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  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
Showing 401 - 382 of 382 Journals sorted alphabetically
Tla-Melaua : Revista de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Tracés     Open Access  
Trajecta : Religion, Culture and Society in the Low Countries     Open Access  
Transatlantica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transmotion     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Transposition : Musique et sciences sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Travail et Emploi     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
TRIM. Tordesillas : Revista de investigación multidisciplinar     Open Access  
Universidad, Escuela y Sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Unoesc & Ciência - ACHS     Open Access  
Urban Research & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Valuation Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Variations : Revue Internationale de Théorie Critique     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Visitor Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Vlast' (The Authority)     Open Access  
Work, Aging and Retirement     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
World Future Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Religion, Gesellschaft und Politik     Hybrid Journal  

  First | 1 2 3        [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

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Sociological Perspectives
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.663
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 12  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0731-1214 - ISSN (Online) 1533-8673
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • The Structure of Social Capital and Cultural Participation: A
           Cross-sectional Study

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      Authors: Michał Cebula
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the relationship between cultural participation patterns and access to social resources, proxied by the position generator tool. In addition, it asks to what extent social networks are class-homogeneous (closed) depending on the configuration of cultural practices. The survey results show that participation in highbrow culture is a more relevant predictor of access to higher prestige contacts than participation in popular culture. Both styles are related with the general volume of contacts and the heterogeneity of social resources. Moreover, the analysis indicates that the structure of social capital (i.e., the proportion of contacts with upper-, middle-, and lower-class members) is connected with pursuing different cultural profiles. The effect of network homogeneity is stronger for highbrow style than for any other style. The results are interpreted in terms of social closure and the role that culture plays in monopolizing access to social resources and maintaining social boundaries.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2024-04-29T09:53:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214241247794
       
  • Hidden to Whom' Aspects of Visibility among People Who Died While Affected
           by Homelessness and Implications for Outreach

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      Authors: Richard Neil Greene
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      Service providers and researchers often describe people affected by homelessness as hidden. This study aims to study social relationships and implications for outreach services through a qualitative content analysis of reports written by field investigators for the New Mexico Office of the Medical Investigator that involve people affected by homelessness who died between 2014 and 2019 across the state (N = 512). Findings describe variation in what is newly conceptualized as the aspects of the visibility framework, which organizes people as most engaged and surveilled, most visible and exposed, or most hidden. Recommendations include facilitating greater engagement with hotel/motel management and staff about harm reduction and engaging more with local business communities and first responders (including the criminal-legal system). This research also conceptualizes subsistence ties, acquaintances that both provide longer-term support and further hide people who are precariously housed. Future research and policy recommendations are described.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2024-04-29T09:51:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214241247795
       
  • “He Was Able to Rely on Me”: Negotiating the Sibling Intragenerational
           Bargain among Latino First-generation College Student Families

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      Authors: Estéfani Marín
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      Though some frameworks suggest that siblings deplete family resources, alternative conceptualizations suggest that siblings, particularly in working-class and minoritized families, are pivotal sources of educational support that may replenish familial capital. Drawing on 41 in-depth interviews with Latino first-generation college students, this study addresses how siblings negotiate educational support. This study builds and extends prior literature on familial capital by proposing that college attendance generates additional resources that (re)shape family obligations and expectations, a process I refer to as the sibling intragenerational bargain. In negotiating the sibling intragenerational bargain, Latino students seek to (1) contribute to the family’s intragenerational mobility by providing educational support and/or (2) repay sibling sacrifices and help with their academic success. Furthermore, birth order and sibling educational attainment shape how students negotiate the sibling intragenerational bargain. This study shows how Latino first-generation siblings (older and younger) are agentic producers of familial capital.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2024-04-20T07:18:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214241242073
       
  • Who’s Eating Rice' Gay Vietnamese American Men’s
           Experiences With (Sexual) Racism

