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  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
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The Sociological Review
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.595
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 33  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0038-0261 - ISSN (Online) 1467-954X
Published by John Wiley and Sons Homepage  [1764 journals]
  • Review of “How Civic Action Works: Fighting for Housing in Los
           Angeles”

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      Authors: Gaby S.
      Abstract: Princeton University Press, 2020, 312 pages. https://press.princeton.edu/books/hardcover/9780691212333/how-civic-action-works
      PubDate: Fri, 23 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soab089
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Review of Globalizing Organic: Nationalism, Neoliberalism, and Alternative
           Food in Israel

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      Authors: Upright C.
      Abstract: Review of Globalizing Organic: Nationalism, Neoliberalism, and Alternative Food in Israel Rafi Grosglik SUNY Press, 2021. 258 pages. http://www.sunypress.edu/p-7005-globalizing-organic.aspx
      PubDate: Thu, 15 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soab086
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Review of Preserving Neighborhoods: How Urban Policy and Community
           Strategy Shape Baltimore and Brooklyn

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      Authors: Hyde Z.
      Abstract: Review of Preserving Neighborhoods: How Urban Policy and Community Strategy Shape Baltimore and Brooklyn Aaron Passell Columbia University Press, 2021, 272 pages. http://cup.columbia.edu/book/preserving-neighborhoods/9780231194075
      PubDate: Thu, 15 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soab085
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Review of “The Cuban Hustle: Culture, Politics, Everyday Life”

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      Authors: Hernández-Medina E.
      Abstract: Review of “The Cuban Hustle: Culture, Politics, Everyday Life” Sujatha Fernandes Duke University Press, 2020, 189 pages. https://www.dukeupress.edu/the-cuban-hustle
      PubDate: Fri, 02 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soab082
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Review of “Race-Ing Fargo: Refugees, Citizenship, and the Transformation
           of Small Cities”

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      Authors: Sattar F.
      Abstract: Review of “Race-Ing Fargo: Refugees, Citizenship, and the Transformation of Small Cities” Jennifer Erickson Cornell University Press, 2020, 282 pages. https://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/book/9781501751158/race-ing-fargo/#bookTabs=1
      PubDate: Mon, 28 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soab079
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Review of “Motherlands: How States Push Mothers Out of
           Employment”

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      Authors: Pettit B.
      Abstract: Review of “Motherlands: How States Push Mothers Out of Employment” Leah Ruppanner Temple University Press., 2020, 186 Pages. http://tupress.temple.edu/book/20000000009939
      PubDate: Thu, 24 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soab073
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Review of “The Corsairs of Saint-Malo: Network Organization of a
           Merchant Elite under the Ancien Régime”

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      Authors: Ruef M.
      Abstract: Review of “The Corsairs of Saint-Malo: Network Organization of a Merchant Elite under the Ancien Régime” Henning Hillmann Columbia University Press, 2021. 336 pages. ISBN 978-0-231-18039-9 paperback. http://cup.columbia.edu/book/the-corsairs-of-saint-malo/9780231180399
      PubDate: Wed, 23 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soab071
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Review of “Power in Modernity: Agency Relations and the Creative
           Destruction of the King’s Two Bodies”

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      Authors: Reed I.
      Abstract: Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2020, 270 pages. https://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/P/bo48408506.html
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soab070
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Review of “A Detroit Story: Urban Decline and the Rise of Property
           Informality”

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      Authors: Garboden P.
      Abstract: Review of “A Detroit Story: Urban Decline and the Rise of Property Informality” Claire W Herbert University of California Press, 2019. 316 pages. https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520340084/a-detroit-story
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soab072
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Review of “Breaking the Social Media Prism: How to Make Our
           Platforms Less Polarizing”

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      Authors: Jones J; Rogers N.
      Abstract: Review of “Breaking the Social Media Prism: How to Make Our Platforms Less Polarizing” Chris Bail Princeton University Press, 2021, 240 Pages. https://press.princeton.edu/books/hardcover/9780691203423/breaking-the-social-media-prism
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soab074
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Review of “Super Polluters: Tackling the World’s Largest Sites of
           Climate-Disrupting Emissions”

