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  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
Showing 1 - 200 of 382 Journals sorted by number of followers
American Journal of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 376)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 301)
Annual Review of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 270)
Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 190)
Social Forces     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 91)
Information, Communication & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 77)
Social Problems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 76)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
European Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Anthropological Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60)
Critical Studies on Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Comparative Studies in Society and History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 56)
The British Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Current Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Qualitative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Sociology of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Critical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Sociological Methods & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
International Political Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
City & Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
European Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Ageing & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Comparative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Contemporary Sociology : A Journal of Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
The Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
AlterNative : An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Poverty and Social Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Victorian Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Sociological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Critical Discourse Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Games and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
International Journal of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
City: analysis of urban trends, culture, theory, policy, action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Judgment and Decision Making     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
International Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Health and Social Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Urbanism: International Research on Placemaking and Urban Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Complexity in Leadership and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Sociolinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Design and Culture : The Journal of the Design Studies Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Rural Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
City, Culture and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Family Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
International Review for the Sociology of Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Social Psychology Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Ethnicities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Sociology of Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
African and Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Social Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Urban Research & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Emotion Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 20)
Sociological Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of International and Intercultural Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
The Sociological Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Family & Community History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Studies in Sociology of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Research in Organizational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Cities in the 21st Century     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
African Identities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
European Societies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Sociological Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Heritage & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Comparative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Cognition and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social and Personal Relationships     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Public Relations Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
American Sociologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Policy History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Health Sociology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Philosophy & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Sociology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Environnement Urbain / Urban Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Berliner Journal für Soziologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Historical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Teaching Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Communication Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Family Relations     Partially Free   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Global Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Sociological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Sport in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Symbolic Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Chinese Sociology & Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Classical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Sociological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Crime, Histoire & Sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Review of Sociology / Revue Canadienne De Sociologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Sojourn: Journal of Social Issues in Southeast Asia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Caribbean Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Metaphor and Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Sociologia Ruralis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Review of Education, Pedagogy, and Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Clio. Femmes, Genre, Histoire - Articles     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Cultures & conflits     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Advertising & Society Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal for the Study of Radicalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Studies in Latin American Popular Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
East Central Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Catalyst : A Social Justice Forum     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Sociological Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Gender and Behaviour     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Political Power     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Canadian Journal of Sociology / Cahiers canadiens de sociologie     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Revista Mexicana de Sociologí­a     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Anthropologie et Sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Bronte Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Sociologie du Travail     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Review of Sociology: Revue Internationale de Sociologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Ateliers d'anthropologie     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Sociolinguistic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Race/Ethnicity : Multidisciplinary Global Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Sociological Research Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Cross-cultural Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Japanese Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Critical Realism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Sexuality Research and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Arabian Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Surveillance and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Nordic Journal of Migration Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Contexts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Senses and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture, and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Genre, sexualité & société     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cuban Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
New Zealand Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Meridians : feminism, race, transnationalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Revista de Psicología Social, International Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Mathematical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contemporary Pacific     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Critical Horizons     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contemporary Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Contributions to Indian Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Group Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Studia Iranica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Visitor Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Aztlan : A Journal of Chicano Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Genre & histoire     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Italian Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Canadian Journal of Women and the Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ethnologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Études françaises     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
The Social Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sociological Spectrum: Mid-South Sociological Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Historical Pragmatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social Dynamics: A journal of African studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Islamic Law and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Good Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
The Tocqueville Review/La revue Tocqueville     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Criminologie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sociologie et sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Public and Professional Sociology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Cahiers de l'Urmis     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue de la régulation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
SociologieS - Articles     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transatlantica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Sustainable Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Seminar : A Journal of Germanic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Chrétiens et sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Canadian Ethnic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Enfances, Familles, Générations     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Lien social et Politiques     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Recherches féministes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Sociology Mind     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
COnTEXTES     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revue Internationale De Securite Sociale     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Caderno CRH     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Loisir et Société / Society and Leisure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Política y sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Landscapes of Violence     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Diversité urbaine     Full-text available via subscription  
Ciencia e Cultura     Open Access  
Studies in American Naturalism     Full-text available via subscription  
Southern Cultures     Full-text available via subscription  
Liinc em Revista     Open Access  
World Cultures eJournal     Open Access  
Spaces for Difference: An Interdisciplinary Journal     Open Access  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access  
Tracés     Open Access  
Socio-logos     Open Access  

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Mental Health and Social Inclusion
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.223
Number of Followers: 38  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 3 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 2042-8308 - ISSN (Online) 2042-8316
Published by Emerald Homepage  [362 journals]
  • Beyond multicultural competency: a scoping review of multicultural
           orientation in psychotherapy and clinical supervision

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Daryl Mahon
      Abstract: Psychotherapy and clinical supervision outcomes are influenced by client and supervisee factors, one of which is cultural identity. Those with diverse racial and ethnic minoritised identities often experience disparities in therapy outcomes. Therapists and supervisors need to be responsive to the identity of those they support. The multicultural orientation (MCO) framework is an emerging concept in psychotherapy and clinical supervision that may offer these practitioners a framework to be responsive. A preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses extension for scoping reviews was conducted. Six databases, PubMed, Scopus, Embase, Academic Search Complete, Web of Science and PsychInfo, were searched for peer-reviewed literature published in English between the years 2000 and 2023. A total of 1,553 sources were identified, of which (n = 42) are included in this review. Findings suggest that MCO is still in its infancy as applied to therapy and clinical supervision. Most of the research has been conducted in America, using quantitative methodologies with white western populations. Cultural humility is the most studied MCO pillar, and variables such as reductions in psychological stress, the working alliance and microaggressions are reported on as outcomes. MCO applied to the group therapy process is an emerging finding of interest. However, more research is needed, especially experiential designs across different and diverse populations and contexts. MCO is an emerging therapy and clinical supervision process that has the potential to improve the outcomes for therapy clients and supervisees. Further research is needed to replicate current studies, and further research with diverse populations, countries and contexts should be undertaken as a priority.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2024-02-28
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-01-2024-0012
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Perceived psychological status among family caregivers of an autistic
           child: the role of coping strategies and self-esteem as predictors

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Abd Alhadi Hasan, Amal ALsulami
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to assess psychological distress among parents of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), self-esteem as a predictor of such distress and the effect of coping strategies. A descriptive correlational study design was conducted using a convenient sample of parents of ASD children (N = 93). This study revealed that the parents of an ASD child experienced a high level of anxiety (M = 15.89), a moderate level of depression (M = 15.85) and a mild level of stress (M = 16.86). Parents of ASD children also reported a low self-esteem score (M= 13.27). Mothers of ASD children reported higher levels of psychological distress, lower levels of self-esteem and more frequent utilisation of maladaptive coping strategies than fathers of ASD children. Parents of children with ASD experience a significant level of psychological distress; however, this may be improved by developing programmes and psychological interventions focused on improving parents’ self-esteem and using more active coping strategies. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study conducted in Saudi Arabia that predict the psychological status among family caregivers of an autistic child.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2024-02-13
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-08-2023-0081
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Self-concept as related to emotional intelligence: a study of tribal and
           non-tribal students

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Aklima Sultana, Nasrin Islam
      Abstract: Emotional intelligence (EI) and self-concept (SC) play a very important role in one’s life. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the SC and EI of tribal and nontribal university students. The research used a quantitative approach, 100 nontribal (50 male and 50 female) and 100 tribal (50 male and 50 female) students were selected by nonprobability sampling method. The Bangla version of the self-concept questionnaire (Beck et al., 2001) and the emotional intelligence questionnaire (Hyde et al., 2002) were used to measure the SC and EI of students. Pearson correlation, t-test and post hoc tests were used for statistical analysis. The findings of this study showed that the tribal and nontribal students differ significantly on the measure of SC and EI (p < 0.01). Although nontribal students showed higher SC than tribal students, tribal students showed a higher level of EI than nontribal students. The results also showed that gender significantly affects SC and EI (p < 0.01). Males have higher SC and EI than females. Furthermore, the study revealed that socioeconomic status differs significantly in the case of SC. Finally, the result also showed a significant positive correlation (r = 0.245, p < 0.01) between SC and EI. The results of the research are only based on the students of one university besides the sample size is limited. This research allowed the authors to determine the practical implications. The findings suggest that there is a significant difference in SC and EI between tribal and nontribal students, with nontribal students showing higher levels of SC. This implies that interventions and programs aimed at enhancing SC may be particularly beneficial for tribal students. The study also reveals that there are significant differences in SC and EI between tribal and nontribal adolescent boys and girls. This highlights the importance of considering gender differences when designing interventions to improve SC and EI among tribal and nontribal students. Moreover, educators, parents and policymakers can use these findings to develop targeted interventions and strategies to enhance SC among tribal students, with the aim of improving their overall well-being, academic achievements and success in life. This paper adds to the literature on the SC and EI of tribal and nontribal university students by describing the difference in levels and a significant correlation. This paper obtains an innovative statistical approach to develop the findings so that information can be used in the future.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2024-02-01
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-11-2023-0120
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Writing disclosure: to tell or not to tell'

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      Authors: Kirsty Lilley
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to explore from a lived experience perspective the factors impacting on the decision to disclose experiences of abuse to gain support. The author hopes to inform healthcare and allied professionals of the barriers people face when disclosing traumatic experiences to facilitate learning. The author has shared various experiences of sharing details of traumatic experiences. It is important to reflect on the narratives of those with living experience to facilitate learning and opportunities to remove any common barriers to disclosure. This lived experience narrative will support healthcare and allied professionals to reduce any barriers to disclosure so that early intervention may be facilitated. Collaborative learnings and reflection which support professionals and those with lived experience to work together to create meaningful services which support people in recovery and support is important. This is the unique perspective and experience of the author which is shared to facilitate understanding and the removal of barriers to disclosure.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2024-01-30
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-01-2024-0006
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Understanding perceived loneliness: a multifaceted approach

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      Authors: Vaishnavi Sharma
      Abstract: This paper aims to understand loneliness with a special focus on perceived loneliness using a multifaceted approach. To the best of the author’s knowledge, this appears to be the first paper dedicated to investigating the perception of loneliness as its primary topic. Unfortunately, not much work is available on this specific focus. However, various facets and dimensions can be integrated to gain a better understanding. Therefore, the author has carefully selected four sections, each focusing on different aspects of loneliness. These sections can contribute to a better understanding of loneliness, keeping in mind its perception. Section one examines the cognitive processes and self-assessment mechanisms that set lonely individuals apart from their non-lonely counterparts. These include heightened awareness, negative social cue interpretation and increased sensitivity to social threats. Section two examines the predictors of loneliness and associated emotional responses. This includes factors such as emotional responses, attributions, duration and situational variables. Section three challenges conventional definitions of loneliness by introducing social asymmetry. Within this framework, personality traits such as extraversion emerge as resilient against loneliness, even in social isolation. Section four discusses the significant influence of cultural diversity on perceptions of loneliness. Collectivist cultures rely on familial and community support to combat loneliness, whereas individualistic cultures require interventions that promote independence. This comprehensive examination contributes insights for informing targeted interventions, reinforcing support systems and enhancing our understanding of human connectivity in an increasingly isolated world.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2024-01-30
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-10-2023-0114
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Passive social network usage and life satisfaction among Vietnamese
           university students: a moderated mediation model of self-esteem and gender
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nhan Nguyen, An Dang, Tai Ngo, Hieu Tran, Dung Tran
      Abstract: This study aims to investigate the role of self-esteem in mediating the relationship between passive social networking usage (PSNU) and life satisfaction, as well as whether the relationships between PSNU and self-esteem/life satisfaction as well as self-esteem and life satisfaction vary by gender. This research is conducted in compliance with the ethical standards of the American Psychological Association’s study on a subject of 304 students. Study participants are invited to participate in the survey by completing the anonymous questionnaire regarding passive social network usage, self-esteem and life satisfaction. The findings indicate that self-esteem mediated the relationship between PSNU and life satisfaction. Furthermore, gender moderated the self-esteem and life satisfaction relationship, and such an effect was stronger for females than males. This study, adopting a cross-sectional design and self-report scale, examined the relationship between PSNU and life satisfaction. However, the short study duration hindered establishing a cause-and-effect relationship. Credibility concerns arose from participant-induced noise variables in the self-report scale. Future research should use diverse methods to validate underlying mechanisms. Despite limitations, the study revealed self-esteem as a mediating factor, alleviating the negative impact of PSNU on life satisfaction. Both male and female users are encouraged to engage in self-education, valuing their self-esteem for heightened life satisfaction. These findings contribute to the understanding of how passive social network usage predicts life satisfaction (mediating effect of self-esteem) based on social comparison theory and when self-esteem increases life satisfaction (moderating effect of gender) based on social role theory of gender differences.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2024-01-25
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-11-2023-0117
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Examining the impact of working conditions, lifestyle choices, and
           demographic factors on mental health of industrial workers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sahar Daghagh Yazd, Mehmet Akif Karaman, Salma Fathi, Areej Alsarraf, Shaikhah Alajmi, Sahab Rutabian, Manya Aladwani
      Abstract: This study aims to explore how factors such as working conditions, lifestyle choices and demographic characteristics may affect the mental health of industrial workers in Kuwait. Within the scope of the study’s objective, the authors reached 400 industrial workers (228 male, 172 female) working in oil and gas organizations in Kuwait. An ordered logistic regression model was conducted to examine the effect of relevant independent variables on workers’ mental health. Result indicated that employees with a lower education level (p-value = 0.015), employees who were smokers (p-value = 0.004) and employees with night shifts (p-value = 0.019), were more likely to experience mental health issues. Furthermore, result strongly highlights a higher chance of experiencing mental health problems among the workers who had longer working times (p-value = 0.000). On the other hand, having children (p-value = 0.042), visiting a mental health professional (p = 0.014) and living in a house with others (flat mate, family members, etc.) (p-value = 0.016) were statistically significant factors to improve employees’ mental health. Surprisingly, the authors’ research did not find a significant relationship between the mental health issues experienced by employees and their yearly income. The paper lies in its exploration of the impact of working conditions, lifestyle choices and demographic factors on mental health of industrial workers using statistical approach. By applying ordered logistic regression, this study uncovers new insights into mental health of industrial workers.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2024-01-23
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-11-2023-0119
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Predictor of depression and anxiety among caregivers of hospitalized
           patients with mental illness

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Abd Alhadi Hasan, Amal Alsulami
      Abstract: The study aims to identify the predictors of depression and anxiety among carers of hospitalized patients with mental illness in Eradah Complex for Mental Health Hospital. A descriptive correlational study design was conducted using a convenient sample of family carers of patients with mental illness (N = 216). The study used the Beck Depression Inventory and Anxiety Inventory scales. The results of regression models revealed that the socio-demographic characteristics of the family carers showed that age is a statistically significant predictor of family carers depression and anxiety scores. In addition, the age of the family carers explained 36% of the variance in the family carers depression and anxiety scores, while marital status explained 64% of the total variance in the family carers’ depression and anxiety scores. Furthermore, having received support in caring significantly predicted depression and anxiety scores, and this was the case for occupation status and being diagnosed with any form of chronic illness. Based on the findings of this study, the authors opine that evaluations of carers’ cognitive strategies and social support are needed to determine the risk of depression in carers of mental patients. This study is the one of the limited studies conducted in Saudi Arabia to identify predictor of depression and anxiety among caregivers of hospitalized patients with mental illness. The study has used a validated scales to assess the main study outcomes.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2024-01-09
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-08-2023-0083
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Living with a friend mediates PTSD and CPTSD symptoms among trauma-exposed
           Ukrainians during the second year of 2022 Russian invasion

