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  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
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AlterNative : An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.194
Number of Followers: 41  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1177-1801 - ISSN (Online) 1174-1740
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1175 journals]
  • Stories from the river: thematic analysis of non-Indigenous health
           students’ free-text survey responses about Australian cultural safety
           education

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      Authors: Kyly Mills, Naomi Sunderland, Jyai Allen, Debra K. Creedy, Amanda Carter
      Abstract: AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples, Ahead of Print.
      This article aims to interpret and theorise non-Indigenous health students’ emotional learning experiences within a cultural safety course from an Australian First Peoples’ perspective. All undergraduate health students enrolled in a First Peoples’ health and cultural safety course were invited to complete a post-course online survey. The survey included quantitative items along with six free-text responses about students’ emotional learning experiences. The free-text comments provided by 72 health students are the focus of this article. Drawing upon Kamilaroi Country and the metaphor of the river in drought, flood and when waters become clear, this research provides a synthesis of non-Indigenous health students’ emotions in the cultural safety classroom. Students acknowledged the powerful impact of work undertaken by First Peoples educators in sharing their narratives, creating safe spaces and bearing witness to students’ emotions. The analysis informs an understanding of student learning and recommendations for teaching practice.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01T09:40:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/11771801221137834
       
  • (Dis)continuity of African Indigenous knowledge

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      Authors: Prince Paa-Kwesi Heto, Takako Mino
      Abstract: AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples, Ahead of Print.
      What role does Indigenous knowledge play in the lives of contemporary Africans' To investigate this question, we visited three communities in Ghana—rural, peri-urban, and urban—where we interviewed community members involved in communal education. Contrary to the literature on the decline of Indigenous knowledge, we find that Indigenous knowledge, practices, and institutions are resilient across all contexts. Traditional leaders continue to play a significant role as stewards of Indigenous knowledge despite the impact of colonization, rural–urban migration, and globalization. However, Indigenous knowledge does not exist in a vacuum. It coexists and competes with many knowledge systems, inculcating in Africans multiple identities and consciousness. We discuss the implication of our findings and explain why there is a need for Africans to better integrate their multiple consciousnesses and different lived realities.
      PubDate: 2022-11-30T11:47:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/11771801221138304
       
  • Food insecurities and dependencies: Indigenous food responses to COVID-19

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      Authors: Babatunde Olusola Alabi, Tabitha Robin
      Abstract: AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples, Ahead of Print.
      Food sovereignty is a relatively new concept in the literature that has evolved as a way to address widespread food-related issues for many Indigenous communities around the world. One of the many crucial lessons we have learned from the COVID-19 pandemic is the importance of this concept in ensuring food sufficiency in Indigenous communities in Canada. In this article, we provide a commentary on food insecurity in Indigenous communities in Canada and how the COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated it. We also highlight the government’s response to mitigating hunger and spotlight how Indigenous peoples are navigating the pandemic’s impact through food sovereignty.
      PubDate: 2022-11-30T07:17:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/11771801221137639
       
  • Book Review: Paradoxes of Hawaiian Sovereignty: Land, Sex, and the
           Colonial Politics of State Nationalism

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      Authors: Kallie Vinson
      Abstract: AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples, Ahead of Print.

      PubDate: 2022-11-24T05:23:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/11771801221137854
       
  • The application of teret-teret as a psychotherapy technique in the context
           of Ethiopia

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      Authors: Tarekegn Tadesse Gemeda, Mohangi Kamleshie, Vanessa Scherman
      Abstract: AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of the study was to examine whether Ethiopian oral stories and narratives, known as teret-teret (a story, a story), could be used as a psychotherapy technique in Ethiopia. Thirteen participants were purposively chosen for the study based on their experience with teret-teret application. They included nine elders, two folklore experts, and two counselors. In-depth semi-structured interviews were used to collect data, which were analyzed using thematic content analysis. The findings demonstrated that teret-teret was a beneficial psychotherapy technique used in Ethiopia to help young adolescents mitigate their socio-emotional and behavioral challenges. The implications of the findings highlight the necessity of reconstructing and using teret-teret in structured and formal ways in schools, childcare facilities, and communities. It also suggests that future studies should concentrate on extended longitudinal studies that use a mixed-methods design.
      PubDate: 2022-11-04T11:53:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/11771801221131714
       
