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  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
Showing 401 - 382 of 382 Journals sorted alphabetically
Rural Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health     Partially Free   (Followers: 13)
Secuencia     Open Access  
Seminar : A Journal of Germanic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Sens public     Open Access  
Senses and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Serendipities : Journal for the Sociology and History of the Social Sciences     Open Access  
Sexuality Research and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Sexualization, Media, & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Signs and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Simmel Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Social Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Social Change Review     Open Access  
Social Currents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Social Dynamics: A journal of African studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social Forces     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
Social Inclusion     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Social Networking     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Social Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Social Problems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 73)
Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Social Psychology Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Social Transformations in Chinese Societies     Hybrid Journal  
Sociální studia / Social Studies     Open Access  
Sociedad y Discurso     Open Access  
Sociedad y Economía     Open Access  
Sociedad y Religión     Open Access  
Sociedade e Cultura     Open Access  
Società e diritti     Open Access  
SocietàMutamentoPolitica     Open Access  
Societies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Society and Culture in South Asia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Society Register     Open Access  
Socio-Ecological Practice Research     Hybrid Journal  
Socio-logos     Open Access  
Sociolinguistic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Sociologia : Revista da Faculdade de Letras da Universidade do Porto     Open Access  
Sociologia del diritto     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Sociologia del Lavoro     Full-text available via subscription  
Sociología del Trabajo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sociologia della Comunicazione     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Sociologia e Politiche Sociali     Full-text available via subscription  
Sociologia e Ricerca Sociale     Full-text available via subscription  
Sociología Histórica     Open Access  
Sociologia Ruralis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Sociologia urbana e rurale     Full-text available via subscription  
Sociología y Tecnociencia     Open Access  
Sociologia, Problemas e Práticas     Open Access  
Sociológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sociological Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Sociological Focus     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Sociological Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Sociological Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Sociological Jurisprudence Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sociological Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Sociological Methods & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Sociological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Sociological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Sociological Research Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Sociological Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Sociological Spectrum: Mid-South Sociological Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sociological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Sociologie     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Sociologie du Travail     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Sociologie et sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
SociologieS - Articles     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sociologisk Forskning     Open Access  
Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 165)
Sociology : Thought and Action     Open Access  
Sociology and Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Sociology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Sociology Mind     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sociology of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Sociology of Islam     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Sociology of Race and Ethnicity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Sociology of Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Sociology of Sport Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Socius : Sociological Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Sojourn: Journal of Social Issues in Southeast Asia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Solidarity : Journal of Education, Society and Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sosiologi i dag     Open Access  
Sospol : Jurnal Sosial Politik     Open Access  
Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture, and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
South African Review of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Southern Cultures     Full-text available via subscription  
Soziale Probleme : Zeitschrift für soziale Probleme und soziale Kontrolle     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Spaces for Difference: An Interdisciplinary Journal     Open Access  
Sport in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Streetnotes     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Studia Białorutenistyczne     Open Access  
Studia Iranica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Studia Litteraria et Historica     Open Access  
Studia Socialia Cracoviensia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Studia Universitatis Babes-Bolyai Sociologia     Open Access  
Studies in American Humor     Full-text available via subscription  
Studies in American Naturalism     Full-text available via subscription  
Studies in Latin American Popular Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Studies of Transition States and Societies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sudamérica : Revista de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Surveillance and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Swiss Journal of Sociology     Open Access  
Symbolic Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Søkelys på arbeidslivet (Norwegian Journal of Working Life Studies)     Open Access  
Teaching Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Tecnología y Sociedad     Open Access  
TECNOSCIENZA: Italian Journal of Science & Technology Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Terrains / Théories     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
The British Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
The Philanthropist     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
The Social Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
The Sociological Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
The Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
The Tocqueville Review/La revue Tocqueville     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Tidsskrift for boligforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for Forskning i Sygdom og Samfund     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for ungdomsforskning     Open Access  
Tla-Melaua : Revista de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Todas as Artes     Open Access  
Tracés     Open Access  
Trajecta : Religion, Culture and Society in the Low Countries     Open Access  
Transatlantica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transmotion     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Transposition : Musique et sciences sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Travail et Emploi     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Treballs de Sociolingüística Catalana     Open Access  
TRIM. Tordesillas : Revista de investigación multidisciplinar     Open Access  
Universidad, Escuela y Sociedad     Open Access  
Unoesc & Ciência - ACHS     Open Access  
Urban Research & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Valuation Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Variations : Revue Internationale de Théorie Critique     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Visitor Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Vlast' (The Authority)     Open Access  
Work, Aging and Retirement     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
World Cultures eJournal     Open Access  
World Future Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Religion, Gesellschaft und Politik     Hybrid Journal  
Социологический журнал     Open Access  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Social Forces
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.257
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 88  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0037-7732 - ISSN (Online) 1534-7605
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [424 journals]
  • The Social Forces that Shape Families: Reflections on 100 Years of
           Publications in Social Forces