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      Authors: Mariana Velykodna, Olha Charyieva, Natalia Kvitka, Kateryna Mitchenko, Oksana Shylo, Oksana Tkachenko
      Abstract: This study aims to develop and test multivariable psychosocial prediction models of perceived post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and complex post-traumatic stress disorder (CPTSD) symptoms development among trauma-exposed Ukrainian adults (n = 761) after 1.5 years of the 2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine. This research was designed as a survey in line with the methodology of “Transparent reporting of a multivariable prediction model for individual prognosis or diagnosis” checklist. The survey included a questionnaire on sociodemographic characteristics and specifics of trauma exposure, as well as validated self-reported inventories: The International Trauma Questionnaire, Acceptance and Action Questionnaire – version 2, Connor–Davidson Resilience Scale-10 and the Modified BBC Subjective Well-being Scale. Regression analysis revealed different prediction models for PTSD and CPTSD symptoms, explaining 18.4% and 41.4% of their variance with five and eight predictors, respectively. Four variables were similar in predicting PTSD and CPTSD: war-relatedness of trauma, living with a friend, perceived physical health and regret for the past. War-relatedness of trauma the respondents were exposed to was among the strongest predictors for PTSD and CPTSD severity. However, living with a friend was almost equally strong in mitigating these mental consequences. Regret for past and lowly rated physical health were assessed as relatively weaker but statistically significant predictors in this study. Upon the original theoretical framework, two psychosocial prediction models were developed for PTSD and CPTSD symptoms in a non-clinical sample of trauma-exposed Ukrainian adults.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2024-01-09
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-11-2023-0118
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Comparative analysis of psychological distress between online and
           on-Campus learning among university students

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      Authors: Hajira Batool, Abdur Rashid
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is a comparative analysis of psychological distress between online and on-campus learning among university students. The study was performed to investigate the comparative analysis of psychological distress between online and on-campus learning among university students. This study is a quantitative, comparative study. Data were collected through convenient sampling technique from different university students. The sample size of the study was (n = 200) and the sample was taken from universities. Three scales, students’ readiness learning scale, DASS-21 Scale and on-campus learning scale, were used for data collection and the data were analyzed statistically. The analysis was carried out by the statistical tests correlation test, t-test and linear regression. It was revealed through this study that on-campus learning is more preferred by the students than online learning. The findings were that online learning has more psychological distress among students than on-campus learning. Additionally, it was found that as compared to males, females have more tendency toward depression, anxiety and stress. Findings also revealed that married students have a larger tendency toward depression, anxiety and stress as compared to unmarried students. No socioeconomic significance difference was found. Moreover, it was revealed that working students prefer online learning to on-campus learning. Learning has a significant impact on students’ future settlement, independence and well-being. The findings of this research study can contribute to understanding the educational system and determining which learning system is better for students and for the students’ mental well-being. Learning has a significant impact on students’ future settlement, independence and well-being. This paper contributes by offering practical insights for educators and policymakers.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2024-01-09
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-11-2023-0127
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • The devastating effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on the lives of women and
           children in 2023

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      Authors: Morve Roshan K., Kadri Nashrin A.
      Abstract: Current issues (such as health and economy-related) emerged due to the impact of COVID-19 on women’s and children’s health. The purpose of this opinion paper is to understand the world’s health issues after COVID-19. The authors study the devastating effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on the lives of women and children in 2023. The authors have applied the content analysis method and reviewed the post-COVID-19 impacts on women’s and children’s health. As a result of unemployment or financial instability, the fear of economic insecurity increases cases of women and child violence, child labour and other health issues. According to the study, the authors find that post-COVID-19-related health issues increase at a high level. After COVID-19, across the world, children and women have gone through domestic violence and health issues (i.e. stress, anxiety and so on) and the vulnerable situation of children and women has badly impacted their mental and physical health. Many children were orphaned, and the poor died due to poverty. COVID-19 has had a direct or indirect effect on children and women all over the world till today. This opinion paper focuses on post-COVID-19 issues that we all have forgotten to include in our current discourse.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2024-01-08
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-12-2023-0133
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Analysis and mapping of research on barriers to mental health service
           utilization in minority and underserved groups (1993-2022)

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      Authors: Waleed Sweileh
      Abstract: This paper aims to investigate research activity on barriers for minority and underserved groups to access and use mental health services. Using Scopus, relevant articles published from 1993 to 2022 were collected. The final list included 122 articles. Research hotspots included cultural and ethnic barriers, obstacles encountered by LGBTQ+ individuals, challenges faced by refugees and immigrants, limited access in rural areas and barriers affecting special populations. The top 10 cited articles focused on language barriers, cultural stigma, gender-specific challenges and systemic obstacles. New research avenues included the role of technology in overcoming barriers to access mental health services. Policymakers and practitioners can use this knowledge to develop targeted interventions, enhance cultural competence, reduce stigma, improve rural access and provide LGBTQ+-affirming care, ultimately promoting equitable mental health care. This research underscores the importance of addressing mental health service barriers for equity and social justice. Neglecting these disparities can worsen mental health, increase health-care costs, reduce productivity and lead to higher social welfare expenses, perpetuating disadvantages. This paper's uniqueness lies in its comprehensive analysis of barriers and facilitators to mental health service utilization among minority and underserved groups. It serves as a basis for developing evidence-based strategies to improve service accessibility and enhance the well-being of marginalized communities.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2024-01-01
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-10-2023-0109
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Stigma research in Arab countries: a rapid review

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      Authors: Waleed Sweileh
      Abstract: This paper aims to provide a comprehensive overview of existing research on stigma in Arab countries. A rapid review approach was used, leveraging the Scopus database to identify relevant articles. This streamlined method allows for timely assessments of the current state of knowledge, identifies research gaps and is particularly relevant given the social and cultural dynamics in Arab countries. This study identified a growing interest in stigma-related topics in Arab countries, with a notable increase in the number of publications and citations over the past decade. Research focused on various aspects of stigma, including mental health, HIV, COVID-19 and diverse health conditions, shedding light on the prevalent challenges faced by different populations. Additionally, comparative studies highlighted the influence of culture and gender on the expression of stigma in the region. To combat stigma in Arab countries, this study suggests the need for culturally sensitive interventions, integration of mental health services into health-care systems and the development of public health campaigns. These measures should be designed to protect vulnerable populations and prioritize educational initiatives for both the younger generation and health-care professionals. Reducing stigma in Arab countries is crucial for fostering greater social cohesion, equality and overall well-being. The study underscores the importance of collaborations to adapt successful strategies to the unique Arab context. This paper fills a crucial research gap by investigating stigma in Arab countries, emphasizing the need for culturally sensitive interventions, education integration and international collaboration to combat it effectively.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2024-01-01
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-10-2023-0111
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Editorial

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      Authors: Jerome Carson
      Abstract: Editorial
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2024-01-10
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-12-2023-134
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Scoping review of peer support for adults and young people experiencing
           loneliness and social isolation

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      Authors: Daryl Mahon
      Abstract: Loneliness and social isolation are risk factors for morbidity and mortality and a growing health concern. Peer support is an intervention that has shown efficacy in the wider health-care arena. However, little is known about its effectiveness when working with adults and adolescents experiencing these issues. The purpose of this study is to conduct a scoping review on loneliness and social isolation in adult and youth populations. A preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses extension for scoping reviews was conducted. Five databases, Web of Science, Academic Search Complete, Embase, PsycINFO and Scopus were searched for peer-reviewed literature published in English from inception to 2023. The search yielded 2,402 articles of which (N = 12) met the inclusion criteria for this review. Peer support interventions for loneliness and social isolation are a relatively new topic of interest for academics. However, it is apparent that loneliness and social isolation cut across populations experiencing various health and social issues. More experiential research is needed to evidence the effectiveness of peer support in these areas with both adults and adolescents. Emerging areas of interest include the use of technology to deliver interventions and the use of technology to facilitate peer support implementation with populations difficult to reach. Peer support may be a promising social intervention to help those experiencing loneliness and social isolation associated with a range of health conditions. However, further research needs to be undertaken in this emerging area of practice. Loneliness and social isolation are of increasing concern. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first scoping review conducted in this area
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-12-28
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-11-2023-0129
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Writing and falling through the cracks

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      Authors: Kirsty Lilley
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to explore the many ways in which those who have experienced early life adversity and trauma can continue to be failed within health-care settings and other organisations. The author explores the impact that repeated exposure to indifference and a lack of help and support has on the ability to recover and rebuild a meaningful life. The author takes the reader through a journey of various autoethnographic vignettes to explore the living experience of continuing to be unseen. The author hopes to contribute to improving the lives of service users. The author has written about the many ways in which distressing experiences and mental health difficulties were left unsupported by various professionals and organisations. The writing is rich and evocative and gives voice to the distress experienced from a lack of caring attention. The author concludes that whilst it has been painful to remember the varied ways people with lived experience of early life trauma continue to be failed it has also been cathartic and helpful. It is noted that the writing of these events brings some perspective and enables the author to limit the potential for self-blame which is a regular feature of the psychology of those living with early-life relational trauma. The writing of these events serves to highlight the ways institutions might improve responses to those seeking support. The author concludes that this is a meaningful way to use such harmful experiences. The author concludes that recovery and the ability to rebuild a meaningful life after early-life trauma is often hindered and denied by the responses received when seeking support from various institutions and people who may be able to intervene to prevent further harm occurring. These testimonies may contribute to the wider learnings about the impacts and lived experience of early life trauma and how institutions might support and encourage recovery. The author notes the helpfulness of writing about these experiences to bring perspective and remind those who seek help that it is a great act of courage despite unhelpful responses. The author has found that writing about these experiences helps to soothe any feelings of self-blame in terms of being unable to recover sooner from early life trauma and that recovery and moving forward must be positioned as a social phenomenon and not a solely individual pursuit. It is noted that writing about difficult experiences can be cathartic and bring fresh perspective and hope. Contributing to ongoing research in terms of how helping professionals can respond wisely is satisfying and meaningful for the author. This is the author’s firsthand and unique testimony of how easy it can be for survivors of trauma to continue to be unseen and failed. The author also shows that there are many opportunities to support and help which are inadvertently missed which contributes to ongoing distress. The author hopes that the courage taken to write of these experiences will contribute to learnings within many professions and organisations of how to notice, support and help those in distress and living with the effects of early life trauma. The author has found the writing of this paper to be meaningful. The process has helped the author to make sense of previously distressing events. It is hoped it will be of value to the reader.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-12-26
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-11-2023-0125
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Using a digital app to monitor the effects of sexual harassment on mental
           health

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      Authors: Amina Muazzam, Aqsa Shabbir, Naveed Iqbal, Muhammad Faran, Mubeena Munir, Fatima Kamran
      Abstract: Sexual harassment on public transport puts women at risk of mental health problems, apart from disrupting their lives and the harmful social consequences. This is especially the case for Pakistani women, for whom sexual harassment has been on the rise for the past decade. This study aims to explore how Pakistani women use strategies to cope with sexual harassment when using public transport and its mediating role in their issues with mental health. Given that the data collection task on such a culturally sensitive topic was crucial, a mobile application for anonymized data collection was used, which appeared to be an effective strategy. Using the mobile application, 1,054 women who use public transport submitted their responses; however, the analysis is based on 250 usable responses. Their experience of harassment was measured using the Sexual Harassment Experience Questionnaire, their mental health using the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales and their coping strategies by the Brief Cope Inventory. The results indicate that adaptive coping is a significant negative mediator between sexual harassment and mental well-being, whereas maladaptive coping is non-significant. Adaptive coping, i.e. “Acceptance” to admit the reality that the problem exists with all, and “Religion” to seek help spiritually to deal with the problem. Unfortunately, the findings show no suitable coping means to deal with the impact of sexual harassment on women who travel on public transport. This study also illustrates that using the right technologies can encourage participants to submit responses for culturally sensitive topics. This study provides insight into the experience of street harassment in Pakistani women and how it is related to mental health. This study also explores the role of adaptive and maladaptive coping as an intervening variable between street harassment and mental health.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-12-26
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-10-2023-0107
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Exploring lesbian adolescence: an analysis of Abha Dawesar’s

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      Authors: Morve Roshan K., Manohar Dugaje
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to examine the advancement of cultural transformation over time demands certain alterations in human perceptions. It also aims to examine the 21st century’s many radical changes in India, the constant legal battles to decriminalize homosexuality, and challenges to the rigid dichotomy between heterosexuality and homosexuality. Besides, it influences popular culture among the masses, which has turned out to create a more visible space for the lesbian community. In India, lesbian literature begins synchronously under the shades of women’s writing and feminism that wires new hopes for their identity. This paper examines a primary text as Indian writer Abha Dawesar’s Babyji (2005). There comes the iconic work of Abha Dawesar’s Babyji (2005), which creates a turning point by introducing the life, inner conflict and turbulence of a teenage girl. In addition, a textual analysis of this novel brings forth an analysis of attributes such as sexuality, gender and the interplay of caste and class that meld lesbian childhood and adolescence. This paper also examines how a lesbian girl adapts to and negotiates her maturation amidst vivid social scenarios and cultural conditioning. A few studies (Hidalgo, et al., 2013; Bem, 1989; Pyne, 2016) show many children have reached or crossed their teenage life without accurate or affirmative knowledge of sexuality and gender. Parents, teachers and even other intellectuals of the adult world fail to transfer their knowledge effectively to children. Definitely, the relevance of sex education is paramount, but more important is what implementation tactics should be used for the same cause. The point is that sex education should not be condensed into a certain gender or perpetuate parochial discrimination. It needs to adapt an age-appropriate curriculum for the cognitive and emotional development of the individuals. Considering these factors, understanding comprehensive sex education is what is most likely to find sustainable remedies for this matter. Gerald writes about a socialization process and gays and lesbians hiding their identity from family and society; a fear of rejection; there is a social gap in peer and family spheres. These fears prevent lesbian or gay young persons from fully developing their identities (1999). Rao and Mason tested a model derived from minority stress theory in which the perceived impact of Section 377 increases depressive symptoms of sexual minorities by increasing concealment stress, leading to a diminished sense of belonging. Because of their minority status, they are more vulnerable to and have a higher prevalence of mental illness than heterosexual individuals (2018). Babyji has created a discourse to perpetuate normativity and gives importance to the mental health of the excluded lesbian group. It opens a door to studying teenage groups’ issues and their challenges to understanding social and mental issues regarding their identity. A study on this untouched area is required to highlight their issues and mental health problems. This research is an initiative step to create and provide a platform to raise awareness in society.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-12-25
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-11-2023-0122
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Reaching out for help