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      Authors: Thuận Phước Nguyễn, C. Winter Han
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      Recent studies on the experiences of gay Asian men demonstrate that members of these groups experience both subtle and blatant forms of racism within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer/questioning (LGBTQ) communities. This study expands on previous research by examining how gay Vietnamese American men experience racism within the gay community of Southern California, how racism affects members of this group mentally and emotionally, and their responses when facing racism. Based on 17 semi-structured, in-depth interviews with self-identified gay Vietnamese American men living in Southern California, this study found that they experienced racism similarly to other gay Asian men. Race and racism shape the everyday experiences of gay Vietnamese American men through the racial paradox of gay desire as they are either deemed undesirable and rejected as a potential sexual and romantic interest, or they are racially fetishized. However, members of this group do not experience racism passively but actively respond through various acts of resistance and intra-racial and ethnic community-building.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2024-04-17T11:40:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214241242074
       
  • Bathing the Dead, the Dirty Work: Stigmatization of Gassals in Modern
           Türkiye

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      Authors: Adem Sagir
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      The present study examines the transformation of the profession of Gassals, dead body bathers in Islamic culture, from a prestigious role to a stigmatized job in modern Türkiye. Through a qualitative research design, this study employs a combination of participant observation and in-depth interviews with Gassals in Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality. In the study conducted with the purposeful convenience sampling technique, in-depth interviews were conducted with 19 participants (3 male,16 female). Ultimately, the study raises three major modernity-related claims: Modernity marginalizes death and excludes it from daily life, primarily functions to secularize the public sphere and excludes religious issues, and presents the dead body as dirty, as it sees the body as a biological mechanism, as a product of standardization and institutionalization. Their job involves physical contamination due to direct contact with deceased bodies, and this solid physical taint overshadows the overall dignity of the profession. The three main findings of the study are important. First, community members perceive it as a “reminder of death.” The second is the modern human tendency to avoid death in the domains of everyday life, primarily through institutions such as hospitals. Lastly, the stigma toward gassals may be explained by them losing their status in the modern era under the influence of institutionalization despite enjoying a prestigious status in the past.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2024-04-11T10:21:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214241242069
       
  • Staying in Bad Jobs: An “Institutional Peg” as Poland’s Adaptation
           to Precarious Markets

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      Authors: Anna Gromada
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      Why and how do workers stay in bad jobs' Based on 972 questionnaires and longitudinal data from 45 interviews, the article finds substantial support for the labor of love and the psychic income theories and no support for the miscalculated risk and commitment device theories. It documents personal strategies (overworking and childlessness) and institution-related strategies (diploma-hoarding and institutional pegs—a term introduced in this article). The article argues that the existing dichotomy of market-driven art and the state-subsidy-driven art could be enriched by the third model epitomized by Poland—a country with neither the art market comparable to that of the United States or the United Kingdom nor a state spending on art comparable to that of France or the Netherlands—where free higher education is used as a fallback option in the context of scarce resources.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2024-04-09T09:05:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214241242063
       
  • Cohort Differences in Occupational Retention among Computer Science Degree
           Holders: Reassessing the Role of Family

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      Authors: Sharon L. Sassler, Kristin E. Smith, Katherine Michelmore
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      Although women’s representation in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) employment has increased significantly over the past few decades, their presence remains low in fields like computer science. Using the National Science Foundation’s Scientists and Engineers Statistical Data System (SESTAT), this paper assesses the factors shaping employment in STEM and non-STEM occupations among men and women with bachelor’s degrees in computer science. Our results reveal that women with degrees in computer science are far less likely than their male counterparts to be employed in STEM occupations, particularly in computer science jobs. But family factors do not have the expected association with employment in computer science jobs. Men who are parents and childless women are more likely to work in non-STEM jobs versus computer science jobs, relative to childless men. Furthermore, the gender gap in employment in computer science jobs is larger among those graduating in the new millennium, suggesting that other factors are at play.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2023-10-28T11:51:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214231195024
       