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1033 - 1047
      Abstract: Selected references from this article are available for free public access for 3 months: Waite and Moore (1978) https://doi.org/10.2307/2577222; Thomson, Hanson and McLanahan (1994) https://doi.org/10.2307/2579924; Cavanagh and Huston (2006) https://doi.org/10.1353/sof.2006.0120; Rybińska and Morgan (2019) https://doi.org/10.1093/sf/soy098; Lappegård and Kornstad (2020) https://doi.org/10.1093/sf/soz124.
      PubDate: Fri, 13 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac126
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2023)
       
  • Social Forces’ Century-Long Contributions to the Field of
           International Migration

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1048 - 1059
      Abstract: Selected references from this article are available for free public access for 3 months: Hiers, Soehl, and Wimmer (2017) https://doi.org/10.1093/sf/sox045; Kurien (2006) https://doi.org/10.1353/sof.2007.0015; Park, Lai, and Waldinger (2021) https://doi.org/10.1093/sf/soab130; Paul (2015) https://doi.org/10.1093/sf/sov049; Ponce (2019) https://doi.org/10.1093/sf/soy111.
      PubDate: Fri, 13 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac101
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2023)
       
  • Forty Years of Reflection, Sixty Years of Solitude: Promising Early
           Pedagogical Initiatives in Social Forces that were Unsustainable

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1060 - 1068
      Abstract: Selected references from this article are available for free public access for 3 months: Nichols (1923) https://doi.org/10.2307/3005177; Odum (1927) https://doi.org/10.2307/3004625; Stout (1936) https://doi.org/10.2307/2570959; Jones (1945) https://doi.org/10.2307/2571517; Atkinson (2001) https://doi.org/10.1353/sof.2001.0029.
      PubDate: Fri, 13 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac107
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2023)
       
  • Continuity and Change in Methodology in Social Forces

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1069 - 1080
      Abstract: Selected references from this article are available for free public access for 3 months: Hagood (1943) https://doi.org/10.2307/2570665; Labovitz (1967) https://doi.org/10.2307/2574595; Lieberson (1991) https://doi.org/10.1093/sf/70.2.307 and Oliver et al. (2005) https://doi.org/10.1353/sof.2006.0023.
      PubDate: Fri, 13 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac133
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2023)
       
  • Review of “Studying Lived Religion: Contexts and Practices”

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      Abstract: Review of “Studying Lived Religion: Contexts and Practices” By Nancy Tatom Ammerman NYU Press, 2021. 272 pages. https://nyupress.org/9781479804344/studying-lived-religion/
      PubDate: Sat, 03 Dec 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac129
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Review of “The Opportunity Trap: High-Skilled Workers, Indian Families,
           and the Failures of the Dependent Visa Program”

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: By Pallavi Banerjee New York: NYU Press. 2022. 336 pages. (ISBN: 978-1479852918). https://nyupress/org/9781479852918/the-opportunity-trap/
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Dec 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac127
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Review of “Time for Things: Labor, Leisure, and the Rise of Mass
           Consumption”

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      Abstract: Review of “Time for Things: Labor, Leisure, and the Rise of Mass Consumption” By Stephen D. Rosenberg Harvard University Press, 2021. 368 pages. https://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php'isbn=9780674979512
      PubDate: Tue, 29 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac130
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Review of “Yes to the City: Millennials and the Fight for Affordable
           Housing”

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      Abstract: By Max Holleran Princeton University Press, 2022, 216 pages. https://press.princeton.edu/books/hardcover/9780691200224/yes-to-the-city
      PubDate: Fri, 25 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac131
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Review of “Thinking like an Economist: How Efficiency Replaced Equality
           in U.S. Public Policy”

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      Abstract: By Elizabeth Popp Berman Princeton University Press: Princeton, NJ, 2022, 344 pages. https://press.princeton.edu/books/hardcover/9780691167381/thinking-like-an-economist
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac128
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Review of “The Colors of Love: Multiracial People in Interracial
           Relationships”