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      Authors: Kirsty Lilley
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how often survivors are dismissed and unsupported in response to actively reaching out for help with distress. The author hopes the vignettes written about in this piece will serve to support and contribute to a body of work, which will educate professionals how to better support. The author shares various experiences when opportunities to help were denied and the impact this had on recovery. It is also noted that the responses of some health professionals mirror the original trauma suffered and therefore add to distress unnecessarily. The author has written about various experiences in different settings in which the support offered fell below professional standards and contributed to further unnecessary distress. The writing is evocative and rich in descriptive detail of the event and then implications of the event on recovery. The author concludes that it is helpful to use experiences of being dismissed and unsupported by various professionals to contribute to a body of work, which will hopefully educate and support those in caring professions to support survivors better. The author notes that responses to requests for help can unintentionally and intentionally further exacerbate the distress already experienced by those living with traumatic early life experiences and relational abruptions. This is the author’s unique and first-hand lived experience of reaching out for help in relation to the distress experienced as a result of early life traumatic and adversarial experiences. The author notes that it is helpful to write about these difficult experiences with the hope that they will inform educational programmes to support health professionals in how they respond to people experiencing trauma. This has helped the author regain a sense of agency in contributing to the prevention of further unhelpful responses from various health professionals to those in distress. The vignettes are rich, deeply evocative and moving. The writing process also helped the author make sense of these further difficulties and how they impacted the recovery process.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-12-25
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-11-2023-0126
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Participation in mental health schemes in Malaysia: perspectives of young
           intellectuals

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      Authors: Hanudin Amin
      Abstract: This study examined the participation in mental health takaful schemes among young intellectuals in two public universities in Malaysia. Drawing from the Attitude-Social Influence-Self-Efficacy (ASE), this study evaluated the effects of attitude, social influence and self-efficacy on participation in mental health takaful schemes using an empirical investigation surveying 767 respondents who were identified as young intellectuals in Malaysia. Evidently, the ASE factors shape the development of participation in mental health takaful schemes among young intellectuals. This study is confined in terms of the context and variables used – which limits its generalisation. Future studies should address these issues accordingly. The results obtained can become a yardstick to gauge the participation of young intellectuals in mental health takaful in Malaysia. This study introduced mental health takaful to the ASE, where young intellectuals are brought into play.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-12-20
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-12-2023-0130
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Emotional intelligence and mental well-being of students in Indian higher
           education sector: an SEM based analysis

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      Authors: Shikha Rana, Vandana Singh, Nishant Chaturvedi
      Abstract: This study aims to provide empirical insights pertaining to the impact of trait emotional intelligence on the mental well-being of students in higher education institutions (HEIs) in India. In the current study, responses from a total of 252 students were randomly taken from different universities of Uttarakhand (India). The analysis was done using structural equation modelling AMOS 23. The current study empirically established the positive impact of trait emotional intelligence (TEI) on the mental well-being of students and highlighted the relevance of TEI in curbing the psychological distress in students of HEIs. This study endeavours to bridge the empirical and population gap by examining the emotional intelligence and its impact on mental well-being of the students of Indian HEIs, where studies are still scant and demand massive exploration of the perceptions of students. Strong emotional intelligence is pivotal in strengthening the mental well-being of students so that they can make appropriate decisions pertaining to their career and personal life.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-12-11
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-07-2023-0078
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Climate change and mental health: impact on people with disabilities

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      Authors: Shinu Vig, Sunita Dwivedi
      Abstract: This paper aims to examine why people with disabilities (PWDs) are at risk due to climate change. It also discusses the linkage between climate change events and the mental health of the disabled population. This paper follows a qualitative approach. Climate change can affect the mental well-being of PWDs in several ways such as increased vulnerability, displacement-related trauma, social isolation, loss of independence, climate anxiety and eco-grief. The paper has practical implications for policymakers. Because climate change has a disproportionate impact on PWDs, there is an urgent need to include them in climate action, both as beneficiaries and decision-makers. The paper attempts to explore the measures that can be taken for prevention and mitigation of impacts on the mental health of PWDs.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-12-06
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-11-2023-0121
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • “Self-compassion and life satisfaction in Vietnamese adolescents: the
           mediating role of emotional and behavioral problems”

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      Authors: Vinh Tuan Nguyen, Cat Tuong Phuoc Nguyen
      Abstract: The current study aims to examine the relationship between self-compassion and life satisfaction in Vietnamese adolescents and investigate the possibility that emotional and behavioural problems mediate this relationship. Quantitative means of data collection and analysis were used to investigate the relationship between self-compassion and life satisfaction and the underlying mechanism of this relationship. A set of questionnaires was presented to a sample of 828 adolescents (M age = 14.61; SD = 1.08) aged 14–17 years from two secondary schools and two high schools in Thua Thien Hue Province, Vietnam. This helped to determine their self-compassion (self-compassion scale), emotional and behavioural problems (strengths and difficulties questionnaire) and life satisfaction (life satisfaction scale). Instruments reflected satisfactory reliability and validity. The results show that self-warmth was positively associated with life satisfaction and that self-coldness was positively associated with emotional and behavioural problems and negatively associated with life satisfaction in Vietnamese adolescents. Emotional and behavioural problems fully mediated the negative relationship between self-coldness and life satisfaction. It is implied that intervention programmes should be tailored to both promote self-compassionate behaviours and reduce self-coldness, to increase life satisfaction in adolescents. The research available on the relationship between self-compassion and life satisfaction in adolescents, especially adolescents from Southeast Asia, is very sparse. More significantly, the underlying mechanisms behind this relationship are not yet fully understood.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-12-04
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-07-2023-0076
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Measuring the impact of loneliness, physical activity, and self esteem on
           the health of the retired people

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      Authors: Eliza Sharma, John Ben Prince
      Abstract: This study aims to measure the impact of loneliness, physical activity (PA) and self-esteem on the health of retired people and also checks the moderating role of living arrangements and gender of the elderly people on this relationship. Four standardized scales were used in the study to measure four different constructs: Self-Worth Questionnaire, UCLA Loneliness Scale Version 3, General Health Questionnaire-28 and Physical Activity Scale for Elders. Structural equation modelling was applied to the four constructs. The study concluded that loneliness has a negative and significant impact on the health of retired people, while self-esteem and PA have a positive and significant impact on their health. The study is among the few to include multiple instruments to measure abstract parameters in the field of health care. The paper brings out implications not just for academicians but also for policymakers, considering the complex situation prevailing in the emerging economy.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-11-27
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-08-2023-0091
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The Platt 3p (P3p) model of mental health interventions

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      Authors: Ian Andrew Platt
      Abstract: This paper aims to introduce the Platt 3p model (P3p), an innovative framework aiming to address the mental health needs of young people. The model comprises three dimensions: past, present and potential, on which any mental health intervention should act to improve mental health outcomes. A conceptual analysis is made that uses an interdisciplinary approach to draw on existing research and theories from psychology, developmental science and educational interventions to create the P3p model. The P3p model presents a multi-layered approach that considers subjective, individual and group-level variables that should be considered in comprehensive mental health interventions. It accommodates systemic barriers and individual differences, thus creating the potential for more targeted, effective interventions. Though every effort has been made to provide a robust theoretical foundation, the model has yet to be empirically validated. Future research is taking place to apply the model in school settings to assess its practical efficacy. The P3p model is novel in its integrative approach, fusing elements from disparate theories into a singular framework. This flexibility allows for person-centred, adaptable interventions that are tailored to individual needs.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-11-27
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-11-2023-0115
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • “You get good at becoming secretive, at hiding it.” Shame and
           loneliness: the mental health impacts of skin picking disorder

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      Authors: Marta Isibor, Olivia Sagan
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to report on a study into the lived experience of skin picking disorder (SPD) and to explore the psychological impact of the disorder. Researchers employed a qualitative phenomenological approach, using Interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA). The study found that the sense of shame, common among participants, led to self-stigma, hiding, concealing and avoidance. Shame of SPD also interplayed with and compounded the shame of loneliness. Limitations included a lack of a longitudinal component to the work. This is deemed important, as both the SPD and the experience of loneliness can shift over time as circumstances change, and individuals develop strategies for coping or, conversely, experience a worsening of the condition and the shame, loneliness and social isolation it can induce. This study draws attention to the complex nature of both SPD and loneliness. It highlights how those living with the disorder are reluctant to seek help, resulting in low rates of treatment access and distrust in health providers. As SPD is little understood, it can be erroneously deemed a “choice”; seldom discussed as a condition, it can lead to exclusion and withdrawal. The sense of shame of both appearance and behaviour interplays with and compounds the shame of loneliness and can force the individual into a further cycle of withdrawal and isolation. While research suggests SPD should be acknowledged as a public health issue, research and literature is still relatively limited, and there are no qualitative phenomenological studies as yet that report on the lived experience of SPD.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-11-22
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-10-2023-0110
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The mediating effect of psychological distress and bullying victimization
           on the relationship between alexithymia and fibromyalgia among school
           adolescents

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      Authors: Eman Alslman, Imad Thultheen, Shaher H. Hamaideh, Basema Nofal, Renad Hamdan-Mansour, Ayman Hamdan Mansour
      Abstract: This study aims to test the mediating effect of psychological distress and bullying victimization on the relationship between alexithymia and fibromyalgia (FM) among school adolescents. This study used cross-sectional, correlational design. Data was collected using self-administered questionnaire. The sample consisted of 1,000 school adolescents at Grade 9–12 who were recruited randomly using multistrategic sampling technique. The analysis showed that alexithymia was a significant predictor of FM (odds ratio [OR] = 1.065). Psychological distress was also a significant predictor of FM; however, its mediating effect resulted in drop of OR to 1.041. The joined effect of bulling victimization and psychological distress found to be significant although OR dropped from 1.065 to 1.039. The study highlights the significant role of school health nurses and mental health counselors to early detect and direct mental health interventions toward significant psychological problems among school adolescents. I affirm this information has not been published or submitted for publication elsewhere. All authors approve the content of the manuscript and have contributed significantly to research involved/ the writing of the manuscript. The authors affirm their commitment to transfer copyright ownership to your journal if the manuscript is accepted for publication. The authors also affirm they will obtain any other copyright permission if deemed necessary within 30 days of acceptance for publication. All identifying information regarding the study participants has been omitted and this study was approved by the IRB at School of Nursing of the University of Jordan. The research conforms to the provisions of the Declaration of Helsinki in 1995 (as revised in Brazil, 2013). All participants gave informed consent for the research, and that their anonymity was preserved. None of the authors has financial or personal matters that may pose a conflict of interest.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-11-21
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-09-2023-0096
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Impact of gender discrimination on young Indian women’s mental health:
           do benevolent childhood experiences play any role'

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      Authors: Bhoomika N. Jadhav, P. Padma Sri Lekha, E.P. Abdul Azeez, Jyoti Sharma, Archana Yadav, Mufina Begam J.
      Abstract: Gender discrimination exists in various settings globally and harms women’s mental health. This study aims to understand the impact of gender discrimination on hopelessness and emotional vulnerability. Further, we attempted to determine whether benevolent childhood experiences (BCEs) moderate the relationships of gender discrimination with hopelessness and emotional vulnerability. Data from 445 young women from India was gathered from a cross-sectional survey. Measures included gender discrimination inventory, Beck’s hopelessness inventory, emotional vulnerability scale and BCE scale. Results yielded a significant positive association of gender discrimination with hopelessness and emotional vulnerability. BCEs were negatively related to hopelessness, emotional vulnerability and gender discrimination. Further, gender discrimination predicted increased feelings of hopelessness and emotional vulnerability. However, BCEs do not neutralize the effect of gender discrimination. It is evident from this study that gender discrimination exists independent of socioeconomic class, domicile and educational qualification, taking a toll on women’s well-being and mental health. Incorporating attitudinal changes at the community and societal level in reducing gender norms responsible for negative outcomes will allow women to function to their full capacity and experience improved mental health. The research on gender discrimination and its impact on women’s mental health is limited, especially exploring the role of BCEs. Previous studies have indicated that BCEs have protective roles in neutralizing adversities. However, the present study uniquely contributes to establishing the limited role of BCEs in the context of gender discrimination, though it contributes to mental health. The policy and psychosocial implications of the study are discussed.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-11-21
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-09-2023-0104
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Is supported living a pathway to recovery' A preliminary investigation
           of a new model

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      Authors: Steven Barnes, Jerome Carson, Kevin Gournay
      Abstract: Evidence suggests supported living can improve functioning and reduce need. However, its lack of a clear definition has presented significant challenges to establishing a definitive evaluation of its efficacy. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of a defined model of supported living using in terms of reductions made to aspects of clinical and social recovery. A naturalistic, non-controlled assessment was conducting using using the Camberwell Assessment of Need Clinical Scale with a sample of adults with severe and enduring mental illness residing with a UK-based mental health company at 1 of 12 UK locations. Analysis regarding preliminary outcomes relating to health and social need is presented with comparison between admission and six-months post-admission (N = 90). Additional analysis relating to outcomes at 12 months is also provided (N = 39). Significant outcomes are noted at both timepoints in terms of reducing unmet need and levels of formal and informal help given/required during tenancy. The findings support that, even in the absence of clinical recovery, opportunities exist to make meaningful and valuable improvements to unmet need and functional independence, with implications for clinical practice in the context of supported living. The findings provide encouraging early indications of the benefits of the model in making meaningful reductions to functional and psychological needs in individuals with severe and enduring mental illness.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-11-20
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-09-2023-0095
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Facilitating a hearing voices group on acute and psychiatric intensive
           care units to promote acceptance and hope: preliminary learning and
           reflections

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      Authors: John McEwan McManus, Styliani Gkika, Elaine Swift
      Abstract: Hearing voices can be a debilitating and traumatic experience, and psychiatric hospitals can feel unsafe and overstimulating to voice hearers. Research suggests this may prolong a service user’s admission time and lead to an unhelpful experience. Therefore, a hearing voices group (HVG) was developed to create a safe space where voice hearers could share their story with others with lived experience and access support. The group was developed by the first author under the supervision of the inpatient psychology lead. Both a practice-based and expert by experience-based approach were considered during the development of the group structure. The group also aligned with the Hearing Voices Network and the Trust’s values. A questionnaire was developed to evaluate the effectiveness of the group using six five-point Likert scale questions and three open questions to collect the data, which was then analysed. The themes from the qualitative data showed that staff and ward-based promotion of the group were paramount to ensuring patient engagement. The results also showed that voice hearers found the group therapeutic, and some found the coping skills shared to be beneficial and effective. A large percentage of women (76%) reported that they had attended a HVG before. This was not the case for service users from the male unit and psychiatric intensive care unit. This result is considered to reflect the fact that women in that unit had the opportunity to attend more than once during their admission, rather than that they had accessed these groups in other settings or in the community. Therefore, in the future, it would be useful to change this question to “have you attended any other HVGs in the past, prior to this admission'”, which might be more appropriate for data collection. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the original work of the first author, who is an expert by experience and an assistant psychologist. The results suggest that HVGs can be beneficial for patients in acute and intensive mental health care and highlight some necessary adaptations and the importance of adopting an MDT approach in promoting therapeutic groups.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-11-07
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-09-2023-0099
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Examining the interplay between resilience, mental health and young
           adults: insights from bibliometric analysis on historical, contemporary
           and future trends

