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  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
Showing 1 - 200 of 382 Journals sorted by number of followers
American Journal of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 340)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 283)
Annual Review of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 234)
Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 167)
Social Forces     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
Social Problems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 73)
Information, Communication & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Comparative Studies in Society and History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 56)
European Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Anthropological Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 54)
Critical Studies on Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Sociology of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Current Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
The British Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Qualitative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Sociological Methods & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
International Political Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
City & Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Critical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
AlterNative : An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 41)
Ageing & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
European Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Comparative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
The Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Poverty and Social Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Victorian Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Contemporary Sociology : A Journal of Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
International Journal of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Games and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Critical Discourse Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Complexity in Leadership and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
City: analysis of urban trends, culture, theory, policy, action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Sociological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
International Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Health and Social Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Judgment and Decision Making     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Design and Culture : The Journal of the Design Studies Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Urbanism: International Research on Placemaking and Urban Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
International Review for the Sociology of Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Sociolinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Ethnicities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
City, Culture and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Rural Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Family Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Social Psychology Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Sociology of Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Sociological Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Social Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Emotion Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Urban Research & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Journal of International and Intercultural Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
African and Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
The Sociological Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Studies in Sociology of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Family & Community History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Research in Organizational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Cities in the 21st Century     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
African Identities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Sociological Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Cognition and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Heritage & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
European Societies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Policy History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 15)
American Sociologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Social and Personal Relationships     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Public Relations Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Health Sociology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Comparative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Philosophy & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Historical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Sport in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Symbolic Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Berliner Journal für Soziologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Global Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Communication Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Family Relations     Partially Free   (Followers: 11)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Classical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Environnement Urbain / Urban Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Sojourn: Journal of Social Issues in Southeast Asia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Sociology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Sociological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Sociological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Review of Sociology / Revue Canadienne De Sociologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Advertising & Society Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
East Central Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Canadian Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Cultures & conflits     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal for the Study of Radicalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Studies in Latin American Popular Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Crime, Histoire & Sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Catalyst : A Social Justice Forum     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clio. Femmes, Genre, Histoire - Articles     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Sociologia Ruralis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Metaphor and Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Review of Education, Pedagogy, and Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Teaching Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Sociological Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Anthropologie et Sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Political Power     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Canadian Journal of Sociology / Cahiers canadiens de sociologie     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Caribbean Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
International Review of Sociology: Revue Internationale de Sociologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Sociological Research Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Bronte Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gender and Behaviour     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Race/Ethnicity : Multidisciplinary Global Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Chinese Sociology & Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Sociologie du Travail     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Cross-cultural Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Revista Mexicana de Sociologí­a     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Surveillance and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ateliers d'anthropologie     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Sexuality Research and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Nordic Journal of Migration Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Arabian Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Japanese Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture, and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Contexts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Genre, sexualité & société     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Senses and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Contemporary Pacific     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Cuban Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Critical Horizons     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Sociolinguistic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Critical Realism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Revista de Psicología Social, International Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Canadian Journal of Women and the Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Visitor Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Italian Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Mathematical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Études françaises     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ethnologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Meridians : feminism, race, transnationalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Studia Iranica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Group Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Contributions to Indian Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Aztlan : A Journal of Chicano Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
New Zealand Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Genre & histoire     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Public and Professional Sociology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sociological Spectrum: Mid-South Sociological Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
The Tocqueville Review/La revue Tocqueville     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Historical Pragmatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social Dynamics: A journal of African studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
The Social Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sociologie et sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Contemporary Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Good Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Islamic Law and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Criminologie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Lien social et Politiques     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Recherches féministes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Sociology Mind     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Sustainable Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Enfances, Familles, Générations     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transatlantica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Chrétiens et sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
SociologieS - Articles     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue de la régulation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Seminar : A Journal of Germanic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Landscapes of Violence     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
COnTEXTES     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Política y sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cahiers de l'Urmis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Loisir et Société / Society and Leisure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revue Internationale De Securite Sociale     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Ethnic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Caderno CRH     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Diversité urbaine     Full-text available via subscription  
Ciencia e Cultura     Open Access  
Studies in American Naturalism     Full-text available via subscription  
Southern Cultures     Full-text available via subscription  
Liinc em Revista     Open Access  
World Cultures eJournal     Open Access  
Spaces for Difference: An Interdisciplinary Journal     Open Access  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access  
Tracés     Open Access  
Socio-logos     Open Access  

