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  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
Showing 1 - 200 of 382 Journals sorted by number of followers
American Journal of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 340)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 283)
Annual Review of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 234)
Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 167)
Social Forces     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
Social Problems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 73)
Information, Communication & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Comparative Studies in Society and History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 56)
European Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Anthropological Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 54)
Critical Studies on Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Sociology of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Current Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
The British Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Qualitative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Sociological Methods & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
International Political Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
City & Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Critical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
AlterNative : An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 41)
Ageing & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
European Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Comparative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
The Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Poverty and Social Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Victorian Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Contemporary Sociology : A Journal of Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
International Journal of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Games and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Critical Discourse Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Complexity in Leadership and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
City: analysis of urban trends, culture, theory, policy, action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Sociological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
International Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Health and Social Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Judgment and Decision Making     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Design and Culture : The Journal of the Design Studies Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Urbanism: International Research on Placemaking and Urban Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
International Review for the Sociology of Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Sociolinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Ethnicities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
City, Culture and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Rural Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Family Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Social Psychology Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Sociology of Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Sociological Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Social Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Emotion Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Urban Research & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Journal of International and Intercultural Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
African and Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
The Sociological Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Studies in Sociology of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Family & Community History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Research in Organizational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Cities in the 21st Century     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
African Identities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Sociological Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Cognition and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Heritage & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
European Societies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Policy History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 15)
American Sociologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Social and Personal Relationships     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Public Relations Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Health Sociology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Comparative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Philosophy & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Historical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Sport in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Symbolic Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Berliner Journal für Soziologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Global Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Communication Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Family Relations     Partially Free   (Followers: 11)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Classical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Environnement Urbain / Urban Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Sojourn: Journal of Social Issues in Southeast Asia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Sociology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Sociological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Sociological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Review of Sociology / Revue Canadienne De Sociologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Advertising & Society Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
East Central Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Canadian Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Cultures & conflits     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal for the Study of Radicalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Studies in Latin American Popular Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Crime, Histoire & Sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Catalyst : A Social Justice Forum     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clio. Femmes, Genre, Histoire - Articles     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Sociologia Ruralis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Metaphor and Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Review of Education, Pedagogy, and Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Teaching Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Sociological Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Anthropologie et Sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Political Power     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Canadian Journal of Sociology / Cahiers canadiens de sociologie     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Caribbean Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
International Review of Sociology: Revue Internationale de Sociologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Sociological Research Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Bronte Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gender and Behaviour     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Race/Ethnicity : Multidisciplinary Global Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Chinese Sociology & Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Sociologie du Travail     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Cross-cultural Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Revista Mexicana de Sociologí­a     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Surveillance and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ateliers d'anthropologie     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Sexuality Research and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Nordic Journal of Migration Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Arabian Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Japanese Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture, and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Contexts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Genre, sexualité & société     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Senses and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Contemporary Pacific     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Cuban Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Critical Horizons     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Sociolinguistic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Critical Realism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Revista de Psicología Social, International Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Canadian Journal of Women and the Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Visitor Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Italian Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Mathematical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Études françaises     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ethnologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Meridians : feminism, race, transnationalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Studia Iranica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Group Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Contributions to Indian Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Aztlan : A Journal of Chicano Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
New Zealand Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Genre & histoire     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Public and Professional Sociology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sociological Spectrum: Mid-South Sociological Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
The Tocqueville Review/La revue Tocqueville     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Historical Pragmatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social Dynamics: A journal of African studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
The Social Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sociologie et sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Contemporary Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Good Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Islamic Law and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Criminologie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Lien social et Politiques     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Recherches féministes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Sociology Mind     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Sustainable Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Enfances, Familles, Générations     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transatlantica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Chrétiens et sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
SociologieS - Articles     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue de la régulation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Seminar : A Journal of Germanic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Landscapes of Violence     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
COnTEXTES     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Política y sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cahiers de l'Urmis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Loisir et Société / Society and Leisure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revue Internationale De Securite Sociale     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Ethnic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Caderno CRH     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Diversité urbaine     Full-text available via subscription  
Ciencia e Cultura     Open Access  
Studies in American Naturalism     Full-text available via subscription  
Southern Cultures     Full-text available via subscription  
Liinc em Revista     Open Access  
World Cultures eJournal     Open Access  
Spaces for Difference: An Interdisciplinary Journal     Open Access  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access  
Tracés     Open Access  
Socio-logos     Open Access  

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Sociology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.807
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 167  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0038-0385 - ISSN (Online) 1469-8684
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1175 journals]
  • Book Review: Jack Palmer and Dariusz Brzeziński (eds), Revisiting
           Modernity and the Holocaust: Heritage, Dilemmas, Extensions

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Shaun Best
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-11-30T11:34:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221135562
       
  • Me' A Hero' Gendered Work and Attributions of Heroism among
           Volunteers during the COVID-19 Pandemic

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Braden Leap, Kimberly Kelly, Marybeth C Stalp
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The gendered features of adults’ attributions of heroism to themselves and others has received substantially less scholarly attention than the gendered dynamics of media representations of (super)heroes. Utilizing 78 interviews and 569 self-administered questionnaires completed by adults in the United States who were voluntarily making personal protective equipment during the COVID-19 pandemic, we show how respondents effectively deployed popularized assessments of the relative value of gendered labour in the private and public spheres to shift attributions of heroism from themselves to others. Though media portrayals at the outset of the pandemic depicted these volunteers working in their homes as heroes, respondents insisted that the real heroes were those working in the public sphere. Even if media representations increasingly frame women as heroes, these results suggest that the long-standing associations between men and heroism will likely remain in place if feminized labour associated with the private sphere of households remains devalued.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-11-26T05:13:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221136035
       
  • The Greta Thunberg Effect: A Study of Norwegian Youth’s Reflexivity
           on Climate Change

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jan Frode Haugseth, Eli Smeplass
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This study reports on an unique opportunity to compare four quantitative/qualitative datasets from 2017 to 2021, before and after the activist Greta Thunberg became known to the general public. Through a mixed-methods approach, we develop a model to distinguish between three forms of climate reflexivity: (1) reflexivity as ranking; (2) reflexivity as recognising; and (3) reflexivity as qualifying. Our findings imply that in 2019 and the following years, Greta Thunberg became a unifying inspiration for young people already concerned with the climate crisis in Norway. Even though two indicators suggest that the COVID-19 pandemic did divert young people’s reflexivity from climate issues, we also find that a subset of the participants expresses rich reflexivity, addressing nature and the need for transition and solidarity. Finally, we argue these forms of reflexivity shape commonalities that may have relevance across social classes, identities and nation-states.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-11-18T05:24:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221122416
       
  • Social Mobility and ‘Openness’ in Creative Occupations since
           the 1970s

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Orian Brook, Andrew Miles, Dave O’Brien, Mark Taylor
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Social mobility in the cultural sector is currently an important issue in government policy and public discussion, associated with perceptions of a collapse in numbers of working-class origin individuals becoming artists, actors, musicians and authors. The question of who works in creative occupations has also attracted significant sociological attention. To date, however, there have been no empirically grounded studies into the changing social composition of such occupations. This article uses the Office for National Statistics Longitudinal Study to show that, while those from more privileged social backgrounds have long dominated, there has been no change in the relative class mobility chances of gaining access to creative work. Instead, we must turn to the pattern of absolute mobility into this sector in order to understand claims that it is experiencing a ‘mobility crisis’.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-11-18T05:21:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221129953
       
  • The Politic of Everyday Counter-Terrorism: Online Performances and
           Responsibilities of the Prevent Duty in UK Higher Education Institutions

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Keith Spiller, Andrew Whiting, Imran Awan, Ben Campbell
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The Prevent Duty mandates that public authorities must work to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism. In this article we review how 158 UK Higher Education Institutions have responded to this new duty by examining their public-facing webpages and Prevent policy documentation. In doing this we draw upon de Certeau’s notions of the everyday to highlight how such initiatives are presented publicly to viewing audiences, and how messages seep into and deepen security measures within UK Higher Education. In reviewing the performative element of Prevent, specifically how information is displayed, we find that the majority of UK Higher Education Institutions have approached their new roles through the prism of ‘compliance’ and/or ‘safeguarding’. The article argues presentations of safeguarding, reassurance and reluctance offer a telling insight into how the Duty has been adopted in Higher Education Institutions’ everyday practice.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-11-18T05:17:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221129950
       
  • Social Quarantining in the Construction and Maintenance of White Australia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Zoe Staines
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      While medical quarantining has (again) received widespread attention during the COVID-19 pandemic, comparatively little consideration has been given to how medical quarantining is entangled with socio-political life. Further, there are no known studies that consider how quarantine might also be employed as a socio-political practice. This article explores the concept of social quarantine by tracing the creation of white Australia via the social construction, excise and discipline of Indigenous peoples as a potentially contagious Other. It shows how social quarantine integrates largely disparate sociological concepts/literatures (e.g. bordering, (im)mobility, confinement, enclave society, discipline, eugenics, assimilation), demonstrating how they unite under settler colonialism as a powerful assemblage of disciplinary technologies. Social quarantine also makes visible how the threat of contamination has been central to constructing and protecting Australia’s (white) imagined nationhood from the perceived disease of Otherness.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-11-18T05:03:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221129046
       