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      Authors: Christine Nya-Ling Tan, Muhammad Ashraf Fauzi
      Abstract: This study aims to conduct a complete bibliometric analysis of published research to develop a solid roadmap for future research into developing young adults’ mental health and resilience and to further the body of knowledge and scientific advancement in this area. A literature search using VOSviewer, through Web of Science, was conducted to identify young adult mental health and resilience studies. A total of 226 studies were identified between 1993 and the end of June 2022, as the number of published studies increased. Extracted data included citation, co-citation, keyword and co-word analyses. This study evaluates the current knowledge structure of young adult mental health and resilience through co-citation analysis and discovers the directions and trends of popular topics in young adult mental health and resilience through co-word analysis. It suggests that legislators and physicians should aim to provide social support via screening and interventions, especially for young adults struggling with disruption in their social lives. Using a bibliometric approach, the findings provide a robust roadmap for further investigation into young adult mental health and resilience evolution. This method will further advance the knowledge and progress of this field, as this research is the first attempt at doing so – to the best of the authors’ knowledge.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-11-06
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-09-2023-0092
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Remarkable lives – Robyn Clegg-Gibson in conversation with Robert
           Hurst

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      Authors: Robyn Clegg-Gibson, Robert Hurst
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to share Robyn Clegg-Gibson’s story. Robyn wrote a biography of her experiences. Robert then asked a series of questions from the perspective of a mental health academic researcher. Robyn shared stories from her life, and how her experiences have shaped her life and herself. Narratives such as this give us an overview of only a single person’s experiences. However, they allow the person with lived experience to explore their story in depth. What Robyn has written is very emotional. Her story will give readers an insight into her life and experiences. There is so much to learn from a story like Robyn’s. In particular, from her experiences of police processes after a crime. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first time that Robyn has chosen to publish her unique story in the written form. The value of Robyn sharing her story is apparent upon reading it.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-10-26
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-10-2023-0105
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The weight of “the keys”: two autoethnographic accounts of how mental
           health nurse training has changed over the decades

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      Authors: Barrie Green, Jake Stanworth
      Abstract: This paper aims to critically compare the impact and preparedness for practice of two types of mental health nurse training in the UK. One being a hospital-based apprenticeship model from the 1980s; the other a university-based and more academically focussed approach from this millennium. This autoethnographic reflective commentary describes and reviews the effectiveness of two training curricula for Registered Mental Nurse (RMN) training. The first being the certificate-level 1983 syllabus of the UK Central Council for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting, which was replaced in the late 1990s by diploma and degree-level Project 2000 training of the General Nursing Council. Using a reflective narrative approach to describe the lived experience of two qualified nurses, it compares, reviews and critiques both initiatives. The author/researchers found both benefits and negatives inherent in each model. These were grouped into five key headings, which are a sense of belonging/identity; exposure to clinical practice; differences in training modality; development of clinical management skills and clinical preparedness; and academic merit. The older curriculum lacked an academic or research base, whereas the more recent approach encouraged and enhanced this element. However, with regard to preparing the clinician/registered nurse to feel confident in addressing a range of clinical and managerial challenges, the older style training seems to deliver better outcomes. They conclude that a move towards a “middle ground” between the two models may be of benefit to future RMN preparation. This study reports on the experience of two registered nurses. Therefore, the sample size is small. However, autoethnography is acknowledged as an effective means of delivering qualitative research; in addition, the authors access and use material from the wider literature to triangulate and critique their approach. This paper adds to the literature but also allows for duplication by others to further test the findings. This type of study provides an opportunity for others to review, compare and contrast nursing or other multi-discipline changes in training/curriculum. The research method is one that is transferable and can be used within areas of practice, which have resource limitations. It provides an opportunity to replicate it in other services or jurisdictions. Nursing in the UK has experienced significant change over the past four decades. For RMNs, the move from hospitals into the community has been transformational. In addition, the influence of higher academic standards and the influence of the recent pandemic have challenged the profession and individuals within it. This study demonstrates positive and negative elements of the dilemma faced by nurses and offers a further contribution to this area. There are a number of academic papers, media stories, statutory reports and guidance that explore the impact of changes within nurse training. This paper uses a first person autoethnographic study of the impact and effectiveness of these changes at a human level, the nurse on the ground. It uses the ward medicine keys as the vehicle to represent the huge responsibility that newly qualified nurses must face; this is not widely represented elsewhere in the literature!
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-10-24
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-09-2023-0097
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Facilitating workplace friendships for individuals with limited work
           capacity

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      Authors: David Chun Yin Li
      Abstract: This paper aims to provide strategies for individuals with limited work capacity (LWC) to build workplace friendships and foster inclusion, which can benefit their mental health. The paper integrates key theories such as social exchange theory and the similarity-attraction paradigm to analyze the dynamics of relationships. Practical tips grounded in the existing literature are outlined. Effective communication, building trust, showing mutual respect and discovering common interests can facilitate friendship development for employees with LWC. Supportive organizational policies and culture are also critical. By building workplace bonds and inclusion, individuals with LWC may experience greater social support, more engagement and better mental well-being. This also helps to diminish stigma and marginalization. This viewpoint provides practical guidance specifically designed for individuals with Limited Work Capacity (LWC) to overcome workplace obstacles and build social relationships. It addresses an existing gap in the interpersonal facets of disability inclusion.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-10-18
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-09-2023-0098
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The death of migrant workers in India during the first wave of COVID-19
           pandemic

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      Authors: Sumant Kumar, Avanish Bhai Patel
      Abstract: COVID-19 lockdown imposed by the government in India affected markets, factories, industries, construction sites, restaurants, transport services, etc. in which migrant workers were engaged. Migrant workers expected that after the imposition of the lockdown government will facilitate transportation facilities to their hometowns as they lost their jobs. But due to negligence from both the central and the state governments, neither transportation was arranged nor food, shelter or health facilities were arranged. This paper aims to investigate the causes of the death of migrant workers under the theoretical framework of negligence theory. The authors have applied the content analysis method and collected 926 death cases of migrant workers from 28 Indian states. The researchers applied this technique as the newspapers in India are one of the largest and most useful sources to generate a report/record on migrant workers causes during the COVID-19 lockdown. During the lockdown period, due to lack of attention from the government, police atrocities, hunger and accidental cases increased which resulted in the death of migrant workers. The finding of the study proves that during the first phase of COVID-19 lockdown the death cases of migrant workers increased due to negligence by the governments. The number of death cases of migrant workers has been analysed through applying negligence theory which included duty, breach, cause, in fact, proximate cause and harm which increased the death cases. It has been noticed that the central government without any prior notice-imposed lockdown all over India, in which all the states were not received any guidelines or communication which indicate what they have to do or how to handle the Covid-19 situation. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is an original work of researchers which is basically based on negligence theory.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-09-26
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-08-2023-0086
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Interprofessional education for mental health professions and peer support
           workers – to facilitate learning in teamwork

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      Authors: Tuija Viking, Julie Repper
      Abstract: In mental health care the peer support workers (PSWs) are, by their experience based expertise, supporting the recovery of people using services and have also been shown to stimulate interprofessional learning (IPL) but which, due to hierarchical teams, is challenged. Therefore, to prepare the teams for IPL that includes PSWs, this study aims to suggest an interprofessional education (IPE) for mental health professions and PSWs. What would such an education look like' The base, in the development of the IPE, is two earlier studies of teams’ inclusion of PSWs and the IPL. The present study suggests Knowledge base 1 with three categories: different roles, expertise and perspectives, and Knowledge base 2 with two categories: teamwork and IPL. The conclusion is that such online IPE offers a readiness for mental health professions and PSWs, in teamwork, to exchange their different expertise to facilitate IPL. This is important to improve the quality of mental health services. One limitation is that the empirical study, this paper is based on, is a small-scaled study. Nevertheless, the main results from this study and the other were considered useful as a ground for the development of the IPE. By suggesting an IPE for mental health professions and PSWs, this paper adds to the literature on peer support as well as IPL.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-09-19
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-03-2023-0028
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Child abuse and neglect and associated mental health outcomes: a large,
           population-based survey among children and adolescents from Jamaica and
           Uganda

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      Authors: Agata Debowska, Daniel Boduszek, Christine Fray-Aiken, Eric Awich Ochen, Karyl T. Powell-Booth, Esther Nanfuka Kalule, Roxanne Harvey, Florence Turyomurugyendo, Kenisha Nelson, Dominic Willmott, Samantha Mason
      Abstract: Few studies assess how child abuse and neglect (CAN) affects adolescents’ mental health. Further, the majority of studies conducted to date discount the individual CAN items and report overall prevalence rates for different types of abuse and neglect. The purpose of this study was to examine the levels of and gender differences in CAN subtypes, lifetime prevalence of individual CAN items and the contribution of different CAN subtypes for explaining depression, anxiety and irritability. The sample included Jamaican (n = 7,182, 60.8% female) and Ugandan (n = 11,518, 52.4% female) youths. The authors used a population-based cross-sectional study design. Youths completed an anonymous survey in school settings. The authors found gender differences in the levels of CAN subtypes. Maltreatment behaviors of lesser severity were more commonly endorsed by the youths than those of greater severity. Neglect and emotional abuse were the strongest correlates of depression (e.g. neglect: ß = 0.23, among Jamaican youths; emotional abuse outside-the-home: ß = 0.23, among Ugandan girls), anxiety (e.g. neglect: ß = 0.17, among Ugandan girls; emotional abuse outside-the-home: ß = 0.27, among Ugandan girls) and irritability (e.g. emotional abuse in-the-home: ß = 0.17, among Jamaican boys; emotional abuse outside-the-home: ß = 0.17, among Ugandan girls) in most samples. These findings will inform policymakers and professionals working with youths in Jamaica and Uganda, providing comprehensive contemporary insights beyond existing research in these regions.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-09-14
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-08-2023-0089
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • An autoethnography of alienation

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      Authors: Andrew Voyce
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to discuss alienation from a viewpoint of autoethnography. Literature since the 19th century has described the economic determinants of social relations. The proposition is that human beings are strangers in a world they have created. The author revisits this paradigm and aims to show the relevance of alienation in the 20th and 21st centuries. This paper uses the qualitative methodology of autoethnography with data from lived experience. The author relates the author’s personal experience to the meta-narrative of alienation. Autoethnography is an excellent tool for interpretation of the author’s experiences. The author’s work life correlates to models of alienation put forward by Marxist and Critical Theory thought. The author gave the surplus value of the author’s labour to others, and as such, the author’s autoethnography is an authentic statement. The author’s experiences of poor mental health are in the context of pathology residing in alienation. Findings reveal that alienation in work and in mental health is a plausible explanation for the way that social situations worked for the author. The author’s experiences support a model of alienation in 20th and 21st century economies. The author shows that the author’s experiences are shared by other vulnerable people.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-09-13
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-08-2023-0082
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The role of host national contact in the mental health of displaced
           Ukrainians in the Netherlands

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      Authors: Naome Al-Saqaff
      Abstract: The Russian invasion of Ukraine in February 2022 has led to the displacement of many Ukrainians. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between their contact with Dutch society and their mental health. To this end, 136 adult, mostly female, displaced Ukrainians in the Netherlands participated in an online survey to investigate the relationship between quality of host national contact and mental health, as moderated by quantity of host national contact. The survey had a Ukrainian, Russian and English version, and it consisted of single questions assessing various variables, including quality of host national contact, quantity of host national contact, amount of discrimination/prejudice as well as five questions assessing mental health (Mental Health Inventory 5 [MHI-5]; Berwick et al., 1991). Contrary to the hypotheses, no interaction was found between quality of host national contact and quantity of host national contact, and quality of host national contact did not have a significant main effect on mental health. However, there is a significant, yet nonlinear main effect of quantity of host national contact on mental health. Moreover, there is a significant correlation between quality of host national contact and quantity of host national contact. Finally, and interestingly, there is a positive relationship between the amount of discrimination/prejudice and mental health among people who chose to fill out the Ukrainian version of the survey. These results provide a nuanced view of the relationship between the host environment and mental health, and governmental policies should take into account the complexity of this relationship. A total of 161 displaced, mostly female (90.40%), Ukrainians in the Netherlands with the average age of 35 agreed to participate in this online survey. The main variables measured were mental health (dependent variable), quality of host national contact (independent variable 1) and quantity of host national contact (independent variable 2/moderator). Additional variables, such as the level of perceived discrimination/prejudice, have been included in the analyses. The survey was available in three different languages: Ukrainian, Russian and English. In this study, the role of host national contact in the mental health of displaced Ukrainians in the Netherlands was investigated. The results showed that there was no interaction between quality of host national contact and quantity of host national contact in the prediction of mental health. Moreover, quality of host national contact did not predict mental health. Thus, both of the (preregistered) hypotheses of this study were refuted. However, the amount of perceived discrimination/prejudice turned out to be linked to mental health. Surprisingly, the amount of perceived discrimination/prejudice predicted higher mental health scores among participants who chose to fill out the survey in Ukrainian. Moreover, of the respondents included in the analysis, 94.85% gave reason for mental health concerns, as expressed by a converted MHI-5 score below 60. Even though this study does show a positive relationship between the level of discrimination/prejudice and mental health among displaced Ukrainians who filled out the Ukrainian version of the survey, it does not offer a definite explanation for why this seemingly unexpected result occurred. No causal conclusions can be drawn based on this study regarding the relationship between host national contact and mental health. The results of this study show that certain occurrences in the contact with host society members relate to mental health in unexpected and seemingly complex ways. This might mean that this study has potential for nuancing the current scientific knowledge regarding the relationship between host national contact and mental health. Such nuances might be quite important, as scientific research often forms the basis for governmental policies aimed at improving the mental health of displaced people. Therefore, governmental policymakers should be aware of the fact that there is no easy, clear-cut answer yet to the complex host society factors that play a role in the mental health of various displaced groups. Moreover, an investigation of the role of host national contact might lead to valuable knowledge about factors that contribute to the mental health of refugees. As has been said, refugees are at risk of developing various mental health issues, so they might need help managing their mental health. To this end, policymakers might need evidence-based information to develop interventions targeted at specific refugee groups. By investigating the mental health of displaced Ukrainians in the Netherlands, new insights will be gained to optimize mental health care for this particular refugee group. This study yields important information regarding the degree of participation and inclusion of displaced Ukrainians in Dutch society, which can inform policies targeted at improving the experiences of this new displaced group. Because displaced Ukrainians have to deal with the mental health consequences of war and displacement, they might be particularly in need of a safe haven in which they feel included. To the best of the author’s knowledge, this is the first study in which the role of the host society context in the mental health of displaced Ukrainians in the Netherlands is assessed. The results are quite unexpected and can nuance the current research on the link between discrimination and mental health. Moreover, this study can inspire future research to be conducted in the reasons behind this nuance, by researching the role of identity and uncertainty. Also, the author believes that this study is particularly suitable for this journal because it really looks at the link between social inclusion in the Dutch context and mental health outcomes.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-09-08
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-05-2023-0050
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The impact of job loss on mental health during the COVID-19 crisis in
           Tunisia: analysis based on counterfactual decomposition approach