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Sociological Perspectives
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.663
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 11  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0731-1214 - ISSN (Online) 1533-8673
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1175 journals]
  • The Role of Institutional Trust in Industry, Government, and Regulators in
           Shaping Perceptions of Risk Associated with Hydraulic Fracturing in the
           United Kingdom

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Paul B. Stretesky, Damien Short, Laurence Stamford
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      This study draws upon concepts of institutional trust and expendability to examine perceptions of risk associated with hydraulic fracturing or “fracking.” To study trust and risk, we collected data from a nationally representative sample of U.K. residents and analyzed it using multivariate regression. Perceptions of trust are measured for the oil and gas industry, central government, local government, and regulators while perceived risks are measured for seismicity, water quality, and hydraulic fracturing in general. Participants with high levels of trust in the oil and gas industry tend to perceive lower levels of risk associated with hydraulic fracturing. Levels of government and regulator trust are, however, largely unrelated to perceived risks. Importantly, trust in the oil and gas industry appears to mediate the relationship between political affiliation and perceptions of risk. Implications for theories of recreancy and environmental justice are explored.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2022-10-22T10:26:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214221125803
       
  • Collective Social Capital, Outgroup Threat, and Americans’ Preference
           for Restrictive Immigration

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Harris Hyun-soo Kim
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      Throughout parts of the Western world, populist nationalism has gained increasing momentum. Despite cross-national differences in populist leaders and parties, one common feature stands out: xenophobic prejudice. This paper examines in the U.S. context, first, a common assumption linking outgroup threat perception with support for restrictive immigration. Second, more importantly, this paper tests how and the extent to which collective (state-level) social capital independently influences the American citizens’ anti-immigrant attitudes, as well as whether it moderates the association between outgroup threat and preference for restricting immigration. Multilevel models based on a nationally representative sample show that people who hold higher perceptions of outgroup threat are indeed more likely to oppose immigration. By contrast, living in a state endowed with more social capital is associated with pro-immigration attitudes. Last, the association between security threat and anti-immigrant preference is weaker (stronger) in states with higher (lower) measures of social capital.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2022-10-18T12:00:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214221127935
       
  • Connecting Spaces: Gender, Video Games and Computing in the Early Teens

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jennifer Ashlock, Miodrag Stojnic, Zeynep Tufekci
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      Informed by evidence that computing attitudes may be uniquely constructed in informal contexts and that the early teens are a key period for academic decision-making, we investigate lines of practice that connect computing skills, attitudes, and videogames. We compare the relationship between computer skill, computer efficacy, and activities associated with gaming using a data set of 3,868 children in middle school. The time that children spend gaming has very modest association with skill and efficacy. Accounting for the frequency with which children modify games, engage in social gaming activities, and the salience of gamer identity explains the gender gap in computer skill and significantly narrows the gender gap in computer efficacy. We find support for the argument that computer skill and efficacy are dependent on children connecting often isolated social contexts, a socially embedded characteristic of the digital divide.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2022-10-11T01:05:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214221125802
       
  • Graduate School, Work, or Unclear' Gender Differences in Post-college
           Plans among China’s Recent College Students

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Man Yao
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      Women are becoming the majority in China’s universities and colleges. This study examines gender differences in post-college plans of China’s college students under the new social context. Drawing on survey data from college students across 15 universities in Beijing, this study identifies a gendered post-college planning process. Descriptive findings show that the majority of students plan to go to graduate school, while women are less likely to have a graduate school plan and more likely to be unclear about their future than men. Multivariate analyses show that these gender gaps can be partly attributed to women’s underrepresentation in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. Moreover, family socioeconomic resources and anticipated parenthood timing are associated with post-college plans, and these associations are more pronounced among women. This paper discusses the implications of these findings for research on the formation of gender stratification in education and career in the global context of women’s progress in education.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2022-09-30T06:49:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214221124536
       