  • ‘You are Still a Guest in This Country!’: Understanding Racism through
           the Concepts of Hospitality and Hostility in Healthcare Encounters in
           Sweden

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hannah Bradby, Suruchi Thapar-Björkert, Sarah Hamed, Beth Maina Ahlberg
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      While regularly applied to globalized migration, conceptualizations of hospitality have rarely been used to understand healthcare settings. Drawing on interviews with healthcare staff in Sweden, our article contributes to the current conceptualization of hospitality accounting for: the internal contradictions of hospitality that racialized staff experience in their everyday interactions with patients and other staff; the shifting boundaries between host and guest in everyday healthcare practices, especially when examined through the lens of racialization and finally; the subtle though troubled coexistence of hostility and un(conditional) hospitality that weakens resistance against racism. The analysis maps the complex contingencies of professional, ethnic and national relations between staff and patients, in light of their racialized and gendered nature, to suggest that the ambivalences theorized as part of the concept of hospitality show how the hurts of racism are so hard to pinpoint.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-11-18T04:53:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221124827
       
  • Disability, Social Class and Stigma: An Intersectional Analysis of
           Disabled Young People’s School Experiences

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Stella Chatzitheochari, Angharad Butler-Rees
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Recent decades have witnessed a renewed interest in stigma and its effects on life-course trajectories of disabled people. However, sociological narratives largely adopt monolithic understandings of disability, neglecting contextual meanings of different impairments and conditions and their intersections with other ascriptive inequalities, which may be consequential for exposure to stigma. Our article provides an intersectional analysis of disabled young people’s lived experiences of stigma in mainstream school settings. Drawing on semi-structured interviews with 35 autistic, dyslexic and/or physically disabled students, we show that stigmatisation is contingent on social class background, which affects students’ location within the school. We also find substantial variation in experiences of stigma between and within sub-categories of conditions/impairments, as a consequence of the perceived distance from normative ideals of skills and behaviour attached to individuals in school settings. Our findings highlight the importance of intersectional analyses of stigma, challenging universalised views about stigmatised disabled people.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-11-14T05:20:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221133710
       
  • A Bourdieusian Latent Class Analysis of Cultural, Arts, Heritage and
           Sports Activities in the UK Representative Understanding Society Dataset

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Emma S Walker, Daisy Fancourt, Feifei Bu, Anne McMunn
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      To Bourdieu, interaction with culture has symbolic power and drives the manifestation of social stratification. Many have adapted his theory and methodology, developing new models of cultural engagement. Here, to further integrate these theoretical and methodological approaches, Bourdieu’s tools were used to operationalise and interpret a Latent Class Analysis of cultural engagement in the Understanding Society dataset. Six classes of increasing engagement were established, and were increasingly correlated with youth, capital and social advantage. However, some qualitative differences in engagement were also seen. The classes also varied by which characteristics correlated with membership. For example, economic capital was associated with sports engagement, while advantaged social position was associated with broad-scale engagement. Overall, this analysis combined Bourdieusian theory with contemporary methodology in the largest representative UK dataset and highlights the broader relevance of cultural engagement patterns in indicating (and possibly generating) status, identity, capital and social position.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-11-14T05:07:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221130163
       
  • Book Review: Stefan Lorenz Sorgner, We Have Always Been Cyborgs: Digital
           Data, Gene Technologies, and an Ethics of Transhumanism

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nashwa Elyamany
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-11-09T09:32:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221135569
       
  • From the Home to the (Hand)bag: Negotiating Privacy in Personal Life when
           Living with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lauren White
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Securing, and negotiating, privacy with intimate bodily needs is an ordinary but often hidden feature of our personal lives. Drawing upon a UK-based qualitative study that utilised diaries and follow-up interviews to explore everyday life with the health condition irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), this article explores the navigations of privacy when anticipating or experiencing symptoms. Building upon sociological understandings of privacy and personal life, this article maps the intimate and mobile ways in which privacy is sought out – disrupted or achieved – in domestic, material and public realms. It does so by following the paths to privacy and the personal belongings carried as they move through personal life. The article demonstrates how privacy is embodied and spatially, temporally, relationally and materially shaped. In doing so, the article argues that privacy comes to shift through everyday contexts and social relations with intimate materialities in mind.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-11-07T10:23:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221122460
       
  • Carrying Europe’s ‘White Burden’, Sustaining Racial Capitalism:
           Young Post-Soviet Migrant Workers in Helsinki and Warsaw

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Daria Krivonos
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The opening up of sociology to postcolonial and critical race thinking has been predominantly animated by the relations between western metropoles and their (post)colonies. ‘Eastern Europe’ seems to be an uneasy fit in this discussion, being excluded from the idea of ‘Europe’; at the same time, it is not grouped together with non-European Others in terms of colonial histories. Drawing on fieldwork among young Russian and Ukrainian migrant workers in Helsinki (2014–2016) and Warsaw (2020), the article examines global connections that tie the North/West, South and East in these migrants’ imaginaries and material lives after migration. I demonstrate that Eastern European subjects are not outsiders to global racial capitalist orders but participate in sustaining a colonial project of Europe, whiteness and labour. The article argues for the importance of articulating postcoloniality of Eastern Europe vis-a-vis the West together with race to show the complicity of semi-peripheries with the global structures of racial capitalism.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-11-07T10:18:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221122413
       
  • The Unhomely of Homeschooling

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Martin Myers
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Despite increasing global popularity perceptions of homeschooling remain problematic. It resists trends towards mass compulsory education and the promotion of children’s rights; it challenges the state’s authority to educate citizens; and raises concerns about child protection issues and educational outcomes. Contemporaneously many homeschoolers identify their fears of risks and failings in mainstream schooling as the reason they homeschool. This article explores how discomfort and fear is ingrained within meanings associated with homeschooling often related to its domestic practice. It develops Freud’s account of unheimlich (the unhomely) as a useful addition to the sociological analysis of the multiple renditions of meaning attached to homeschooling. These include the conflation of homely and unhomely accounts; the significance of anecdotal accounts as a means of restating class biases and racisms; and the ambiguous relationship between family and state. It argues both policymakers and homeschoolers need to acknowledge these ambiguities.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-11-07T02:08:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221129943
       
  • Portholes of Ethnography: The Methodological Learning from ‘Being
           There’ at a Distance

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Julie Walsh, Asma Khan, Maria Teresa Ferazzoli
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Ethnography is, in essence, an approach to social research reliant on ‘being there’ and ethnographic approaches to the social world have been widely taken up in sociological research. In this research note, we share our UK-based experiences of ethnographic fieldwork with professional practitioners during the initial months of the COVID-19 pandemic, when ‘staying at home’ was the antithesis of ‘being there’. In doing so, we highlight opportunities the pandemic presented to re-evaluate familiar qualitative methods, to develop new, remote ethnographic research strategies and to examine the limitations of conducting ethnography from a distance. We consider how far we stretch ‘ethnography’ in a socially distanced context, using what we call ‘portholes of ethnography’, and we outline how our learning informs the ways in which we can adapt research approaches – driven by relationality – in times of crises.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-11-03T04:38:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221122458
       
  • Platforms Disrupting Reputation: Precarity and Recognition Struggles in
           the Remote Gig Economy

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      Authors: Alex J Wood, Vili Lehdonvirta
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Digitalisation and the use of algorithms have raised concerns over the future of work, the gig economy being identified by some as particularly concerning. In this article, we draw on 70 interviews in addition to participant observations to highlight the role of gig economy platforms in producing a novel form of reputational insecurity. This insecurity is generated by platforms disrupting the traditional operation of industry reputation in freelance markets. We highlight three areas of transformation (recognition, power relations and transparency) in which platforms disrupt the social regulation of reputation and thus algorithmically amplify uncertainty. We also detail how workers individually and collectively attempt to re-embed reputation within interpersonal relations to reduce this novel insecurity.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-11-02T12:01:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221126804
       
  • Variations of Gender Gaps in the Labour Market Outcomes of Graduates
           across Fields of Study: A (Combined) Test of Two Theories

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      Authors: Diana Roxana Galos, Nevena Kulic
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Unequal gender outcomes in occupational success unravel through different channels in higher education. Using the AlmaLaurea dataset comprised of 80% of Italian graduates and 98 fields of study, this article investigates whether men and women receive similar returns on employment and earnings when choosing the same field of study. Two complementary perspectives are applied – Kanter’s theory of relative numbers and the status theory of gender – to examine the quantitative and qualitative differences between fields. The results show that the most gender ‘balanced’ fields of study are the most gender unequal in terms of earnings and employment. Separate analyses demonstrate that the status of a field interacts with its gender composition, and gender gaps in female-intensive nurturing fields shrink faster with an increasing proportion of women, albeit at higher absolute levels compared with non-nurturing fields. Therefore, nurturing fields of study should not necessarily be considered as levelling gender inequality in the labour market.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-11-02T10:46:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221122400
       
