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  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
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European Journal of Sociology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.643
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 38  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0003-9756 - ISSN (Online) 1474-0583
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [353 journals]
  • EUR volume 63 issue 2 Cover and Front matter

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      Pages: 1 - 5
      PubDate: 2022-07-04
      DOI: 10.1017/S0003975622000285
       
  • EUR volume 63 issue 2 Cover and Back matter

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      Pages: 1 - 7
      PubDate: 2022-07-04
      DOI: 10.1017/S0003975622000297
       
  • Executive Pay: Board Reciprocity Counts

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      Authors: Godechot; Olivier, Horton, Joanne, Millo, Yuval
      Pages: 165 - 211
      Abstract: We study the influence of the corporate board network on executive pay for 3,395 US firms between 1990 and 2015. We identify three elementary structures through which the interlocking network reflects forms of inter-group reciprocity across firms: restricted exchange, when two executives sit on each other’s respective boards; delayed exchange, when y sits on the board of x after the end of x’s mandate on the board of y; and generalized exchange, when x sits on the board of y, who sits on the board of z, who sits on the board of x. These ties, which are overrepresented, are related to higher executive pay, but are not related to firm performance, which we interpret as a form of rent extraction. We use the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (2002) as a natural experiment to confirm our results. The impact on pay disappears after 2004, once these types of exchanges are constrained.
      PubDate: 2022-03-31
      DOI: 10.1017/S0003975622000194
       
  • Structure, Strategy and Self in Cultural Peripheries: Theorizing the
           Periphery in the Polish and Dutch Fashion Fields

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      Authors: Kuipers; Giselinde, Holla, Sylvia, Van Der Laan, Elise
      Pages: 213 - 245
      Abstract: This article analyzes the creation of value in (semi-)peripheral fields, using interview (N=94) and ethnographic data of creatives, models and cultural intermediaries in Polish and Dutch fashion. Drawing on field theory and center-periphery theories we show that these peripheral fields have a distinct structure—peripheral worlds—marked by the dependence on foreign centers for goods, standards and consecration, in which actors employ field-specific peripheral strategies for pursuing value and success. Workers in the (semi-)periphery develop peripheral selves, marked by a “double consciousness”, simultaneously seeing themselves from a local perspective and through the eyes of “central” others. We theorize “peripheralness” as a dimension of social inequality, a continuum ranging from “most central” to “most peripheral”, that spring from transnational interdependencies; and offer building blocks for a theory of the periphery that connects structural conditions and personal experiences. This theory explains, among others, why peripheries are not the reverse of centers, why centers also need peripheries (though not as much as peripheries need centers), and why peripheral and semi-peripheral actors don’t leave for cultural hubs to “make it there”.
      PubDate: 2022-04-21
      DOI: 10.1017/S0003975622000224
       
  • Fragile Bonds of Recognition: Exploring the Social Underpinnings of
           Sentiments of Exclusion in Post-1989 East Germany

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      Authors: Hilmar; Till
      Pages: 247 - 278
      Abstract: Recently, as a corollary of intensified efforts to understand the rise of right-wing populism, the topic of social recognition has gained renewed attention in sociological research. It seems that a sense of misrecognition and exclusion is shaped as much by cultural as by economic factors. Just how these elements are interlinked, however, remains a black box. In this article, I offer an empirical contribution to this problem: I demonstrate that social recognition is nourished in everyday interpersonal relations and that people negotiate ideas of economic deservingness in their social surroundings—so much so, in fact, that they make social ties dependent on them. The article studies the case of the post-1989 societal shifts in formerly communist-ruled East Germany, a context marked by a pervasive sense of social exclusion today. In interviews with 41 individuals who lived through this rupturing process, I identify a crucial dynamic of social misrecognition in how respondents evaluate other peoples’ strategies of coping with the economic fallout of this time and how they draw—often deeply personal—boundaries between themselves and others on these grounds.
      PubDate: 2022-05-23
      DOI: 10.1017/S0003975622000236
       
  • Dynamics of Policy and Politics: Politics of Unemployment in Sweden during
           the Interwar Period

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      Authors: Ahn; Jae-Hung
      Pages: 279 - 320
      Abstract: Inspired by the theoretical perspective that “new policies create a new politics,” this paper explores how unemployment policies affected the politics of tripartite relations in Sweden during the interwar period. After the economic depression of 1920, strike activities began to decrease. Our panel data analysis finds that after 1920, the strength of the relationship between unemployment and strike activities decreased substantially. Historical interpretations complement statistical analysis. In the 1920s, the implementation of unemployment policies entailed the following feedback effects: First, the state reinforced its capacities, gaining increasingly firm control over strike activities. Second, the union movement was plunged into internal conflicts. In contrast to the arguments of power resources theory and the theory of cross-class coalition, neither the empowerment of the Social Democratic Workers’ Party (SAP) nor employers’ lockouts induced the Confederation of Labor Unions (LO) to turn towards concertation. Rather, this turnaround occurred in the 1920s while LO coped with the feedback effects engendered endogenously in processes of the implementation of unemployment policies.
      PubDate: 2022-05-04
      DOI: 10.1017/S0003975622000261
       
 
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