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: By Melinda A. Mills NYU Press, 2021, 312 pages. https://nyupress.org/9781479802418/the-colors-of-love/
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac117
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Review of “The Border Within: Vietnamese Migrants Transforming Ethnic
           Nationalism in Berlin”

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: By Phi Hong Su Stanford University Press, 2022. 216 pages. https://www.sup.org/books/precart/'id=32854
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac118
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Review of “Critical Humanism: A Manifesto for the 21st
           Century”

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: By Ken Plummer Polity Press, 2021, 224 pages. https://www.politybooks.com/bookdetail'book_slug=critical-humanism-a-manifesto-for-the-21st-century--9781509527946
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac119
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Review of “Queer Stepfamilies: The Path to Social and Legal
           Recognition”

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: By Katie L. Acosta New York University Press, 2021. 272 pages. https://nyupress.org/9781479800988/queer-stepfamilies/. ISBN: 9781479800988.
      PubDate: Wed, 26 Oct 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac116
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Review of “Dead Reckoning: Air Traffic Control, System Effects, and
           Risk”

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Review of “Dead Reckoning: Air Traffic Control, System Effects, and Risk” By Diane Vaughan The University of Chicago Press, 2021. 640 pages. https://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/D/bo95833511.html
      PubDate: Fri, 14 Oct 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac110
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Review of “Second-Class Daughters: Black Brazilian Women and Informal
           Adoption as Modern Slavery”

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Review of “Second-Class Daughters: Black Brazilian Women and Informal Adoption as Modern Slavery” By Elizabeth Hordge-Freeman Cambridge University Press, 2022. 271 pages. https://www.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/history/latin-american-history/second-class-daughters-black-brazilian-women-and-informal-adoption-modern-slavery
      PubDate: Sat, 08 Oct 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac111
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Review of “Exhuming Violent Histories: Forensics, Memory, and Rewriting
           Spain’s Past”

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Review of “Exhuming Violent Histories: Forensics, Memory, and Rewriting Spain’s Past” By Nicole Iturriaga Columbia University Press, 2022, 256 pages. http://cup.columbia.edu/book/exhuming-violent-histories/9780231201131
      PubDate: Sat, 08 Oct 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac109
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Review of “Food Allergy Advocacy: Parenting and the Politics of
           Care”

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Review of “Food Allergy Advocacy: Parenting and the Politics of Care” By Danya GlabauUniversity of Minnesota Press, 2022. 288 pages. https://www.upress.umn.edu/book-division/books/food-allergy-advocacy
      PubDate: Fri, 07 Oct 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac112
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Book Review of “School Zone: A Problem Analysis of Student Offending
           and Victimization”

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Book Review of “School Zone: A Problem Analysis of Student Offending and Victimization” By Pamela Wilcox, Graham C. Ousey, Marie Skubak Tillyer 2022. School Zone: A Problem Analysis of Student Offending and Victimization. Philadelphia:Temple University Press, 2022 (ISBN: 978-1-4399-2037-4) 242 pages https://tupress.temple.edu/book/20000000010048.
      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac108
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Review of “Automation is a Myth”

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      Abstract: Review of “Automation is a Myth” By Luke Munn Stanford, CA:Stanford University Press, 2022, 184 pages. https://www.sup.org/books/title/'id=34899
      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac105
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Review of “Work, Pray, Code: When Work Becomes Religion in Silicon
           Valley”

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      Abstract: Review of “Work, Pray, Code: When Work Becomes Religion in Silicon Valley” By Carolyn Chen Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2022. 272 pages. https://press.princeton.edu/books/hardcover/9780691219080/work-pray-code
      PubDate: Thu, 22 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac106
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Review of “What Is Sexual Capital'”

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      Abstract: Review of “What Is Sexual Capital'” By Dana Kaplan and Eva Illouz Polity Press. 2022, 140 pages. https://www.politybooks.com/bookdetail'book_slug=what-is-sexual-capital--9781509552313
      PubDate: Fri, 16 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac104
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Review of “Crunch Time: How Married Couples Confront
           Unemployment'”

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      Abstract: By Aliya Hamid Rao University of California Press, 2020, 308 pages. https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520298613/crunch-time
      PubDate: Wed, 14 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac096
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Review of “Grasping for the American Dream: Racial Segregation, Social
           Mobility, and Homeownership”