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      Authors: Prechel H.
      Abstract: Review of “Super Polluters: Tackling the World’s Largest Sites of Climate-Disrupting Emissions” Don Grant, Andrew Jorgenson, and Wesley Longhofer Columbia University Press: 2020. 296 pages. http://cup.columbia.edu/book/super-polluters/9780231192170
      PubDate: Tue, 15 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soab066
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Review of “Democratic Practice: Origins of the Iberian Divide in
           Political Inclusion”

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      Authors: Christensen M.
      Abstract: Review of “Democratic Practice: Origins of the Iberian Divide in Political Inclusion” Robert M. Fishman Oxford University Press: 2019. 288 pages. https://global.oup.com/academic/product/democratic-practice-9780190912888'lang=en&cc=us
      PubDate: Mon, 14 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soab069
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Review of “Seeds of Power: Environmental Injustice and Genetically
           Modified Soybeans in Argentina”

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      Authors: Scanlan S.
      Abstract: Review of “Seeds of Power: Environmental Injustice and Genetically Modified Soybeans in Argentina” Amalia Leguizamón Duke University Press, 2020, 224 pages. https://www.dukeupress.edu/seeds-of-power, ISBN 978-1-4780-1085-2.
      PubDate: Mon, 14 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soab068
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Review of “Religious Parenting: Transmitting Faith and Values in
           Contemporary America”

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      Authors: Silverstein M.
      Abstract: Review of “Religious Parenting: Transmitting Faith and Values in Contemporary America” Christian Smith, Bridget Ritz, and Michael Rotolo Princeton University Press, 2019, 312 Pages. https://press.princeton.edu/books/hardcover/9780691194967/religious-parenting
      PubDate: Sat, 12 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soab064
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Review of “Living on the Edge: An American Generation’s Journey
           through the Twentieth Century”

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      Authors: Alwin D.
      Abstract: Review of “Living on the Edge: An American Generation’s Journey through the Twentieth Century” Richard A. Settersten, Jr., Glen H. Elder, Jr., and Lisa D. Pearce University of Chicago Press, 2021, 392 pages.https://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/L/bo68652394.html
      PubDate: Sat, 12 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soab067
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Review of “Live at Jackson Station: Music, Community, and Tragedy in a
           Southern Blues Bar”

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      Authors: Eastman J.
      Abstract: Review of “Live at Jackson Station: Music, Community, and Tragedy in a Southern Blues Bar” Daniel M. Harrison University of South Carolina Press, 2021, 256 Pages. https://uscpress.com/Live-at-Jackson-Station
      PubDate: Wed, 09 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soab065
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Review of “Freezing Fertility Oocyte Cryopreservation and the Gender
           Politics of Aging”

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      Authors: van de Wiel L.
      Abstract: NYU Press, 2020, 344 pages. https://nyupress.org/9781479817900/freezing-fertility/
      PubDate: Sat, 22 May 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soab061
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Review of Hurricane Harvey’s Aftermath: Place, Race, and Inequality
           in Disaster Recovery

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      Authors: Fitzpatrick K; Spialek M.
      Abstract: NYU Press, 2020, 208 pages. https://nyupress.org/9781479800759/hurricane-harveys-aftermath/
      PubDate: Wed, 19 May 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soab059
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Review of “Grassroots Environmentalism”

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      Authors: Staggenborg S.
      Abstract: New York, NY: Cambridge University Press: 2020, 244 pages. ISBN-13: 9781108745864 https://www.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/sociology/political-sociology/grassroots-environmentalism'format=HB
      PubDate: Wed, 19 May 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soab058
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Review of “Population Health in America”

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      Authors: Hummer R; Hamilton E.
      Abstract: University of California Press, 2019, 280 pages. https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520291577/population-health-in-america
      PubDate: Wed, 19 May 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soab062
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Review of “Camming: Money, Power, and Pleasure in the Sex Work
           Industry ”