  • Inequalities in Home Learning and Schools’ Remote Teaching Provision
           during the COVID-19 School Closure in the UK

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      Authors: Sait Bayrakdar, Ayse Guveli
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Millions were affected by COVID-19 school closures, with parents and schools caught unprepared. Education is expected to play a role in creating equal opportunities, so transferring schooling responsibilities to families may have increased learning inequalities generated by family backgrounds. We examined the time students spent on home learning and explored the role of the schools’ distance teaching provision in explaining differences traditionally attributed to parental education, eligibility for free school meals, ethnic background and single parenthood. Using the Understanding Society COVID-19 dataset, we found children who received free school meals, single-parent families and children with parents with lower formal education qualifications and Pakistani or Bangladeshi backgrounds spent significantly less time on schoolwork. However, schools’ provision of offline and online distance teaching and homework checking significantly increased the time spent on learning and reduced some inequalities, demonstrating the policy relevance of digital preparedness to limit learning loss in school closures.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-10-29T04:47:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221122444
       
  • No Pass Laws Here! Internal Border Controls and the Global ‘Hostile
           Environment’

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      Authors: Kathryn Medien
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores internal border controls in 1980s Britain, examining how they were conceptualised and resisted by a group of activists, the No Pass Laws Here! Group. Drawing on archival research conducted at the Hull History Centre and the Institute of Race Relations and focusing analysis on the Group’s public-facing information leaflets and bulletins, this article explores how internal border controls created differentiated access to employment and the welfare state, targeting migrant and racialised residents and citizens. The No Pass Laws Here! Group’s framing and analysis, in particular their use of pass laws as a frame through which to apprehend the spread of internal border controls, this article argues, allows us to draw out the continuities between policies developed to maintain colonial rule and those present in the metropole.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-10-25T04:51:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221122518
       
  • The Visibility of Digital Money: A Video Study of Mobile Payments Using
           WeChat Pay

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      Authors: Christian Greiffenhagen, Rongyu Li, Nick Llewellyn
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article analyses situated uses of digital payment platforms, contributing to the sociology of money, and digital sociology. Our data are video recordings of 256 small-scale transactions, gathered from across four Chinese cities, at grocery stores, supermarkets, street markets, restaurants, and cafes. Our focus is the visibility of money in particular circumstances associated with some WeChat payments. In these cases, payment is made visible via a confirmation screen only seen by the customer. We argue that payment applications provide a good empirical site for understanding how digital media reconfigure ‘the social’ by shaping how monetary information is seen and heard. Rather than eliminating trust, reducing transactions to impersonal semi-automated affairs, we show how mobile payments generate new and complex patterns of economic action. A nuanced language game is described that requires sellers to trust customers are acting in good faith. We show how ‘the social’ is imprinted on this contemporary monetary medium.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-10-20T09:14:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221104007
       
  • Social Space as a Theory of Society: Scientific Arguments Regarding the
           Figuration of the Social in Bourdieu’s Distinction

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      Authors: Hervé Glevarec
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      At the core of Pierre Bourdieu’s sociological theory lies the notion of ‘social space’, which in Distinction is embodied under the headings ‘the space of social positions’ and ‘the space of life-styles’. Social space is not a product of correspondence analysis, and yet it is deemed to be a true representation of a national society with ‘universal validity’. Contemporary sociology has not tested the scientific foundation of the Bourdieusian social space, or challenged it using contemporary factorial plans for culture practices. The purpose of this article is therefore to examine social space in four steps: (1) review the supposedly factorial character of the ‘social space’ diagram, and basic concepts, such as ‘lifestyle’ and ‘relative structure of the capital’; (2) analyse the representativeness of the ad hoc cultural survey; (3) critique the interpretation of the two ‘variants of tastes’; and (4) rethink the ‘variant of dominant taste’. What we suggest from our findings is that social space should no longer be considered as a well-founded representation of society.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-10-14T12:18:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221094771
       
  • Ethical Practices of the Family Child

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      Authors: Sofie Henze-Pedersen
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Following the introduction of the influential ‘doing’ family perspective, an active understanding of parents has taken centre stage in sociological thinking on how families are constructed. However, this has not extended to children, and their roles as co-constructors of families have not received the same amount of attention. This article examines the practices children use to construct themselves as child of someone in relation to a parent. By locating children’s practices within the ‘doing’ family perspective, the article identifies three levels of childhood in families – being child, doing child and reflecting child. The article shows how the three levels must be understood in relation to discourses on what it means to be a ‘good’ child of someone, as these moral questions influence what children come to do. The article draws on interviews with 39 children (aged 5–17 years) from two studies that explored children’s family relationships in challenging family circumstances.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-10-08T06:17:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221112246
       
  • Deindividualising Imposter Syndrome: Imposter Work among Marginalised
           STEMM Undergraduates in the UK

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      Authors: Órla Meadhbh Murray, Yuan-Li Tiffany Chiu, Billy Wong, Jo Horsburgh
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Imposter syndrome is the experience of persistently feeling like a fraud despite one’s achievements. This article explores student experiences of imposter syndrome, based on 27 interviews with marginalised STEMM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics and Medicine) undergraduates at two pre-1992 elite UK universities. We argue that imposter feelings are a form of unevenly distributed emotional work, which we call imposter work. Drawing on Sara Ahmed’s ‘diversity work’ concept we explore how marginalised students’ imposter feelings are often in response to, and reinforced by, the exclusionary atmosphere of university, resulting in more imposter work to survive and thrive at university. Three key themes are explored – the situated and relational nature of imposter feelings; the uneven distribution of imposter work; and the myth of individual overcoming – before concluding with suggestions for collective responses to addressing imposter feelings.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-10-08T06:11:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221117380
       
  • The Sociology of Utopia, Modern Temporality and Black Visions of
           Liberation

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      Authors: Joe PL Davidson
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article focuses on the relationship between the sociology of utopia and Black visions of liberation. Influential figures from Karl Mannheim to Ruth Levitas have effectively demonstrated the value of a utopian perspective for sociology. However, the African American tradition of utopianism has been largely overlooked in this literature. I argue that the Black standpoint forces a rethinking of the sociological understanding of utopia. More specifically, while most sociologists of utopia straightforwardly associate the desire for a better world with the future, the Black tradition proposes a more expansive understanding of utopia’s temporality. Building on visions of new worlds advanced by WEB Du Bois and the movement for reparations for slavery, I suggest that Black utopia involves a glance backwards to the past, such that the image of a better future is accompanied by the memory of the catastrophe of slavery.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-10-08T06:05:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221117360
       
  • Migrant Black African Youths’ Experiences of Racial Microaggressions
           in the Workplace

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      Authors: Joshua Kalemba
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article offers an exploration of migrant Black African youths’ (MBAYs’) experiences of racial microaggressions in Australian, predominantly White, workplaces. Data for this article are drawn from qualitative interviews conducted with 20 MBAYs working in Newcastle, a traditionally White working-class city. Drawing on a theoretical framework that approaches racial microaggressions through a Critical Race Theory lens, the article centres MBAYs’ experiences of racial microaggressions in the workplace as a site of legitimate experiential knowledge. The findings of this article underscore how MBAYs perceive questions like ‘Where are you from'’ posed by their White colleagues and clients as a racial microaggression. They showcase how MBAY experience racial microaggressions in the workplace as an invisible, insidious and infantilizing process. Finally, the findings highlight how some MBAYs respond to racial microaggressions by accepting or contesting them in the workplace. The article concludes by reflecting on how these microlevel, subtle forms of racism contribute towards institutionalizing and sustaining White supremacy.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-10-08T06:00:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221117351
       
  • Dialectical Family Imaginaries: Navigating Relational Selfhood and
           Becoming a Parent through Assisted Reproduction in China

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      Authors: Iris Po Yee Lo
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines underexplored aspects of family imaginaries by examining lesbians’ ways of thinking and feeling about having children. Drawing on in-depth interviews with lesbians in Beijing, China, I illustrate their agency and difficulties in pursuing parenthood through assisted reproductive technology or other unconventional means and redrawing the boundaries of the family. Building on the concept of family imaginaries and insights into relational selfhood, I identify three types of ‘dialectical family imaginaries’ in lesbians’ accounts of reproductive decision making: imaginaries of bridging, bonding and self-fashioning. These imaginaries are dialectical in the sense that they reproduce cultural ideals of what it means to be related and simultaneously generate new ways of pursuing parenthood while lesbians juggle filial affection and personal, pragmatic goals. This article highlights the sociological utility of ‘dialectical family imaginaries’ for exploring different forms and meanings of relatedness negotiated between the self, family and intergenerational relations, and wider society.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-10-08T05:56:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221113480
       
  • Book Review: Rebecca Elliott, Underwater: Loss, Flood Insurance, and the
           Moral Economy of Climate Change in the United States

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      Authors: Joydeb Garai
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-10-08T05:53:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221112862
       
