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  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
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Contemporary Pacific
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.259
Number of Followers: 5  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1043-898X - ISSN (Online) 1527-9464
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [305 journals]
  • About the Artist: Nālani Wilson-Hokowhitu

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      Abstract: Nālani Wilson-Hokowhitu ('o ia/she/her) is a transdisciplinary Kanaka 'Ōiwi scholar, curator, and artist presently residing in Kirikiriroa, Aotearoa/New Zealand. She is a global citizen with Indigenous, Moana genealogies to Moloka'i Nui a Hina and Kanaka'aukai from Kalapana, Hawai'i. An alumna of the University of Hawai'i–Mānoa's Center for Pacific Islands Studies and a senior research fellow at Ngā Wai a Te Tūī, Māori and Indigenous Research Center, she received a Royal Society of New Zealand Te Apārangi Marsden Fast-Start grant (2021–2024) focusing on retracing the story lines of Pacific women voyagers and navigators, with special interest in Hina, Hine, Sina, Sima, and Nim'anoa.Photo courtesy of the artistHer ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • One Salt Water: The Storied Work of Trans-Indigenous Decolonial Imagining
           with West Papua

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      Abstract: The white concrete walls of Cenderawasih University in Jayapura, West Papua, are topped with barbed wire and covered with graffiti, usually in a color scheme of red, blue, and black—colors frequently used to represent West Papuan identity. In December 2013, returning to Papua to visit after several years away in my passport country of Aotearoa/New Zealand, I passed the walls as I have done many times before. On one of the walls, I saw the image of the Morning Star flag—an overt symbol of Papuan independence. Also painted on a wall was a man wearing an Organi–sasi Papua Merdeka (Organization Papua Freedom) hat, along with the words "Refrendum [sic]," "Free West Papua," "PAPUA MERDEKA," "FREEDOM," and "NO" painted ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Making Sartorial Sense of Empire: Contested Meanings of Aloha Shirt
           Aesthetics

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      Abstract: On 18 January 2021, armed demonstrators gathered at a rally outside of the Oregon State Capitol to protest the outcome of the November 2020 US presidential election. They carried customized assault rifles and sidearms and wore tactical body armor over brightly colored shirts. While the sight of white men toting military-grade gear on US streets was not new, the addition of the "aloha" or "Hawaiian" shirt was notable. Since early 2020, this garment, with its bright colors and bold, usually floral patterns, has appeared at protests, riots, and rallies across the United States. Along with tactical gear, the aloha shirt serves as a uniform for a mixture of right-wing extremists, including clusters of white ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Compensation Page: News Narratives of Public Kinship in Papua New
           Guinea Print Journalism

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      Abstract: On 2 July 2020, people of Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea (PNG), gathered for a vigil for the death of a woman who had allegedly been killed by her husband. Though this kind of killing is sadly not uncommon, this woman's death was vociferously denounced and had already sparked several demonstrations against domestic violence. Her vigil was attended by a number of prominent officials, including the prime minister, James Marape. In his remarks, Marape promised swift prosecution of the husband and strong government action against domestic violence. He also called for broader social change, specifically saying: "Sometimes we allow customary obligations to take precedent. So let me thank the … family for standing up to ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "We Are So Happy EPF Came": Transformations of Gender in Port Moresby
           Schools

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      Abstract: For several decades, Papua New Guinea (PNG) has been viewed as a country where gender inequality is a major social problem. Fewer girls than boys go to school, fewer attend university, and even fewer enter the political domain (Misra 2017; Barry and others 2018). The extremely high incidence of violence against women and girls is often represented as a crisis in which women's rights as citizens are denied and gender violence is normalized or generally accepted as justifiable (Chandler 2014; Macintyre 2012; see also Law Reform Commission of Papua New Guinea 1992; Banks 1993, 2000; Amnesty International 2006). There have been numerous campaigns by nongovernment and foreign aid agencies aimed at reducing gender ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Pacific Island Pride: How We Navigate Australia