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      Authors: Jones A.
      Abstract: NYU Press, 2020, 344 pages. https://nyupress.org/9781479874873/camming/
      PubDate: Mon, 17 May 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soab057
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • The New Milk Carton Campaign: An Analysis of Social Media Engagement with
           Missing Persons’ Cases

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      Authors: Jeanis M; Powers R, Miley L, et al.
      Pages: 454 - 476
      Abstract: AbstractThe unique feature of social media as a platform for news is that the public can directly engage with content. In this way, the public shapes the narrative on current issues, including crime. Criminal justice agencies have leveraged this engagement to relay information about missing persons’ cases quickly and efficiently to a large audience. Whereas previous research has explored disparities in news coverage of missing persons’ cases, it is unknown whether the public perpetuates these same disparities in the social media realm. This study contributes to the current literature by examining public engagement with missing persons’ social media content. Results suggest that engagement along some dimensions corresponds to disparities found in traditional news coverage, namely with regard to race, where marginalized victims experience less engagement. Further, there is evidence of an interaction between race and runaway status. Certain posting behaviors are also related to several forms of user engagement with missing persons’ posts; however, case characteristics remain prominent engagement-shaping factors. Implications for these findings are discussed from both a theoretical and practitioner standpoint.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jan 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soaa139
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Intersecting Boundaries: Comparing Stereotypes of Native- and Foreign-Born
           Members of Ethnoracial Groups

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      Authors: Schachter A.
      Pages: 506 - 539
      Abstract: AbstractPast research finds that Americans hold biased stereotypes about ethnoracial groups and about immigrants, but we lack an understanding of how these group identities intersect. Immigration theories offer opposing predictions; while the straight-line assimilation model predicts Americans will hold weaker ethnoracial stereotypes about the native-born compared to their immigrant coethnics, theories of racialized assimilation suggest that the enduring power of race will limit any differential stereotyping of immigrant and native-born members of racialized groups. I use an original survey experiment to compare Americans’ stereotypes of native- and foreign-born members of the four largest ethnoracial groups in the United States—Whites, Blacks, Latinos, and Asians. As predicted by straight-line assimilation theory, I find that Whites’ negative stereotypes of Latinos fade away with nativity; however, White Americans do not substantially alter their stereotypes of Asians and Blacks based on nativity status. Moreover, native-born Black and Latino Americans do not appear to hold differential stereotypes of ethnoracial groups based on their nativity status. This research highlights both the importance and limitations of accounting for nativity status to understand ethnoracial group boundaries in the United States.
      PubDate: Wed, 10 Feb 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soab004
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Selective Disclosure as a Self-Protective Process: Navigating Friendships
           as Asian and Latino Undocumented Young Adults

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      Authors: Cho E.
      Pages: 540 - 563
      Abstract: AbstractDrawing on in-depth interviews with sixty-three undocumented, 1.5-generation Korean-origin and Mexican-origin young adults in the United States, I bring attention to the deep-seated effects of immigration status that extend into the most intimate aspects of undocumented immigrants’ lives. Findings show that the stigma of being undocumented leads undocumented young adults to be selective about whom they befriend and to whom they decide to disclose their status, feeling safer with those of shared immigrant descent. Furthermore, ethnoracial background shapes pathways of selective disclosure. Korean undocumented young adults in the study were more likely to be prompted to disclose their status to justify another personal circumstance, whereas Mexican respondents primarily sought empathy and community in times of distress. Moreover, Korean respondents more often created a distinction between individuals with whom they discussed the intimate details of their legal situation and those they deemed close but from whom they hid their status. This work demonstrates the ways in which undocumented immigrants engage in selective status disclosure as one of myriad strategies to mitigate the harmful affective and material effects of undocumented immigration status. By using a comparative qualitative approach, this study points to the nuanced and very personal ways in which ethnoracial background shapes everyday experiences of illegality.
      PubDate: Fri, 08 Jan 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soaa122
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • The Under-Utilization of Women’s Talent: Academic Achievement and
           Future Leadership Positions