  • Worth Less' Exploring the Effects of Subminimum Wages on Poverty among
           U.S. Hourly Workers

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      Authors: Michelle Maroto, David Pettinicchio
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      The Fair Labor Standards Act’s minimum wage laws provide important protections for workers. However, it still permits employers to pay subminimum wages to youth under age 20, student-vocational learners, full-time students, individuals with disabilities, and tipped workers. This has important economic consequences, especially for economically vulnerable workers in the low-wage sector. Using 2009–2019 Current Population Survey–Merged Outgoing Rotation Group (CPS-MORG) data (n = 502,976), we find that 3.7 percent (about 1,565,805) of hourly workers were paid subminimum wages based on state minimum wage laws, and subminimum wages were associated with increases in family poverty by 1.4 percentage points. Importantly, the relationship between subminimum wages and poverty differed across workers with particularly telling results for disability. Unlike for youth and students for whom access to subminimum wage labor was associated with decreased family poverty, subminimum wage work compounded already high poverty rates for hourly workers with disabilities. Within a broader context of low-wage work, this research speaks to the impacts of subminimum pay on economic insecurity and poverty—an ongoing social problem disproportionately affecting people with disabilities.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2022-09-29T07:57:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214221124630
       
  • The Ongoing Process of HIV-Stigma (Re)Production

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      Authors: Chadwick K. Campbell
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      HIV stigma negatively affects the social experiences of people living with HIV (PLWH) and remains a challenge to HIV prevention, treatment, and care. Research has overwhelmingly focused on individual cognitive measures of HIV stigma (e.g., internalized, anticipated, and experienced). However, little research explores the interactions and societal structures through which HIV stigma is produced. Data from qualitative interviews with 30 black gay and bisexual men living with HIV in the U.S. Deep South revealed an interconnected and interdependent set of processes that produce and reproduce HIV stigma. These included social interactions (silence, euphemism, and gossip), witnessed acts of marginalization, word-of-mouth transmission of HIV misinformation, and laws and policies carried out within the education and criminal justice systems. Efforts to reduce stigma that focus on individual beliefs and attitudes are critical to improving the well-being of PLWH. However, reducing HIV stigma requires intervening on the social interactions and structures through which HIV stigma is produced and reproduced.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2022-09-26T09:37:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214221117294
       
  • Arts for Whose Sake' Arts Course-taking and Math Achievement in US
           High Schools

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      Authors: Daniel Mackin Freeman, Dara Shifrer
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      Math achievement in U.S. high schools is a consistent predictor of educational attainment. While emphasis on raising math achievement continues, school-level interventions often come at the expense of other subjects. Arts courses are particularly at risk of being cut, especially in schools serving lower socioeconomic status youth. Evidence suggests, however, that arts coursework is beneficial to many educational outcomes. We use data on 20,590 adolescents from the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 to answer two research questions: (1) Does student accumulation of fine arts courses across different topic areas relate positively to math test scores in high school' (2) Does school SES differentiate this potential association' Results indicate that youth attending higher-SES schools take more art courses and taking music courses is related to higher math test scores. However, this benefit only seems to only apply to more socially advantaged student bodies. Results reveal a site of additional educational advantage for already privileged youth.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2022-09-24T12:32:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214221124537
       
  • Durable Disadvantage: Gender and the Mark of Unauthorized Status in
           Immigrants’ Occupational Trajectories

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      Authors: A. Nicole Kreisberg, Margot Jackson
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      Adverse life course events associated with unemployment can negatively affect individuals’ future labor market prospects. Unauthorized status, and subsequent unauthorized employment, may operate similarly, marring immigrants’ labor market prospects even after they change legal status. However, it is unclear how and why any durable disadvantage associated with prior unauthorized status operates differently by gender. This is an important shortcoming, given that legal status and gender overlap to influence both migration and stratification. Using longitudinal data from a nationally representative sample of lawful permanent residents, we find durable disadvantage associated with prior exposure to unauthorized status, especially among women. Men with prior exposure to unauthorized status experience persistent occupational disadvantage over time relative to men who were never unauthorized. However, women with exposure to unauthorized status experience widening occupational disadvantage over time relative to women who were never unauthorized. Human capital and legal processes help to explain this pattern.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2022-09-05T08:24:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214221117296
       
