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  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
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Journal of Policy History
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.125
Number of Followers: 15  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0898-0306 - ISSN (Online) 1528-4190
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [305 journals]
  • States of Immigration: Making Immigration Policy from Above and Below,
           1875–1924

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      Abstract: Federalism provides a powerful—if not indispensable—lens for understanding the history and development of immigration policy in the United States. Although the Constitution made the federal government unequivocally preeminent in this policy realm, national officials were exceptionally slow to assert their authority and granted to state and local governments enormous power to regulate the entry and lives of immigrants from the nation's founding to the Gilded Age.1 According to most studies of US immigration policy making over time, this all changed with landmark Supreme Court rulings in the 1870s that established federal supremacy over immigration for 150 years to follow.2 This inflection point is regularly ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Labor Secretary Frances Perkins Reorganizes Her Department's Immigration
           Enforcement Functions, 1933–1940: "Going against the Grain"

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      Abstract: In 1939 Congress considered a resolution to impeach Labor Secretary Frances Perkins, who was the first woman to serve in a presidential cabinet and whose ideas—from unemployment insurance to Social Security—seeded many of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's (FDR) New Deal programs. The charges against her and two department officials were, in part, that they "fail[ed] … neglect[ed], and refus[ed] to enforce the immigration laws of the United States."1 The accusations were stunning because the Immigration Act of 1924 had made the immigration laws, to that point, the most restrictive in American history. Although the literature in immigration policy history recognizes the liberal policies she championed—some were ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Vote Aquí Hoy: The 1975 Extension of the Voting Rights Act and the
           Creation of Language Minorities

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      Abstract: Congress recognized Spanish speakers as a named category of citizens in a federal law for the first time in 1975 when it expanded the Voting Rights Act of 1965 (VRA). The Voting Rights Act of 1975 (VRA-1975) created a series of regulations for language minorities, which included Spanish-speaking voters.1 The provisions mandated that items related to voting be offered in identified minority languages for federal elections including bilingual ballots, election instructions, and registration forms. By validating rights for language minorities, Congress expanded federal voting protections far beyond African Americans. Although these language protections catered largely to Spanish speakers, the category also included ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Conflict over Congressional Reapportionment: The Deadlock of the 1920s

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      Abstract: For almost a century, the size of the US House of Representatives has remained capped at 435 seats. That number does not come from the US Constitution, which requires only that "the Number of Representatives shall not exceed one for every thirty Thousand, but each State shall have at Least one Representative."1 Instead, the contemporary House is set at 435 because of a 1929 law that fixed the number of representatives, delegated the power to reapportion from Congress to the Executive Branch, and empowered state legislatures to redistrict with few federal limitations on the shape of or equality of population between districts. The Apportionment and Census Act of 1929 reflected the culmination of ten years of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Remembering Welfare as We Knew It: Understanding Neoliberalism through
           Histories of Welfare

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      Abstract: Twenty-six years ago, with the assistance of a Republican congress, Democratic President William Jefferson Clinton fulfilled his campaign promise to "end welfare as we know it." Clinton signed the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) on August 22, 1996, replacing the then sixty-one-year-old Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), the federal cash assistance program that Americans had long referred to as "welfare," with Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). Under AFDC, the federal government had granted states matching funds to support dependent children and caregivers (usually single mothers) they found eligible.1 The PRWORA removed the welfare entitlement and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-01-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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