  • Becoming a Survivor' Identity Creation Post-violence

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      Authors: Meghan Olivia Warner
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      In recent decades, advocates have sought to combat stereotypes about sexual violence and victims. This effort included replacing the term “victim” with the term “survivor,” but researchers have little understanding of how people who have experienced violence understand these terms. Drawing on in-depth interviews of 30 young people marginalized by gender who have experienced sexual violence, I find that few strongly identified with either label. Respondents described victim and survivor in contrast with each other, creating two typologies of response post-violence that exist along a continuum. Respondents described “victim” as an all-encompassing label that communicated overall weakness and passivity. Most distanced themselves from the victim label and aspired to the survivor label. However, most did not identify as survivors. They described being a survivor as the result of a long process toward becoming strong, morally worthy people who had “moved on” and were ready to advocate for others. Respondents’ descriptions of survivors constitutes what I theorize as the “perfect survivor narrative,” a cultural script that made it difficult for most people in the sample to identify as a survivor, with implications for their racialized and gendered self-perceptions. The findings demonstrate the freedoms and constraints of using new language to combat dominant narratives.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2023-10-14T08:50:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214231195340
       
  • Moral Panic and Electric Micromobilities: Seeking Space for Mobility
           Justice

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      Authors: Travers, N. Scott, K. J. Reed, P. Hall, M. Winters, G. Kwan, K. Park
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      This article makes the case that electric micromobilities (EMMs) are the site of a moral panic and employs the lens of mobility justice to explain it. Through analysis of scholarly and media discourse, interviews with, and social media content produced by, EMM riders (eriders), and the auto ethnographic experiences of the lead author as an electric unicycle rider in daily life, as a participant in online and offline “erider” communities, and as a food delivery worker, we reinforce the conclusion that alternate mobilities face an uphill battle in gaining legitimacy and inclusion in transportation policy and infrastructure. While this is not a new finding—alternate mobilities have a long history of being demonized and excluded—this article offers insight into how individuals who find themselves unwitting scapegoats in conflicts over public space consciously engage in deliberate actions to resist EMM panic and achieve greater mobility justice.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2023-10-03T11:56:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214231193355
       
  • Pathways of Intergenerational Support between Parents and Children
           throughout Adulthood

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      Authors: Bo-Hyeong Jane Lee, Anna Manzoni
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      This paper examines varying patterns of exchanges in financial and residential support between parents and children. We apply a life course perspective to explore how patterns of intergenerational support unfold throughout adulthood. Using Waves 3 to 5 of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, we conduct a repeated measure latent class analysis and identify six pathways of intergenerational exchange. About one-third of individuals have minimal intergenerational exchange while the majority share some form of residential and financial assistance with their parents between their late teens and early forties. Upward and downward intergenerational exchanges are most common among Blacks, Hispanics, and families with less formal educational backgrounds, whereas pathways of complete independence are most common among White families. This paper challenges the notion of complete independence as a necessary marker of adulthood and maps out the diverse patterns of intergenerational exchange along multiple dimensions over the life course.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2023-08-31T08:11:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214231193342
       
  • The Allure of Transactional Intimacy in Sugar Dating

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      Authors: Lena Gunnarsson
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      The proliferation of “sugar dating” websites, facilitating transactional relationships between a “sugar baby” and a “sugar daddy,” raises new questions about the reconfigured relationship between intimacy and economy in the contemporary Global North. By encouraging people to approach sex and intimacy through a logic of exchange, sugar dating has been claimed to represent the culmination of a broader trend towards a ”marketization” of intimacy. Based on semi-structured interviews, this article analyzes Swedish “sugar babies”’ investment in a transactional approach to intimate interactions with men, focusing on the emotional rewards that they associate with the transactional setup of sugar dating. While the participants’ transactional approach to intimacy is bolstered by the cultural dispersal of a neoliberal rationality into ever more domains of life, I argue that its deeper roots need to be sought in the precarious conditions of contemporary intimacy. Drawing in particular on the work of Eva Illouz, I claim that the women’s embracement of a transactional approach to heterosexual sex and intimacy may be read as a defensive tactic of seeking to gain control over the flows of intimate interaction in light of the (gendered) insecurities and vulnerabilities of the contemporary market of intimacy.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2023-08-21T06:02:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214231191771
       
  • Long-term Consequences of Men’s Migration for Women’s Well-being in a
           Rural African Setting