  • Durkheim’s Failed Darwinian Encounter: Missed Opportunities on the Path
           to a Post-exemptionalist Environmental Sociology

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      Authors: Paul Joseph McLaughlin
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      The philosophical underpinnings of Durkheim’s failed Darwinian encounter have been neglected by environmental and mainstream sociologists. Although he claimed to employ Darwinian insights, Durkheim wrote during the eclipse of population thinking by an essentialist revival in biology. His inability to grasp the former and embrace of a specific variety of the latter explain the limitations and contradictions in his incipient environmental sociology and challenge the broader disciplinary myth that Durkheim discovered a new approach to theorizing society. Even his repudiation of Lamarckian analogies relied upon and reinforced his more fundamental commitment to essentialism. That commitment has contributed to the persistence of developmentalism within sociology and delayed a second Darwinian revolution. Seizing the opportunity that Durkheim missed by confronting the deeper lessons of the first Darwinian revolution offers the best hope for constructing a post-exemptionalist theory of societal-environmental interactions and addressing enduring disciplinary concerns with structural diversity and human agency.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2022-09-02T09:36:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214221121164
       
  • Walking That Fine Line: Doulas as Overseers of Evidence-based Practice

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      Authors: Megan M. Henley
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      Doulas provide individualized support during labor and childbirth. Research has consistently shown that having doulas support increases positive physical and psychological outcomes. Professional medical organizations have begun to recognize the evidence showing the positive effects of doula support. Even though professional organizations recommend doulas to reduce non-medically indicated treatments such as overuse of cesarean delivery, many practitioners uphold their authority to intervene as they see necessary. I utilize interviews with 25 doulas to explore how doulas use scientific evidence to ensure that women receive appropriate care. Results indicate that doulas do not think that many obstetricians follow evidence-based practices; doulas feel compelled to serve as overseers who remind medical staff about the clinical guidelines. In addition, doulas use evidence to prepare mothers to confront providers. I argue that while doulas can help close gaps, obstetric medicine needs to implement evidence-based strategies more systemically to improve care for all women.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2022-09-02T09:35:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214221121161
       
  • Intersectional Criminalization: How Chicanas Experience and Navigate
           Criminalization through Interpersonal Relationships with Latino Men and
           Boys

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      Authors: Veronica Lerma
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      Recent work has begun to investigate how criminalization is mediated through interpersonal relationships. While this research emphasizes the importance of gender dynamics and cross-gender intimate relations for boys and men of color, little is known about how gendered and sexualized relationships matter for criminalized women and girls of color. This study seeks to fill this knowledge gap and asks: How do system-involved Chicanas’ relationships with men and boys shape their experiences of criminalization over the life course' How do they navigate criminalization through men and boys' While previous research suggests that young men of color may avoid criminalization through their relationships with young women of color, life-history interviews with formerly incarcerated and system-impacted Chicanas reveal that relationships with Latino men and boys exacerbated their experiences of criminalization. Utilizing an intersectional criminalization framework, I argue that racialized, gendered, and heteronormative assumptions about Latinas’ interpersonal relationships condition criminalization over the life course. Chicanas employed two strategies to navigate criminalization through men and boys, both of which came at a cost to their wellbeing.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2022-09-02T05:19:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214221121336
       
  • Controlling Defiance: An Examination of School Social Control in
           California School Districts

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      Authors: David Michael Ramey, Brittany N. Freelin
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      U.S. schools suspend 2.5 million children each school year. Although states mandate suspensions for serious offenses, most students are suspended for minor transgressions, such as “willful defiance” of authority. Moreover, districts suspend students of color for minor issues at higher rates than White children. In response, California banned suspension for “willful defiance” in elementary schools statewide in 2015 and larger districts eliminated the practice for all grades throughout the 2010s. In this article, we use California Department of Education (CDE) data from 2011 to 2018 to determine: (1) whether banning suspension for willful defiance changes school district suspension rates; (2) whether these bans are associated with changes in special education enrollment; and (3) how these relationships differ by the race/ethnicity of the student.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2022-08-26T06:45:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214221116661
       
