younger Generations’ Mental
           Health: Insights from Network Theory

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      Authors: Mattia Vacchiano
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Two years after the first wave of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), one fact seems to be emerging clearly: lockdowns affect mental health differently across generations. This article uses data collected before and after the first wave of COVID-19 on a sample of 5,859 respondents, showing that the first lockdown worsened the mental health of the younger generations (Gen Y and Gen Z) in particular. Given that the older generations are considered the most vulnerable in this global pandemic, this may seem surprising. However, our data reveal that the pandemic outbreak raised very different concerns in different generations. While older people appear to be worried about the economy and their own health, younger people were more concerned about their lifestyles and, generally, their social relationships. This suggests that some of the mechanisms behind the exacerbation of younger people’s mental health may lie at the intersection of these two issues. On one hand, a life lived essentially online undermines all those processes of social capital activation that occur through leisure and face-to-face encounters, from which Gen Z may have suffered in particular. On the other hand, not only has the pandemic added further uncertainty to Generation Y’s career paths but working from home has also forced them to reorganize family routines and construct entirely new ones with colleagues using computers and smartphones. The article reflects on the upheavals of work and leisure to foster research on networks, social capital, and mental health in this period of a continuing pandemic.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-05-17T05:40:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221084723
       
  • Exploring the Promise and Limitations of Autonomous Online Timelines to
           Understand Experiences of the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Jaime Garcia-Iglesias, Nigel Lloyd, Imogen Freethy, Nigel Smeeton, Amander Wellings, Julia Jones, Wendy Wills, Katherine Brown
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      This article discusses the use of autonomous, asynchronous, timelines to analyse personal and organizational experiences of COVID-19 using an online platform, LucidSpark. We evaluate the benefits and limitations of this approach and highlight findings in three areas: aesthetics, the balance of personal and organizational information, and the identification of key events. We argue that timelines generate fascinating data about participants’ personal and professional experiences of COVID-19. Then, we discuss the limitations of the data, and suggest how the method may be refined and used in combination with other approaches. By themselves, timelines provide limited data about how events relate to each other. Instead, timelines serve as useful pre-interview activities that should be combined with additional methods.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-05-17T05:40:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221084341
       
  • Cultural Omnivorousness and Status Inconsistency in Chile: The Role of
           Objective and Subjective Social Status

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      Authors: Francisco Olivos, Peng Wang
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Sociological research has long suggested that cultural participation is socially stratified. We build on this literature to discuss the role of the subjective and objective dimensions of stratification and how they are linked to practices of social distinction through cultural consumption. The aim of this study is to understand (1) the effect of subjective and objective social status on patterns of cultural participation and (2) the implications of the status inconsistency. We use a probabilistic and representative sample of the Chilean urban population older than the age of 18. Latent class analyses show that a significant proportion of Chileans can be considered cultural omnivores. Multinomial diagonal reference models suggest that omnivorousness is positively predicted by subjective and objective social status. Moreover, regarding inconsistency, objective social status is prominent in the explanation of omnivorousness for both status-underestimating and status-overestimating individuals. These findings provide important insights for discussing the implications of status inconsistency on cultural consumption.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-04-11T07:13:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221078023
       
  • On the Discrepancy of Descriptive Facts and Normative Values in
           Perceptions of Occupational Prestige

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      Authors: Ylva Ulfsdotter Eriksson, Erica Nordlander
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Previous research has argued that occupational prestige is a social fact founded in the collective conscience and prestige perceptions morally grounded. Ideas of strong consensus in perceptions rest on comparisons of compressed mean values, and the similarity between what prestige an occupation has and what it ought to have has not previously been empirically explored. Drawing on survey data and a discrepancy index, the present study explores the resemblance between descriptive facts and normative values in perceptions of occupational prestige and consensus and discrepancies in prestige perceptions. The analysis showed discrepancies in descriptive and normative prestige perceptions for welfare and cultural occupations. The differences in perceptions can be explained by sex, beliefs about what factors give prestige to an occupation, and the prestige of one’s occupation.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-03-28T07:00:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221075357
       