  • Moving on up' How Social Origins Shape Geographic Mobility within
           Britain’s Higher Managerial and Professional Occupations

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      Authors: Katharina Hecht, Daniel McArthur
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article presents the first longitudinal analysis of social and geographic mobility into Britain’s higher managerial and professional occupations. Using linked census records from the Office for National Statistics Longitudinal Study, we find that those from advantaged social origins are substantially more likely to make long-distance residential moves, implying that geographic mobility is a correlate of advantaged social origins rather than a determinant of an advantaged adult class position. Among higher managers and professionals, those with advantaged backgrounds lived in more affluent areas as children than those from disadvantaged backgrounds. This ‘area gap’ persists during adulthood: when the upwardly mobile move, they are unable to close the gap to their peers with privileged backgrounds in terms of the affluence of the areas they live in: they face a moving target. Geographic advantage, and disadvantage, thus lingers with individuals, even if they move.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-10-03T03:25:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221113669
       
  • How Intellectuals Perform: Meaning Making and Community in the
           Czechoslovak Philosophical Underground

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      Authors: Dominik Zelinsky
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article moves beyond the conventional strictures of the sociology of intellectuals, which is preoccupied with intellectuals’ texts, power struggles and institutional trajectories. Instead, I propose to focus on intellectuals’ situated performances as a way into analysis of the dynamics of their relations and mutual influences. Drawing on theoretical resources from the Strong Program in cultural sociology, I argue that their performances have both social and cultural impact through disseminating ideas, facilitating the emergence of social ties and the production of new social selves in intellectuals’ audiences. I demonstrate the importance of situated intellectual performances in the case of unofficial philosophy in socialist Czechoslovakia.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-09-03T04:18:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221112233
       
  • Book Review: Gurminder Bhambra and John Holmwood, Colonialism and Modern
           Social Theory

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      Authors: Sam Pryke
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-09-03T04:18:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221113485
       
  • What Lies Beneath: Organisational Responses to Powerful Stakeholders

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      Authors: Fabiola Alvarez, Dimitrinka Stoyanova Russell, Barbara Townley
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article takes recourse to a particular branch of French Pragmatic Sociology, namely, Boltanski and Thévenot’s ‘orders of worth’ paradigm, as a lens through which to both explore the misalignment between espoused values and retrospective discourses and illustrate the underlying motivations behind decision making in an organisation within the creative industries sector. By virtue of its contributions at the organisational, social and sectorial levels, our study contributes to extant debates pertaining to individual agency versus structural constraints as well as demonstrating the heterogeneity of modes of formal compliance to wider institutionalised legitimacy. In so doing, it builds upon recent work that seeks to broaden the notion of value in the creative industries, while, simultaneously, calling for greater heterogeneity in policy making in the sector through an ongoing process of ‘creative conflict’.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-08-12T04:36:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221103955
       
  • Book Review: Rebecca O’Connell and Julia Brannen, Families and Food
           in Hard Times

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      Authors: Elisabeth Garratt
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T06:41:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221103397
       
  • Book Review: Kathe Hicks Albrecht, The Machine Anxieties of Steampunk:
           Contemporary Philosophy, Victorian Aesthetics and the Future

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      Authors: Tim Strangleman
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T06:39:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221109774
       
  • Enacting Resistance, Performing Citizenship: Trajectories of Political
           Subjectification in the Post-Democratic Condition

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      Authors: Bojan Baća
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Dominated by the ‘weak postsocialist civil society’ thesis, Central and Eastern Europe has generally been uninspiring for social movement scholars. In recent years, a growing body of scholarship has challenged this pessimistic notion, highlighting the emergence of grassroots activism. What remains under-researched, however, is the process of political subjectification of society’s apolitical segments through contentious practices. Informed by pragmatic sociology, this article explores three case studies – of student, civic and environmental movements, respectively – that demonstrate how citizens constituted themselves as collective political subjects by performatively enacting their citizenship through resistance in post-democratic Montenegro (2010–2015). Through analysis of news media sources and interviews with activists, this article postulates three trajectories of political subjectification – political becoming, political bonding and political embodying – by which citizens (re)gain their civic autonomy, allowing them to challenge dominant power relations and to attain political legitimacy to think, speak and act as relevant political actors on the public stage.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T06:35:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221109701
       
  • Becoming an Activist: Individualisation and a Democratic Contentious Ethos
           in ‘How to’ Books

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      Authors: Johan Gøtzsche-Astrup
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The article explores a new aspect of the interplay of individualisation and democracy. I ask how individualisation affects a contentious ethos, a set of ethical relations that contentious actors cultivate towards themselves and others in articulating their idea of the good. I analyse the ethea in the public through ‘how to become an activist’ books. The books instruct individuals in how they should turn inwards and work on themselves to become activists. I delineate three ethea: individuals can work on themselves to discover their passion, connect to an impersonal truth or situate themselves in a structural context. These may undermine collective political projects but can also facilitate deep democratic engagement.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T06:31:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221107495
       
  • Anticipatory Regimes in Pregnancy: Cross-Fertilising Reproduction and
           Parenting Culture Studies

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      Authors: Edmée Ballif
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Despite attempts at highlighting continuities across the reproductive process from conception to childcare, reproduction and parenting still tend to be studied as a collection of separate objects. This article contributes to the cross-fertilisation of reproductive and parenting culture studies by first introducing anticipation as a transversal analytical lens. A conceptual framework for the analysis of anticipatory regimes in reproduction is introduced with a focus on subjectification effects and future images. Second, the importance of pregnancy as a connector between reproduction and parenting is highlighted. These propositions are fleshed out with reference to an ethnography of pregnancy care in Switzerland. The results demonstrate that pregnant women are expected to act as anticipating agents and that foetuses are treated as future children. Future images reveal how prenatal care reproduces gender norms. Analysing anticipatory regimes contributes to discussions of power relations in prenatal care, the stratification of reproduction and challenges to reproductive justice.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T06:29:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221107492
       
  • Powerful or Disempowering Knowledge' The Teaching of Sociology in
           English Schools and Colleges

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      Authors: Sarah Cant, Anwesa Chatterjee
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      While studying sociology can be empowering and transformative, fostering criticality and reflexivity, this capacity is not being sufficiently harnessed in school/college-based delivery in England. A large survey of sociology teachers revealed that they are required to teach outdated and sometimes discredited studies, which can reinforce rather than challenge stereotypes held by the privileged and which can be disempowering for those students who cannot recognise their own experiences. This article provides a unique insight into the ways that school/college curricula reinforce inequality and contributes to important debates within the sociology of education. Specifically, the article argues that the work being undertaken to decolonise the curriculum in universities, through challenging structural and discursive operations of power, should also inform the revision of school/college specifications. The lessons from this study can be usefully applied to the teaching of sociology beyond England and indeed to other subject disciplines.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-08-05T04:56:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221107299
       
  • Cultural Models of Contention: How Do the Public Interpret the Repertoire
           of Contention'

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      Authors: Johan Gøtzsche-Astrup, Oluf Gøtzsche-Astrup
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The literature on contention tends to conflate contentious actions and audience’s interpretation of those actions. This is problematic because interpretation is central to how contention unfolds and brings about social change. We theorise that interpretation is patterned by one or more cultural models of contention. These provide background assumptions about what actions count as political and what actions are legitimate. We show the fruitfulness of our approach in two survey studies of 1429 US citizens. It allows us to explore patterns in how the US public interpret contention. Furthermore, we investigate how interpretation varies across political and apolitical contexts, finding little variation between these. Finally, we study heterogeneity in how the public interpret contention, finding variation between individuals but also shared patterns. The article contributes to the literature on contention by providing a theoretical framework to study the public’s interpretation of contention and a fine-grained empirical analysis of this interpretation.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-07-27T05:28:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221109698
       
  • Turning the Decolonial Gaze towards Ourselves: Decolonising the Curriculum
           and ‘Decolonial Reflexivity’ in Sociology and Social Theory

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      Authors: Leon Moosavi
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article provides a theoretical evaluation of the author’s attempts at decolonising a sociology and social theory course in Singapore. It also introduces the notion of ‘decolonial reflexivity’ as a strategy for refining academic decolonisation. In doing so, this article seeks to overcome both the insufficient introspection about the potential for coloniality to reside within efforts at academic decolonisation, and the tendency to separate theoretical and applied discussions about academic decolonisation. It is argued that the author’s attempts to decolonise the curriculum were limited because the course may have inadvertently: (a) sustained exclusion while claiming to be inclusive; (b) maintained the status quo while claiming to be radical; and (c) reinscribed Westerncentrism while claiming to decolonise. This article suggests that although academic decolonisation is a commendable aspiration, academics who wish to decolonise must continually consider the theoretical complexities that are generated by our attempts at academic decolonisation.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-07-20T02:55:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221096037
       
  • Coloniality of Gender and Knowledge: Rethinking Russian Masculinities in
           Light of Postcolonial and Decolonial Critiques