  • Returning Biology to Evolutionary Sociology: Reflections on the Conceptual
           Hiatuses of “New Evolutionary Sociology” as a Vantage Point

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      Authors: Wing Chung Ho
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      Decades of scholarly efforts to reignite the theoretical integration between sociology and biology have come to partial fruition in the birth of evolutionary sociology at the turn of the twentieth-first century. This paper examines one of the most elaborated versions of the paradigm—“new evolutionary sociology” (NES)—proposed by Jonathan H. Turner and colleagues. NES emphasizes purposeful, multilevel selective pressure targeted at corporate units, groups, or societies—rather than the blind, Darwinian natural selection on individuals—from which institutional systems are developed. Despite its contribution, NES possesses conceptual lacunae that have fettered NES in specific and evolutionary sociology in general from becoming a novel and truly evolutionary-cum-sociological paradigm in explaining social phenomena. This paper identifies three conceptual hiatuses of NES, in that it lacks due deliberation of (1) the gene-culture interaction that bridges individual behaviors—via natural, sexual, group, and multilevel selections—with the emerging sociocultural formations; (2) the epistemic role of fitness as a post factum propensity in empirical analysis; and (3) the concept of causal mechanism utilized to explain the diverse paths leading to the emergent phenomena.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2022-08-25T09:51:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214221119256
       
  • Primed for Backlash: Among Whom Does Demographic Change Provoke
           Anti-Immigration Attitudes'

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      Authors: Christopher Maggio
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      Past research has explored which factors are important in understanding immigration attitudes, incorporating economic, cultural, and political components, among others. Simultaneously, a literature linking local demographic context to immigration attitudes has developed, in part to identify under what conditions demographic change might increase immigration Backlash. I combine these literatures by examining what characteristics and/or contexts for U.S.-born Whites predict Backlash to demographic change. I find evidence that county-level Hispanic growth predicts a preference for reducing immigration among three groups: those without a four-year degree, those identifying as political Independents, and those reporting a decrease in household income. These results provide a framework for understanding how immigration policy attitudes may evolve for different groups in the context of demographic change.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2022-08-13T09:39:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214221116660
       
  • One and Many Asian America: Intra-Asian Ethnic Boundaries and
           Intermarriage

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      Authors: Jess Lee
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      As a racialized pan-ethnic group, Asian Americans exhibit ethnically heterogeneous structural and cultural characteristics, but such heterogeneity and its implications for Asian Americans’ pan-ethnic groupness were seldom explored empirically. Using the American Community Survey and the 2016 National Asian American Survey datasets, this paper examines intra-Asian symbolic and socioeconomic boundaries and boundary processes captured in Asian interethnic marriage. I find prominent intra-Asian boundaries distinguishing exceptionally disadvantaged refugee-origin Southeast Asians, yet intra-Asian marriages still occur across these boundaries. This mismatch between intra-Asian boundaries and marriage patterns reflects loose and often unstable interpretations of ethnic similarities and differences. Together, my findings reveal Asian Americans’ contextually salient interpretations of ethnic heterogeneity behind intra-Asian boundary processes, which further reinforce the socially constructed notion of Asian Americans as a racialized group.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2022-08-11T09:25:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214221114297
       
  • “Damned If You Do, Damned If You Don’t: Perceived Discrimination and
           the Paradoxes of Assimilation among U.S. Muslims”

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      Authors: Kenneth Vaughan, Jerry Z. Park, Joshua Christopher Tom, Murat Yilmaz
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      Muslim Americans are a fast-growing minority group within the United States, both demographically and in the public consciousness. National surveys place them among the least liked groups in the U.S. cultural landscape, and throughout the twenty-first century they have often been the target of both high-profile vitriol and common daily abuses. We use logistic regression analyses of nationally representative data from the Pew Research Center’s 2011 Survey of American Muslims to better understand the social predictors of experiencing discrimination among American Muslims. Integrating these analyses with existing literature on minority group assimilation, we find that both patterns of assimilation and resistance to assimilation positively predict experiences of discrimination. These results suggest that American Muslims face no unequivocal path away from discriminatory experiences and inhabit a precarious place where assimilation presents more opportunities for exposure to discrimination and resistance to assimilation leads to sanctions from the dominant culture.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2022-08-09T06:01:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214221114294
       