  • Shifting Narratives of the Self – Students’ Experiences of Chronicity
           and Multiplicity in the Management of Chronic Illness at University

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      Authors: Grace Spencer, Kathryn Almack
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing on the chronic illness scholarship and identity theories, this article aims to deepen the understanding of the biographical disruptions experienced by undergraduate students living with a long-term health condition. Data are drawn from in-depth interviews with six undergraduate (female) students attending university in England. The analysis highlights the ways chronicity and multiplicity come together to shape students’ health and social identities. The findings reveal three narratives of the Self: the ill Self, the determined Self, and the authentic Self. These distinct, yet interconnected, narratives highlight the complex shifts in the Self as students sought ways to ‘push through’ multiple (academic, health, social) pressures. Maintaining academic and social engagement met with significant challenge, ultimately shaping the emotional and social lives of these students. The article offers a novel contribution to how undergraduate students navigate multiple identities in the face of ongoing illness.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-03-17T02:46:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221078028
       
  • Do Different Types of Households Use Outsourced Domestic Cleaning Services
           for Different Reasons' An Explorative Study in South Africa

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      Authors: David Du Toit
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      In recent years, many households have shifted from employing a full-time or part-time domestic worker to using an outsourced domestic cleaning services company that specialises in professional household cleaning services. Few studies have focused on outsourced domestic cleaning services from clients’ perspectives. While there is limited research on the topic, a possible reason for the increase in outsourced domestic cleaning services might be that the domestic labour needs of the middle-class are changing. The decline in the stigma of voluntary childlessness and better educational and career opportunities for women have impacted household compositions. There has been a rise in one-person households and couples without children. These changes affect how domestic work is approached. Some women continue to perform domestic labour themselves, while others employ domestic workers or use outsourced domestic cleaning services. Against this background, this study sought to establish how changes in household compositions are linked to peoples’ preferences to use outsourced domestic cleaning services to take care of their domestic cleaning needs rather than employing a domestic worker on a full-time or part-time basis. This study draws on 18 qualitative interviews with clients of domestic cleaning services and shows that people who live alone, as a childless couple or in an empty-nest household, use outsourced domestic cleaning services for their convenience, efficiency, and flexibility. Couples with children tend to rely on personal help when it comes to care work but outsource less emotional domestic duties to domestic cleaning service companies. This study contributes to new insights by showing that domestic cleaning services are used by households who can afford and require flexible cleaning services offered by outsourced domestic cleaning services.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-03-10T06:04:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221075644
       
  • The Gambling Act 2005 and the (De)regulation of Commercial Gambling in
           Britain: A State-Corporate Harm

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      Authors: James Banks, Jaime Waters
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the forms of harmful practices and harms experienced by individuals since the implementation of the Gambling Act 2005. Employing the state-corporate crime paradigm as an analytical lens through which to examine the narratives of individuals who gamble and affected family members, and supporting secondary sources, it illustrates the ‘collateral damage’ that has resulted from an industry that embeds harmful practices as a means of capital accumulation. By providing insight into the often-hidden array of economic, physical, emotional, and psychological, and cultural harms that result from the entrenchment of a leisure culture that institutes ever more potent forms of aleatory consumption, the article offers a rare sociological critique of an industry that has been able to flourish as a consequence of an alliance between state and business.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-03-09T05:41:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804211072263
       
  • ‘They are Alone in Their Parenthood’: Parenting Support and
           (Re)building Community

