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  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
Showing 401 - 382 of 382 Journals sorted alphabetically
Tla-Melaua : Revista de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Tracés     Open Access  
Trajecta : Religion, Culture and Society in the Low Countries     Open Access  
Transatlantica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transmotion     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Transposition : Musique et sciences sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Travail et Emploi     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
TRIM. Tordesillas : Revista de investigación multidisciplinar     Open Access  
Universidad, Escuela y Sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Unoesc & Ciência - ACHS     Open Access  
Urban Research & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Valuation Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Variations : Revue Internationale de Théorie Critique     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Visitor Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Vlast' (The Authority)     Open Access  
Work, Aging and Retirement     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
World Future Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Religion, Gesellschaft und Politik     Hybrid Journal  

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Sociological Theory
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.641
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 32  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0735-2751 - ISSN (Online) 1467-9558
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • The Entangled Emergencies of COVID-19

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      Authors: Claire Laurier Decoteau
      Abstract: Sociological Theory, Ahead of Print.
      City of Chicago officials adopted a “racial equity” approach to mitigate the disproportionate racial impact of COVID-19, yet according to interviews with racially and socioeconomically marginalized Chicagoans, this approach failed to address core vulnerabilities associated with health, housing, mental health, and welfare. This article argues that COVID-19 represents and reifies the convergence of three sets of emergencies. First, federal and local governments governed through emergency, enacting temporally bounded governmental strategies that presumed scarcity, triaged care, and naturalized structural inequality by delinking the effects of racism from its causes. This response was spectacular and anticipatory—designed to safeguard the status quo until “normalcy” could be restored. This approach exacerbated two existing endemic emergencies: (1) the slow emergencies racially marginalized populations have faced for decades due to neoliberal restructuring and fragmented care infrastructure and (2) the sacrifice of lower-income frontline workers to premature death to safeguard the economy and protect the middle class.
      Citation: Sociological Theory
      PubDate: 2024-04-23T12:39:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07352751241247567
       
  • Class Experience Mobility through Consumption, Work, and Relationships

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      Authors: Taylor Laemmli
      Abstract: Sociological Theory, Ahead of Print.
      Sociological analyses of class mobility focus on enduring class movement. How might we reconceptualize class mobility to capture more shifting experiences of class' I propose a new way to theorize class mobility that is oriented toward the analysis of short-term class mobility. Class experience mobility (CEM) is a form of class mobility in which people temporarily access a class lifestyle that does not correspond to their class position, tasting another life before returning to their own. In this theory-building article, I first conceptualize CEM, situating it relative to mainstream class analysis. I then describe six class experience processes that enable temporary upward class mobility through consumption, work, and relationships. Finally, I show how the processes by which people engage in CEM can serve as mechanisms shaping long-term class mobility and people’s classed self-understandings.
      Citation: Sociological Theory
      PubDate: 2024-04-12T12:47:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07352751241242804
       
  • Relational Durkheim: Homo Duplex as the Foundation of a Formalist Cultural
           Sociology

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      Authors: Kyle Puetz
      Abstract: Sociological Theory, Ahead of Print.
      I propose that the sociology of Émile Durkheim can serve as a useful foundation for a formalist cultural sociology. Durkheim’s homo duplex model of human cognition directs analytic attention to the relative balance of opportunities that the moral integration of society as a system of representations affords for establishing moral unity with others, on one hand, and realizing personal autonomy, on the other. This apriority, like Simmel’s forms, operates independently of any specific representational contents to produce outcomes related to solidarity, well-being, affect, and existential security. Accordingly, Durkheim provides conceptual resources for a hypothetico-deductive research program that promotes the development of testable hypotheses grounded in intuitions about how individuals phenomenologically experience formal properties of belief networks or other systems of social ideation.
      Citation: Sociological Theory
      PubDate: 2024-04-10T11:05:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07352751241241517
       
  • Playing up Difference

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      Authors: Krystal Laryea
      Abstract: Sociological Theory, Ahead of Print.
      How do groups reckon with differences in members’ identities and beliefs' A tension exists between groups, whose identities are singular and stably positioned, and their members, whose identities are intertwined and constituted in interaction. Existing work shows how this tension is addressed through downplaying difference, but we know less about how differences are played up in group life. Drawing on two years of ethnographic fieldwork and 56 interviews with a racially and politically diverse religious group, I examine how members play up identities and beliefs that are not shared by all and how comembers respond. This analysis reveals two pathways that playing up difference takes: an engagement pathway and an avoidance pathway. The engagement pathway depends on the activation of shared structural, relational, and epistemic foundations. I conclude with a broader consideration of how playing up difference relates to the pursuit of plurality and wholeness in contemporary organizations and communities.
      Citation: Sociological Theory
      PubDate: 2024-04-02T06:19:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07352751241241081
       