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      Authors: Qian Y; Yavorsky J.
      Pages: 564 - 598
      Abstract: AbstractDespite high labor force participation, women remain underrepresented in leadership at every level. In this study, we examine whether women and men who show early academic achievement during their adolescence—and arguably signs of future leadership potential—have similar or different pathways to later leadership positions in the workplace. We also examine how leadership patterns by gender and early academic achievement differ according to parenthood status. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, we find that overall, men supervise more people than women at work during their early-to-mid careers, regardless of their grade point averages (GPAs) in high school. In addition, among men and women who are parents, early academic achievement is much more strongly associated with future leadership roles for fathers than it is for mothers. Such patterns exacerbate gender gaps in leadership among parents who were top achievers in high school. Indeed, among those who had earned a 4.0 GPA in high school, fathers manage over four times the number of supervisees as mothers do (nineteen vs. four supervisees). Additional analyses focusing on parents suggest that gender leadership gaps by GPA are not attributable to different propensities for taking on leadership roles between the genders but are in part explained by unequal returns to educational attainment and differences in employment-related characteristics by gender. Overall, our results reveal that suppressed leadership prospects apply to even women who show the most promise early-on and highlight the vast under-utilization of women’s (in particular mothers’) talent for organizational leadership.
      PubDate: Mon, 18 Jan 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soaa126
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • The Gender Gap in Workplace Authority: Variation across Types of Authority
           Positions

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      Authors: Stojmenovska D; Steinmetz S, Volker B.
      Pages: 599 - 621
      Abstract: AbstractThe finding that men are disproportionately represented in positions of workplace authority to an extent that cannot be explained by human capital attributes and location within the structure of the economy is well documented. Arguing that different authority positions are differentially gendered, this article tests a more refined hypothesis: that the gender gap in authority is larger in positions that are relatively seen as more suitable for men. We distinguish authority positions by the amount of authority and the gender-typed control over resources they involve, hypothesizing a larger gender gap in positions with larger proportions of supervisory, as opposed to nonsupervisory tasks, and in positions with control over organizational, as opposed to human, resources. Our findings, based on Dutch linked survey and administrative data from about 32,000 employees who have started their careers between 1999 and 2016, largely support these ideas. We find an overall larger gender gap in positions with largely supervisory tasks as opposed to positions with only some supervisory tasks. Additionally, the authority gender gap is the largest in largely supervisory positions with control over organizational resources and smallest in positions with control over human resources. We discuss both theoretical and practical implications of our findings.
      PubDate: Thu, 25 Feb 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soab007
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Highly Skilled Women Reaching the Top: A Cost-free Achievement'
           Analyzing the Gender Promotion Gap in the Medical Profession

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      Authors: Gaiaschi C.
      Pages: 622 - 648
      Abstract: AbstractThis paper investigates the gender promotion gap in a particular highly skilled profession, that of physicians. The following analyses are based on a dataset of more than a thousand doctors working in Italy, a country in which hospitals play a central role in the national health care system. Given a three-step career ladder—first level, vice, and head—this research finds that women are 8% less likely than men to be promoted from the first level to vice, whereas no significant disadvantage is found in the promotion from vice to head. This suggests that the vertical segregation is due more to a sticky floors mechanism than to a glass ceiling effect. Moreover, no motherhood penalty occurs. Private organizations appear to be more gender equal than public ones and similar, albeit weaker, findings come from the analysis of the specialties, cautiously suggesting that the male-dominated area of surgery is more gender equal than the female-dominated area of medicine. These findings point out that women in highly skilled professions may encounter fewer obstacles to promotion than in the general labor market. Furthermore, they may encounter fewer obstacles within the most competitive organizations and specialty areas than across the profession in general. This is not, however, because of a greater number of opportunities, but because they represent a highly selected and career-oriented population. These results shed light on the costs of such achievement for women, both in terms of effort and in terms of equality among women themselves.
      PubDate: Mon, 19 Apr 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soab026
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Open But Segregated' Class Divisions And the Network Structure of
           Social Capital in Chile