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      Authors: Ella Sihvonen
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      This article uniquely contributes to critical discussions about parenting support in contemporary social science research that has examined the recent political and public attention on parenting. The studies highlight the increased attention on individualised parenting support focused on the parent–child relationship. Based on an analysis of 310 family support projects initiated in Finland, this research found that another orientation exists alongside individualised parenting support, which has gained only little attention in recent studies about parenting support. That alternative focuses on a communal parenting support, wherein parenting support is conducted by means of community (re)building. This article summarises how anxiety about parenting overlaps with discussions about community as well as ‘the family decline’, creating a need for community (re)building. In this study, I show how concern within family support projects is harnessed to establish ‘communion’, representing a third category alongside the more common sociological notions of ‘society’ and ‘community’. However, fundamental tensions appear as projects attempt to build community, which I also discuss in this article.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-02-22T01:14:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221075358
       
  • The Preston Model: Economic Democracy, Cooperation, and Paradoxes in
           Organisational and Social Identification

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      Authors: Ioannis Prinos, Julian Manley
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      The ‘Preston Model’ (PM) has substantially improved the socio-economic outlook of Preston (UK). It is a community wealth-building approach, harnessing local economic power for a more resilient, environmentally sustainable, democratic economy and socially cohesive community, prioritising social value, through private and public sector partnerships. This qualitative research article investigates how people in local ‘anchor institutions’ (major wealth creators and employers ‘anchored’ in Preston) perceive the PM. Focusing on economic democracy and solidarity, and building on organisational and social identity theory, its relation with democratic participation, organisational identification and pride processes enabling social change is examined. Most interviewees doubt its organisational and local impact; nevertheless, they exhibit a sense of pride as its ‘drivers’, attributing to it ‘higher’ ethical values. While the PM exerts a subtle emotional, aspirational, and socio-cultural influence, it still represents a shifting, alternative socio-economic paradigm, emerging through both individual and collective assent, rather than specific policy directives.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-02-08T08:05:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804211069398
       
  • Solo-Living and Social Individualization: Analysis of Life Experience
           among Young Women in Spain

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      Authors: Carmen Rodríguez-Guzmán, Francisco Barros-Rodríguez, Inmaculada Barroso-Benítez, Antonio David Cámara-Hueso
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      The increase in one-person households is regarded as a manifestation of the process of social individualization that strengthens individuals’ ability to make lifestyle choices to the detriment of certain social institutions. However, the background circumstances to solo living can vary widely and often stem from structural determinants, such as gender inequalities, within the framework of a highly competitive society. This article analyses the nature and social significance of solo-living in Spain through a case study of young adult women (25–45 years of age) residing in an urban environment (Barcelona and Jaen). The analyses focus on aspects connected with the theory of social individualization (e.g. the demands of working life and expectations regarding life partners, motherhood and social relations). Four different profiles of women can be distinguished in the results: ‘cosmopolitans’, ‘unconditionals’, ‘empowered’, and ‘temporaries’. In broad terms, the interviewees’ narratives bear witness to the process of individualization (self-realization with which to engage in a personal life project), although tensions come into play between personal expectations and the demands of working life, especially in the spheres of sexual partnership and motherhood.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-02-06T03:57:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804211069401
       
  • Coaching and ‘Self-repair’: Examining the ‘Artful Practices’ of
           Coaching Work

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      Authors: Charles L T Corsby, Robyn L Jones, Gethin Ll Thomas, Christian N Edwards
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      The significance of this article lies in examining how sports coaches construct and negotiate their professional sense making; what Goffman described as the practices engaged in to manage ‘ugly’ interpretations. Using the work of Garfinkel and Goffman, the article pays attention to coaches’ ‘ethno-methods’; that is, the background knowledge and practical competency employed in forming and maintaining social order. In doing so, the explanatory accounts of Christian, a coach and author who supported the co-construction of this work, were collected via recorded interviews over the course of a 3-month period during a competitive season. The analysis explores the procedures used to ‘achieve coherence’ in what he did. The analysis employed Garfinkel’s description of ‘artful practices’ and related concepts of ‘self repair’ to demonstrate the fundamental interactional ‘work’ done by Christian, not only to understand why he did what he did, but also how he would ‘get things done’ in future. Such analysis highlights the mundane routines of coaching in particular, and work settings in general, to reveal the backstage manufacturing individuals ‘do’ to maintain a sense of ‘practical objectivity’ to their continual inferences, judgements, and justifications of practice.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-02-02T11:41:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804211064911
       
