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  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
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Qualitative Sociology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.984
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 47  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-7837 - ISSN (Online) 0162-0436
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • I wonder if this is like a saxophone: An Interview with Howard Becker

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      PubDate: 2023-05-10
       
  • The Limits of the Law: Women, Violence, and Legal Ambivalence in Nicaragua

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      Abstract: This article analyzes the experiences of Nicaraguan women victims of domestic violence as a lens for developing a theoretical concept I term legal ambivalence. I define legal ambivalence as the process by which women experience hesitancy or reluctance about if, when, and how to pursue legal claims in response to situations of relationship violence. Drawing on eight months of ethnographic fieldwork and 38 in-depth interviews, I demonstrate how women’s legal ambivalence is produced through a combination of socio-cultural factors like family support, gendered expectations of women, and economic dependence on a male partner, and women’s everyday interactions with state officials and the ways that the law itself is used against them. Building on decades of critical feminist scholarship highlighting the limitations of legal frameworks for addressing gender-based violence, my findings illustrate how contextual constraints, quotidian practices, and the gendered structure of legal institutions contributes to women’s reluctance to resort to the law.
      PubDate: 2023-04-18
       
  • Reframing the Community: How and Why Member Participation Shifts in the
           Face of Change

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      Abstract: How and why do people reframe their understanding of the communities and organizations to which they belong' I draw on the case of a collegiate religious fellowship that moved online during the COVID-19 pandemic to examine how individuals’ frames and participation patterns evolved as their community underwent a collective shift. I argue that reframing is triggered by temporal disconnect between past frames and present circumstances, present circumstances and imagined futures, or all three. My findings add nuance to existing theorizing on how members’ frames shape participation by revealing how positive frames that sustain high levels of participation in “settled times” can become a liability in “unsettled times.” My findings have relevance for understanding participation trajectories in a variety of group contexts, and advance theorizing on micro-level framing as a dynamic, fundamentally temporal process.
      PubDate: 2023-04-12
       
  • Black and Jewish: “Double Consciousness” Inspired a Qualitative
           Interactional Approach that Centers Race, Marginality, and Justice

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      Abstract: Classic theoretical arguments by seven Black and Jewish sociologists—informed by their experience of “double-consciousness”—comprise an important legacy in sociology. Approaches that ignore the role of racism and slavery in the rise of Western societies suppress and distort this legacy in favor of a White Christian Hero narrative. By contrast, Durkheim, a Jewish sociologist, took Roman enslaved and immigrant guild-workers as a starting point, positing the “constitutive practices” of their occupations as media of cooperation for achieving solidarity across diversity. His argument marks a transition from the treatment of social facts as durable symbolic residue in homogeneous cultures, to the qualitative study of constitutive social fact making in interaction in diverse social situations. Because making social facts in interaction requires mutual reciprocity, troubles occur frequently in contexts of inequality. Like W.E.B. DuBois, who first theorized double consciousness as a heightened awareness produced by racial exclusion, Harold Garfinkel looked to troubles experienced by the marginalized as clues to the taken-for-granted practices for making social order, calling them “ethno-methods.” Together with other Black and Jewish sociologists—Eric Williams, Oliver Cromwell Cox, Erving Goffman, and Harvey Sacks—they challenge popular interpretations of classical social theory, center Race and marginality, and explain how features of practice that unite/divide can be both interactional and institutionalized.
      PubDate: 2023-04-10
       
  • “Our Childhood Was Happier”: Retrospective Moment in Elite
           Chinese Childrearing

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      Abstract: The rules of the game in Chinese education have changed since current generations of Chinese upper-middle-class parents were schoolchildren. How these elite parents were raised should not matter to how they raise their children. But Chinese elite reproduction is stickier and less certain than the habitus concept suggests. My pragmatist-inspired analysis takes into account the role that history and social change plays in Chinese elite reproduction and develops the retrospective moment of Chinese upper-middle-class childrearing. Based on interviews with 46 upper-middle-class parents in Shanghai, I show that parents draw on their past experiences when adapting to social change in their childrearing. In reconstructing the past, they reason that they must adapt to social change; reflect on their own resistance to change; and recalibrate their practices to make them more resilient to change. To raise happy and successful children, parents embrace and resist suzhi (quality) in education. The indigenous concept highlights the limits of class privilege under Chinese authoritarianism.
      PubDate: 2023-03-22
      DOI: 10.1007/s11133-023-09533-x
       
  • My Home Quarantine on an App: A Qualitative Visual Analysis of Changes in
           Family Routines During the COVID-19 Pandemic in Chile