  • Stranger in the Mirror: Exploring Somatic Defamiliarization

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      Authors: Eduardo Duran
      Abstract: Sociological Theory, Ahead of Print.
      This study explores the centrality of the senses for the maintenance or disruption of people’s commonsensical familiarity with the world. Drawing from in-depth interviews with people affected by depersonalization/derealization, which the American Psychiatric Association defines as a dissociative condition in which people perceive the world as dream-like, I conceptualize what I term somatic defamiliarization. I define somatic defamiliarization as a process whereby people experience previously unquestioned sensory phenomena, such as mundane objects or their bodies, as unfamiliar. Building on Berger and Luckmann’s work, I contend that somatic defamiliarization is a perpetual, albeit latent, condition of social life that threatens reality maintenance. I discuss how the concept of somatic defamiliarization can be applied to explore the somatic qualities of experiential ruptures that people may undergo in various circumstances, such as immigration or war.
      Citation: Sociological Theory
      PubDate: 2024-04-02T06:17:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07352751241240527
       
  • The Interactional Zoo: Lessons for Sociology from Erving Goffman’s
           Engagement with Animal Ethology

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      Authors: Colin Jerolmack, Belicia Teo, Abigail Westberry
      Abstract: Sociological Theory, Ahead of Print.
      Erving Goffman is one of sociology’s most influential thinkers. Scholars debate the extent to which he worked in competing theoretical traditions (e.g., interactionist or structuralist), yet few acknowledge his intellectual indebtedness to animal ethology. This article traces how naturalistic studies of paralinguistic animal communication influenced Goffman’s corpus and specifies the ideas he built on from that field, especially territoriality and ritualized display. Goffman’s comparative approach to animal and human interaction reveals the shortcomings of sociologists’ lingua-centric approach to interaction; elevates animals to social actors, capable of metacommunication, reading others’ intentions, and adjusting their behavior accordingly; and humbles humans, who he finds enacting rituals of civility for the same reason animals engage in ritualized display: to manage threats and facilitate bonding. Goffman’s thesis on the similarities between animal and human social behavior compels sociology to consider animal studies, and his use of ethology helps reconcile his interactionist and Durkheimian tendencies.
      Citation: Sociological Theory
      PubDate: 2024-03-05T09:34:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07352751241230955
       
  • From Public Sociology to Sociological Publics: The Importance of Reverse
           Tutelage to Social Theory

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      Authors: Ali Meghji
      Abstract: Sociological Theory, Ahead of Print.
      This article develops an alternative vision of public sociology. Whereas public sociology is often defined through the actions of professional sociologists, this article calls for a recognition of reverse tutelage in public sociology. Here, publics are seen as sociological interlocutors who can, and often do, produce sociological theories and analyses that can inform professional sociology. I demonstrate this reverse tutelage by focusing on anticolonial and anti-racist social movements, including the Zapatistas, Black Lives Matter, Palestine Action, and Cops Are Flops. I highlight how they produce sociological theories of power, neoliberalism, race, bordering, and violence that can orient professional sociology toward relational forms of analysis that build connections between different sites of resistance. In doing so, I highlight how the boundary between what Burawoy terms “professional” and “critical” sociology is much more porous than initially theorized and that critical sociology—from wider publics—can significantly shape professional sociology.
      Citation: Sociological Theory
      PubDate: 2024-02-07T10:52:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07352751241227429
       
  • Performing Social Control: Poverty Governance, Public Finance, and the
           Politics of Visibility

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      Authors: John N. Robinson, Spencer Headworth, Shai Karp
      Abstract: Sociological Theory, Ahead of Print.
      The visibility of populations, policies, and the state matters greatly for questions of power, inequality, and democratic life. This article builds on existing scholarship by examining how visibility operates as a lever and effect of social control in a racially and economically stratified society. By doing so, the article identifies a paradox. Race- and class-empowered groups often pressure state actors to implement punitive policies or otherwise visibly contain and control disadvantaged populations. But they also tend to decry and disavow the necessary public costs of these disciplinary interventions. This creates a conundrum for authorities: how to satisfy popular demands for social control while concealing resource commitments. We use the term disciplinary tensions to describe the contradictory political desires that state actors must navigate to maintain legitimacy with privileged constituents. We examine two state projects that, in different ways, crystallize this dilemma: the expansion of low-income housing development in New York in the 1960s and 1970s and state prison construction in California in the 1980s and 1990s. In both episodes, officials responded to disciplinary tensions by turning to covert public finance options: specifically, revenue bonds, which seemingly detach policy from conventional tax-and-spend public finance. We argue that these cases shed light on the shifting nature of power as finance has come to pervade all aspects of government and covert governing tactics supplement and supplant society’s more direct practices of social control. Revenue bonds, in particular, allow governing actors to appease and placate the populace by reconfiguring the state’s disciplinary power so that social control appears to pay for itself.
      Citation: Sociological Theory
      PubDate: 2024-01-30T12:01:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07352751231222476
       