  • The Cutaway to the Toilet: Towards a Visual Grammar of Spatial Stigma in
           Factual Welfare Television

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      Authors: Jayne Raisborough, Lisa Taylor, Katherine Harrison, Shelly Dulson
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Editing techniques used in Factual Welfare Television (FWT) in the UK undermine narratives of hardship and structural inequality in representations of the living places of welfare claimants. This research identifies the affects of a televisual syntax – or ‘visual grammar’ – of spatial stigma in FWT. Using original data generated in a study of Channel 5’s documentary series On Benefits (2015–2019), we conduct a visual grammar analysis to argue that cutaway editing, which inserts camera shots of toilets, canine excrement, and fly-tipping into programmes, undermines potentially sympathetic representations of poverty communicated via narrator voiceovers, and/or verbal testimonies of participants. Our findings show that cutaway editing is a significant feature in the production of On Benefits and is oppositional to the articulated narrative. The research concludes that cutaway editing in FWT generates disgust towards the living places of benefits claimants, which is productive of a powerful visual grammar of spatial stigma.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-01-28T03:08:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804211066118
       
  • Furry Families: Ethical Entanglements Through More-than-Human Domestic
           Dramas

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      Authors: Janet Sayers, Rachel Forrest, Maria Pearson
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Companion animals (CA) are seen as part of the family by their human guardians. However, guardians’ intense attitudes towards CA can lead to tensions with larger society. Recent scholarship has argued for more critical work exploring interspecies family relations. The present research is framed by previous scholarship exploring CA family relations and the role that storytelling about animals plays in developing ethical relations with animals. We examine 369 stories told by guardians of companion animals as part of a One Welfare study examining attitudes to companion animal welfare. Our analytical frame was a genre discourse approach sensitive to questions of animal ethics. Our theoretical contribution is to contribute a new sub-genre of domestic drama, more-than-human domestic drama. We explore the implications of this genre of family stories and why it matters beyond families to wider society.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-01-28T03:08:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804211064913
       
  • Book Review: Radical Secrecy: The Ends of Transparency in Datafied America

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      Authors: Kevin Walby
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-01-28T03:07:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804211066116
       
  • ‘Go Home, Get a Job, and Pay Some Taxes to Replace a Bit of What
           You’ve Wasted’: Stigma Power and Solidarity in Response to
           Anti-Open-Cast Mining Activism in the Coalfields of Rural County Durham,
           UK

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      Authors: Andrea Brock, Carol Stephenson, Nathan Stephens-Griffin, Tanya Wyatt
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the nexus of stigmatisation and environmental activism in the Campaign to Protect Pont Valley against open-cast mining in the northeast of England. Drawing on Imogen Tyler’s work, our analysis examines stigma power as embedded in wider efforts to police and repress environmental dissent and defend core neoliberal values. Examination of qualitative interviews with campaigners, drive-past insults shouted at activists, online police statements and public responses, and online trolling of activists by mining employees and the wider public reveals stigmatisation to be a process of power, informed by neoliberal ideologies (of the threat and danger of worklessness), and reproduced through neoliberal power structures (the state, corporate power, and popular culture), shaped by the insecurities that are specific to social and political contexts. We show how the state mobilises stigma through ideologies associated with austerity and the hostile environment to delegitimate activism through association with worklessness/idleness and the inaccurate representation of activists as part of broader processes of criminalisation, policing, and management of protest. In an area renowned for its work ethic and high levels of unemployment, the work of environmental activists is dismissed as illegitimate, drawing on tropes associated with the disciplining of the so-called deviant working classes. The historical importance of coal and activism in the defence of the ‘mining way of life’ feeds into dominant narratives associated with work and individualism. Pride associated with coal mining is reconfigured and forms the basis of insults against those (working class and otherwise) who are recast as ‘outsiders’, ‘wasting time and money’ in resisting environmental destruction. Finally, we examine how activists were able to largely deflect stigmatisation through collective engagement, solidarity, and political analysis of the process they were subject to.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-01-28T03:07:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804211055486
       