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      Abstract: Review of “Grasping for the American Dream: Racial Segregation, Social Mobility, and Homeownership” By Nora E. Taplin-Kaguru Routledge, 2021. 158 Pages GBP £26.99. ISBN: 978-0-367-07592-7 (hbk), ISBN: 978-0-367-07594-1 (pbk) $36.95, ISBN: 978-0-429-02146-6 (ebk), https://www.routledge.com/Grasping-for-the-American-Dream-Racial-Segregation-Social-Mobility-and/Taplin-Kaguru/p/book/9780367075941
      PubDate: Tue, 06 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac094
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Review of “Wine Markets: Genres and Identities”

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      Abstract: Review of “Wine Markets: Genres and Identities” By Giacomo Negro, Michael T. Hannan, Susan Olzak Columbia University Press, New York. 2022, 280 pages. https://cup.columbia.edu/book/wine-markets/9780231203715
      PubDate: Sun, 04 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac093
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Review of “Redefining Geek: Bias and the Five Hidden Habits of
           Tech-Savvy Teens”

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      Abstract: By Cassidy Puckett University of Chicago Press, 2022. 320 pages. https://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/R/bo137270726.html
      PubDate: Thu, 25 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac092
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • The Precarity of Self-Employment among Low- and Moderate-Income Households

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1081 - 1115
      Abstract: AbstractMany people in the United States have achieved economic stability through self-employment and are often seen as embracing the entrepreneurial spirit and seizing opportunity. Yet, research also suggests that self-employment may be precarious for many people in the lower socioeconomic strata. Drawing on a unique dataset that combines longitudinal survey data with administrative tax data for a sample of low- and moderate-income (LMI) workers, we bring new evidence to bear on this debate by examining the link between self-employment and economic insecurity. Overall, our results show that self-employment is associated with greater economic insecurity among LMI workers compared with wage-and-salary employment. For instance, compared with their wage-and-salary counterparts, the self-employed have 78, 168, and 287 percent greater odds of having an income below basic expenses, and experiencing an unexpected income decline and high levels of income volatility, respectively. We also find that differences in financial endowment and access to health insurance are key drivers in explaining the relationship between employment type and economic insecurity, as being able to access $2,000 in an emergency greatly lowers the odds of budgetary constraint, whereas lack of health insurance increases those odds. These findings suggest that formal work arrangements with wages and benefits offered by an employer promotes greater economic stability among LMI workers compared with informal work arrangements via self-employment. We discuss implications of these results for future research and policy initiatives seeking to promote economic wellbeing through entrepreneurship.
      PubDate: Mon, 07 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soab171
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Adoption of LGBT-Inclusive Policies: Social Construction, Coercion, or
           Competition'

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      Pages: 1116 - 1142
      Abstract: AbstractCompanies evaluate LGBT policy adoption in an environment with competing and often contradictory societal institutions and ethical frames. This makes the adoption process more difficult to understand when compared to new practice diffusion in less contested settings, providing an opportunity to examine diffusion in an uncertain and varying institutional environment. Herein, we develop a policy adoption model that examines both competing and reinforcing forces. Utilizing a longitudinal dataset of LGBT policy adoption by 283 firms across 1980 firm-years between 2002 and 2014 as measured by the Human Rights Campaign (HRC), we find that firms respond to coercive, social constructivist, and competitive forces for and against LGBT-inclusive work policy adoption. We find that coercive forces exercised by shareholder resolutions and competitive forces driven by industry-level policy adoption lead to firm-level policy adoption. However, other forces, such as state-level anti-marriage equality constitutional amendments, are associated with LGBT-exclusive policies. We also disaggregate the overall HRC policy data into equal employment opportunity (EEO) policy, benefits, and inclusion dimensions and find similarities and differences among our hypothesized relationships.
      PubDate: Sat, 23 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac033
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Bringing Family Demography Back In: A Life Course Approach to the Gender
           Gap in Caregiving in the United States

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1143 - 1170
      Abstract: AbstractDespite decades of progress toward gender equality, women remain as the United States’ primary caregivers. Past research has shown how couples and families organize care at distinct life course moments but has not studied how these moments combine to create differences in men and women’s full life courses of caregiving. In this article, I look beyond negotiations within households to introduce a complementary demographic explanation for the gender gap in caregiving—women’s greater likelihood to reside with dependents. A focus on patterns of coresidence is warranted, given the growing diversity of family forms, which may expose women to additional and varied care demands at differing ages. Drawing on data from the 2011 to 2019 American Time Use Surveys, I study how coresidential care demands shape the population gender gap in childcare and eldercare across ages 20–79 and how demands differ for Black, White, and Latina/o women and men. My results show that coresidence with dependents is uneven across the life course, and women’s exposures occur early and late in adulthood, while men are exposed to more care demands in midlife. Patterns of childbearing, partnership, and extended family embeddedness contribute to Black and Latina women’s greater exposure to care demands early in adulthood and White women’s greater exposure to care demands later in the life course. Thus, despite growing egalitarianism within households, the rise of complex families contributes to bolstering population-level gender inequality in caregiving across adulthood.
      PubDate: Mon, 09 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac041
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Mother–Father Parity in Work–Family Conflict' The Importance of
           Selection Effects and Nonresponse Bias*