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      Authors: Khaled Nasri, Mohamed Anis Ben Abdallah, Fethi Amri
      Abstract: This study aims to investigate the impact of job loss on the mental health of individuals in Tunisia during the COVID-19 crisis. In this research, the authors use the counterfactual decomposition technique and the potential outcome approach. In the first part, the authors calculated mental health indicators for all individuals included in the sample based on the World Health Organization-5 items. The individuals were then grouped into two subpopulations: the first group included those who had lost their jobs and the second group included individuals whose status in the labor market had remained unchanged. In the second part, the authors used the Blinder and Oaxaca decomposition to explain the mean difference in the mental health scores between the two groups and determine the factors contributing to this difference. The empirical results identified symptoms of depressed mood, decreased energy and loss of interest in several individuals. Based on these three symptoms, the authors were able to classify individuals into three types of depression: mild, moderate and severe. In addition, it appeared that job loss had significantly contributed to the worsening mental health of the individuals. Although the psychological impact of the COVID-19 outbreak among health-care professionals has been the subject of other studies in health literature on Tunisia, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, no research has addressed the impact of job loss on the mental health of Tunisian workers. Thus, this study fills this gap in the literature.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-08-23
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-07-2023-0079
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Examining the immediate and enduring psychological impact of street
           harassment on women’s mental health

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      Authors: Georgina Thornton, Dominic Willmott, Emma Richardson, Lara Hudspith
      Abstract: Many women report experiences of street harassment during their lifetime. Previous quantitative survey research has shown the variety of ways in which this type of harassment can impact upon a victim’s life, including restricting their freedom of movement and fear of further victimisation. The purpose of this study is understand the immediate and enduring psychological impact of street harassment on female victim-survivors. The present study aims to explore, qualitatively, women’s experiences of street harassment through thematic analysis of on 35 online blog posts. Data were collected from the “Stop Street Harassment” website, where women are invited to share their experiences anonymously. Three main themes were generated from the data. First was the age at which women began to experience street harassment, with recurring early incidents during formative childhood years. Second was the impact that experiences had on their mental health and psychological well-being with feelings of shame, fear, self-loathing, as well as decreased self-esteem and confidence experienced in the immediate aftermath – though the longer-term negative emotions reported were enduring feelings of anger alongside a constant state of anxiety from feelings of vulnerability to further victimisation. The final theme was the modification of behaviour after experiencing street harassment where women choose to avoid walking alone on the streets or consciously changed their clothing choices, to avoid being harassed. This study offers a further qualitative insight into the real-life experience and psychological consequences of street harassment upon survivors’ mental health.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-08-15
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-07-2023-0080
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Patient-led co-production in community mental health nursing practice:
           part 1

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      Authors: Jo Mullen
      Abstract: This paper aims to provide an example of patient-led co-production. Using the six principles of co-production to frame the activities undertaken during the author’s relationship with a community mental health nurse. The paper describes the benefit of a collaborative support group for the three lived experienced participants and a mental health nurse. Small support groups like the one described in this paper can be established effectively through the process of co-production between people with lived experience and mental health professionals working in partnership. Co-production is usually used with groups of stakeholders working together in an equitable way to design or deliver a new service; this paper, however, seeks to demonstrate how the process can be effectively used when the project is patient-led within the context of a therapeutic relationship.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-07-31
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-06-2023-0068
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Depression, anxiety, suicidal ideation and social determinants of mental
           health of Romani in Ukraine

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      Authors: Viktoriia Gorbunova, Vitalii Klymchuk, Olha Savychenko, Valeriia Palii, Zemfira Kondur, Viola Popenko, John Oates
      Abstract: This paper aims to explore the prevalence of depression, anxiety symptoms and suicidal ideation among the Romani population in Ukraine and their connections with various social health determinants: age, gender, household characteristics, employment and living conditions. For measuring mental health conditions, GAD-7 and PHQ-9 were used. Individual interviews were conducted by trained volunteers of the International Charitable Organization “Roma Women’s Foundation Chirikli”. Data were gathered from January to March 2020. The overall level of depression found in the sample was 8.08, while the mean for anxiety was 7.22. In general, 32.7% of respondents scored positively for signs of depression and 29.6% for anxiety. The two-week prevalence of suicidal ideations was 26.9%. Compared to the general population, the prevalence of depression among the Romani research participants was twofold higher, and anxiety was 2.5-fold higher. Signs of depression and anxiety in women were significantly higher (36% vs 28.6% for depression and 33.9% vs 24.2% for anxiety) than in men. Signs of depression and anxiety were higher for people without education than for university students (9.32 vs 3.04 for depression and 8.26 vs 3.00 for anxiety). The lowest levels of depression, anxiety and suicidal ideation were among officially married persons (6.61, 6.36 and 0.23, respectively). Significant small positive correlations were found between all measurements and the number of household members (0.149 for depression, 0.124 for suicidal ideation and 0.175 for anxiety; p < 0.001) and the number of children (0.303 for depression, 0.224 for suicidal ideation and 0.243 for anxiety; p < 0.001). In terms of employment, the highest scores for depression, anxiety and suicidal ideation were found among those who are employed seasonally (9.06, 8.25 and 0.61) or irregularly (9.09, 8.12 and 0.57) in contrast with self-employed (4.88, 4.90 and 0.19) and full-time employees (5.86, 5.51 and 0.18). Living place (city, village or camp) showed no relation with mental health, except for suicidal ideation: those living in villages had higher levels of suicidal ideation than those living in cities (0.49 vs 0.31). The study has some limitations. Data were gathered from January to March 2020, and since then, the situation in Ukraine has drastically changed due to the full-scale Russian invasion. While this study’s data and conclusions might serve as a baseline for further research, they do not represent the real-time situation. While many social factors were analysed, the effects found for them do not necessarily represent causality, given the statistical methods used. Interactions among factors were not studied; therefore, no firm conclusions can be made about the effects of those interactions on mental health. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this paper is original in terms of its topic, as the first-ever in Ukraine quantitative study of mental health and social determinants of mental health of the Romani population.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-07-24
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-06-2023-0070
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Mental health, art and creativity II: develop the child within

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      Authors: Mats Niklasson
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to elevate the importance of complementary views concerning the first years of life as important precursors for personal growth and sustainable mental health. Paper II is a follow up to Paper I. After a short overview, connecting to the previous paper, the focus is on infancy followed by a few overlooked aspects and then a short summary on childhood and adolescence. Finally, some concluding remarks have been provided to put the paper together. The main findings are connected to publications by other authors with insights which could be viewed as either “politically incorrect” or as simply overlooked in present research studies and discussions. The author presents his personal perspective on the aforementioned topics. There are contrasting ways to view them. A recognition of the importance for a child to experience a “good as possible” infancy and childhood, which could mean to grow up with less use of computers and less influences from social media. A recognition of the importance parents and other adults have for the socialization of infants, children and adolescents. This conceptual paper has compiled complementary views of infancy and childhood which are seldom heard about but are of importance for sustainable mental health.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-07-24
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-07-2023-0073
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Identity Structure Analysis: a potential framework for process and outcome
           evaluation in psychotherapy

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      Authors: Marta B. Erdos, Tamas Karpati, Robert Rozgonyi, Rebeka Jávor
      Abstract: This paper aims to explore the potential utility of Identity Structure Analysis (ISA) in single-case and group-level outcome and process evaluations. A study was conducted to evaluate mentalization-based therapy by using ISA and its linked framework software, Ipseus. Ten patients with borderline personality disorder and substance use disorder were involved in the study. ISA/Ipseus was administered prior to and at the completion of the treatment. Five-year follow-up data, comprising behavioural indicators, were also collected and compared to ISA/Ipseus results. Improvements occurred in the evaluation of stressful, demanding and emotionally burdening situations. Evaluations on concerned others also improved, together with progress in self-reflection. Changes in the evaluation of recovery-related themes were less salient. On a case level, changes in the self-states and role models were consistent with the results of the five-year-follow up data. An initial crisis state seems suggestive of progress, while initial defensive positions with high positive self-regard, of stagnation. ISA/Ipseus, integrating the benefits of qualitative and quantitative approaches in evaluation, is a potential method to explore the complexity of identity changes during therapy.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-07-20
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-06-2023-0071
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Alec Grant: a living tribute

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      Authors: Jerome Carson
      Abstract: This paper aims to provide a living tribute to the leading autoethnographer, Alec Grant. Alec provided Jerome with a list of names of people he might approach to write a tribute on his behalf. The accounts describe the influence that Alec has had both as an educator and as a trusted colleague for the people approached. While this is a living tribute, it is about one man and could, therefore, be described as a case study. Some people wonder what can be learned from a single case study. Read on and find out. Alec has carved out a path for himself. In many senses, he chose “The Road Less Travelled”. He has never shied away from challenging “The System” and defending the rights of the marginalized and socially excluded. It is not a road for the faint-hearted. For systems to change, radical thinkers need to show the way. “Change keeps us safe” (Stuart Bell). Alec was a well-known and highly respected cognitive behavioural academic practitioner and the author of key textbooks in the field. He then decided to reinvent himself as an autoethnographer. This has brought him into contact with a much more diverse group of people. It has also brought him home to himself.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-07-19
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-07-2023-0074
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Evaluation of the impact of a self-stigma reduction programme on
           psychosocial outcomes among people with schizophrenia spectrum disorder

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      Authors: Abd Hasan, Anas Alsharawneh, Nofaa Alasamee
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a self-stigma reduction programme on self-stigma. A randomized controlled trial was conducted from November 2017 to December 2018 with 278 people diagnosed with schizophrenia (PDwS). Participants were randomly assigned to receive a self-stigma reduction programme (psychoeducation, cognitive behavioural therapy and social skills training) or treatment as usual. PDwS in the intervention group experienced a greater reduction in the level of self-stigma (20.19 vs −0.62; p < 0.001) at post-intervention and (37.35 vs −0.66; p < 0.001) at six-month follow-up. The first RCT examines the problem and implements intervention in middle east country. Also, the authors have conducted high-quality RCT.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-07-19
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-12-2020-0083
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • How do we rage against the dying of the light' A trans-generational
           exploration of character strengths

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      Authors: Mahimna Vyas, Rudresh Vyas
      Abstract: This study aims to investigate character strengths, focussing on their development over time and application from a personal perspective. The research was conducted using an autoethnographic, semi-structured interview approach with two participants: the authors themselves. This study explored character strengths, their commonalities across generations and how personal experiences shape them. It also highlighted how to encourage others to recognise and use their strengths. This study also enriches character strengths theory by addressing cultural and generational differences, aligning with positive psychology 3.0 (Lomas et al., 2020). This study also introduces a unique methodological approach to explore character strengths. This study provides novel insights for personal growth, enhancing psychological evaluations and inter-generational discourse on knowledge transfer through the lens of character strengths. These can be used to develop interventions for a range of populations. Through this personalised and culturally relevant approach, novel insights into the longitudinal effects of interactions between individual experiences and character strengths were gained. This study emphasised the dynamic nature of strengths and drew parallels to the tenets of Indian psychology, thereby underscoring the significance of strengths as a pivotal next step in the understanding of a person.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-07-17
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-06-2023-0072
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Homelessness: measuring need to design more inclusive services

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      Authors: Angela Woods, Rebecca Lace, Joanne Dickinson, Ben Hughes
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper – the second of three – is to report the findings from a service user needs assessment in those who have contact with a local homelessness service in the North-West of England. Data were collected using a semi-structured questionnaire that included a section exploring Adverse Childhood Experiences. Aggregated data from a total of 100 completed questionnaires were analysed to understand the nature and scope of those accessing the Homelessness and Vulnerable Adults Service (HVAS). Homeless people accessing HVAS face a number of challenges, which reflect their upbringing and chaotic and complex lifestyles. Reports of multiple disadvantage, social isolation, physical and mental health problems were common among the cohort. This was a small cohort study, and the authors accept that this may potentially limit the scope of the findings. Themes identified are, however, reflected in wider research and official data collection sources. Future research may seek to widen the data collection methods to offer a more representative cohort. The provision of co-ordinated multi-agency support is essential to tackle health inequalities experienced by those who are homeless. The complex issues often experienced by those who are homeless can further compound the impact of social exclusion on health and well-being. The reduction of statutory support and increased emphasis on self-reliance can further impact those people on the margins of society. This study identifies how multiple deprivations and social isolation impacts upon health and well-being, further compounding a person’s ability and willingness to engage with services. It raises the question of the systems failure to respond effectively.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-07-14
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-06-2023-0065
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Perspectives on cannabis risks and harm reduction among youth in Early
           Psychosis Intervention programs: a qualitative study

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      Authors: Amar Ghelani
      Abstract: The Canadian government legalized cannabis in 2018 and funded harm reduction campaigns to educate youth about the risks. Cannabis can contribute to psychosis in vulnerable populations, and consumption is common among youth in Early Psychosis Intervention (EPI) programs. The purpose of this study is to understand the views of youth in EPI programs on the risks related to cannabis and methods to reduce those risks. A qualitative design and thematic analysis were used to understand the perspectives of youth in EPI programs (n = 15) towards cannabis risks and harm reduction. Participants associated Δ−9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) with problems related to cognition, psychosis, respiration, addiction, motivation, finances, relationships and anxiety. Cannabidiol (CBD) was believed to be safe and risk-free. To reduce the risks associated with THC, participants suggested using in moderation, delaying use, using CBD over THC, accessing legal sources, avoiding high THC dosages and using non-combustible methods. Participants self-selected to participate, were psychiatrically stable and may not represent youth in EPI programs with more severe psychotic symptoms. Assessing risk perceptions, motives for use and perspectives towards the cannabis and psychosis connection can reveal educational needs. CBD may offer a harm reduction option for EPI clients wanting to decrease THC intake, though more research is needed and adverse effects should be explained. Educational campaigns should disseminate the connection between cannabis and psychosis to facilitate early intervention. This study adds to the literature by highlighting knowledge of harm reduction methods and gaps in risk awareness among EPI program youth.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-07-13
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-06-2023-0064
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Attachment, trauma and homelessness

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      Authors: Peter Cockersell, Elias Barreto
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to describe research into attachment styles of rough sleepers and considersthe implications for practice. The research was structured interviews with a cohort of rough sleepers analysed through evidence-based techniques, and the implications were drawn out with reference to current best practice. The rough sleepers in the cohort had a very different pattern of attachment styles to the housed population, with 100% insecure vs c35%, and 50% insecure disorganised vs>15%. The limitation is that the cohort was relatively small, n = 22 and was a sample of convenience. The implications are that homelessness services working with rough sleepers need to be attachment-informed as much as trauma-informed. Practical implications are that homelessness services need to have a more rounded psychological perspective such as psychologically informed environments rather than just a trauma-informed approach. Rough sleepers suffer from deeply pervasive and severe attachment disorders, and this may be causal to their becoming rough sleepers and is certainly a factor in whether or not they are successfully rehoused. There is almost no other original research published into the attachment styles of rough sleepers or homeless people. The current trend is for trauma-informed services: the call for attachment-informed ones is original.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-07-12
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-06-2023-0066
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • First-hand reports of prolonged social withdrawal: contributing factors,
           experiences, and change processes