  • ‘They Wouldn’t Mind Pushing People Off the Bus’: Exploring Power in
           Practice Theory through the Work of Simultaneous Interpreters

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      Authors: Deborah Giustini
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Based on a qualitative interview dataset, this article highlights the power relations in the work experiences of UK-based professional simultaneous interpreters, who provide valuable communication services to users but are constrained by the ‘invisible labour’ arrangements of their job. Adopting a practice theory approach, this study extends available theorisations of power as an effect manifested in performance, by articulating a view of power suffusing from the wider organisation of practices – meanings, competencies, and materialities – which governs social order. By making professional rewards conditional on collaborative engagement with other interpreters, the hiding of failure, and unobtrusive behaviours, the practice of interpreting translates power as the struggle to assert individual visibility. The study contributes to the sociological debate by offering an understanding of power shaped by the situated, practical order of everyday action.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T10:39:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804211055489
       
  • Adult Children Move Out: Family Meals and Reflections on Parental
           Self-sacrifice at the Moment of Transition

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      Authors: Dorota Rancew-Sikora, Marta Skowrońska
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the differentiation and change in the shared eating practices of parents and their adult children, linking theories of sacrifice with empirical research. Drawing on 26 qualitative, in-depth dyadic interviews, the authors analyse the transformation of expectations sensed by the parents before and after their adult children leave home. While the article confirms the significance of meals for family relationships, it further develops the findings in transition to the empty nest phase of family life. First, it examines the understanding of different aspects and distribution of everyday sacrificing in an intergenerational family, as well as the dynamics introduced by the life course transition connected with adult children moving out. Second, it analyses how this transition carries in consequence a transformation in the food-related practices of the parents of adult children, who tend to pay less attention to the quality, variety, and regularity of their dinners once their children have moved out. Third, it explores children’s visits to their family home that can trigger or modify old self-sacrifice patterns. Finally, it demonstrates the perceived gains or losses resulting from parents’ long-term sacrifices connected with feeding their children.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T09:43:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804211065050
       
  • Love and Narcissism in Reality Television

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      Authors: David W Hill
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Love Island is a reality television series structured as a dating game, where participants compete to form romantic relationships. This article puts the show in conversation with theories and philosophies of love to draw between them an idea of love as a singular moral event that is constrained by cultural imperatives. What emerges is an existential phenomenology of love in three parts: first, romantic love is framed as an opening on to moral life; then, it is argued that moral life is enacted through a love for the neighbour that constitutes and animates our being in the world; and finally, it is shown that narcissism is not straightforwardly a negative condition but a balancing force in moral life. The article concludes with reflections on what this conceptual work might offer to analyses of relationships played out on reality television.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T09:42:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804211058746
       
  • How Infrastructures and Practices Shape Each Other: Aggregation,
           Integration and the Introduction of Gas Central Heating

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      Authors: Matt Watson, Elizabeth Shove
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      We know that networked infrastructures enable forms of mobility, energy use, and flows of data, and we know that modern life depends on these arrangements. We also know that relations between infrastructures and social practices are recursive, extensive, and multiple. But what of the detail' How do infrastructures shape the many practices to which they relate, and vice versa' The research we describe was designed to address these questions head on. We discuss the arrival and normalisation of gas central heating with reference to householders’ experiences and practices and to the ambitions and decisions of utilities and city authorities. In the process, we identify forms of aggregation and of integration on which infrastructure – practice dynamics depend. In taking this approach, we demonstrate the relevance of practice theory for conceptualising and analysing ‘large’ social phenomena including transitions in energy systems and related patterns of demand.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T09:40:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804211055495
       