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      Pages: 1171 - 1198
      Abstract: AbstractDo mothers experience worse work–family conflicts compared with fathers' Yes, according to trenchant and influential qualitative studies that illuminate mothers’ deeply felt problems from work demands that intrude into family life. No, suggest studies employing representative samples of employed parents that show mothers’ and fathers’ have similar work-to-family conflict. We assess these paradoxical depictions of parents’ lives using panel data from the national Canadian Work, Stress and Health study (2011–2019). We argue that comparable reports from men and women are misleading because they overlook mothers’ adjustment of work hours in the face of high conflict. As evidence, we reveal a gender suppression effect whereby mothers report higher conflict than fathers when adjusting for work hours in the baseline sample. Next, we show that mothers are more likely to leave paid work because of conflict. In fact, they are three times more likely than fathers to leave because of conflict’s focal predictor—having young children. These findings reflect mothers’ adjustment to the conflict they might already experience or anticipate. We use pooled person-year data and fixed-effects regression with logit specification to estimate the hazard of not working at the next wave by gender. We underscore the selection of some mothers into surveys or subsequent waves because it excludes those who systematically dropped out due to higher conflict and its primary predictor of having young children. We argue the observed “gender symmetry” of conflict is an artifact and illustrate the importance of theorizing stress processes over time to understand contradictory work–family conflict scholarship.
      PubDate: Mon, 21 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac015
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • What Gender Values Do Muslims Resist' How Religiosity and
           Acculturation Over Time Shape Muslims’ Public-Sphere Equality, Family
           Role Divisions, and Sexual Liberalization Values Differently

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      Pages: 1199 - 1229
      Abstract: AbstractPopulist voices argue that Muslim migrants’ religion would cause them to denounce all aspects of women’s equality and sexual liberalization, no matter how long migrants have lived in Western Europe. Previous quantitative studies have refuted claims that Islamic religiosity necessarily begets gender traditionalism and that migrants would not become more progressive over time. However, existing studies have not yet addressed the assumption of uniformity in “gender egalitarianism.” The present study argues that individuals’ religiosity and acculturation over time shape support for public-sphere equality, progressive family role divisions, and sexual liberalization in different ways. EURISLAM data on 4,000 Muslim migrants show that different gender values are indeed driven by varying mechanisms and develop differently. Over time and generations, Muslim migrants’ support for public-sphere equality and sexual liberalization swell, but their support for progressive family roles dwindles. Religiosity hardly reduces support for public-sphere equality, more strongly curbs progressive family roles, and most strongly stifles sexual liberalization. These differences magnify over the years after migration; religiosity’s already weak and inconsistent obstruction to public-sphere equality further dulls, while its stronger opposition to sexual liberalization intensifies. Altogether, varying gender values differ to such an extent that any conclusion on “the gender traditionalism” of Muslim migrants should be viewed suspiciously.
      PubDate: Wed, 09 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac004
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Too Much of a Good Thing' Testing the Curvilinear Relationship between
           Parental Involvement and Student Outcomes in Elementary School

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      Pages: 1230 - 1257
      Abstract: AbstractMost scholars, parents, and educators agree that parental involvement is beneficial for children’s academic and developmental outcomes. However, a small but growing body of scholarship suggests that intensive parental involvement may potentially hinder children’s development. In this study, we examine the “more is less” assumption in parental involvement research and formally test the argument of parental overinvolvement. Using nationally representative data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998–1999 (ECLS-K), we examine whether high levels of involvement are associated with unintended negative child development in elementary school. Analyses based on curvilinear mixed effects models show that elevated parental expectations, intensive participation in extracurricular activities, and increased parental school involvement are associated with diminishing returns to children’s outcomes. The most meaningful parental overinvolvement pattern is found for internalizing problems. These patterns are generally consistent for children from all socioeconomic levels. We conclude with a discussion of the research and policy implications of these findings.
      PubDate: Thu, 03 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac001
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • The Effects of Undergraduate Financing on Advanced Degree Attainment