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      Authors: Or Hareven, Tamar Kron, David Roe, Danny Koren
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to gain deeper understanding of the experience of PSW and pathways to recover. Prolonged social withdrawal (PSW) among young people has been widely reported; however, the voice of those who withdraw is rarely heard. Illuminating these firsthand experiences is important as the phenomenon becomes widespread, calling for increased attention and creative solutions to promote recovery processes and re-inclusion in society. This study conducted nine in-depth semi-structured interviews with young people who have been reclusive for 2–19 years and inquired about their perspectives and experiences around times of PSW and beyond. These data were analyzed and categorized according to three main areas: factors contributing to PSW, subjective experiences and general functioning during PSW and processes involved in coming out of PSW. This study presents the main findings and illustrates them using a case of a young man in PSW for 19 years. The findings reveal that young people may turn to social withdrawal in response to varied personal and familial challenges, and often experience intense loneliness and psychic pain. Attempts to cope and recover from withdrawal involve inner motivation combined with support from significant others and a strong therapeutic alliance with professionals. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to report findings from in-depth interviews with people who spent very long periods in PSW, and accordingly it contributes to the growing body of knowledge on this phenomenon. Based on this unique firsthand perspective, the authors propose potential guidelines for caregivers and mental health professionals trying to help people in PSW to reintegrate into society.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-07-04
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-05-2023-0055
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • A brief report on student gambling and how UK universities can support
           students

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      Authors: Paul McGivern, Mark Mierzwinski, Edward Stupple
      Abstract: An estimated 1.2 million students gamble, equating to approximately two in every three students. In the UK, university students have reached the legal age to gamble; many have received significant sums of financial support and will be responsible for managing their own finances. Some UK universities have acknowledged that students engage in gambling activity and the need to provide gambling-related support. However, more research is needed to better understand student gambling activities and how universities can optimise provision of support. The purpose of this study was to enhance this understanding. A total of 210 university students completed an online survey to provide details of their gambling behaviour and views on the types of support that they felt would best support students. Both gambling and non-gambling students reported a preference for specialised gambling-related support within student services without the requirement for gambling-focused workshops (p < 0.01). Follow-up analysis revealed a significantly greater proportion of females did not gamble (p < 0.01), that males spent more money when gambling (p < 0.01) and were higher risk gamblers than females (p < 0.01). These results provide evidence for gambling support to feature overtly as part of university support and well-being services.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-06-15
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-05-2023-0061
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Effects of long-term Ashtanga Yoga practice on psychological well-being

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      Authors: Ben Morris, James Jackson, Anthony Roberts III
      Abstract: In recent years, Yoga practice has seen a rapid rise in popularity with many positive consequences, both physical and mental attributed to its practice. Ashtanga Yoga has been less well researched in this area and is the specific focus on this work. The aim of this study is to investigate the possible positive impact of long-term Ashtanga Yoga on psychological well-being. In total, 213 long-term Ashtanga Yoga practitioners were asked to complete the positive emotion, engagement, relationships, meaning, accomplishment (PERMA) 23 scale (Butler and Kern, 2016) which measures psychological well-being. The values given by these individuals were then compared against a larger sample of 31,966 representative of the general population. Scores were then compared with a PERMA data set representative of the general population (see Butler and Kern, 2016), primarily using a test of difference to compare samples. Secondly, the causal relationship between time spent in practice upon well-being scores. Findings indicated that those individuals engaged in long-term Ashtanga Yoga practice significantly outperformed the control group on all dimensions of psychological well-being. This work has demonstrated specific benefits to the practice of Ashtanga Yoga on psychological well-being. Yoga is a form of exercise that is now widely available across the globe, and as such, represents an accessible form of physical practice, which has important psychological benefits. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first work investigating differences in psychological well-being profiles using PERMA, as a function of Yoga practice.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-06-13
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-03-2023-0033
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Does perpetrator gender influence attitudes towards intimate partner
           violence (IPV)' Examining the relationship between male-perpetrated and
           female-perpetrated IPV attitudes among a sample of UK young adults

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      Authors: Ethan Conroy, Dominic Willmott, Anthony Murphy, B. Kennath Widanaralalage
      Abstract: Understanding of the role that attitudes and beliefs may play on the judgments people make about intimate partner violence (IPV) is becoming increasingly important, notably in the context of the criminal justice process and in recognising IPV as a public health issue. This study aims to investigate the importance of several established factors predictive of attitudes towards male-perpetrated IPV, which have never previously been explored in relation to female-perpetrated IPV. In total, 295 young adults (18–28) from across the UK completed an online survey (M Age = 23.82) comprised of four established psychometric inventories; the Rosenberg Self-esteem scale, Satisfaction with Life scale, Attitudes Towards Female Dating Violence scale and newly developed Modern Adolescent Dating Violence Attitudes (MADVA) scale, alongside a suite of associated demographic factors. Results derived from a multiple linear regression indicates that three types of attitudes towards male-perpetrated violence against women (physical, sexual, and psychological abuse offline), were significant predictors of attitudes towards female-perpetrated IPV, along with gender and ethnicity. Self-esteem, satisfaction with life, age and education among those surveyed were not associated with attitudes towards female-perpetrated IPV. The results have important implications in developing educational programmes for those who have committed IPV offences, as well as teaching young people about the nature of partner abuse. The results suggest that those who endorse attitudes supportive of male-perpetrated IPV in offline environments, also endorse violence-supportive beliefs towards female-perpetrated IPV. In effect, violence-supportive attitudes are held irrespective of the sex of the perpetrator. However, this may differ in terms of how individuals view online types of abuse, where these attitudes appear to be processed differentially to offline attitudes.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-06-08
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-05-2023-0057
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The ripple effects of suicide: a personal account of dealing with the
           death of an adult sibling

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      Authors: Angela Woods
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to offer an opinion piece that documents the experience of losing an adult sibling to suicide and explores the experience of personal and family grief. This narrative is written from an autoethnographic perspective and uses the current evidence base to support a personal reflection. This paper identifies the complex nature of bereavement following death from suicide and considers those factors that support more positive outcomes for those grieving. This piece focuses on autoethnographic data but is supported by findings from the wider evidence base. The importance of seeking positives as part of the healing process when processing complex grief. Disclosure has been identified as an important part of processing complex grief associated with suicide bereavement and yet suicide remains a taboo subject for many. This autoethnographic piece details the experience of dealing with a sibling suicide and the importance of creating the opportunity for positive reflection to process complex grief.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-06-07
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-05-2023-0059
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Mental health and homelessness in the social service providers' outlook
           (Luxembourg case)

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      Authors: Céline Dujardin, Vitalii Klymchuk, Viktoriia Gorbunova
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to explore the perception of the mental health problems of the homeless population in a high-income country (Luxembourg) by social service providers and to develop proposals for better inclusion of homeless people into the mental health services and homeless people with mental health issues into society. The study was of qualitative design and conducted using a semi-structured interview method (in person). The semi-structured interviews (seven participants) were conducted to analyse the challenges, practice approaches and prospects of stakeholders or decision-makers working in housing exclusion and homelessness. A secondary thematic analysis of this content regarding mental health issues was performed. Three main themes in the social providers’ perception were identified related to mental health and homelessness: the general view on the mental health problems of homeless people (accent on substance use disorders [SUDs], overshadowing of other mental health conditions by the SUDs); the positive impact of housing and social services on the mental health of the homeless per se (role of social rhythms, social connectedness and multidisciplinary approach are emphasised); and the need for improvement of mental health services in the country (need for the long-term timely continuing mental health support and recognition of the importance of complex intersectional and multidisciplinary solutions). Mental health themes were not the primary focus while research was planned and conducted. They were revealed as results of secondary qualitative data analysis. Therefore, additional mental health-focused mixed methods research is needed to verify the conclusions. The paper is written on the results of the research project “Social Housing and Homelessness” (SOHOME), implemented at the University of Luxembourg with the financial support of the Fonds National de la Recherche of Luxembourg (FNR12626464). The sponsor had no involvement in the study design, the collection, analysis and interpretation of data or the preparation of the paper. The study brings together different perspectives from social workers, stakeholders and decision-makers. The results show that there are cross-field connections between homelessness and mental health that require specialised and coordinated services. The first existing approaches seem to be promising in their continuation but need to be promoted by social policy. To promote social cohesion in the Luxembourgish society and also to include one of the most vulnerable people, the study points to the importance of the link between homelessness and compromised mental health. Appropriate support and service provision as well as social and affordable housing play a central role. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first of its kind, revealing several social work stakeholders’ perspective on the mental health of homeless people in Luxembourg.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-06-02
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-02-2023-0018
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The relationship between perception of well-being and depression among
           adolescents in Jordan: using PERMA model as a theoretical framework

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      Authors: Bushra Ghannam, Husam Al Khatib, Abeer Alzayyat, Ayman Hamdan Mansour
      Abstract: Adolescence is a developmental stage of transition that is marked by multiple biopsychosocial changes that affect their well- and ill-being. This study aims to examine the multidimensional of well- and ill-being among adolescents, and to understand the relationship between well-being and depression using the PERMA model among school-age adolescents. A descriptive, cross-sectional design was used to recruit 625 school-age adolescents (343 males and 282 females), using convenience sampling technique from the central district of Jordan. Self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data in relation to depression and well-being. The analysis revealed that 32% had a well-being score below the median and 19% had severe depressive symptoms. Depression and well-being were moderately correlated, with the connectedness dimension being the most correlated to depression, whereas the engagement dimension was the least correlated. Females had higher scores on all subscales of depression and a significantly higher score on depression than males, whereas males had higher scores on all well-being dimensions and significantly higher scores on overall well-being than females. Adolescents’ mental health is compromised and affected by their perception of well-being, and a comprehensive psychoeducation for adolescents on how to enhance well-being might combat development of depressive symptoms. This study used all PERMA model components to provide an in-depth description of adolescents’ well-being, which is a crucial initial phase in better understanding how this age group experiences well-being and how it connects to their ill-being, as indicated by their depressive symptoms. The in-depth description of adolescents’ well-being will aid in planning early intervention and prevention programs for mental illness.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-05-26
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-04-2023-0047
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Andrew Voyce: a living tribute. “You can end up in a happy
           place.”

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      Authors: Jerome Carson
      Abstract: The main aim of this paper is to provide a living tribute of lived expert by experience and researcher Andrew Voyce. Andrew provided the author with a list of names of people he might approach to write a tribute on his behalf. The accounts describe the influence that Andrew has had both as an educator and as a trusted colleague for the people approached. In many ways, the voices of people with mental health problems have been marginalised. Few mental health journals, with only some exceptions, encourage lived experience contributions. The mental health agenda continues to be dominated by professional groups. The remarkable individuals who continually battle with serious mental illness are often lost in official discourses. Despite the fact that the topic of mental health is now much more in the public domain, research tells us that the most effective anti-stigma strategy is contact with sufferers. The archivist Dr Anna Sexton co-produced one of the few mental health archives that only featured people with lived experience. Andrew was one of the four people featured in it. This account “showcases” the work of this remarkable man.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-05-19
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-04-2023-0046
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Commentary on promoting the mental health and wellbeing benefits of using
           student response systems (SRS) in higher education: more than just a
           learning device

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      Authors: Paul McGivern
      Abstract: This commentary discusses the broader potential of student response systems (SRS) regarding their positive impact on student mental health and wellbeing. The purpose of this paper is to draw on relevant literature to illustrate the wider social and intrapersonal benefits of SRS beyond its use as an educational tool. Tenets of social information processing theory are used in conjunction with the literature from health, sociological and psychological disciplines to explicate the mental health benefits of SRS. SRS can make a positive contribution students’ mental health and wellbeing, thus assisting the broader pastoral support and employability frameworks of higher education institutions. An original perspective on the use of SRS in promoting the mental health and wellbeing of university students
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-05-19
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-04-2023-0048
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The way you make me feel: a network analysis of social ties that could
           exacerbate compulsive exercise among a sample of sorority women

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      Authors: Megan S. Patterson, Mandy N. Spadine, Allison N. Francis, Tyler Prochnow
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to assess factors related to sorority women connecting with people who exacerbate feelings of exercise guilt and body dissatisfaction (BD), both of which preclude compulsive exercise. In all, 207 sorority women (egos) completed online surveys measuring physical activity, BD, compulsive exercise and egocentric networks (n = 1,105 social ties/alters). Two random coefficient multilevel models assessed factors related to an ego connecting to someone who makes her feel: guilty about her exercise habits and good about her looks. Exercise patterns within networks related to how often an alter made ego feel guilty about her exercise habits; alter gender and communication frequency related to how often an alter made ego feel good about her looks; and ego’s BD score was related to both feelings of guilt and body satisfaction. The findings of this study support and extend literature highlighting the importance of someone’s immediate social network on their body image and related behaviors.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-05-16
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-01-2023-0004
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Mental health of Indian LGBT+ community: role of coping self-efficacy and
           social inclusion

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      Authors: Sanjana Parwani, Asim Kumar Talukdar
      Abstract: The sexual minority groups in India seem to be suffering from continued social exclusion affecting their mental health. This study aims to investigate the effect of the hostile attitude of society and lack of social support on the mental health of the Indian LGBT+ members. Hypotheses were developed by drawing theories and concepts from the literature and were tested using the partial least square–structural equation model with a sample size of 151 of the Indian LGBT+ community. The findings showed a strong negative effect of the hostile attitude of society on the mental health of the Indian LGBT+ community. The findings further showed that weak problem-focused and emotion-focused coping self-efficacy negatively mediated the relationship between the hostile attitude of society and mental health, while lack of social support negatively moderated the relationship between the hostile attitude of society and both problem-focused and emotion-focused coping self-efficacy of the Indian LGBT+ community. This study makes a novel and significant theoretical contribution by investigating the effect of the hostile attitude of society and the lack of social support on the mental health of the Indian LGBT+ community members. This study also makes a significant practical contribution in underpinning the urgent need for social inclusion and support to improve the mental health of Indian LGBT+ community members, which is currently in dire condition.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-05-10
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-01-2023-0003
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Bringing recovery to the youth – a review of discovery colleges