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      Abstract: Growing up as a Pacific Islander, I have seen it all by mainstream society, their views on my culture, from those who were both intolerant and accepting. But with age, I wish to move away from this paradigm and use my "Pacificness" as my competitive advantage, now and here in Australia.Pacific Island peoples residing in Australia have been the subject of negative stereotypes. Sadly, this cohort has been the target of deficit ideologies imposed on them by Australian society at both a community and a government level (Enari and Matapo 2021; Enari and Lemusuifeauaali'i 2021; Ravulo 2015). It is the aim of this essay to privilege the mana and resilience of these peoples. Through centering how they use their pride ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Pacific People Navigating the Sacred Vā to Frame Relational Care: A
           Conversation between Friends across Space and Time

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      Abstract: This essay represents a dialogue between three diverse friends about something that is central to us all: the significance of relational thinking and the value of the Pacific concept of vā, or sacred relational space. Here we seek to leverage connection to provide tentative answers to the question: To what extent can a dialogue about vā that is informed, critical, insightful, useful, and valuable be constructed across the spaces that connect and separate us' This begs questions of how a concept at home in the village travels and what its form might become, muffled or otherwise (Simati 2011; Tuagalu 2008).Accordingly, we offer a synthesis of the ways people care for various vā drawn from our three fields: ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Kiribati

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      Abstract: Reviews of the Federated States of Micronesia, Guåhan (Guam), the Marshall Islands, Nauru, and Palau are not included in this issue.Given its vulnerability to fluctuations in its currency exchange rate and the cost of imported basic products, the Republic of Kiribati is one of the most dependent Pacific Island countries on external financial support (which comes from the United States, the European Union, New Zealand, Australia, and China). Global warming and its impacts—sea-level rise, submersion, flooding, erosion, soil and freshwater salinization, alteration of marine resources hit by ocean acidification and deoxygenation, and cultural and legal dilemmas caused by climate migration (ipcc 2019)—increase this ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Northern Mariana Islands

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      Abstract: "We have suffered enough" (mv, 31 Dec 2020). This statement from a local lawmaker pretty much sums up what the period in review meant for the people of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) as they—like the rest of humanity—tried to make sense of, and cope with, the staggering social and economic costs imposed by a rampaging global pandemic. The tiny and remote Northern Marianas, with a tiny population and a tiny economy, has only one tiny industry, tourism—and covid-19 put it in a coma (mv, 29 July 2020).On 3 July 2020, Marianas Variety reported that Republican Governor Ralph Deleon Guerrero Torres's administration had submitted a revised fiscal year (fy) 2021 budget amounting to over $82.6 ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Hawai‘i

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      Abstract: Reviews of American Sāmoa, Cook Islands, French Polynesia, Norfolk Island, Rapa Nui, Tokelau, Tuvalu, and 'Uvea (Wallis) and Futuna are not included in this issue.Like in most parts of the world, the ramifications of the covid-19 pandemic were perhaps the single most important issue in Hawai'i during the period under review. As the vaccine became available in early 2021, Governor David Ige slowly lifted restrictions on visitors, businesses, and gatherings by residents. By June 2021, 61 percent of Hawai'i residents had received at least one shot of one of the available vaccines (Cocke 2021).As in parts of the US continent, there was resistance in some areas to wearing masks. In October 2020, the Hawai'i Department ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Māori Issues

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      Abstract: Protection for our communities from the covid-19 pandemic continued to take top priority for Māori during the year in review. While some support was provided from the government, the recommendations of our medical experts continued to be ignored and the virus attacked mainly Māori and Pasifika airport, managed-isolation, and quarantine facilities workers in Auckland in August 2020. Vaccinations started in February 2021, and Māori vaccination rates have been unacceptably low, although to date, we have continued to be spared the huge loss of life suffered in so many other countries. The general election in October 2020 saw the unprecedented appointment of five Māori to the Labour government's twenty-member cabinet. ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Niue