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      Pages: 1258 - 1287
      Abstract: AbstractThis study examines the effects of undergraduate financing on subsequent advanced degree attainment in a context characterized by a shift away from traditional grant aid programs and toward widespread student loans. Using data from the National Survey of College Graduates, 2SLS Lewbel method regressions estimate the effects of having received undergraduate grant aid and having student loan debt on the chances of attaining an advanced degree during the next ten years. Results suggest a large positive influence of receiving undergraduate grant aid on advanced degree attainment (+8.5%), thus boosting higher education attainment far beyond only an undergraduate degree across college graduation cohorts between 1986 and 2007. Conversely, having loan debt upon college graduation affected the chances of advanced degree attainment negatively. The increased reliance on loans during undergraduate studies coincided with its long-term (or “spillover”) effect on advanced degree attainment being null in the late 1980s to a substantive deficit of more than 4 percentage—points from the 2000s onward. Counterfactual projection models suggest that loan-taking after the 1992 Higher Education Act suppressed the number of advanced degree holders in the US labor market and will continue to do so given current undergraduate financing patterns.
      PubDate: Mon, 30 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac044
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • The Counteracting Nature of Contextual Influences: Peer Effects and
           Offsetting Mechanisms in Schools

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      Pages: 1288 - 1320
      Abstract: AbstractThere is currently a mismatch between the theoretical expectations of peer effects held by many scholars and the quantitative empirical literature. This paper contributes to the understanding of peer effects by highlighting the oft-overlooked conceptual distinction between social influences and a well-defined causal effect; peers may influence one another via several potentially contradicting mechanisms that result in small overall causal peer effects on educational outcomes. We exploit the idiosyncratic variation in gender composition across cohorts within schools to study offsetting mechanisms. Using population-wide Norwegian register and survey data, we find two distinct ways in which the share of girls in lower secondary schools (grades 8–10) affects academic outcomes. First, more girl peers improve the learning environment at school. Simultaneously, however, more girl peers reduce the students’ motivation for schoolwork. Such results suggest that peer effects stem from a complex process where various mechanisms are at odds with one another, and where the influence of peers on academic outcomes is a composite of different mechanisms. Overall, we find that more girl peers lower students’ school grades and reduce students’ likelihood of attending an academic track in upper secondary school (which qualifies for higher education). Supplementary analyses suggest that the achievement level of girls is the main reason for the gender peer effects found in our study.
      PubDate: Sat, 02 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac023
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Undocumented Again' DACA Rescission, Emotions, and Incorporation
           Outcomes among Young Adults

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      Pages: 1321 - 1342
      Abstract: AbstractFormer President Trump’s election and subsequent anti-immigrant policy initiatives brought an unprecedented sense of uncertainty for undocumented immigrants. This is particularly true for those who had experienced expanding opportunities through the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) executive action signed by former President Obama in 2012. We use in-depth interviews with undocumented young adults to explore how the 2016 presidential election and 2017 executive action that rescinded DACA evoked emotions of anticipatory loss—including sadness and grief—and ontological insecurity—including anxiety and uncertainty. We adopt an interpretive and social constructionist approach to explore these emotions and their implications, demonstrating how even the threat of policy change impacts immigrant young adults’ societal incorporation. We illustrate how DACA recipients conceptualized loss and how these experiences manifested in educational attainment, labor market incorporation, feelings of belonging, and civic participation. Our study provides an innovative contribution to interpret in real-time the incorporation trajectories through the emotions of living with precarious legal status.
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac056
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Nativity Penalty and Legal Status Paradox: The Effects of Nativity and
           Legal Status Signals in the US Labor Market

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      Pages: 1343 - 1371
      PubDate: Sat, 18 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac055
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Embedded Distress: Social Integration, Gender, and Adolescent Depression

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      Pages: 1396 - 1421
      Abstract: AbstractIn adolescence, teens manage close friendships while simultaneously evaluating their social position in the larger peer context. Conceptualizing distinct local and global network structures clarifies how social integration relates to mental wellbeing. Examining local cohesion and global embeddedness in the context of key factors related to mental health, such as gender and friends’ depression, can further distinguish when the structure and content of social integration relate to higher and lower depressive levels. Analyses using survey data from PROSPER (n = 27,091, grades 9–12) indicate global embeddedness is generally protective, but for girls, greater global embeddedness when friends are more depressive is associated with increased depressive symptoms. For girls, greater local cohesion reduces associations between more depressive friends and increased depressive levels, while for boys, both local cohesion and friends’ depression are largely irrelevant. Results indicate the importance of considering both local and global network integration in tandem with gender and friends’ depression to understand how social integration relates to mental health.
      PubDate: Mon, 18 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac034
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Adolescent Partnership Quality and Emotional Health: Insights from an
           Intensive Longitudinal Study