  • “Maladies of Infinite Aspiration”: Smartphones,
           Meaning-Seeking, and Anomigenesis

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      Authors: Justin J. Nelson, Christopher M. Pieper
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      Smartphones have become a ubiquitous part of everyday life, and attachment to these devices is a felt reality for many Americans. This paper describes the link between smartphone attachment and the pursuit of meaning and purpose in life. Analyses reveal meaning-seeking as a positive correlate of smartphone attachment. However, while interaction effects suggest that meaning-seeking through heavy social media and Internet use decreases the odds of smartphone attachment, meaning-seeking is strongly related to attachment at lower levels of daily media use. Also, having a satisfying life purpose decreases the odds of smartphone attachment, though this protective effect is not as strong as meaning-seeking in the final models. We conclude that smartphone attachment, within a context of latent anomie, could be anomigenic, inadvertently exacerbating feelings of despair while simultaneously promising to resolve them. Findings provide a sociological link between smartphone attachment and the negative psychosocial outcomes described in the literature.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2022-08-05T06:46:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214221114296
       
  • Critical Consciousness of Gender Inequality: Considering the Viewpoints of
           Racially Diverse High School Girls with Engineering Aspirations

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      Authors: Catherine Riegle-Crumb, Tatiane Russo-Tait, Katherine Doerr, Ursula Nguyen
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      This study utilizes interviews with 33 racially diverse high school girls who have expressed interest in engineering careers. Using the framework of critical consciousness and informed by intersectional theories, the authors examine their views about gender inequality in engineering. Results revealed that while most articulated systemic understandings of inequality, Black participants were particularly likely to exhibit this critical reflection. Yet many young women revealed a more emerging form of critical reflection, particularly Asian participants. Few respondents expressed critical self-efficacy, or confidence to challenge gender inequality in their future careers; such views were almost exclusively held by Black and Latinx respondents. In contrast, White respondents commonly invoked a “lean-in” self-efficacy to be successful navigating, but not challenging, the White male-dominated engineering workforce. Overall, we find clear evidence that young women’s racialized identities have implications not only for their understandings of gender inequality, but also for their motivation to disrupt it.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2022-07-28T10:17:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214221112448
       
  • Polarization and Persuasion: Engaging Sociology in the Moral Universe of a
           Divided Democracy

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      Authors: Dennis J. Downey
      First page: 1029
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      Our divided democracy—characterized by partisan polarization and moralized opposition—presents significant challenges to sociologists who would use our discipline to create a more just society. I focus here on the strategic role of, and need for, deeper engagement across the political divide. I review current research on polarization—increasingly focused on attitudinal consolidation and partisan identity—to emphasize challenges to and opportunities for persuasion. I call for increased engagement in three strategic subfields of sociology: (1) social movements, to integrate persuasion more centrally into theories and research on collective social action; (2) social psychology, to engage the interdisciplinary field of moral cognition to develop effective strategies for persuasion; and (3) rural sociology, to understand more deeply the perspectives and moral frameworks essential to engagement across the divide.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2022-09-16T10:42:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214221124443
       
  • PSA Presidential Address: The New Normal and the Redefinition of Deviance

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      Authors: Sharon Kantorowski Davis
      First page: 1052
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      There are three major social issues that are identified and discussed as major contributors to the new normal and the redefinition of deviance. They include: 1) the political rise of the extreme right; 2) the renewed urgency to address issues of social, political, and environmental justice, including and racial inequalities and inequities; and 3) COVID and its effects on society and culture. Sociologists must be key players in the identification and resolution of these issues. In so doing, we impact the reframing and redefinition of what is deviant and what constitutes the new normal.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2022-09-22T06:49:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214221124446
       