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      Abstract: This article presents original findings from a longitudinal qualitative study on changes in individual and family life associated with safety and health measures implemented during the COVID-19 pandemic in three regions of Chile. We developed a methodological approach based on multimodal diaries in a mobile application, in which participants submitted photographs and texts to express changes in their daily lives under residential confinement. Content and semiotic visual analyses show a significant loss in instances of collective recreation, partially compensated through new personal and productive activities performed at home. Our results suggest that modal diaries serve as potential tools to capture people’s perceptions and meanings as their lives go through exceptional and traumatic times. We assert that using digital and mobile technologies in qualitative studies could allow subjects to actively participate in the co-construction of fieldwork and produce quality knowledge from their situated perspectives.
      PubDate: 2023-02-22
      DOI: 10.1007/s11133-023-09531-z
       
  • “Welcome to the Revolution”: Promoting Generational Renewal in
           Argentina’s Ni Una Menos

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      Abstract: Despite the global upsurge of youth-fueled mass mobilization, the critical question of why new generations may be eager to join established movements is under-explored theoretically and empirically. This study contributes to theories of feminist generational renewal in particular. We examine the longer-term movement context and more proximate strategies that have enabled young women to participate steadily in a cycle of protest, alongside more seasoned activists, due to a process of feminist learning and affective bonding that we call “productive mediation.” We focus on the Argentine Ni Una Menos (Not One Less) massive yearly march, which, since its onset in 2015, demonstrates that feminist activists have achieved the sought-after goal of fostering a highly diverse mass movement. These large-scale mobilizations against feminicide and gender-based violence gain much of their energy from a strong youth contingent, so much so that they have been called “the Daughters’ Revolution.” We show that these “daughters” have been welcomed by previous generations of feminist changemakers. Drawing on original qualitative research featuring 63 in-depth interviews with activists of different ages, backgrounds, and locations across Argentina, we find that long-standing movement spaces and brokers, as well as innovative frameworks of understanding, repertoires of action, and organizational approaches, help to explain why preexisting social movements may be attractive for young participants.
      PubDate: 2023-02-20
      DOI: 10.1007/s11133-023-09530-0
       
  • The Micro-Foundations of Predictable Stability: How Multigenerational
           Achievement Informs Upper-Middle-Class Parenting

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      Abstract: Drawing on interviews with upper-middle-class parents in a large North-eastern city, we examine how “predictable stability” informs their assessment of downward mobility risks for their children. In contrast to anxiety and a ‘fear of falling,’ multigenerational achievement allows these parents to assume that their children will realize education and career success and a comfortable standard of living. This analysis extends contemporary theories of parenting and social stratification by illustrating variation among upper-middle-class dispositions and the micro-foundations that underlie quantitative research on the “stickiness” of intergenerational status mobility and the “glass floor” that protects upper-middle-class children from experiencing downward mobility.
      PubDate: 2023-02-14
      DOI: 10.1007/s11133-023-09529-7
       
  • “Horrible Slime Stories” When Serving Victims: The Labor of
           Role-taking and Secondary Trauma Exposure

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      Abstract: The emotional and psychological consequences associated with providing services to traumatized others have been well established with extant scholarship highlighting these workers’ susceptibility to vicarious trauma and secondary traumatic stress. But less is known about the underlying interactional processes by which symptoms of secondary trauma emerge. This research investigates the consequences of taking the role of a person who is victimized and experiencing emotional turmoil by analyzing interviews with workers who serve victims seeking legal services. Role-taking is the process of mentally and affectively placing the self in the position of another, understanding another’s perspective. Workers described listening to victims’ experiences or coworkers’ accounts of difficult cases as being “slimed.” Those engaging in both cognitive and empathic role-taking often struggled to “shake” this content and became susceptible to mirroring the distress of the traumatized clients and coworkers. In response to this exposure, workers often shared troubling intakes or cases with coworkers as a type of interpersonal emotion management. Workers who provided emotional support to colleagues often experienced indirect exposure to trauma on two fronts: in the service of clients who had experienced intimate partner violence and from coworkers. Thus, those best able to role-take with victims or coworkers are most likely to experience greater secondary trauma exposure and its potential toll.
      PubDate: 2023-01-14
      DOI: 10.1007/s11133-022-09528-0
       
  • Privileged but not in Power: How Asian American Tech Workers use Racial
           Strategies to Deflect and Confront Race and Racism

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      Abstract: Research on tech workers has often focused on racial inequalities within the industry but has failed to seriously consider Asian American professionals as racialized subjects. This paper addresses this knowledge gap by centering Asian Americans as workers whose racial identity impacts their career trajectory and professional experiences in the high-tech industry. Based on 57 interviews with Asian American tech professionals, I find that Asian Americans use four main racial strategies to deflect or confront racism in the workplace Three of these racial strategies—racial maneuvering, essentializing, distancing— intentionally remove Asian Americans from the glare of racism. The fourth racial strategy, dissenting, acknowledges racism; workers using this racial strategy are often so frustrated by the white power structure of the high-tech industry that they find no other choice but to leave mainstream organizations. Several of these racial strategies are reinforced by local racial politics and the historical influence of Asian immigrant workers that helped shape both Silicon Valley and Asian American culture in the San Francisco Bay Area.
      PubDate: 2023-01-10
      DOI: 10.1007/s11133-022-09527-1
       