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      Authors: Victor Agadjanian, Sophia Chae
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      Labor migration is a massive global reality, and its effects on the well-being of nonmigrating household members vary considerably. However, much existing research is limited to cross-sectional or short-term assessments of these effects. This study uses unique longitudinal panel data collected over 12 years in rural Mozambique to examine long-term connections of women’s exposure to husband’s labor migration with women’s material security, their perception of their households’ relative economic standing in the community, their overall life satisfaction, and their expectations of future improvements in household conditions. To capture the cumulative quality of such exposure, we use two approaches: one based on migrant remittances (“objective”) and the other based on woman’s own assessment of migration’s impact on the household (“subjective”). The multivariable analyses detect a significant positive association between “objective” migration quality and household assets, regardless of women’s current marital status and other characteristics. However, net of household assets, “objective” quality shows a positive association with life satisfaction, but not with perceived relative standing of the household or future expectations. In comparison, “subjective” quality is positively associated with all the outcomes even after controlling for other characteristics. These findings illustrate the gendered complexities of long-term migration impact on nonmigrants’ well-being.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2023-07-08T10:39:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214231180557
       
  • Asian Americans and Income Inequality: Disparities Between and Within
           Racial, Ethnic, and Gender Groups

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      Authors: Tiffanie Vo, Cyrus Schleifer, Peyman Hekmatpour
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      Asian Americans nearing economic parity with White individuals is unique, particularly given the historical and contemporary disadvantaged position of other racial minorities in the U.S. labor market. While there is growing literature exploring how Asian Americans are reshaping the labor force, most of these studies categorize them as a homogenous group, failing to recognize social, cultural, and historical diversities within the community. Using the Current Population Survey, we investigate income disparity trends across ethnic groups and gender. Results show that Asian American men and women have high income levels compared to other racial minority groups. However, these perceived advantages reinforce racial stereotypes and mask income variations within these groups and across genders. We find a widening gender income gap over recent years for Asian ethnic groups, highlighting how race and gender interact to shape their labor-market experiences. We conclude by discussing the implications for future studies in labor-market research.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2023-07-08T10:30:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214231177019
       
  • Internal Migration and Cohabitation in China: A Mixed-method Study

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      Authors: Zheng Mu, Wei-Jun Jean Yeung
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      Migration occurs at earlier ages, lasts for long periods, and profoundly shapes migrants’ experiences of cohabitation. We use a mixed-method approach based on the 2012 China Family Panel Studies and 127 in-depth interviews. To address potential selection bias, we estimated the treatment effects of migration based on propensity score matching. Results show that migrants, particularly rural-origin migrants with longer migration duration, are more likely to cohabit than their non-migrant counterparts. Qualitative interviews reveal the main underlying mechanisms: more liberal attitudes and less parental supervision in the receiving communities, a desire to vet potential partners in the absence of background knowledge, and economic barriers to marriage that make cohabitation an attractive buffer. Although migrants may cohabit as a sub-optimal option due to life instabilities and financial pressures, cohabitation also reflects a newly gained autonomy in their private lives, attributable to the liberal mindsets toward nonconventional family behaviors in the receiving communities.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2023-07-04T09:10:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214231180559
       
  • “I Would Give Anything to Talk about Aliens Now”: QAnon Conspiracy
           Theories and the Creation of Cognitive Deviance

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      Authors: Meggan M. Jordan, Jennifer Marie Whitmer
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      Conspiracy theory researchers observed how the conspiracy theory known as QAnon traveled from dark Web message boards like 4chan to mainstream sources like Facebook, turning everyday people into fervent believers. However, the responses from nonbelievers have been overlooked. We report findings from in-depth interviews with adults (n = 20) who identify as concerned about their family member’s involvement with the QAnon conspiracy theory. Overall, the findings reveal the fundamental basis for nonbelievers’ concern about QAnon. Participants reported epistemic conflicts, out-of-character behavior, broken boundaries, and fears of future actions due to their family member’s involvement in QAnon. The study contributes to the theoretical concept of cognitive deviance by empirically documenting the point at which beliefs become deviant in the eyes of others.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2023-07-04T09:01:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214231181383
       
  • The Consent of the Oppressed: An Analysis of Internalized Racism and
           Islamophobia among Muslims in Spain