  • The U.S. Space of Lifestyles and Its Homologies

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      Authors: Will Atkinson
      First page: 1060
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      Pierre Bourdieu’s influence on the study of lifestyles in the United States has been profound, yet the vast majority of relevant research operates with methods and assumptions at odds with Bourdieu’s own. His specifically relational or geometric understanding of social structures, and lifestyles, has been overlooked, meaning that no one has yet done for the contemporary United States what Bourdieu did for France, that is, construct a model of the “space of lifestyles” and its homologies. This paper does precisely that, deploying Bourdieu’s own favored technique of multiple correspondence analysis on survey data from 2017 to 2018. It finds a remarkable continuity between 1970s France and the contemporary United States, specifically in the existence of axes relating to economic and cultural capital. The paper also explores the correspondence of sociodemographic factors with the space, and importantly, it unveils associated patterns of symbolic domination.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2022-04-06T10:51:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214221084690
       
  • Diversity, Disrupted: A Critique of Neoliberal Difference in Tech
           Organizations

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      Authors: Lauren M. Alfrey
      First page: 1081
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      Since 2014, technology companies have spent an estimated $1.2 billion on diversity efforts. Despite these investments, Black and Latinx Americans remain starkly underrepresented. How is this problem understood by people in tech' Connecting theories of white racial ideologies and research on racialized organizations, I show how understandings of tech’s “diversity problem” paradoxically serve to naturalize tech organizations as white spaces. Using interviews and surveys of 69 tech workers, I identify several semantic maneuvers used to defend predominantly white workplaces as “diverse.” Together, they demonstrate a pattern I call neoliberal difference. Neoliberal difference is a culturally authorized ideology that expresses support for pluralism and progressive ideals while ignoring systems of racial exclusion. The theory of neoliberal difference expands and complicates our existing knowledge of white racial ideologies using the tech industry as an important case study. Implications for a sector so powerful in shaping social life are discussed.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2022-06-02T01:25:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214221094664
       
  • Pharmaceuticalization to Opioid Pharmacovigilance: A Qualitative
           Investigation of the Impact of Opioid-related Policy Changes and the
           Perspectives of Residents and Chronic Non-cancer Pain Patients

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      Authors: Zachary Simoni, Philip Day, David Schneider, Chance Strenth, Neelima Kale
      First page: 1099
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      As a result of the pharmaceuticalization of chronic pain over the past three decades, opioid therapy became a common form of treatment for chronic pain patients. However, the overprescribing of opioids led to the opioid overdose epidemic in the United States. In response, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention implemented guidelines reducing the number of opioid prescriptions—better known as opioid pharmacovigilance. Little is known about the sociocultural challenges during the transition to opioid pharmacovigilance for the resident/patient relationship. Using a thematic analysis, we analyzed 20 semi-structured interviews of residents and chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP) patients in a family medicine residency practice. Findings suggest that due to the pharmaceuticalization of CNCP and the transition to opioid pharmacovigilance, residents develop a wariness to prescribe opioids, which leads to prejudice against patients. Patients report constrained care and a lack of alternative treatments for chronic pain, which inevitably leads to duplicitous behavior.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2022-06-09T01:39:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214221097086
       
  • Policy Relay: How Affirmative Consent Went from Controversy to Convention

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      Authors: Katelyn Rose Malae
      First page: 1117
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      This article analyzes how a formerly mocked policy idea became a widespread solution. Through content analysis of newspaper articles and legal documents, I develop a framework that extends timelines of social movement influence, expands the range of actors and locations of mobilization, and traces how activists frame policy ideas over time: the policy relay. This framework allows for an analysis of how opponents unintentionally advanced the reform process in 1993 by turning its originators into laughingstocks. Anti-rape advocates eventually reformulated the policy in 2014. This time, the origin was removed from the story, presenting a concise narrative that credited politicians and college administrators, rather than activists, for the reform. By tracing the ideas of a movement, rather than focusing on organizations or public protests, I uncover a complicated process of social change, where consequential actors work across different settings to ignite reforms and strategically remove controversial aspects from narratives of social change.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T10:09:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214221100836
       