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      Authors: Otero G; Volker B, Rozer J.
      Pages: 649 - 679
      Abstract: AbstractThis paper studies how social capital is divided across classes in Chile, one of the most unequal countries in the world. We analyse the extent to which upper-, middle-, and lower class individuals congregate in social networks with similar others, while following Bourdieu and expecting that in particular the networks of the higher social strata are segregated in terms of social capital. We test our argument with large-scale, representative survey data for the Chilean urban population aged 18–75 years (n = 2,517) and build an integrated indicator of people’s social class that combines measures of education, occupational class, and household income. Our regression analyses show that upper-class individuals have larger networks and access to more varied and prestigious social resources than their middle- and lower class counterparts. Interestingly, however, we found a U-shaped relationship between social class and class homogeneity, indicating that network segregation is high at the top as well as at the bottom of the class-based social strata. In contrast, the classes in the middle have more heterogeneous class networks, possibly forming an important bridge between the “edges” of the class structure. These findings demonstrate that whereas social and economic capital cumulates in higher classes, the lower classes are socially deprived next to their economic disadvantage.
      PubDate: Tue, 23 Feb 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soab005
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Class Inequality in Parental Childcare Time: Evidence from Synthetic
           Couples in the ATUS

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      Authors: LaBriola J; Schneider D.
      Pages: 680 - 705
      Abstract: AbstractThe time that parents spend teaching and playing with their young children has important consequences for later life achievement and attainment. Previous research suggests that there are significant class inequalities in how much time parents devote to this kind of developmental childcare in the United States. Yet, due in part to data limitations, prior research has not accounted for how class inequalities in family structure, assortative mating, and specialization between partners may exacerbate or ameliorate these gaps. We match parental respondents within the American Time Use Survey (ATUS) to generate synthetic parental dyads, which we use to estimate, in turn, the contributions of family structure, assortative mating, and specialization to class gaps in parental time spent in developmental care of children aged 0–6. We find some evidence that accounting for class differences in family structure widens income gaps in total parental time in developmental childcare of young children. Further, we show that assortative mating of parents widens educational gaps in developmental childcare, whereas specialization between partners marginally widens these class divides. Although the net effect of these three processes on income-based gaps in childcare time is modest, accounting for these three processes more than doubles education-based gaps in total parental developmental childcare as compared to maternal time alone. Our findings from this novel empirical approach provide a more holistic view of the extent and sources of inequality in parental time investments in young children’s cognitive and social development.
      PubDate: Thu, 28 Jan 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soaa133
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Vertical Education-Occupation Mismatch and Wage Inequality by
           Race/Ethnicity and Nativity among Highly Educated US Workers

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      Authors: Lu Y; Li X.
      Pages: 706 - 737
      Abstract: AbstractDespite remarkable educational gains of minorities, ethnoracial wage inequality persists and has even expanded among highly educated workers. Conventional explanations for this inequality are primarily derived from comparing workers across different educational levels and are less salient for understanding inequalities within the highly educated workforce. This study examines a previously overlooked source of ethnoracial inequality among highly educated workers: vertical mismatch between workers’ educational level and the education requirements for their occupation. Using a longitudinal sample of college graduates from the Survey of Income and Program Participation, we find that vertical mismatch accounts for a large part of racial/ethnic and nativity wage inequality. Specifically, highly educated minorities (especially blacks and Hispanics) and immigrants (especially those holding a foreign degree) are disproportionately channeled into mismatched jobs and subsequently consigned to such positions. Also, highly educated Hispanics and Asians, as well as foreign-educated immigrants, face greater wage penalties of vertical mismatch. The findings offer new insights into a key source of ethnoracial and nativity stratification.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Feb 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soaa145
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • What Does it Take to Get Ahead' Individual Characteristics, Community
           Contexts, and Stratification Beliefs among Youth in China