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      Authors: Marina Yusupova
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores how the legacy of European colonialism and its role in transforming gender relations globally, shapes post-Soviet Russian masculinities. It points to historical connections between European and Russian/Soviet colonial projects, both of which relied on the notion of ‘progress’ in gender relations. Drawing on analysis of biographical interviews with a diverse sample of Russian men interviewed in Russia and the UK, this work identifies how the research participants use the core modern/colonial narratives to establish their individual masculinities. Shifting from a common conceptualisation of Russian masculinities as ‘traditional’, ‘conservative’ and ‘macho’, I show that they are instead, closely bound up with the European project of modernity/coloniality. The study advances the analysis of postcolonial masculinities and posits an agenda for decolonisation of sociological research on global masculinities.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-07-14T12:59:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221110724
       
  • Trajectories towards Political Engagement on Facebook around Brexit:
           Beyond Affordances for Understanding Racist and Right-Wing Populist
           Mobilisations Online

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      Authors: Natalie-Anne Hall
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Social media are frequently implicated in the racist and right-wing populist mobilisations that found voice in support for Brexit. However, research tends to focus on platform affordances and fails to provide a sociological account of individuals’ actual experiences with these media, and how they interact with broader social and political experiences to impact attitudes. Based on interviews with newly passionately engaged pro-Brexit Facebook users, this article examines the trajectories by which individuals came to be so engaged. The findings demonstrate that the technological opportunities provided by social media were only significant in the context of offline experiences and socio-political factors. These include racist discourses that predate social media, a loss of trust in traditional media and government, and the opportunity provided by Brexit to articulate and activate pre-held attitudes.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-07-14T12:57:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221104012
       
  • Communities of/for Interest: Revisiting the Role of Migrants’ Online
           Groups

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      Authors: Taulant Guma, Stephen Drinkwater, Rhys Dafydd Jones
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article offers a critical examination of the role played by migrants’ online communities. With much of scholarly analysis focusing on the new ways in which online groups enable migrants to connect, interact or socialise together in digital space, little attention has been paid to how these groups are actually formed, by whom and with what motivations. Drawing on qualitative interviews with moderators of online groups created by EU migrants living in Wales, UK, our findings reveal the diverse and sometimes ambivalent roles played by these groups, acting not only as networks of support for migrants (‘communities of interest’) but also driven by commercial motives. To capture the impact of this commercialisation and the complexity in the field, we introduce the notion of ‘communities for interest’. The article thus offers new empirical and conceptual contributions that advance our understanding of migrants’ online communities beyond the much-discussed online/offline and virtual/real dichotomies.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-07-14T12:55:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221104008
       
  • When Two Worlds Collide: The Role of Affect in ‘Essential’ Worker
           Responses to Shifting Evaluative Norms

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      Authors: Natalia Slutskaya, Annilee Game, Rachel Morgan, Tim Newton
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Concerns about devaluation and misrecognition are central for understanding the experiences of workers in stigmatised occupations. Yet contemporary approaches have been criticised for over-simplifying workers’ responses to mis/recognition. Povinelli’s concepts of ‘trembling of recognition’ and ‘social tense’ offer a useful starting point for extending existing understandings of mis/recognition by highlighting the contextual importance of temporality. To explore these ideas, we report on an ethnographic study of waste management workers in London, UK. The findings suggest that dirty workers’ responses to mis/recognition are a complex mix of discordant cognitive and affective reactions and narrative strategies, shaped by changing normative ideals. The findings suggest that recognition derives not only from workers’ encounters, meanings and feelings attached to the past and present but also from the sense that they have a valued part to play in the future.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-07-06T04:40:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221101795
       
  • Recognition or Redistribution' How Mainstream Media Frames Charitable
           Responses to People Experiencing Poverty

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      Authors: Ella Kuskoff, Andrew Clarke, Francisco Perales, Cameron Parsell
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Charitable responses to people experiencing poverty are often viewed as valuable community-led initiatives that address the support gaps created by a withdrawing welfare state. This perspective provides important insights into the culturally valorised nature of charity. The role of the mainstream media in cultivating and valorising charity, in contrast, remains relatively underexplored. Drawing on a framing analysis of Australian mainstream news reports published between 2014 and 2020, we analyse how the media frames charity as a response to people experiencing poverty. We demonstrate that the media frames people experiencing poverty as having a devalued identity, for which the remedy is the restoration of dignity through charity. Little attention is paid to the material inequalities that underpin people’s experiences of poverty; nor the role of the media as a body that reifies the interests of the powerful, who benefit from poverty and charitable responses to it.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-07-06T04:39:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221095025
       
  • Upward Social Mobility in Chile: The Negotiation of Class and Ethnic
           Identities

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      Authors: Denisse Sepúlveda
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines how upward mobility affects both class and ethnic social positioning of Mapuche indigenous people in Chile. The article builds on cultural class analysis dominated by Bourdieusian approaches, suggesting the incorporation of an intersectional and postcolonial lens, considering the ways in which ethnicity complicates classed trajectories, focusing on class mobility and indigeneity. Drawing on 40 life history interviews of first-generation Mapuche professionals, the analysis reveals complex and varied responses to social mobility. The interviewees display three groups of responses: the ‘mobile-accommodators’, embracing deracinated middle-class identities; the ‘rooted’, asserting connections with working-class and Mapuche origins; and the ‘resignifiers’, embracing a more ambivalent class identity, but articulating a strong sense of Mapuche identity. The experience of upward social mobility represents a challenge to the respondents’ sense of class position, class and ethnic identities, as they have had to manage indigenous identity claims across their social origins and destinations.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-07-04T12:02:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221099402
       
  • Movement Texts as Anti-Colonial Theory

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      Authors: Mahvish Ahmad
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the decolonial turn among sociologists, we have yet to engage a vast amount of thought produced by anti-colonial movements. The circumvention of much of this thought indexes overly restrictive understandings of what constitutes social theory, and I diagnose three ways in which this plays out. Anti-colonial movement texts provide striking demonstrations of this limitation, and of what is lost as a result. Through a close study of a banned 1970s pamphlet from Pakistan, I show that critically deepening the decolonial project through an engagement with movement texts raises ethical questions about the academy’s relationship to political struggle and demands new methodologies of archival retrieval that recognise the scattered, fragmented condition of texts subject to colonial violence. If addressed, southern movement texts reveal counter-infrastructures of knowledge production replete with counter-political vocabularies that challenge homogenising academic definitions of the Global South and enrich our theories of decolonial praxis.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-07-04T12:01:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221098516
       
  • Niche Sociality: Approaching Adversity in Everyday Life

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      Authors: Nick Manning, Rasmus Birk, Nikolas Rose
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      How should sociologists understand the everyday lives of those living in adversity, coping with the experience of structural violence' In this article, focusing on the urban experience, we suggest a perspective on ‘everyday life’ that can encompass corporeal, mental, relational and social dimensions, which we term ‘niche sociality’. First, we use Gibson’s niches and affordances to enrich the post-representationalist understanding of human beings as embodied/cultural/environmentally embedded organisms. Second, we enrich Gibson’s niches and affordances with theories for ‘small-scale’ sociality drawn from social practice theory and interaction ritual chains. Third, we illustrate the productivity of these ideas throughout the article, by grounding our conceptual work in empirical examples that analyse the everyday lives and mental life of migrant workers in Shanghai. Niche sociality, we argue, is a way of framing the experience of the everyday, a perspective that could – perhaps should – provoke novel ecosocial studies of adversity.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-07-04T12:00:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221094770
       
  • Grudging Acts

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      Authors: Wendy Bottero
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article argues for a greater focus on how, and why, social life is often engaged in through grudging acts. Grudging acts are those activities in which we really would rather not participate but which we perform nonetheless. Such acts play a significant role in how many social practices are routinely sustained, but also reworked or undermined. Yet grudgingness is underexplored in social analysis, and its significance for social arrangements is insufficiently examined. This neglect occurs because foregrounding grudging acts requires a focus on key aspects of social life that often slip from view in analysis, and is an omission associated with a number of significant explanatory difficulties.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-07-01T05:07:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221104017
       
  • Book Review: Anna Tarrant, Fathering and Poverty: Uncovering Men’s
           Participation in Low-Income Family Life

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      Authors: Josie Horton
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-07-01T05:03:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221103370
       
  • Book Review: Suhaiymah Manzoor-Khan, Tangled in Terror: Uprooting
           Islamophobia

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      Authors: Izram Chaudry
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-07-01T04:56:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221103367
       
  • Back to the Future: The Impact of Perceptions and Experiences of Time on
           the Lives of British Lifestyle Migrants in Spain

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      Authors: Laura Dixon
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Increasingly, lifestyle migration research has focused on the ways that social categories like race, gender and sexuality, as well as concepts from post-colonialism to spatialisation, intersect and impact on lifestyle migrants’ everyday experiences, in an attempt to complicate its theoretical foundations. Adding to this body of work, this article explicitly investigates post-migration perceptions of time among lifestyle migrants, which have previously been more implicitly explored. It does so, by showing how British migrants in the Catalan tourist town of Sitges remained orientated towards the future in a way that conflicted with the temporal rhythm of the town itself, which was determined by a calendar of cultural festivals and events that was repeated annually, with minimal variation. As a result, participants soon felt so stuck within a seemingly unchanging present, which they were unable to transition fully into, that it often precipitated (or contributed to) return migration to the UK.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-10T08:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221096267
       