  • Racial and Ethnic Differences in Homework Time among U.S. Teens

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      Authors: Allison Dunatchik, Hyunjoon Park
      First page: 1144
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      Along with intensified competition for college admissions, U.S. teens increasingly spend more time on educational activities. Homework can be a particularly important component of educational time for economically disadvantaged and racial/ethnic minority students who have limited access to private sources of learning beyond the classroom. This study uses data from the American Time Use Survey and the Programme for International Student Assessment to compare homework time by race/ethnicity and examine the factors that explain these differences. We extend existing literature to consider explanations beyond demographic and family background. Our ordinary least squares (OLS) results show that family background accounts for the difference in homework time between Hispanic and White students and partially explains the difference between Black and White students, with students’ academic characteristics or school fixed effects explaining the remaining gap. While these factors partially account for Asian students’ greater time spent on homework than their White peers, a substantial gap remains.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2022-06-11T10:09:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214221101422
       
  • The COVID-19 Pandemic and the Gender Gap in Newly Created Domains of
           Household Labor

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      Authors: Jurgita Abromaviciute, Emily K. Carian
      First page: 1169
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, we draw on interview data from 62 matched different-sex, dual-career spouses raising young children to examine the mechanisms behind the gender gap in household labor during the COVID-19 pandemic. We argue that the pandemic represents a unique case of social uncertainty and an opportunity to observe how structural conditions shape the gendered division of household labor. We find that under the rapid social transformation imposed by the pandemic, gender serves as an anchor and orienting frame for couples with young children. We argue that the pandemic (1) expanded traditional gender expectations to new domains of household labor and (2) heightened the importance of gendered explanations for the division of labor that justified intra-couple inequality. Our findings suggest that the particular structural conditions that characterize different times of uncertainty work through slightly different mechanisms, yet produce the same outcome: gender inequality, with long-lasting and wide-ranging implications.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T10:36:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214221103268
       
  • Intergroup Contact and White Racial Apathy: Findings from the National
           Study of Youth and Religion (NSYR)

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      Authors: Tony N. Brown, Asia Bento, Julian Culver, Raul S. Casarez, Horace J. Duffy
      First page: 1188
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      Scholars theorize racial apathy is one form contemporary white racial prejudice takes. Racial apathy signals not caring about racial inequality. Invoking intergroup contact theory, we hypothesize interracial contact would predict less racial apathy among whites. To test our hypothesis, we analyze survey data from white teenagers participating in the 2003 National Study of Youth and Religion (NSYR). We find interracial contact matters and its inclusion improves model fit over and above previously specified correlates. Specifically, interracial friendship and dating, and having a different race mentor predict the tendency to care about racial equality. Furthermore, any interracial contact and a count of interracial contact experiences across five settings, respectively, predict less racial apathy. We encourage scholars to investigate further the sociological significance of racial apathy and its correlates, including interracial contact.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2022-07-14T09:56:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214221104041
       
  • “We’re Not All Anti-Choices”: How Controlling Images Shapes Latina/x
           Feminist Abortion Advocacy

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      Authors: Rocío R. García
      First page: 1208
      Abstract: Sociological Perspectives, Ahead of Print.
      Reproductive politics and Latinxs’ politics demonstrate a preoccupation with representations and discourses across time and space. Intersectional feminists theorize how controlling images function as mechanisms of social control by distorting holistic perceptions of marginalized people. While social movement research documents the importance of culture in collective action, little research applies a controlling images interpretive framework to social movement contexts. An important case for examining Latina/x representations is the ideological terrain created by pro-abortion Latina/x feminist advocates. Utilizing a three-year ethnography with California Latinas for Reproductive Justice (CLRJ), written materials produced by the organization, and in-depth interviews with staff, I argue that CLRJ highlights the limitations of existing research, uses feminist approaches to dialogue, and creates structural analyses of inequalities to challenge la santa (the saint), a controlling image centering cisgender mestiza and white Latinas used to assume that all Latinas make poor advocates for reproductive autonomy.
      Citation: Sociological Perspectives
      PubDate: 2022-07-25T10:44:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07311214221112623
       
 
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