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      Abstract: Incredibly, Niue has been able to maintain its covid-19-free status while more than 90 percent of coun tries throughout the world continue to grapple with the pandemic. Despite the impacts of covid-19 and the international border restrictions in place, Niue has adapted a new normal and continued with business as usual, all guided by the country's more rational, albeit reserved, leader, Premier Dalton Tagelagi.Notwithstanding the impacts of covid-19, this has been an uncomplicated year for Niue, which has seen the new government reiterate the strength of partnerships to support collective success at both a domestic and regional level (eg, to Pacific Islands Forum partners following the withdrawal of its Micronesian ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Pitcairn

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      Abstract: The islands of Pitcairn, Henderson, Ducie, and Oeno (commonly known as Pitcairn) make up a single territory, the last remaining British Overseas Territory in the Pacific Ocean. During the period under review, two key events shaped the territory. First, there was the continuing threat posed by the covid-19 pandemic. If covid-19 had entered Pitcairn, it would have posed an immediate existential threat to a small and aging population. Pitcairn's isolation was an advantage in minimizing its exposure, but because of the severe limitations on travel, accessing health care off island was a real concern. Second, and related to the economic impacts of covid-19, was discussion between Pitcairn and the UK government regarding ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Tonga

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      Abstract: The last year has been full of grief and uncertainty globally; the covid-19 pandemic has tested the very limits of the world's infrastructure, economy, and capacity for resilience. In the current climate, we are grateful to report that Tonga has remained steadfast—and covid-19 free—in these trying times. Furthermore, Prime Minister Pōhiva Tu'i'onetoa has proved to be a suitable leader for Tonga during this time, responding thoughtfully and thoroughly to the threat of covid-19 and to the virus's economic aftermath. While the past year has highlighted many of Tonga's strengths and the kingdom's resourcefulness, sadly it has also brought the long-standing issues of queer rights and women's rights to the fore. The ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • E Hina e! E Hine e! Mana Waahine Maaori/Maoli of Past, Present and Future
           (review)

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      Abstract: I begin this review by exposing myself as a sometimes-reluctant visitor to museums rather than an expert with a sharp eye for museological exhibitions. My reluctance stems from the sterile whiteness and theft often associated with museums—no apologies given. Museums have a reputation for not serving Indigenous communities well. However, the long-term exhibition E Hina e! E Hine e! Mana Waahine Maaori/Maoli of Past, Present and Future sat me down like a well-meaning mafua (elder) and encouraged me to rethink my skepticism.Curated by Nālani Wilson-Hokowhitu (Kanaka Maoli), Aroha Yates-Smith (Te Arawa, Tainui, Horouta, Takitimu, Mataatua), and Maree Mills (Ngaati Tuuwharetoa), this exhibition explores the creation ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Sista, Stanap Strong!: A Vanuatu Women's Anthology ed. by Mikaela Nyman
           and Rebecca Tobo Olul-Hossen (review)

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      Abstract: This anthology of Vanuatu women's writing was curated to celebrate the fortieth anniversary of Vanuatu's independence. It is a welcome gift. Launched in Vanuatu and New Zealand in June 2021, the book engages thirty-seven authors across several genres—poetry, short stories, memoirs, essays, songs—writing mainly in English, occasionally in Bislama, and uniquely in two Tannese languages. It straddles generations, from a twenty-year-old to an octogenarian. While most authors are ni-Vanuatu women, several have diverse ancestries, several live overseas, and several authors born overseas have made Vanuatu their home. Some had previously been published; some are published here for the first time.The exquisite cover art by ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Refocusing Ethnographic Museums through Oceanic Lenses by Philipp Schorch
           (review)

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      Abstract: Refocusing Ethnographic Museums through Oceanic Lenses explores Indigenous museum practices at the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum in Hawai'i, the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, and the Museo Antropológico Padre Sebastián Englert in Rapa Nui. The writers include Philipp Schorch, professor of museum anthropology at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität in Munich, Germany; Noelle M K Y Kahanu, assistant specialist in American studies at the University of Hawai'i–Mānoa; Sean Mallon, curator at the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa; Cristián Moreno Pakarati, Rapanui historian and founding member of the research and educational organization Rapanui Pioneers Society; Mara Mulrooney, senior project supervisor at ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • A Whakapapa of Tradition: 100 Years of Ngāti Porou Carving, 1830–1930
           by Ngarino Ellis (review)