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      Authors: Lei L; Yu W.
      Pages: 738 - 764
      Abstract: AbstractResearch on youth in disadvantaged neighborhoods suggests that community contexts can affect youth’s beliefs about what it takes to get ahead. Nevertheless, a systematic analysis of such beliefs across a variety of communities remains rare. Using data from the China Family Panel Study from 2010 to 2014, we examine how individual characteristics, community socioeconomic status (SES), and their interplay are linked to young adolescents’ views on the importance of meritocratic, structural, and fatalistic contributors to future success. Results show that being in school for more years, having better-educated parents, having a higher family income, and being in communities with elevated SES generally lead youth to place greater importance on meritocratic elements and less emphasis on structural and fatalistic elements. Parental education is more strongly associated with the dismissal of a fatalistic view about who gets ahead in higher-SES communities. Meanwhile, the positive influence of community SES on meritocratic beliefs is stronger for poorer youth. Finally, we find that meritocratic beliefs are conducive to greater future progress in verbal and math skills, suggesting that such beliefs have important consequences for youth.
      PubDate: Fri, 22 Jan 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soaa143
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Intergenerational Educational Mobility and Life-Course Income Trajectories
           in the United States

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      Authors: Yaish M; Shiffer-Sebba D, Gabay-Egozi L, et al.
      Pages: 765 - 793
      Abstract: AbstractAtheoretical formulation derived from the cumulative advantage literature, that intergenerational educational mobility has enduring life-course income effects above and beyond individuals’ education, is empirically tested. This formulation contrasts sharply with both the human capital model, which does not consider parental education as a determinant of children’s income, and the sociological research on social mobility, which mostly relies on a snapshot view to study the economic consequences of educational mobility. To test this theory, we use NLSY79 survey data (with Panel Study of Income Dynamics data serving for robustness checks). We apply growth models to the data to estimate if and how the different intergenerational educational mobility groups that are produced by the intersection of parental and respondent education shape life-course income trajectories. Results provide evidence in support of the argument that the intersection of parental and respondent education bears important long-term income consequences, mainly for men. These results, moreover, do not vary by race. We discuss the theoretical and policy implications of our results.
      PubDate: Fri, 22 Jan 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soaa125
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Work–Family Reconciliation and Children’s Well-Being
           Disparities across OECD Countries

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      Authors: Andersson M; Garcia M, Glass J.
      Pages: 794 - 820
      Abstract: AbstractSocioeconomic inequalities in health and well-being are large, beginning early in childhood and accumulating over the life course, but they also vary widely across rich, developed nations. Despite this well-known cross-national variation, research has yet to examine why children’s health disparities might be larger or smaller based on national policy contexts and macroeconomic conditions. Parental health and well-being suffer under high work–family or economic strain, which may directly impact children’s health inequalities by family social class. These childhood health disadvantages, if not substantially improved, compound to even larger adult inequalities. To examine the role of national work–family reconciliation in children’s health, we merge country-level policy data with 2006 and 2010 World Health Organization child-level data on mental and physical well-being and family economic disadvantage. Based on adjusted estimates, we find greatly narrowed disparities in children’s self-rated health as work flexibility and vacation-sick leave mandates become more generous. However, cash transfer policies, including family benefits spending and childcare costs, were not associated with the size of children’s health disparities. Taken together, our results suggest the distinctive value of better work–family accommodations, rather than any generic cash allowances, for lessening family-based inequalities in children’s health and human capital development.
      PubDate: Thu, 28 Jan 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soaa132
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Why Precarious Work Is Bad for Health: Social Marginality as Key
           Mechanisms in a Multi-National Context