  • He kāinga pai rawa: Te Kete Mātauranga mō te hanga whare tino pai
           rawa—a knowledge basket to support building affordable and safe housing
           for the elderly

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      Authors: Sophie Nock, Yvonne Wilson, Rangimahora Reddy, Kath Holmes, Mary Simpson, John Oetzel
      Abstract: AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples, Ahead of Print.
      Tuhinga whakarāpopoto (Abstract)Poor, unaffordable and overcrowded housing among Māori in Aotearoa New Zealand is one of the converging societal trends to impact significantly on older Māori ageing in place and in age-friendly environments. Some kaupapa Māori (Māori approach) organisations have sought to develop kaumātua (elders) villages to address these challenges. From the study of one such village, a toolkit of successful practices was developed. The purpose of this article is to describe the research design and methods for a project that will use this toolkit to develop community determined villages in three additional communities. The research approach involves process evaluation using photovoice, interviews, wānanga (consultation meetings) seminars and meeting’s notes, along with summative evaluation using surveys. The research process is grounded in a culture-centred and co-design approach with a vision underpinned by tikanga Māori (Māori custom) and te ao Māori (Māori world) that will be shared with others through a revised toolkit.
      PubDate: 2022-11-03T07:19:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/11771801221126350
       
  • Indigenising the screen: Te Tangata Whai Rawa o Wēniti—The Māori
           Merchant of Venice (2002)

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      Authors: Angela Marie Moewaka Barnes
      Abstract: AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines Te Tangata Whai Rawa o Wēniti—The Māori Merchant of Venice (2002), the first dramatic feature film, performed entirely in te reo Māori (the Māori language). This adaptation of Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice was based on Pei Te Hurinui Jones’ 1946 te reo Māori translation. Alongside close readings of the film, I drew on an interview with director, Don Selwyn, whānau (family) input and the literature. I applied Kia Manawanui: Kaupapa Māori Film Theoretical Framework, an analytical tool, to provide thematic structure. Don Selwyn’s interpretation disrupts hierarchies of language, validating not only the Māori language but Indigenous languages globally as eminently capable of cinematic expression. He draws out the dynamics of oppression and colonisation, providing transformative and disruptive images of Māori, Māori culture and tikanga (protocols). By expressing these features Don Selwyn successfully indigenizes the screen. I argue that the film is a taonga (treasure).
      PubDate: 2022-10-28T12:10:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/11771801221126254
       
  • A plurinational transformation: an entanglement between change and
           continuity

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      Authors: Gloriana Rodriguez Alvarez
      Abstract: AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples, Ahead of Print.
      The persistence of a broad coalition of social movements, including Indigenous-led protests in the 1990s, the War on Gas, War on Water and the election of Evo Morales, contributed to a Plurinational Constitution in 2009. The result was a profound reframing of the social contract, enshrining legal, political and social pluralism. Nevertheless, the extent to which these measures have led to an improvement is still debated. For this reason, based on 22 interviews in La Paz and Sucre with former Constituent Assembly members from 2017 to 2019, this article examines the role of social movements in contesting the status quo. Second, it explores whether the pluralistic measures have changed the situation of Indigenous peoples and decolonised the governance model.
      PubDate: 2022-10-27T11:26:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/11771801221126703
       
  • A review of localised Māori community responses to Covid-19 lockdowns
           in Aotearoa New Zealand

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      Authors: Shemana Cassim, Teorongonui Josie Keelan
      Abstract: AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples, Ahead of Print.
      Aotearoa New Zealand has been commended for the overarching effectiveness of its Covid-19 response. Yet, the lockdowns challenged the health of whānau Māori (Māori families) alongside their social, cultural and financial well-being. However, Māori have repeatedly demonstrated innovative means of resilience throughout the pandemic. This review aimed to document the local grassroots, community-level responses to Covid-19 lockdowns by Māori. Three sources for searching for evidence were used: academic, websites and media, and Māori community networks. A total of 18 records were reviewed. Four of these records comprised published academic literature, 13 comprised news, online and media articles, and one was a situation report. Findings were grouped into three categories: distributive networks, well-being and resource support. The findings of this review provide an exemplar for the strength of Māori leadership and agency, alongside value-driven holistic approaches to health and well-being that could positively impact the health of all.
      Citation: AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples
      PubDate: 2022-09-13T10:54:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/11771801221124428
       
 
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