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      Pages: 1422 - 1459
      Abstract: AbstractPrior research has documented an association between adolescents’ romantic experiences and poor emotional health. However, lack of intensive longitudinal measurement and an emphasis on negative affect have limited understanding about the extent to which adolescent relationship quality influences the emotional health of adolescents in partnerships, including the potential benefits of high-quality partnerships. Previous research has also been limited in its ability to account for factors that select adolescents into lower or higher quality partnerships. Using biweekly intensive longitudinal data from the mDiary Study of Adolescent Relationships linked to six waves of birth cohort data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, this paper uses multilevel mixed-effects models to address three questions: (1) How are changes in partnership quality (defined as validation, frequency of disagreements, and global quality) associated with changes in both positive and negative affect; (2) Do observed associations persist net of factors that potentially select adolescents into lower or higher quality partnerships (e.g., childhood family experiences); and (3) Do associations between partnership quality and affect differ by gender' Results show that higher quality partnerships are associated with both decreases in negative affect and increases in positive affect. There were no significant gender differences on average. The study’s findings highlight the importance of partnership quality as a key source of temporal variation in adolescents’ emotional states.
      PubDate: Thu, 19 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac043
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Social Consequences of Homeownership: Evidence from the Home Ownership
           Scheme in Hong Kong

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      Pages: 1460 - 1484
      Abstract: AbstractHomeownership is expected to provide a wide range of social benefits. However, the empirical evidence for causation is weak, and knowledge beyond Western countries is even more limited. This article investigates how homeownership affects life satisfaction and subjective class identification in Hong Kong. The Home Ownership Scheme, a large-scale subsidized homeownership program based on a random draw, represents a quasi-experimental setting to identify the causal impact of homeownership. Based on the analyses of data from four waves of the Hong Kong Panel Study of Social Dynamics (HKPSSD) and instrumental variable estimation, we show that homeownership significantly improves life satisfaction among Hong Kong adults, and that those who own a home deem themselves as belonging to a higher social class. This study contributes to the understanding of homeownership effects by providing causal evidence from a Chinese society and sheds light on the effectiveness of housing policies that aim to promote homeownership in Hong Kong and beyond.
      PubDate: Thu, 17 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac011
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Subjective Well-Being Scarring Through Unemployment: New Evidence from a
           Long-Running Panel

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      Pages: 1485 - 1518
      Abstract: AbstractScarring effects of unemployment on subjective well-being (SWB), i.e., negative effects that remain even after workers reenter employment, are well documented in the literature. Nevertheless, the theoretical mechanisms by which unemployment leads to long-lasting negative consequences for SWB are still under debate. Thus, we theorize that unemployment can have an enduring impact mainly through (1) the experience of unemployment as an incisive life event and (2) unemployment as a driver of future unemployment. In the empirical part, we focus on one important dimension of SWB: overall life satisfaction. Based on advanced longitudinal modeling that controls for group-specific trends, we estimate scarring through unemployment using the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP). Our results consistently show a large negative effect of unemployment on life satisfaction as well as significant scarring effects that last at least 5 years after reemployment for both men and women as well as for short- and long-term unemployment spells. Further analyses reveal that repeated periods of unemployment drive these effects and cause even longer lasting scarring, implying that there are hardly any adaptations to unemployment that buffer its effect on life satisfaction. We conclude that scarring effects mainly work through repeated episodes of unemployment. Regarding policy implications, our findings suggest that preventing unemployment, regardless of its duration, is beneficial for individual well-being not only in the short term.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac022
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Ideology, Legitimation and Collective Action: Evidence from Chile on the
           Mechanism of Ideological Inversion