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      Abstract: In A Whakapapa of Tradition: 100 Years of Ngāti Porou Carving, 1830–1930, Ngāti Porou carving, history, and people are honored through skillfully woven images and stories. Supplementing the discussion with new photography from Natalie Robertson, Ngarino Ellis highlights the roles, works, and genealogies of six key carvers from the Iwirākau School of carving in Waiapu Valley, Aotearoa/New Zealand, and illustrates the school's transformative impact on Māori art forms. In doing so, she brings fresh views on what it means for art to be "traditional" or "contemporary," transporting the reader between fascinating stories and Robertson's wildly expressive photos of landscapes, meeting houses, and chapels and portraits of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Hawaiian Language: Past, Present, Future by Albert J Schütz (review)

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      Abstract: The manifold intrigue and value of Pacific languages include the way each language has its own unique story, history, and development spanning long periods of time. In Hawaiian Language: Past, Present, Future, Albert J Schütz focuses on the past, present, and possible futures of the Hawaiian language. Crucial to diving into the study of any Pacific language is the understanding that language is not simply a combination of sound systems and syntactical rules, of words and utterances, but also a fully integral and entangled aspect of the cultural and social fabric of its speakers and their home (is)lands. In brief, Schütz's work stands as a strong reminder that anyone engaging with the Hawaiian language and the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Waikiki dir. by Christopher Kahunahana (review)

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      Abstract: The tragedy of Hawai'i, from an Indigenous perspective, is the tragedy of settler colonialism. With the establishment of permanent residence by Americans and Europeans in the early nineteenth century, Kānaka Ma'oli became subject to what Norwegian sociologist Johan Galtung termed "structural violence," which asserts its cruelties in institutional rather than just face-to-face forms. They were victimized not only by foreign diseases for which they had no resistance but also by the loss of land to entrepreneurs and culture to missionaries without getting anything in return in terms of opportunities, much less respect. Now, two centuries later, their efforts to build and sustain meaningful, sovereign lives go on—both ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Unsustainable Empire: Alternative Histories of Hawai'i Statehood by Dean
           Itsuji Saranillio (review)

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      Abstract: On 2 July 2021, county officials declared a water shortage in upcountry Maui and prohibited residents from using water for nonessential activities like washing cars or watering lawns, with fines of up to us$500 for violating regulations. Meanwhile, about eight thousand visitors were flying to Maui daily, often staying in hotels with high water demands for pools and golf courses (see "'Water fiasco' on Maui Leaves Residents Feeling Mistreated, Unfairly Targeted," by Chelsea Davis, Hawaii News Now, 11 July 2021). This diversion of life-sustaining resources away from residents to tourists, from people for profit, is exemplary of the extractive tourism industry in Hawai'i. As Native Hawaiians like myself and longtime ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Balancing the Tides: Marine Practices in American Sāmoa by JoAnna
           Poblete (review)

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      Abstract: In Balancing the Tides: Marine Practices in American Sāmoa, historian JoAnna Poblete continues her work on US colonial experiences by tracing the effects of American colonization on the evolution of Indigenous marine relations. US administrative oversight of American Sāmoa rests with the Department of the Interior, making federal marine policies a fitting entry point to examine the history of colonial relations. Combining primary interview data with peer reviewed studies, agency reports, and local news media, Poblete builds a rich historical account of successful and problematic marine resource use to inform the public, scholars, and policymakers alike.The book examines four marinerelated policies: fishing ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Sāmoa

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      Abstract: The Samoan general elections dominated headlines in 2020–2021. Samoans worldwide watched intently as the two leading political parties battled for seats in the XVII Parliament during the April 2021 general elections. The Human Rights Protection Party (hrpp), which had been in power for over thirty years, was challenged by a newly formed opposition party, Fa'atuatua i le Atua Sāmoa ua Tasi (fast). This year's political review also includes the passing of the controversial Land and Titles Court (ltc) bills, the breakaway of key members of the hrpp, the beginning and rise in popularity of fast, political gridlock in the general elections, and the swearing in of Sāmoa's first female prime minister.Sāmoa's newest ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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