  • Temporalities of Friendship: Adults’ Friends in Everyday Family Life
           and Beyond

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      Authors: Aino Luotonen
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines how adults’ close friendships are lived using different temporalities. The modern ideal of friendship underlining individual choice and affinity is challenged by marriage and family. Using a temporal approach, I aim to grasp the variety of experiences of individuals during the early years of marriage. Drawing from qualitative interviews with 32 individuals forming 16 couples, I distinguished between three temporalities of friendship: (1) friendship here and now; (2) friendship in cyclical time; and (3) friendship based on the past and revived by timeless moments. I argue that, while some friendships entangle everyday family practices, other friendships are lived among two individuals, involving intimacy as outlined by Simmel, and simultaneously challenging the experience of linear time. This study contributes to an understanding of how friendships are lived within and beyond the family, and, furthermore, to a wider sociological discussion on the use of temporality in analysing social life.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-10T08:08:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221090863
       
  • Affective Intensities of Single Lives: An Alternative Account of Temporal
           Aspects of Couple Normativity

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      Authors: Marjo Kolehmainen, Annukka Lahti, Anu Kinnunen
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The number of people living without a partner is growing globally, but this demographic shift has barely disrupted the tenacity of the couple norm. Researchers have identified several concrete mechanisms of singlism – practices that feed the unequal treatment of single people. Nevertheless, there is still a need to develop an understanding of how singlism operates affectively. To provide insights into the affective intensities of single lives, we incorporate the notion of affective inequality into an analysis of singlehood and temporality, bringing together a range of data sets to further develop this idea. We examine the varying affective and psychic experiences that characterise how singles feel about their singlehood, how they experience the current moment and how they view the future. We argue that these experiences are shaped by singlism, and that affective inequalities and affective privileges co-condition the possibilities for different types of relationships.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-10T07:32:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221090858
       
  • Spatial Imaginaries and Geographic Division within the UK: Uneven Economic
           Development, Ethnicity and National Identity

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      Authors: Michael Donnelly, Sol Gamsu
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article provides an account of how spatial divisions permeate imaginaries of the UK’s geography, drawing on a large qualitative data-set on the locational choices of young adults. The data we draw from are unique in their multi-sited design, which includes accounts of how young people look upon the UK’s internal geography from 17 geographic vantage points, that span the four UK nations and each region of England. Data collection involved an innovative mapping exercise capturing how their spatial imaginaries are relationally constructed, and the demarcation of spatial boundaries. Drawing parallels with research on the way divisions are constructed globally by internationally mobile students, we argue that the young adults’ spatial imaginaries were infused with intranational boundaries of uneven economic development, national identity and ethnicity. Their spatial imaginaries and the geographic divisions they embody have important implications for public policy that seeks to redress spatial inequality within nations like the UK.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-10T07:30:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221090828
       
  • Moderating Contentious Care Relations: Meat Consumption among Finnish
           Consumers

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      Authors: Outi Koskinen
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      In the Global North, meat consumption is both an integral part of everyday diets and under increasing pressure to be reduced, owing to its various harmful effects. There has been much research on the issues that forestall less meat-dominated diets. Based on interview and participant observation data of consumers with a wide variety of meat relations in Finland, this article extends these discussions by framing the issue as navigating contentious relations of care. This enables a two-fold contribution. First, the article brings together previously disconnected research on these themes and makes explicit the benefits of studying meat consumption through care. Second, it demonstrates how this approach contributes an understanding of the persistence of meat on our plates, by showing how contentious care relations within meat consumption are navigated through moderation: varying degrees of engagement with care, defined by distances and realignments as well as disconnections in the processes of caring.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-09T08:51:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221095007
       
  • Living Together through the Asylum Process: Affective Proximity in Home
           Accommodation of Asylum Seekers

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      Authors: Paula Merikoski
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the home accommodation of asylum seekers in Finland from the perspective of hosts’ affective experiences of living through the asylum process from proximity. This study contributes to the research on the affective dimension of pro-asylum solidarity beyond the framework of compassion. Instead of being observers of distant suffering, hosts are personally affected by the asylum seekers’ past involving war and conflict and their present struggle for asylum, which are inseparably intertwined. As a result, the hosts’ homes and domestic lives are transformed. The boundaries between home and faraway events blur when daily life includes technology-mediated connections to war. Affective proximity to asylum struggles may cause an emotional burden for hosts, which can also be politicising. Living together often leads to a shared mission of fighting for the right to remain and increased awareness of the political question of asylum.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-09T08:31:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221091124
       
  • Life-Cycle Economic Returns to Educational Mobility in Denmark

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      Authors: Jesper Fels Birkelund, Kristian Bernt Karlson, Meir Yaish
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Although most studies of the transition from school to work take a snapshot perspective in examining economic returns to education, such returns evolve over an individual’s lifetime. We empirically test a theoretical formulation derived from the cumulative advantage mechanism about enduring life-cycle effects of educational mobility on income. We analyse income trajectories for all Danes born in 1960–1961, and we consider how the welfare state may counteract certain mechanisms of intergenerational transmission that give children with college-educated parents better opportunities in the labour market. We find only small direct effects of parental college attainment on earnings trajectories after we control for offspring college attainment. Thus, schooling acts as a powerful and enduring economic leveller of family background effects in Denmark. Our analyses also show direct effects on trajectories in property income derived from wealth, suggesting that the welfare state has a harder time equalising income from wealth than from earnings.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-09T08:28:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221090877
       
  • Truth, Proof, Sleuth: Trust in Direct-to-Consumer DNA Testing and Other
           Sources of Identity Information among Australian Donor-Conceived People

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      Authors: Giselle Newton, Kerryn Drysdale, Michele Zappavigna, Christy E Newman
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The digital age is characterised by unprecedented access to technologies to understand our bodies, genetics and family histories. The last decade has seen a growing uptake of direct-to-consumer DNA testing, which is (re)shaping individuals’ identity narratives. Drawing on data from a national online survey with Australian donor-conceived people (N = 91) and semi-structured interviews (N = 28), we conceptualise DNA results as a genetic narrative that coexists with other sources of identity information such as familial narratives, medical records and experiential knowledge from peers. Our analysis derived three themes: truth – how DNA results disrupted ontological security and prompted confrontation; proof – how DNA testing was valued and legitimised, especially compared with medical records; and sleuth – how DNA testing was leveraged in agentive practices. In doing so, we explore how processes of (dis)trust shape the forms of identity information individuals seek out, believe and rely upon to position themselves within relational and socio-technical webs.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T10:14:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221091184
       
  • ‘Without Papers I Can’t Do Anything’: The Neglected Role of
           Citizenship Status and ‘Illegality’ in Intersectional Analysis

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      Authors: Dorina Damsa, Katja Franko
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Intersectionality scholarship has yet to systematically recognize the importance of citizenship status for the mutual shaping of inequalities. In this article, we bring attention to the combined structuring force of criminal law and citizenship status (and the related concepts of ‘illegal’ or ‘irregular’ status) in intersecting with other categories of social disadvantage, such as those created by racialization, class, gender and ethnicity. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork and interviews with women in prisons for ‘foreign nationals’ and health clinics for ‘undocumented’ migrants in Norway and Denmark, this article shows how citizenship status has a central role in the co-constitution of gendered, classed and racialized social disadvantages.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T06:34:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221096043
       
  • The Stateless Person, the Citizen and Human Rights: A Revised
           Neo-Hobbesian Theory of Human Rights for Sociology

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      Authors: Angela Leahy
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Given the world is witness to over 80 million forcibly displaced persons, Turner’s neo-Hobbesian theory of human rights, first proposed in this journal decades ago, warrants revisiting. Turner highlights parallels between his foundationalist approach to human rights and Hobbes’ theory of the state. Both thinkers conceive of a vulnerable human in need of a protective canopy. However, Turner neglects Hobbes’ account of rights, and with it the key social dimensions of Hobbes’ theory. Hobbes places great importance on the social conditions of the rights-bearing person. He contrasts two distinct social spaces inhabited by the stateless person and the citizen respectively, and the kinds of rights they hold. For Hobbes, rights are protected only in society, an ideal-typical social space secured by the state. This article proposes a revised neo-Hobbesian theory of human rights that incorporates Hobbes’ treatment of rights as a social concept.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-05-17T05:29:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221083872
       
  • Book Review: Emanuel Deutschmann, Mapping the Transnational World: How We
           Move and Communicate across Borders, and Why It Matters

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      Authors: Paul Schuler
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-05-17T05:25:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221091126
       
  • The Burden of Conviviality: British Bangladeshi Muslims Navigating
           Diversity in London, Luton and Birmingham