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      Authors: Aleisha Fitzgerald, Tom Moberg, Phelim Quinlisk, Chloe Costello
      Abstract: While the research literature on Recovery Colleges is relatively well-established, comprehensive research concerning Recovery Education for young people is currently scarce. The purpose of paper is to provide an overview of determinants of, and barriers to, the successful implementation of youth-adapted Recovery Colleges, known as Discovery Colleges, and to explore the wider impact of Discovery Colleges and Recovery Colleges. In consultation with a Recovery College Peer Educator, three undergraduate applied psychology students conducted a literature review with no date limits on publications in the Google Scholar and PubMed electronic databases. A total of 15 publications were included. Determinants for successful implementation included the importance of previously established Recovery College foundations, service and content accessibility and evaluative feedback. Barriers were primarily related to differences in how development, identity and environment between adults and young people impact positive educational outcomes. The wider impact of Discovery Colleges highlighted an improvement in relationships between service users and health-care professionals, an improved attitude towards education; improvements in well-being, self-worth and social connection; and promotion of transformative learning and personal autonomy. Through this, Discovery Colleges also continue to challenge the contemporary medical model of mental health. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this was the first literature review conducted specifically focussing on important factors in establishing Discovery Colleges. This literature review provides an important overview for both service users and staff members in how the development and implementation of this exciting and relatively new initiative can be further explored and enhanced going forward.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-05-09
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-04-2023-0041
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Compare social support in patients with schizophrenia or methamphetamine
           dependency with healthy individuals

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      Authors: Fatemeh Amini, Seyyed Mohammad Mousavi, Jamshid Yazdani Charati
      Abstract: This study aims to compare the social support among patients with schizophrenia or methamphetamine dependency with healthy individuals. Using convince sampling, the authors recruited 80 patients (schizophrenia, n = 40; methamphetamine dependency, n = 40) and their companions (healthy individuals, n = 40) who were referred to a psychiatric hospital in a cross-sectional study in Sari, Iran. In in-person interviews, the authors collected data on demographic characteristics and measured social support using a standardized questionnaire. The three groups were similar regarding age and marital status, but different in gender distribution (p = 0.001). The average social support score was 58.0 in the schizophrenia group and 42.3 in the methamphetamine-dependent group, both significantly lower than 63.6 in the healthy group (p = 0.001). The social support scores in schizophrenia and methamphetamine-dependent groups were significantly lower than those in the healthy group across all subgroups of gender (p < 0.04), age (p < 0.05) and marital status (p < 0.001). The methamphetamine-dependent group had the lowest score overall and across all demographic groups and social support subdomains. This study had two main limitations. First, the study samples were from one city and one hospital in the north of Iran and so may not be generalizable to other population and settings. Second, the authors did not study the causes or predictors of low social support like social stigma which should be studied in future studies. Despite the limitations, this study found low social support for people diagnosed with schizophrenia or methamphetamine dependency. Intervention to increase social support for them, especially for those with substance use, is required.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-05-05
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-02-2023-0019
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Social network use and life satisfaction: a systematic review

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      Authors: Cemil Akkaş, Aykut Hamit Turan
      Abstract: As our time spent on social networking sites (SNS) is increasing, more people are facing the psychological and mental consequences of SNS use. Given the growing body of research on the relationship between social network use and life satisfaction, this study aims to provide an overview of empirical studies through a systematic literature review. As a result of the screening process, 43 articles were included in the review in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. First, the characteristics of the studies included in the review, such as sample country, data collection method and data analysis method, are presented. Then, the findings on the relationship between SNS use and life satisfaction are outlined. Based on the results, it is seen that the relationship between SNS use and life satisfaction varies considerably with the sample and platforms studied. Theoretically, this systematic review provides a comprehensive picture of the relationship between SNS use and life satisfaction and encourages researchers to study the topic further. There are reviews on the relationship between SNS use and psychological factors such as self-esteem, loneliness or depression. In the reviews, limited variables such as problematic social network use, adolescents’ social network use and social network addiction have been examined instead of general social network use. However, the number of reviews on the relationship between social network use and life satisfaction is quite limited. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this systematic review is both a comprehensive literature review and one of the first studies to provide a broad perspective on the relationship between social network use and life satisfaction.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-05-05
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-03-2023-0037
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Peter Bullimore: a living tribute

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      Authors: Jerome Carson
      Abstract: This paper aims to provide a living tribute to the mental health activist and international trainer Peter Bullimore. Peter provided a list of people to who he wanted to provide tributes. Jerome approached all these people. All agreed. Several people from around the world attest to the influence that Peter’s teaching and personality have had on their clinical practice and on their lives. The disappearance of an Open Mind has left a shortage of journals, which welcome the user perspective. Mental Health and Social Inclusion have always championed the voice of people with lived experience. These are selected tributes to one man’s work in the field of mental health. These accounts provide insights into the work of a remarkable individual. Students of the mental health professions are mainly exposed to work produced by their peers. The history of mental health is filled with the stories of professionals, not the people who have used services. Historically accounts of psychiatry are written by mental health professionals. Service user or lived experience accounts are often written from the perspective of the person’s story of illness and recovery. There are comparatively few, which celebrate the additional achievements of specific individuals with lived experience.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-05-05
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-04-2023-0038
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The experience of launching a psychological hotline across 21 countries to
           support Ukrainians in wartime

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      Authors: Valeriia Palii, Mariana Velykodna, Marcio Pereira, Rosaleen McElvaney, Sam Bernard, Vitalii Klymchuk, Oleg Burlachuk, Alexander A. Lupis, Nadiia Diatel, Jane L. Ireland, Kimberley McNeill, Janina L. Scarlet, Ana L. Jaramillo-Sierra, Bassam Khoury, Diana Rocio Sánchez Munar, Sarah L. Hedlund, Tara Flanagan, Jeanne LeBlanc, Diana Maria Agudelo Velez, Yvonne Gómez-Maquet
      Abstract: This paper aims to discuss current work and further steps of the psychological hotline launched by the National Psychological Association of Ukraine (NPA), along with a call for action to mental health professionals worldwide. This paper describes the training and support of the NPA’s hotline staff as well as reflections on the hotline’s work from June 2022 to April 2023. With broad international support, the NPA’s psychological hotline currently operates in 21 countries providing psychological assistance and referrals to other service providers within Ukraine and abroad. The authors propose further steps of its work, including international collaboration. Providing citizens of Ukraine with broad public access to evidence-based remote psychological support through NPA’s hotlines is a high priority considering the war’s negative impact on mental health diverse and the limited capacity of the state mental health system.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-05-04
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-04-2023-0040
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Humor, laughter and mental health: a case study of Mary Kay Morrison

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      Authors: Mary Kay Morrison, Ros Ben-Moshe, Freda Gonot-Schoupinsky
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to meet Mary Kay Morrison, an active member and past president of the Association for Applied and Therapeutic Humor (AATH). This case study is presented in two sections: an autobiography of Mary Kay Morrison, followed by a ten-question interview. Mary Kay recommends exploration of the benefits of humor and laughter for mental health professionals. In recognition of the need for clarifying terminology, she coined the terms Humergy, which is joyful, optimistic, healthy energy and Humordoomer, which denotes a person who zaps that energy from us. Her work includes exploring the five stages of Humor Development as a significant factor in understanding cognitive development. This is a personal narrative, albeit from an educator who has been active in the field of applied and therapeutic humor for over 30 years. Humor and laughter research is recommended to explore their use in optimizing mental health. Mary Kay endorses expanding pioneering work in therapeutic humor as a treatment for anxiety and depression. She shares recommendations for humor practice in both prevention of mental health challenges and as a viable treatment for anxiety and depression. Three humor benefits with particular social applications are highlighted. Humor facilitates communication, creates an optimal learning environment and supports change. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first case study about Mary Kay Morrison, Past President of the AATH and founder of the AATH Certified Humor Professional program.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-04-28
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-03-2023-0036
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The Multi-Modality Practitioner (MMP) approach: a technically eclectic,
           multimodal workforce innovation in the provision of support for
           individuals and families with multiple needs

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Nicky Lidbetter, Emma Eaton, Paul Cookson, Moira Bell
      Abstract: The aim of this paper is to describe and detail a new workforce initiative developed by a third sector organisation: the Multi-Modality Practitioner (MMP) approach, in the provision of support for individuals and families presenting in the community with multiple and varied needs. This paper presents a case study on a third sector organisation’s pioneering workforce initiative – the MMP approach. The MMP approach has been developed as an alternative to existing approaches designed to address “single issues”, providing those working in the fields of health and social care and beyond, with a range of technically eclectic interventions from different modalities and approaches, to enable them to appropriately meet the needs of individuals and families presenting with multiple needs. This case study is limited to providing a rationale for the development of the MMP approach and a description. It does not include any formal analysis as a future evaluative paper will report on an independent theory-based examination of the MMP approach via Theory of Change and Contribution Analysis methodologies. This case study describes the innovative role that the MMP approach as a workforce innovation plays in meeting multiple needs in the community when deployed as either a stand-alone approach, or one that can be integrated with existing community-based services including, but not limited to, mental health, employability, addiction, housing, homelessness, public health and child and family services. The MMP approach constitutes a disruptive, pionneering, client-centred, workplace innovation that is trauma-informed, relational, strengths-based and continuity of care focused, capable of supporting individuals and families with multiple needs, negating onward referral and with potential to reduce demand on public services. It also provides those working in a range of health and social care roles with the opportunity to expand their therapeutic repertoire through high-quality, multi-skilled training in evidence-based and societally important, technically eclectic interventions drawn from a range of modalities. Pluralistic practice and multimodal theories have been in existence for over two decades, the MMP approach however, whilst sharing some of these concepts and philosophies, differs in that it provides those trained in the approach with a ‘toolkit’ of interventions that are technically eclectic, drawn from a range of modalities and approaches and aimed at meeting multiple needs in a pragmatic and accessible manner. Furthermore, the Diploma in Multi-Modality Practice is the first training course of its kind available at postgraduate level.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-04-07
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-01-2023-0010
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Trafficking trauma: a review on the psychological effects of human
           trafficking

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      Authors: Raluca Ioana Pascale, Calli Tzani, Maria Ioannou, Thomas James Vaughan Williams, Daniel Hunt
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to investigate the psychological consequences of human trafficking and to reveal the importance of appropriate post-trafficking psychological interventions. Specifically, this study provides a detailed analysis of human trafficking categories, as well as the characteristics of victims and traffickers’ motives. More recent data in the literature show that trauma-coerced attachments and complex post-traumatic stress disorder are also observed among trafficking survivors. Each of the mentioned mental disorders is presented separately, and results are discussed throughout this study. Consequently, psychological interventions are proposed in accordance with the human trafficking category, survivors’ characteristics and needs and with the relevant personal risk factors determined among victims. Sex trafficking can have a severe effect on a victim’s mental health, and mental health disorders are substantially higher in human trafficking victims compared to non-trafficked victims or general psychiatric population. Limitations, implications and future recommendations are discussed. A limited number of past studies evaluated the mental health consequences and identified that survivors have a higher prevalence of anxiety disorders, depression disorders and post-traumatic stress disorder.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-04-07
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-03-2023-0026
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • “Understanding the journey from A to Z”: centering peer support
           perspectives to unveil the mechanisms and power of peer support

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      Authors: Sandy Rao, Gina Dimitropoulos
      Abstract: This study aims to gain insights from peer support workers (PSWs) on the unseen mechanisms of peer support work that may be applied to implementing a child and youth mental health peer support program in a children’s hospital emergency department (ED). This study used a critical realist perspective with a qualitative research design. Eight participants, all PSWs in health, community and social services working with adults, adolescents and children, were recruited from Alberta, Canada. Data were collected through in-person semi-structured interviews and analyzed using Braun and Clarke’s reflexive thematic analysis. The results generated interrelated patterns of meaning among PSWs that were grouped into three main themes: inside out and outside in, no one leaves empty-handed and sculpting health system softness. All participants were trained by the same organization and may have similar understandings and approaches to the peer support role. Participants were predominantly of a similar demographic; thus, participants with minoritized identities may have challenges not represented. Using nontraditional staffing models in an acute center may facilitate a shift to meet the chronic and complex issues of the 21st century. Youth peer support roles may reduce stigma by challenging stereotypes and myths, reduce social isolation and improve meaning, connection and belonging for individuals with mental illness who are often dislocated and disconnected from society. This study exemplified the positive impacts peer support could make by improving child, youth and family experiences; reducing stigma; providing hope and help; and embedding the recovery model directly into the ED.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-04-04
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-02-2023-0016
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The aftermath of the Syrian crisis: a glimpse of the challenging life of
           widowed and divorced refugee women in Jordan

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      Authors: Ayat J. Nashwan, Lina Alzouabi
      Abstract: This study aims to address the social, cultural, financial and psychological obstacles these women face in preserving their living arrangements and in parenting as well as the coping mechanisms women adopt to overcome everyday challenges. Researchers used qualitative methodology and interviews to fulfill the aims. Researchers used qualitative methodology and interviews to fulfill the aims. The sample consists of 20 Syrians living in Jordan’s Amman, Irbid and Al Ramtha in specially designed compounds for them (14 widows and 6 divorcees). This study’s findings demonstrate that social and cultural norms existing in Jordan and Syria are generally similar, in which women view the males in the family as a source of socioeconomic and emotional stability for them. Widows and divorcees face serious sociocultural, financial and psychological challenges in maintaining their living conditions and the integration process as well as performing single parenting. Faith and social connections represent an important part of coping with the situation in the short term; nevertheless, financial and psychological support seems a vital component in the long term. Research on the conditions of widows and divorcees provides evidence to comprehensively approach the issue of “vulnerabilities” in the humanitarian-policy programming targeting refugees. Theoretically, the findings may provide empirical insights for discussions around women’s changing identities through displacement, agency and empowerment in relation to parenting experiences. The lived experience of widowhood and divorce among Syrian is understudied, while their resilience strategies are less known. To fill these gaps, this study focuses on Syrian refugee widows and divorcees who are raising their children in specially designated compounds in Jordan and the difficulties they face on social, economic and emotional levels. Besides its originality in providing empirical material about challenges Syrian women faced, our study contributes to better understand women's claims for agency and empowerment as a part of identity changes.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-03-27
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-01-2023-0007
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • “My words matter”: perspectives on evaluation from people who access
           and work in recovery colleges