  • Re-Conceptualising Repeat Reports of Hate Crime/Incidents as Hate
           Relationships Based on Coercive Control and Space for Action

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      Authors: Catherine Donovan, Stephen Macdonald, John Clayton
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Developing from existing research in the field of hate studies, this article outlines a new approach to understanding repeated experiences of hate by perpetrators who live in close proximity as neighbours to those victimised. Building on previous work, a conceptual argument is made drawing parallels between what we call ‘hate relationships’ and coercive control in domestically abusive relationships. Empirical data from a hate crime advocacy service in the North East of England evidences these parallels through consideration of the home as central to the hate experienced and the cumulative impact of a pattern of hate-motivated behaviours. As with coercive control, our analysis shows that the apparent inaction of help providers exacerbates hate relationships and their impacts. We argue that the current reliance on a criminal justice system, incident-based, approach to understanding and responding to repeat reporting of hate incidents is inadequate. Rather, an approach identifying hate relationships and intervening early in a hate relationship might better preempt escalation and provide possibilities for those victimised to remain in their own homes.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T04:39:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804211065052
       
  • Developing the Diary-Interview Approach to Study the Embodied, Tacit and
           Mundane Nutrition Information Behaviours of People with Type 2 Diabetes

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      Authors: Jane McClinchy, Angela Dickinson, Wendy Wills
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      This article discusses the development and use of the solicited unstructured diary-interview method to explore the everyday tacit and mundane nutrition information activities (NIA) of people who have type 2 diabetes. Diary completion was followed by individual qualitative interviews with individuals (n = 18) and one couple. Diary entry styles ranged from succinct daily logs of their NIA to extensive prose reflecting on the nutrition information they used and associated practices. Development of the method incorporated piloting and advice from lay groups who checked acceptability and understanding of the research tools, and highlighted the need for regular contact between the researcher and participants throughout the diary completion phase. Participants engaged positively with the diary approach. The findings highlight the extent to which the everyday NIA is mundane and thus unavailable for academic exploration. The diary-interview method exposed these practices to both the researcher and participant, and supported them to reflect on the practices they engage in every day in order to self-manage their type 2 diabetes. Although this article draws on an example from health, the article demonstrates how the diary-interview method has utility for researchers exploring other everyday tacit and mundane experiences.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T04:39:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804211058747
       
  • Transnational Healthcare Preferences Among EU Nationals in the UK: A
           Qualitative Assessment

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      Authors: Chris Moreh, Derek McGhee, Athina Vlachantoni
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the motivational factors behind preferences for medical care in the country of residence or the country of origin among EU nationals living in the UK. Undertaking a thematic analysis on a large-N qualitative data set, the article aims to establish a data-driven typology of motivations inductively. This provides an intermediary analysis between qualitative depth and quantitative operationalisability, contributing to the existing literature on healthcare location preferences among transnationally connected social groups. This article finds that preferences for medical care in the country of origin are driven overwhelmingly by quality considerations, while preferences for the UK have more to do with convenience and financing. These perceptions result from negative personal experiences, lack of trust, and often concealed cultural differences, and the analysis identifies various nuances and connections between attitudes that previous in-depth qualitative studies could not systematise.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T04:39:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804211058744
       
  • Daily Bread: Women’s Self-Help Microfinance and the Social Meanings
           of Money

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      Authors: Esther Bott, Shalini Ojha, Sunita Mini, Rajeev Kamal Kumar, Sunil Choudhary, Gil Yaron, Alan R Smyth
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we explore the impacts and implications of ‘Rojiroti’, a women’s self-help group (SHG) microfinance scheme operating in poor communities in Bihar, India. We focus particularly on how improvements found in women’s circumstances and in children’s health might result from Rojiroti SHG membership. Through data from 5 focus groups and 19 individual interviews with women in communities where Rojiroti operates, we discover how the scheme is regarded and how it affects women’s management of household budgets. Moreover, we explore the relational aspects of SHG microfinance and the ways that it can alter family and social dynamics. Drawing on notions of ‘earmarked’ money and ‘safeguarded’ money, we argue that the money itself has meaning and non-pecuniary value in the form of other currencies, including power and agency, which can lead to the improved well-being and health of families.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T04:35:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804211058745
       