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      Authors: Victoria Redclift, Fatima Rajina, Naaz Rashid
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article considers the convivial turn in migration and diversity studies, and some of its silences. Conviviality has been conceptualised by some as the ability to be at ease in the presence of diversity. However, insufficient attention has been paid to considering who is affectively at ease with whose differences or, more particularly, what the work of conviviality requires of those marked as other vis-a-vis European white normativity. Drawing on in-depth qualitative interviews with British Bangladeshi Muslims in London, Luton and Birmingham, we argue that a focus on ‘ease in the presence of diversity’ obscures the ‘burden of conviviality’ carried by some, but not others. We discuss three key types of burden that emerged from our data: the work of education and explanation, the work of understanding racism, and quite simply the work of ‘appearing unremarkable’.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-05-14T07:14:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221090783
       
  • Where Does Ascribed Privilege Get You in' Structural and Net Effects
           of Caste and Religious Belonging in India

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      Authors: Mathieu Ferry
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Socio-economically advantaged upper castes tend to claim that Indian society is ‘post-caste’, suggesting that individuals from historically marginalized castes and religious groups do not face specific social barriers when attempting to move into white-collar positions. Alleged intergenerational mobility and the emergence of a ‘new middle class’ related to the growth of the private sector is widely used to counter affirmative action initiatives in higher education and public-sector recruitment. In this article, I test these claims by examining Brahmin, lower caste Dalit and Muslim patterns of intergenerational class and educational mobility of father–child pairs. I point to the strong role of caste and religion in shaping one’s destination, particularly when accessing top occupational positions in the private sector. These results question the meritocratic and casteless claims of the Indian ‘new middle class’ in post-liberalization India, and they call for more encompassing policies reducing origin-based inequality.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T05:01:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221083890
       
  • Thwarted or Facilitated' The Entrepreneurial Aspirations and
           Capabilities of New Migrants in the UK

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      Authors: María Villares-Varela, Monder Ram, Trevor Jones
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article draws on biographical interviews with migrants to assess their aspirations and capabilities to become entrepreneurs. By augmenting mixed embeddedness emphasis on contextual factors with Sen’s capabilities framework, we contribute to extant sociological debates on the interaction of structure and agency, the conceptualisation of aspirations, the non-pecuniary aspects of entrepreneurship and the role of institutions in neoliberal Britain. We argue that structural barriers drive the formation of aspirations to become entrepreneurs while at the same time limit their capabilities to do so. Entrepreneurial agency must be seen as relative autonomy, effective in strategic decision making but limited to the weak financial position in which migrant entrepreneurs operate.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T04:58:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221083865
       
  • A Multi-Faceted and Relational Approach to Gay Men’s Identities

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      Authors: Shiva Chandra
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The idea of a ‘post-gay’ identity suggests sexuality no longer remains a key identifier to gay men’s sense of self. The concept provides a useful framework for theorising how gay men’s identities include and go beyond their sexuality, allowing scholars to conceptualise it in more complex ways. This study contributes to the literature, by drawing on the idea of ‘personal community’ to unpack how multiple connections inform gay men’s multi-faceted identities. It is based on in-depth qualitative interviews with gay South Asian men in Australia. Findings reveal that friends, partners and LGBT+ groups play important roles in informing respondents’ subjectivities. Significantly, the family of origin was important to identity formation, which challenges the dominant understanding that gay men’s identities exist separately to them. More broadly, findings from this study contribute to a deeper understanding of diverse gay male identities in contemporary multicultural Australia.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T04:55:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221081389
       
  • Book Review: Gurminder K Bhambra and John Holmwood, Colonialism and Modern
           Social Theory

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      Authors: Georgi Asatryan, Jack Kalpakian
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-05-07T08:59:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221091135
       
  • Black Lives Matter: The Role of Emotions in Political Engagement

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      Authors: Rune Ellefsen, Sveinung Sandberg
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      In the spring of 2020, the Black Lives Matter protests shook the Western world. Spreading from the USA, demonstrations diffused globally, especially to Europe, calling out racism in its different forms. Emotions ran high and were pivotal in igniting protests. The role of emotion in social movements has received renewed scholarly attention during the last decades. It plays an important role at every stage of protest, but few studies have traced its part in individuals’ shifting engagement over time. This study examines the role of emotion during the global wave of Black Lives Matter protests. Based on retrospective interviews with 38 participants in Black Lives Matter demonstrations in Norway, we identify the role of emotion before, during and after their participation. Our findings help explain how individual patterns of participation develop in the course of a wave of protest, and also provide insights into the consequences of the recent Black Lives Matter protests in Europe.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-05-07T08:54:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221081385
       
  • Co-Sleeping with Partners and Pets as a Family Practice of Intimacy:
           Israeli Couples’ Narratives of Creating Kinship

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      Authors: Dana Zarhin, Alexandra Karanevsky-Samnidze, Moriah Aharon
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Despite advances in the sociology of sleep, we know relatively little about the experience of co-sleeping in general and about co-sleeping with pets in particular. This study draws on semi-structured interviews with Israeli couples who raise either a dog or a cat to show that co-sleeping with partners and pets is a family practice of intimacy, which both implicates and constitutes time and space, emotions, as well as the body and embodiment of the interacting parties. Co-sleeping allows couples to constitute their pets as ‘kin’ and to blur the boundaries between humans and animals in two distinct ways: (1) by emphasising the personhood of pets and treating them as children or substitute-partners, and (2) by highlighting the animality of humans. This study enhances sociological understanding of the associations between family practices and time and space and sheds light on how family practices create post-human sensory worlds of kinship.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-03-30T04:31:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221081365
       
  • Anthropotropism: Searching for Recognition in the Scandinavian Gig Economy

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      Authors: Gemma Newlands
      First page: 821
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      By curtailing workplace socialisation, platform-mediated gig work hinders the development of affective relationships necessary for the experience of recognition. However, extant research into recognition at work has typically only focused on face-to-face interactions, overlooking technologically complex forms of work where recognition might be sought from and via technical intermediaries. Advancing sociological research into the lived experience of contemporary gig workers, this article draws on 41 interviews with Foodora riders in Norway and Sweden to explore how gig workers solicit and experience recognition at work. I identify a process of anthropotropism, whereby gig workers turn to human connections where possible in an attempt to pursue traditional social scripts of collegiality and to gain recognition from legitimate human sources. Further, I identify how platform-mediated communication does not prohibit recognition, but intermittent automation and neoliberal modes of instrumentalising recognition can disrupt the development of individual subjectivities and lead to feelings of mechanistic dehumanisation.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-01-28T07:21:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385211063362
       
  • Landscape and Work: ‘Placing’ the Experiences of Male Manual Workers
           in a UK Seaside Town

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      Authors: Ruth Simpson, Rachel Morgan, Patricia Lewis, Nick Rumens
      First page: 839
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the experiences of white, male manual workers in Hastings, East Sussex – a mid-sized UK seaside town that has undergone long-term decline in employment opportunities. Informed by the theoretical insights from Bourdieu, it focuses on the role of place in shaping the employment paths of a group that has arguably been ‘left behind’ by local and global forces. Drawing on broader notions of place as landscape and highlighting the significance of ‘immobility and dependence’, ‘competitive localism and belonging’ and ‘bounded potential’, it examines how landscape conditions are implicated in the meanings given to work experiences, perceived employment opportunities and future aspirations. We argue that incorporating landscape into Bourdieu’s Theory of Practice extends our understanding of landscape’s influence on employment experiences and its unique capacities as both a physical and a socially constructed entity.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T06:35:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221081342
       
  • Documenting Families: Paper-Work in Family Display among Planned Single
           Father Families

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      Authors: Sophie Zadeh, Vasanti Jadva, Susan Golombok
      First page: 859
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article extends existing sociological scholarship on doing and displaying family by developing the concept of documenting families. We suggest that documenting is conceptually rich insofar as it showcases the relationship, and tensions, between institutional practices and individual experiences of family display. Drawing on our research with men who became parents without partners, we argue that the process of documenting family is made especially evident in studies of what Finch originally referred to as ‘non-conventional’ family relationships. We explain that documenting sheds light not only on the official and unofficial means through which families are recognised on paper, but also on family practices as work – in this case paper-work – that involves negotiation between different social actors who are generally unequal in terms of their authority and agency to impose situational meaning.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-03-09T05:27:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385211073238
       
  • Homemade State: Motherhood, Citizenship and the Home in Child Welfare
           Encounters

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      Authors: Rachel Humphris
      First page: 876
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the relationship between migrant mothers and welfare workers in domestic space to argue the home is a site where the boundary between formal, social and affective aspects of citizenship is remade. Drawing on 14 months’ ethnography with migrant mothers, this article attends to state encounters in new migrants’ homes revealing how migration and welfare policy changes are reconfiguring their most intimate spaces. Mothers who can prove they are ‘appropriate’ subjects of care (through their mothering practices) are deemed ‘deserving’ objects of state care (and worthy of a form of citizenship and belonging). The deep gendered, raced and classed inflections of ‘deservingness’ and assumptions based on these norms are co-constituted by space and embedded social relations between mothers and welfare workers shaping possibilities of migrant mothers’ citizenship practices.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-01-28T07:22:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385211063367
       