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      Pages: 1519 - 1551
      Abstract: AbstractWe present evidence on a social mechanism of legitimation—ideological inversion—proposing that a fantasy consensus deters collective actions oriented toward social change, even in contexts were individuals support transformations. This fantasy consensus emerges as individuals infer the order’s validity mainly from the practices of others, which are largely constrained by social structures. Relying on a factorial survey experiment conducted in Chile, our results support the two main hypotheses from ideological inversion: people systematically overestimate the support for the status quo, and this overestimation has a deterrent effect on collective actions oriented toward social change. We argue that ideological inversion helps explain how legitimation crises often remain hidden, and therefore how political crisis often emerge abruptly. For instance, before the revolt of 2019 Chile was perceived as an example of social stability within Latin America, yet after an ordinary subway fare hike the country erupted in an unrelenting and massive wave of protests. Our findings suggest that the social support for the status quo previously perceived in Chile was a fantasy consensus enforced by constrained practices, and that this fantasy was very effective until recently in deterring social change. Ideological inversion thus provides a mechanism that contributes to explain the stability of social structures and inequalities regardless of individual dispositions or shared norms.
      PubDate: Sun, 03 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac032
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Ambiguities in Action Ascription

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      Pages: 1552 - 1579
      Abstract: AbstractIn everyday interactions with one another, speakers not only say things but also do things like offer, complain, reject, and compliment. Through observation, it is possible to see that much of the time people unproblematically understand what others are doing. Research on conversation has further documented how speakers’ word choice, prosody, grammar, and gesture all help others to recognize what actions they are performing. In this study, we rely on spontaneous naturally occurring conversational data where people have trouble making their actions understood to examine what leads to ambiguous actions, bringing together prior research and identifying recurrent types of ambiguity that hinge on different dimensions of social action. We then discuss the range of costs and benefits for social actors when actions are clear versus ambiguous. Finally, we offer a conceptual model of how, at a microlevel, action ascription is done. Actions in interaction are building blocks for social relations; at each turn, an action can strengthen or strain the bond between two individuals. Thus, a unified theory of action ascription at a microlevel is an essential component for broader theories of social action and of how social actions produce, maintain, and revise the social world.
      PubDate: Sun, 10 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac021
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Patterns of Perceived Hostility and Identity Concealment among
           Self-Identified Atheists

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      Pages: 1580 - 1605
      Abstract: AbstractResearchers have produced important findings regarding the types of stigma associated with nonreligion, particularly atheism. However, while numerous studies analyze who is more or less likely to identify as an atheist given that stigma, less is known about how self-identified atheists manage the stigma associated with their identity. This study uses new survey data from a nationally representative sample of US adults, with an oversample of individuals identifying as atheists, to examine the predictors of and connections between atheists’ perceptions of hostility toward their identities and whether they conceal those identities. Contrary to our expectations, we find no association between atheists’ perceived hostility toward their identity and concealment of that identity. We do find, however, that atheists in some social locations report higher levels of identity concealment, particularly those who identify as women, those who identify as Republican, those who live in the South, and those who were raised in a religion or still attend religious services. Our findings suggest that atheists who feel like social or institutional outsiders are more likely to conceal their identity. Our findings also suggest that affirming an atheist identity may buffer some of the negative effects of atheist stigma. These findings have implications for how researchers understand the context-specific nature of religious discrimination, as well as implications for research on stigma management and the ways that the shifting religious and political landscape in the United States shapes the expression of atheist identities.
      PubDate: Sat, 08 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soab165
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Erratum to: How Internal Hiring Affects Occupational Stratification

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      Pages: 1606 - 1606
      Abstract: In the originally published version of this manuscript, there were errors in some tables and the supplementary appendix. A line of data was duplicated in Table 2, standard errors were omitted from a line in Table 3, and the wrong supplementary file was uploaded in place of the appendix. These errors have been corrected. The publisher apologizes for these errors.
      PubDate: Wed, 09 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac014
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Corrigendum to: Work Primacy and the Social Incorporation of
           Unaccompanied, Undocumented Latinx Youth in the United States

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1607 - 1607
      Abstract: In the originally published version of this manuscript, it was stated that the total number of Guatemalan respondents who originated from the rural highlands and identified as Indigenous was 34 (71 percent). This has been corrected to state the number is 36 (or 75 percent).
      PubDate: Mon, 28 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac026
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Correction to: Review of Redistributing the Poor: Jails, Hospitals, and
           the Crisis of Law and Fiscal Austerity

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      Pages: 1608 - 1608
      Abstract: By Armando Lara-Millán, Oxford University Press. 2021, 256pages. https://global.oup.com/academic/product/redistributing-the-poor-9780197507902'cc=us&lang=en&
      PubDate: Fri, 08 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soac036
      Issue No: Vol. 101, No. 3 (2022)
       
 
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