  • A ‘Proper Night Out’: A Practice Theory Exploration of
           Gendered Drinking

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      Authors: Kath Hennell, Mark Limmer, Maria Piacentini
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing on the three-element model of social practice theory and key conceptualisations relating to gender performance, this article reports on an empirical study of the intersecting practices of drinking alcohol and doing gender. We present data from a 14-month research project to explore the online and offline intoxicated drinking practices of 23 young people in England framed as a ‘proper night out’. The data were analysed with a focus on three elements (the ‘corporeal’, ‘alcohol’, and ‘caring’), and the findings demonstrate how young people collectively practice gender through their intoxicated drinking practices. This operationalisation of practice theory highlights the potential value that a practice theory lens has for exploring gendered social practices and broadening understandings of notions of acceptable and suitable practice performance.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-01-03T04:12:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804211055488
       
  • What Happens Next' Using the Story Completion Method to Surface the
           Affects and Materialities of Digital Privacy Dilemmas

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      Authors: Ash Watson, Deborah Lupton
      First page: 690
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      People’s ideas and practices concerning their personal data and digital privacy have received growing attention in social inquiry. In this article, we discuss findings from a study that adopted the story completion method together with a theoretical perspective building on feminist materialism to explore how people make sense of and respond to digital privacy dilemmas. The Digital Privacy Story Completion Project presented participants with a set of four story prompts (‘stems’) for them to complete. Each introduced a fictional character facing a privacy dilemma related to personal data generated from their online interactions or app use. Our analysis surfaces how privacy is imagined as simultaneously personal and social, redolent with affective intensities, and framed through relational connections of human and nonhuman agents. While the story stems involved scenarios using digital technologies, participants’ stories extended beyond the technological. These stories offer insight into why and how the potential for and meaning of digital privacy unfolds into more-than-digital worlds.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-05-14T07:24:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221084343
       
  • Hearing, Policing, and Using Gender Diversity: The Role of Institutional
           Gatekeepers in Researching Youth and Gender

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      Authors: Karen Cuthbert, Joseph J Hall, Sally Hines, Kim Allen, Sharon Elley
      First page: 763
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.
      This article comprises a critical reflection on our experiences of recruiting participants and organising focus groups through institutional gatekeepers for research about young people and changing gendered landscapes. We show how reflections on the research process can give (inadvertent) substantive insight into how gender is interpreted by gatekeepers in institutions – that is, gender as only about or for certain young people; gender as something to be contained by the institutional logics of equality and diversity; and how ‘right’ and ‘wrong’ views of gender diversity were understood through the nationalisation and racialisation of the student body. Crucially, we also trace how these institutional interpretations of gender diversity had epistemological consequences for the kinds of knowledge we were able to generate in the focus groups with young people, as meanings were re-framed and contested, and we were funnelled down particular routes. Furthermore, the article discusses how the act of research itself was leveraged by some institutions as institutional diversity capital and/or as part of classed enrichment agendas, highlighting new dimensions to both the co-option of research and the ‘doing’ of diversity work by institutions. Overall, the article provides empirical insight on gender and gender diversity in education and youth settings, and also key methodological insight into the social constitution of ‘Knowledge’ through gatekeeping, recruitment, and access.
      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-02-15T07:12:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804211065053
       
  • Book Review: Generations: Does When You’re Born Shape Who You
           Are'

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      Authors: Glynne Williams
      First page: 787
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T01:28:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221093077
       
  • Book Review: Capitalism on Edge: How Fighting Precarity Can Achieve
           Radical Change Without Crisis or Utopia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      First page: 788
      Abstract: Sociological Research Online, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Sociological Research Online
      PubDate: 2022-06-09T08:24:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13607804221084725
       
 
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