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Sophie Soklaridis, Rowen Shier, Georgia Black, Gail Bellissimo, Anna Di Giandomenico, Sam Gruszecki, Elizabeth Lin, Jordana Rovet, Holly Harris
      Abstract: The purpose of this co-produced research project was to conduct interviews with people working in, volunteering with and accessing Canadian recovery colleges (RCs) to explore their perspectives on what an evaluation strategy for RCs could look like. This study used a participatory action research approach and involved semistructured interviews with 29 people involved with RCs across Canada. In this paper, the authors share insights from participants about the purposes of RC evaluation; key elements of evaluation; and the most applicable and effective approaches to evaluation. Participants indicated that RC evaluations should use a personalized, humanistic and accessible approach. The findings suggest that evaluations can serve multiple purposes and have the potential to support both organizational and personal-recovery goals if they are developed with meaningful input from people who access and work in RCs. The findings can be used to guide evaluations in which aspects that are most important to those involved in RCs could inform choices, decisions, priorities, developments and adaptations in RC evaluation processes and, ultimately, in programming. A recent scoping review revealed that although coproduction is a central feature of the RC model, coproduction principles are rarely acknowledged in descriptions of how RC evaluation strategies are developed. Exploring coproduction processes in all aspects of the RC model, including evaluation, can further the mission of RCs, which is to create spaces where people can come together and engage in mutual capacity-building and collaboration.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-03-07
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-01-2023-0002
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Irish transgender voices on mental health and mental health care
         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Jan de Vries, Carmel Downes, Danika Sharek, Louise Doyle, Rebecca Murphy, Thelma Begley, Edward McCann, Fintan Sheerin, Siobhan Smyth, Agnes Higgins
      Abstract: People who identify as transgender face stigma, isolation and harassment while often struggling to come to terms with their gender identity. They also disproportionately experience mental health difficulties. The purpose of this paper is to present the voices of transgender people in the Republic of Ireland (RoI) in regard to the issues they are facing, improvements they would like to see made to schools, workplaces, services and society in general and whether mental health supports fulfil their needs. Ten open questions were embedded within a quantitative online survey (LGBTIreland study) on factors impacting social inclusion, mental health and care. These open questions were re-analysed with exclusive focus on the transgender participants (n = 279) using content/thematic analysis. The participants in this study reported significant signs of mental distress. The following themes emerged: impact of stigma, deficiencies in mental health services, need for education on transgender identity, importance of peer support, achieving self-acceptance and societal inclusion questioned. Efforts to recruit young participants have led to a possible over-representation in this study. The findings suggest the need for improvement in mental health support services, including further education in how to meet the needs of transgender individuals. Transgender people in Ireland experience social exclusion. The need for more inclusivity was emphasised most in secondary schools. Education on transgender identities in all contexts of society is recommended by the participants. This study reports on the largest group of transgender participants to date in RoI. Their voices will affect perceptions on social inclusion and mental health care.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-03-03
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-12-2022-0085
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Is this the real life' Or just a fantasy' A closer look at
           maladaptive daydreaming

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      Authors: Mahimna Vyas, Mehatab Shaikh, Shubh Rana, Anjana Gauri Pendyala
      Abstract: Maladaptive daydreaming (MD) has yet to be recognized as a formal condition. This paper aims to shed light on the phenomenon of daydreaming, its potential maladaptive nature and the characteristics of MD, as well as potential interventions that may be implemented to address it. The present paper is a general conceptual review of the condition of MD. It provides a historical overview of the phenomenon and attempts to draw meaningful inferences from the scientific work pertaining to the development of diagnostic criteria, the assessment and interventions developed to treat MD. Studies have shown that MD can cause distress and impair an individual's typical functioning, and specific diagnostic criteria and symptoms have been identified. Scheduled clinical interviews, self-report measures and derivative treatment modules are currently utilized to understand, assess and treat the symptoms related to MD. Formal recognition of the condition ensures that the individuals receiving treatment for the condition are provided with insurance coverage and reimbursement for treatment.
      Authors also hope for MD recognition, awareness, reduced stigma and acceptance. This review offers a fair overview of the recent scientific findings pertaining to MD and attempts to open a channel of discourse to enhance the inclusivity of relevant psychopathological conditions in the existing classifications.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-02-28
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-01-2023-0014
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Factors contributing suicide in India

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      Authors: Avanish Bhai Patel
      Abstract: The death of a person caused by suicide is a matter of grave concern in contemporary society. Today, a number of people in society are taking their own lives because of many reasons. This study aims to examine the causes of suicide in Indian society using anomie theory. The author has applied the content analysis method. The researcher has collated 210 occurrences of suicide from newspapers of Uttar Pradesh between 1 October 2020 and 30 April 2021. The author has recognised the type, patterns and causes of suicide in society by analysing and observing daily news items. The result demonstrates that most suicides (16.67%) have been caused by frustration/mental illness, followed by several other causes of suicide such as family problems (13.81%), love affairs (10.00%), poverty (9.05%), harassment (8.57%) and sexual harassment (7.62%). The data shows a major gap in the number of suicide deaths between the genders. This is an original work of researcher which is basically based on anomie theory.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-02-17
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-01-2023-0011
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • An exploration of the implementation of peer work across multiple fields
           in Ireland

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      Authors: Daryl Mahon, Danika Sharek
      Abstract: Peer support work is increasingly becoming part of the delivery of health and social care services. However, in an Irish context, there is a paucity of research in this area. This study aims to investigate the experiences of peers and other key stakeholders across four sectors in Ireland. Qualitative interviews (N = 35) were conducted with key respondents in mental health, substance use, migrant health and homelessness sectors. Data were analysed using thematic analysis and reported using an ecological framework. Peer work is a slowly emerging area of practice, although mental health is further ahead in this journey. Findings suggest that peers are important additions to service delivery but also have various support and development needs. Organisations can encourage and support peers into employment through enacting human resource policy and practices, effective supervision, management and maintaining a positive working culture. Helping other professionals to understand the peer role and how it can function within the wider team is highlighted. National policy and governance structures can also support the emergence of the peer role, which exists in a highly complex arena. Peers can play a meaningful role in supporting service users in four sectors of health and social care in Ireland. Structures and processes to help embed these roles into systems are encouraged across micro, meso and macro levels. Implications and limitations are discussed for moving forward with peer work. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to include these four areas of practice simultaneously.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-02-03
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-12-2022-0082
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • (Re)-constructing patients’ post-treatment identities through a gender
           lens: a case among psychiatric patients in Malaysia

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      Authors: Nur Zafifa Kamarunzaman
      Abstract: Psychiatric patients’ post-treatment identities are one of the potent indicators reflecting the efficacy of the medical intervention. This study aims to explore how psychiatric patients construct their post-treatment social identities through a gender lens. This study used a descriptive phenomenological approach, and in-depth interviews were undertaken on 29 informants with experience of psychiatric treatment for at least one year and who are in the remission stage. The lived experience of each informant was scrutinised, which covered how psychiatric post-treatment affects and alters their personal life, work and social relationships. Data collected were then analysed using thematic analysis. The result found two mutually reinforced identities, namely, self-empowerment and resilience emerged from their experience with psychiatric post-treatment. Firstly, self-empowerment themes include acceptance of the disorders, meaningful choices, assertiveness and helping others. Such self-empowerment attributes enabled them to negotiate with the doctors during the treatment and also with their family members and partners. Secondly, psychiatric post-treatment allows them to be resilient; their good feeling of being liberated from the symptoms while allowing them to partake in a normal lifestyle. Meanwhile, gender differences were found to have diverse meaning-making that positively impacted their lives, particularly among female informants. Firstly, the data collection was only made in two states in North Peninsular Malaysia; hence, it would be biased in this sense to generalize to a larger population. At the same time, a prevalent study could be undertaken to view the pervasiveness of mental illness among Malaysians. Secondly, the study did not investigate the social institutions that are linked to the relief of psychiatric patients in the country. Thus, there is a grey area on how at the systemic level aid is given to the patients and the impact of such action. A rigour campaign on promoting mental health should be undertaken to create an inclusive environment for the patients. This is consistent with the aspiration of deinstitutionalization and the Shared Prosperity Vision 2030 agenda by the Malaysian government. This is a call for an allotment in special education, training, and funding, employment, housing and other aspects that are significant for their livelihood. The findings discovered that their social environment primarily caused the depression suffered by the patients. The remark is particularly true for female informants who had very little control over their lives and bodies. Hence, health professionals should consider practicing cultural and gender-sensitive treatment for these patients. Such treatments are to avoid re-discriminating, or re-victimisation feelings to occur during the treatment. Patients’ post-treatment social identity construction is seldom reported systematically through a gender lens. This study is one of the early efforts on gender lens that allow one to understand how it influences social structures and institutions, especially in the Malaysian realm.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-02-02
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-08-2022-0056
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Coffee as an axis of recovery: cooperativism and mental health

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      Authors: Andrés Felipe Agudelo Hernández, Ana Belén Giraldo Alvarez
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to understand the functioning of a mutual aid group for mental health in rural area and analyze their own strategies for the recovery of mental health, especially those focused on cooperation, social innovation and the strengthening of their own culture through coffee. The qualitative approach was addressed through the thematic analysis, method to identify, analyze and report patterns within the data. For the selection of participants, the members of a mutual aid group called “Cooperativa de Mujeres' was selected. This group functions as an autonomous business organization in Risaralda, Colombia. They have accompanied people diagnosed with anxiety, depression and domestic violence. Six women were interviewed, between the ages of 18 and 62. Two thematic nuclei are described: “One for all” made up of categories such as identification with the other, need for the other, being able to communicate, contributing to the group involuntarily and actions to help others. “All for one”, made up of categories such as growing together, welcoming individuals in their individuality from group dynamics, strengthening the relationship of the person with reality, strengthen from the experiences of others. Mutual Aid Groups in mental health propose associative structures that they seek to oppose the barriers of historical exclusion in the labor field and in this way contribute to the fact that the models, although they have a long history, have been little studied with a view to their implementation by health systems. Current research in the field of health should focus on recognizing the flaws of the current mental health model focused on medicalization, psychologization and institutionalization, and point to a greater commitment to intersectoral support for initiatives and scenarios that promote links, networks, autonomy and care for each other and the environment, where sustainability and social and economic growth are fundamental. The transformative actions of cooperatives are configured with a fundamental element when it comes to generating spaces for the rehabilitation of mental health. Components of a mutual aid group in rural areas are explored, which could serve to replicate said structures in similar scenarios, especially in territories where social inequities make recovery difficult, such as Colombia.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-02-02
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-12-2022-0087
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Laughter, mental health and cancer: a case study of Ros Ben-Moshe

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      Authors: Ros Ben-Moshe, Freda Gonot-Schoupinsky
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to meet Ros Ben-Moshe, a cancer survivor – or rather thriver – and lecturer in positive psychology at La Trobe University, describes how she uses laughter to boost levity and mental health. This case study is divided into two parts: an autoethnographic life story of Ros Ben-Moshe, followed by 10 questions and answers. Regular laughter is an enjoyable way to stimulate the feel-good chemicals dopamine, oxytocin, serotonin and endorphins. A laughter mindset is an important tool for overall wellbeing. It can help build connections and re-frame negative situations. This is a personal narrative and gives the perspective of one person who harnessed the benefits of laughter following a cancer diagnosis. Laughter can be used strategically to reset our internal mindset and prime ourselves towards optimal mental health and wellbeing, even while struggling with serious health issues. Research into how and when to prescribe laughter for mental health and overall wellbeing is therefore of interest. Social laughter is important and rewarding. For those anxious about social laughter, finding people to laugh with who do not judge you is recommended, as are affirmations to lessen anxiety. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first case study and interview with a cancer survivor on the topic of laughter, cancer and mental health.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-01-26
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-11-2022-0071
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Suicide attempts as turning points

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      Authors: David Lester
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to examine why an attempt at suicide does not always indicate the beginning of a life with poor mental health. Case studies, supplemented by follow-up studies of attempted suicides. One of the strongest predictors of a healthy life after the suicide attempt was found to be improvement in the appropriateness of behavior toward others and improved adult functioning. The results suggest that behavioral coaching, in addition to traditional psychiatric treatment, could help attempted suicides move on with their lives productively.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-01-25
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-12-2022-0092
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
 
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  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
Showing 1 - 200 of 382 Journals sorted by number of followers
American Journal of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 376)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 301)
Annual Review of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 270)
Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 190)
Social Forces     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 91)
Information, Communication & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 77)
Social Problems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 76)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
European Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Anthropological Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60)
Critical Studies on Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Comparative Studies in Society and History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 56)
The British Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Current Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Qualitative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Sociology of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Critical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Sociological Methods & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
International Political Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
City & Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
European Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Ageing & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Comparative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Contemporary Sociology : A Journal of Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
The Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
AlterNative : An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Poverty and Social Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Victorian Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Sociological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Critical Discourse Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Games and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
International Journal of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
City: analysis of urban trends, culture, theory, policy, action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Judgment and Decision Making     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
International Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Health and Social Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Urbanism: International Research on Placemaking and Urban Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Complexity in Leadership and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Sociolinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Design and Culture : The Journal of the Design Studies Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Rural Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
City, Culture and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Family Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
International Review for the Sociology of Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Social Psychology Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Ethnicities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Sociology of Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
African and Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Social Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Urban Research & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Emotion Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 20)
Sociological Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of International and Intercultural Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
The Sociological Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Family & Community History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Studies in Sociology of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Research in Organizational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Cities in the 21st Century     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
African Identities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
European Societies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Sociological Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Heritage & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Comparative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Cognition and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social and Personal Relationships     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Public Relations Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
American Sociologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Policy History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Health Sociology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Philosophy & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Sociology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Environnement Urbain / Urban Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Berliner Journal für Soziologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Historical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Teaching Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Communication Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Family Relations     Partially Free   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Global Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Sociological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Sport in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Symbolic Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Chinese Sociology & Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Classical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Sociological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Crime, Histoire & Sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Review of Sociology / Revue Canadienne De Sociologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Sojourn: Journal of Social Issues in Southeast Asia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Caribbean Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Metaphor and Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Sociologia Ruralis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Review of Education, Pedagogy, and Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Clio. Femmes, Genre, Histoire - Articles     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Cultures & conflits     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Advertising & Society Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal for the Study of Radicalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Studies in Latin American Popular Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
East Central Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Catalyst : A Social Justice Forum     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Sociological Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Gender and Behaviour     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Political Power     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Canadian Journal of Sociology / Cahiers canadiens de sociologie     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Revista Mexicana de Sociologí­a     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Anthropologie et Sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Bronte Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Sociologie du Travail     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Review of Sociology: Revue Internationale de Sociologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Ateliers d'anthropologie     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Sociolinguistic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Race/Ethnicity : Multidisciplinary Global Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Sociological Research Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Cross-cultural Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Japanese Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Critical Realism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Sexuality Research and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Arabian Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Surveillance and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Nordic Journal of Migration Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Contexts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Senses and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture, and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Genre, sexualité & société     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cuban Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
New Zealand Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Meridians : feminism, race, transnationalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Revista de Psicología Social, International Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Mathematical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contemporary Pacific     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Critical Horizons     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contemporary Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Contributions to Indian Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Group Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Studia Iranica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Visitor Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Aztlan : A Journal of Chicano Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Genre & histoire     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Italian Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Canadian Journal of Women and the Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ethnologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Études françaises     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
The Social Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sociological Spectrum: Mid-South Sociological Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Historical Pragmatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social Dynamics: A journal of African studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Islamic Law and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Good Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
The Tocqueville Review/La revue Tocqueville     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Criminologie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sociologie et sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Public and Professional Sociology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Cahiers de l'Urmis     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue de la régulation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
SociologieS - Articles     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transatlantica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Sustainable Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Seminar : A Journal of Germanic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Chrétiens et sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Canadian Ethnic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Enfances, Familles, Générations     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Lien social et Politiques     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Recherches féministes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Sociology Mind     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
COnTEXTES     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revue Internationale De Securite Sociale     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Caderno CRH     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Loisir et Société / Society and Leisure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Política y sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Landscapes of Violence     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Diversité urbaine     Full-text available via subscription  
Ciencia e Cultura     Open Access  
Studies in American Naturalism     Full-text available via subscription  
Southern Cultures     Full-text available via subscription  
Liinc em Revista     Open Access  
World Cultures eJournal     Open Access  
Spaces for Difference: An Interdisciplinary Journal     Open Access  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access  
Tracés     Open Access  
Socio-logos     Open Access  

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