  • Understanding Disability and Cultural (Re)production: An Ethnography of
           Coaching Practice in High Performance Disability Sport

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      Authors: Robert Townsend, Christopher Cushion
      First page: 892
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This ethnographic study draws on the theoretical framework of Pierre Bourdieu to illustrate the production and reproduction of disability through the social practices of high performance disability sport. We illustrate how, through the pedagogic action of the coaches, disability was continually inscribed in the habitus of the athletes through a focus on structure and routine. As such, social differentiation was ever-present as a way of ordering the social space of coaching. The coaching process comprised a number of mechanisms for the exchange of cultural capital and the accumulation of social competencies through a focus on lifestyle and behaviour change. Together, these practices closely resembled the workings of symbolic violence, in particular its social reproduction of cultural reproduction function. By outlining how the socialising conditions of major institutions can naturalise systems of social differentiation, this article brings together and extends sociological theorising of the disabled body through engagement with disability sport.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-02-26T04:41:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385211073229
       
  • Educational Differences in Cycling: Evidence from German Cities

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      Authors: Ansgar Hudde
      First page: 909
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Cycling is an environmentally sustainable social practice that contributes to liveable cities and provides affordable and healthy transport. People with lower education could particularly benefit from cycling, as they tend to fare worse regarding finances and health. However, in bivariate analyses, those with lower education cycle less. This article discusses the social meaning of cycling and investigates whether the education–cycling association holds after accounting for (1) confounders and (2) factors that determine decision leeway between different transport modes. I analyse approximately 80,000 short-distance trips (0.5–7.5 km) reported by 28,000 working-age individuals from cities in Germany using multilevel linear probability regression models. Results support that higher education systematically and substantially increases the propensity to cycle. This education gap implies major untapped potential for environmental sustainability, that current pro-cycling policies in cities disproportionally favour the highly educated and that cycling patterns contribute to inequalities in finances and health.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-01-06T09:52:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385211063366
       
  • Do Western Sociological Concepts Apply Globally' Towards a Global
           Sociology

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Dieter Neubert
      First page: 930
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The post-colonial debate challenges the self-certainty of sociology and the suggested universality of its theoretical premises. This has led to calls to provincialize sociological theories and concepts and include perspectives from the South. Thus, we need to ask whether sociological concepts apply globally. Burawoy’s notion of a professional ‘global sociology’ offers a starting point for provincializing sociological concepts without giving up their global applicability. The problems involved in applying the core sociological category of class to Kenya show that classical sociological concepts may be inadequate for analysing societies outside the European and North American context. For the analysis of inequality, we need a more open and empirically founded concept in which the classical notion of class describes just a particular pattern of social structure. For the development of sociological concepts, we always require a broad empirical and intercultural basis in order not to be caught in the trap of Eurocentrism.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T09:38:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385211063341
       
  • Global Multiple Migration: Class-Based Mobility Capital of Elite Chinese
           Gay Men

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      Authors: Susanne YP Choi
      First page: 946
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The present study examines how global multiple migration – a pattern of migration characterised by multiple changes of destination internationally in one’s lifetime – becomes a strategy employed by highly educated, Chinese self-identified gay men to navigate social stigmatisation, negotiate family pressure, circumvent state oppression and achieve desired life goals. By examining the intersection between sexuality, migration and class, the present study contributes to the sexuality and migration literature. It explores how relationships between sexuality and migration are related and mediated by class-based capital. It adds to the discussion that migration has increasingly become a multi-directional and open-ended process. For the class and social inequality literature, it seeks to understand how global multiple migration has become an element of social stratification and generates mobility capital. It also highlights how sexuality influences the value of mobility capital for the pursuit of an authentic self.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-03-09T05:25:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385211073237
       
  • Bourdieu and Sociological Biography: The Case of Vincent van Gogh’s
           Choice of Profession

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      Authors: Will Atkinson
      First page: 967
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Pierre Bourdieu’s conceptual framework offers a productive means of making sense of statistical regularities and correspondences. When it comes to explaining the intricacies of individual biographies, however, including something as seemingly personal as one’s choice of occupation, Bourdieu offers only a starting point in need of elaboration. Above all, there is a need to pay greater attention to the multiplicity of fields in which individuals are situated and the interplay between them in shaping desires and strategies. These include class, family relations and, in some cases, employment-based fields such as art, religion or specific organisations. To demonstrate the argument, this article takes as a case study the trajectory of Vincent van Gogh, highlighting the ongoing interaction between class, family and other fields in generating his eventual decision to become an artist.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-03-09T05:22:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385211069520
       
  • Lying and Time: Moving beyond the Moral Question of Lying

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      Authors: James Hodgson, Andrew Balmer
      First page: 983
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Lying is typically considered as a morally salient phenomenon in existing research. In this article we seek to expand the understanding of lying and deception as socially situated phenomena. We draw on qualitative interview data from a larger project on everyday experiences of living with dementia and examine how carers of people living with dementia describe, explain and justify care practices that involve the use of untruth in some way. We find that carers frequently refer to a problem with their temporal landscapes. Weaving this into moral accounts of lying, we argue for recognising the importance of our orientation in time (to the past, the present and the future) for how lying and deception are made sense of in everyday life.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-02-24T04:28:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385211073233
       
  • The Civil Savage: How Young People Living Rurally ‘Do’ Distinction at
           Regional Festivals in the Netherlands

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      Authors: Samira van Bohemen, Sophie de Graaf
      First page: 998
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Building on previous work about cultural informalisation and the growing urban–rural divide in western democracies, this article studies symbolic boundary work as performed by white youths living in rural areas in the Netherlands. We conducted a micro-sociological analysis of how these youths celebrate regional festivals in the Netherlands, and particularly the meanings they attach to their affective displays of intoxication and sexuality. We show how distinction is ‘done’ here by many of these youths taking pride in drinking too much beer, sexual directness and impropriety, which they argue are expressions of conviviality and down-to-earthness. In doing so, they appear to be finding dignity and redemption in an image of themselves as savages and reappropriating it as part of their own ‘civility’, contrasting their revelry with what they perceive to be urban, middle-class snobbery.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-03-09T05:28:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385211069506
       
  • Black Men’s Experiences of Colourism in the UK

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      Authors: Aisha Phoenix, Nadia Craddock
      First page: 1015
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Colourism – skin shade prejudice – is a social justice issue for People of Colour globally. Yet, there has been no major sociological study that explores colourism in the UK. Addressing this gap, we draw on nine in-depth qualitative interviews with Black and Mixed-Race heterosexual men living in England that formed part of a larger study of colourism. Using reflexive thematic analysis through an intersectional feminist lens, we argue that colourism is gendered. We found that Black men both experience colourism and perpetuate it by teasing male peers and favouring women with light skin. Our analysis generated three themes: (1) navigating colourism as part of growing up; (2) skin shade paradoxes for Black and Mixed-Race men; and (3) colourism and desirability through the Black male gaze. This research provides a nuanced exploration of colourism from Black and Mixed-Race men’s perspectives. It underscores the significance of colourism in the UK.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T08:00:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385211069507
       
  • Parental Leave within the Workplace: A Re-assessment of Opposite
           Educational Gradients for Women and Men

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      Authors: Helen Eriksson, Sunnee Billingsley, Maria Brandén
      First page: 1032
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Educational gradients in parental leave length are opposite for women and men: highly educated women return to work faster than those with low education while highly educated men are absent longer than less educated men. Explanations for the opposite gradients are typically made at the individual- or couple-level. To date, no quantitative study has documented whether the opposite educational gradients hold also within workplaces. In this study, we use employer–employee matched Swedish register data with fixed-effects models to examine whether the educational gradient applies also among co-workers in the same workplace. The results show that three-quarters of the educational effect typically attributed to the individual father disappeared when comparing fathers within workplaces. The educational gradient of mothers remained largely unchanged. These findings provide the first population-level evidence for the primacy of the workplace in determining fathers’ care choices.
      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T06:37:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221109743
       
  • Book Review: Gargi Bhattacharya, Adam Elliot-Cooper, Sita Balani, Kerem
           Nişancıoğlu, Kojo Koram, Dalia Gebrial, Nadine El-Enany and Luke de
           Noronha Empire’s Endgame: Racism and the British State

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      Authors: Harshad Keval
      First page: 1045
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-03-09T05:23:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385211073034
       
  • Book Review: Claude Rosental, Catherine Porter (translator), The
           Demonstration Society

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      Authors: Georgi Asatryan, Jack Kalpakian
      First page: 1047
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-05-07T08:55:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221091130
       
  • Book Review: David S Meyer, How Social Movements (Sometimes) Matter

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Clare Saunders
      First page: 1048
      Abstract: Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-05-07T09:01:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00380385221091136
       
 
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