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      Authors: Daniel Gil-Benumeya
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      Taking as our starting point the premise that all domination mechanisms are based partly on their naturalization and reproduction by the very persons that experience them, this study uses the notion of “internalized racism” to explore how Muslims living in Spain internalize some of the cultural and ideological myths that sustain the racism and Islamophobia they experience, especially in relation to institutional practices of control and discrimination. It contributes an innovative approach to the knowledge of racism in the Spanish context, showing how religious and racialized minorities in Spain understand, perceive, experience, and at times reproduce the discrimination they are subject to, and how Islamophobia is entwined with other forms of racism and exclusion as well as with Spain’s specific historical relationship with Islam. The research is based on qualitative data obtained from eight discussion groups that met between 2019 and 2021 and comprised a total of 61 Muslims resident in various parts of Spain.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2023-07-03T06:33:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214231180555
       
  • Secrets as Storytelling: Family Histories and Interpersonal Intimacy

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      Authors: Magda Nico, Maria Gilvania Silva, Ana Caetano
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      Keeping and telling secrets are acts of intimacy. This article explores secret-telling-friendly methodologies, capable of encouraging individuals to share their life stories in their own terms, with particular episodes, emotional connections, protagonists, and also secrets. The openness of our research design played an important part in the identification of the role of secret-storytelling in the understanding of life. This was enhanced by methodological tools mobilized during the biographical interviews with individuals of families (the life calendar and the socio-genealogical tree). It testifies the importance of the research design, and method lato sensu, in the sociological analysis of secrets. Each secret connects to the person’s biography, social positioning, historical context, and generational anchor, contributing to understand more about wider social, gender, family, interpersonal, and normative values of given time-space coordinates. Secrets are narrative and emotional devices to build biographical narratives and chronologize life stories, bridging biography and society, exemplarily.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2023-06-27T12:15:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214231180563
       
  • Caregiving, Gender, and Health: The Moderating Role of Age

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      Authors: Min Ju Kim
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      Unpaid caregiving by family or friends has increased over the recent years, with a simultaneous decline in the health of caregivers. Yet, limited research has examined the interrelationships between caregiving status, gender, age and health, or how dimensions of caregiving (type of care, relationship with care recipient) complicate these relationships. Using data from 428,395 U.S. adults from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), I find that young adult men and women providing personal care report poorer self-rated health than noncaregivers. Regarding the relationship with care recipient, young adults caring for a spouse/partner report the poorest self-rated health, and particularly women. Overall, caregiving tends to be more adversely associated with health among young adults when the type of care provided is personal or when they have an ill spouse/partner to care for, both of which can be construed as off-timed from the life course perspective.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2023-06-26T08:48:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214231180558
       
  • In Millennial Footsteps: California Social Movement Organizations for
           Generation Z

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      Authors: Uriel Serrano, May Lin, Jamileh Ebrahimi, Jose Orellana, Rosanai Paniagua, Veronica Terriquez
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      This article highlights main themes that emerged from our panel featuring youth organizers and scholars of youth social movements in California. We focus on how organizations uplift youth leadership, foster queer inclusivity, build across racial difference, and cultivate “beloved community,” a concept popularized by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Our organizations address the root causes of inequities that threaten low-income communities of color, while adapting to contemporary challenges by proposing new modes of social change. For example, youth-centered leadership has long been at the crux of youth organizing; meanwhile, “healing” has increasingly emerged as a prominent aspect of youth organizations devoted to social change. This article thus summarizes our panel’s insights about youth organizing across California.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2021-05-05T12:36:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214211010565
       
 
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  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
Showing 401 - 382 of 382 Journals sorted alphabetically
Tla-Melaua : Revista de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Tracés     Open Access  
Trajecta : Religion, Culture and Society in the Low Countries     Open Access  
Transatlantica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transmotion     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Transposition : Musique et sciences sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Travail et Emploi     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
TRIM. Tordesillas : Revista de investigación multidisciplinar     Open Access  
Universidad, Escuela y Sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Unoesc & Ciência - ACHS     Open Access  
Urban Research & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Valuation Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Variations : Revue Internationale de Théorie Critique     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Visitor Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Vlast' (The Authority)     Open Access  
Work, Aging and Retirement     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
World Future Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Religion, Gesellschaft und Politik     Hybrid Journal  

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