  • Morality, Affect, and Reputation in the Making of a Motivated Social Self

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      Authors: Seth Abrutyn, Jienian Zhang
      Abstract: Sociological Theory, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the prevalence of symbolic interaction’s theory of the self, alongside alternative implicit models in dual-process and practice theory, sociology continues to struggle with incorporating affect into models of the self. To address this gap, we distinguish between the conventional sociological understanding of Goffman’s self as cynical and masked and an alternative construct we excavate by paying close attention to negative cases like Goffman’s Asylums and Stigma. This alternative theory of self treats self and situation not as one-sided but as mutually constitutive. Unlike most models of self, our alternative is continuously motivated by humans’ desire to maintain reputation within a given situation; reputation making is dependent on the situation, and its ceremonial rules provide the context for the self’s realization of affective rewards. After considering how reputational claims around ceremonial rules reveal an affectively driven, moral self, we consider the theoretical and methodological implications of the theory for major strands within symbolic interactionism.
      Citation: Sociological Theory
      PubDate: 2024-01-22T05:42:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07352751231223203
       
  • The Bio-Habitus: Using Pain Science to Reconstruct Bourdieusian Theory

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      Authors: Tyler Leeds
      Abstract: Sociological Theory, Ahead of Print.
      Habitus is society inscribed on the body, but Bourdieu does not explore how biological processes interact with habitus, namely, how action flows from a bio-habitus. I engage pain science to illustrate this point. First, I document how dispositions—specific components of habitus—mediate pain both before and after its onset. Second, I explain how pain alters cognition and affect, an interaction I contend inhibits the habitus. Far from placing the biological over the social, my discussion illustrates how the two are inseparable, a unity underlined by the term bio-habitus. I demonstrate how this concept intervenes in Bourdieusian debates over social reproduction and how the biological inhibition of habitus compares to work on hysteresis. I end by discussing resonances with and implications for disability studies.
      Citation: Sociological Theory
      PubDate: 2024-01-19T12:46:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07352751231222889
       
  • Situational Orders: Interaction Patterns and the Standards for Evaluating
           Public Discourse

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      Authors: Oded Marom
      Abstract: Sociological Theory, Ahead of Print.
      How do civic groups judge what issues are appropriate for public discourse' And how do they know what kinds of arguments to use where' Cultural sociologists identify varying “orders of worth,” that is, historically defined systems of typification and evaluation people draw on to evaluate public arguments. Yet it remains unclear how these take form in ongoing group practices. This article theorizes how groups’ ongoing interaction patterns, or “style,” typify social scenes to steer members toward distinct orders of worth in varying situations. As I argue, different typifications of public and private scenes condition the type of arguments members deem appropriate for public discourse, with meaningful implications for their politics. Combining style and orders of worth allows us to ask how ostensibly similar groups may publicly define different political goals and value varying forms of civic engagement. I illustrate this theoretical framework with an ethnographic study of two culturally distinct groups of libertarians in the United States.
      Citation: Sociological Theory
      PubDate: 2023-12-30T10:11:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07352751231218479
       
 
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 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  First | 1 2 3        [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
Showing 401 - 382 of 382 Journals sorted alphabetically
Tla-Melaua : Revista de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Tracés     Open Access  
Trajecta : Religion, Culture and Society in the Low Countries     Open Access  
Transatlantica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transmotion     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Transposition : Musique et sciences sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Travail et Emploi     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
TRIM. Tordesillas : Revista de investigación multidisciplinar     Open Access  
Universidad, Escuela y Sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Unoesc & Ciência - ACHS     Open Access  
Urban Research & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Valuation Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Variations : Revue Internationale de Théorie Critique     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Visitor Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Vlast' (The Authority)     Open Access  
Work, Aging and Retirement     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
World Future Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Religion, Gesellschaft und Politik     Hybrid Journal  

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Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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