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      Authors: Macmillan R; Shanahan M.
      Pages: 821 - 851
      Abstract: AbstractThe expansion of precarious work in recent decades has motivated a large body of research on its implications for health. While considerable work has focused on whether precarious work undermines health, much less is known about why it matters. To fill this gap, this paper offers and tests a conceptual model whereby the effects of precarious work on health are mediated by social marginality, specifically reduced self-efficacy, weaker social integration, and lower social capital. All three mechanisms are understood as both social consequences of precarious work and important determinants of health. Empirically, we use data from the European Social Survey and investigate (1) conditional direct effects of precarious work on self-rated health and (2) extent of mediation via the three mechanisms. Furthermore, we assess the generalizability of the model across five welfare state regimes that prior work has deemed to be important moderators of the health–precarious work relationship. Results indicate precarious work has significant conditional direct effects and indirect effects through all three mediators that significantly reduce effect of precarious work on health. This is robust in the general sample and for four of five welfare state regimes. These findings highlight a previously unexplored vector connecting precarious work to health and indicate that the effects of precarious work on perceptions of self and social relations is a key link to poorer health. The study also expands conceptualization of the broad role of socioeconomic status for health inequalities and furthers understanding of the mechanisms at work.
      PubDate: Sat, 27 Feb 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soab006
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • The Salience of Religion Under an Atheist State: Implications for
           Subjective Well-Being in Contemporary China

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      Authors: Luo W; Chen F.
      Pages: 852 - 878
      Abstract: AbstractWe examine the linkage between religious involvement and life satisfaction among adults in contemporary China, a largely nonreligious society. Using data from the China Family Panel Studies (2012, 2014, and 2016), we conduct latent class analysis by using four indicators of religious involvement, including membership of religious groups, types of religion, frequency of participation, and evaluation of importance of religion in life. We classify the sample into four latent classes: (1) the pure nonreligious, (2) the nonreligious, but with some spirituality, (3) Chinese-religion adherent, and (4) organized religion adherent. Results from our fixed-effect models show that Chinese-religion and organized-religion adherents have higher levels of life satisfaction than those with no religious beliefs. Moreover, the disadvantaged groups benefit more from religious involvement in China, as evidenced by the stronger positive effect of religious adherence found among rural residents and individuals in the lowest income quartile. We discuss the benefits of religion both in terms of its public/social and private/intrinsic aspects and situate our findings in the larger social context of China.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 May 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soab049
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • The Structure of Protest Cycles: Inspiration and Bridging in South
           Korea’s Democracy Movement

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      Authors: Chang P; Lee K.
      Pages: 879 - 904
      Abstract: AbstractAlthough the concept of protest cycles has received much attention in the collective action literature, its empirical operationalization remains relatively crude compared to the rich theoretical discussion. Reimagining social movements as populations of interlinked protests, we demonstrate the advantages of analyzing protest event networks with a novel dataset related to South Korea’s democracy movement. In our conceptualization, protest events play the role of network nodes and links were identified based on protesters citing prior events as sources of inspiration for mobilizing. Appropriating strategies for network analysis, we assess the types of events that were more likely to be cited as sources of inspiration and bridge otherwise disconnected events. Our analysis shows that protests that raised systemic versus local issues and events that were repressed by the state were more likely to occupy central positions in the democracy movement. By identifying the characteristics of events that contribute to movement inspiration and bridging, our novel approach to analyzing protest events sheds new light on dominant themes in social movement research.
      PubDate: Fri, 15 Jan 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soaa130
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • The Liberalization of American Attitudes to Homosexuality and the Impact
           of Age, Period, and Cohort Effects

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      Authors: Ekstam D.
      Pages: 905 - 929
      Abstract: AbstractPrior analyses of age, period, and cohort effects in American attitudes to homosexuality have resulted in conflicting findings. I show that this is due to insufficient attention to the statistical identification problem facing such analyses. By means of more than four decades worth of survey data and two attitudinal measures taping social tolerance of homosexuality, I demonstrate that the conflicting results of prior research can be explained by differences in the implicit and unsubstantiated assumptions made to ensure model identification. To make up for the lack of attention to these assumptions in prior work, I discuss which age, period, and cohort effects we might expect to see based on prior knowledge about the case at hand, socialization theory, and research on how aging affects outgroup attitudes. On that basis, I also discuss which conclusions about age, period, and cohort effects we can actually draw in the case at hand. On a more general level, this article joins a growing literature that cautions against age-period-cohort analysis that does not give sufficient attention to theoretical expectations and side information when making the identifying assumptions on which the analysis must unavoidably rest.
      PubDate: Mon, 25 Jan 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sf/soaa131
      Issue No: Vol. 100, No. 2 (2021)
       
 
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