  • Correction to: “I don’t know what’s racist”: White Invisibility
           Among Explicitly Color-conscious Volunteers

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      PubDate: 2022-12-10
      DOI: 10.1007/s11133-022-09526-2
       
  • An Interpretive Approach to Religious Ambiguities around Medical
           Innovations: The Spanish Catholic Church on Organ Donation and
           Transplantation (1954–2014)

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      Abstract: How do institutionalized religions solve moral ambiguities around controversial medical innovations and public health issues' Most religions have moral guidelines about what can and cannot be done to people’s bodies, but these guidelines are not always straightforward and, when faced with certain scientific advances, can come into contradiction with other doctrinal principles. I address this theoretical puzzle through the empirical case of the Spanish Catholic Church’s discourse on organ donation and transplantation during the second half of the twentieth century. Drawing on an interpretive analysis of official statements by the Spanish Catholic Church, and of the media coverage of the religious debate over organ donation and transplantation in Spain from 1954 onwards, I show that the first experiments in organ transplantation faced the Church with a contradiction between its altruistic teachings and its beliefs in the sacredness of human life. Faced with an interpretive dilemma, the Church produced a context-specific version of its official doctrine friendly to organ donation and transplantation. It did so by activating its altruistic elements and suppressing sacralized meanings of the body, thus aligning organ donation with Catholic values of generosity and fraternal love. My study theorizes this moral alignment as a semantic overlap realized through historically situated institutional discourse. Additionally, it incorporates 24 primary and secondary sources on comparative cases to propose three facilitating factors that enabled and encouraged the Spanish Catholic Church to embrace a controversial medical practice.
      PubDate: 2022-12-06
      DOI: 10.1007/s11133-022-09525-3
       
  • Making Babies Pay Rent: Race Suicide, and the Subsidization of Whiteness
           Through Rental Housing

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      Abstract: Research demonstrates that, since the beginning of contemporary US cities, the rental market has been a site of regulation and material disadvantage for residents racialized as non-White. We know much less, however, about the other side of the coin: rental housing and those racialized as White. In this paper, I use the panic over race suicide in the early twentieth century – the perceived decline in the birth rate among Anglo-Saxon women coupled with the putative high rates of fertility of immigrant women – as a case to demonstrate how various social actors used rental housing to regulate the sexualities of (1) immigrant women (who were racialized as non-White); and (2) women racialized as White. A variety of social actors sought to reform the physical conditions and arrangements of tenements that they associated with large immigrant families and discipline residents. At the same time, developers built new buildings that were more amenable to children and landlords offered financial incentives to have babies to women racialized as White. By illuminating these bifurcated racialized practices, this article adds to work demonstrating that rental housing can be adapted and adopted for various political racialized projects. The article also reveals rental regulations and domestic space as a hitherto unknown mechanism for subsidizing Whiteness.
      PubDate: 2022-12-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s11133-022-09524-4
       
  • Collective Memory and Collective Forgetting: A Comparative Analysis of
           Second-Generation Somali and Tamil Immigrants and Their Stance on Homeland
           Politics and Conflict

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      Abstract: The concept of collective memory derived from Maurice Halbwachs’ (1925) seminal work can serve as an excellent analytical tool to understand the integration processes of diaspora groups. In this article, we examine how a diaspora’s social standing vis-à-vis the “host country” combines with relationships to the “home country” and their stance towards their respective “homeland conflict” to develop collective memory. Based on 118 in-depth qualitative interviews with 1.5 and second-generation Somali immigrants, and 50 in-depth interviews with 1.5 and second-generation Tamil immigrants in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), Canada, we examine how contemporaneous features of diasporas and home countries shape, and are shaped by, processes of collective memory formation and collective forgetting. In so doing, we argue that active “remembering” that is predominately present in the Tamil diaspora contributes to the facilitation of community cohesion, whereas the process of collective “forgetting,” which shapes much of the memory work in the Somali diaspora, has contributed to a slower development of community cohesion therein.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11133-022-09508-4
       
  • Pathways to Mobility: Family and Education in the Lives of Latinx Youth

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      Abstract: In the context of US higher education, the collective advancement of low-income youth, especially youth of color, has been limited. Latinxs are faring the worst, with the lowest college graduation rates when compared to Blacks, whites and Asian Americans. Yet, while collective mobility stagnates a growing number of Latinx youth are finding their way into elite colleges and universities. In this paper, we draw from life history interviews and focus groups to explore the mobility pathways of low-income Latinx youth who have achieved admission into a highly selective college. We pay special attention to how Latinx youth are experiencing educational mobility as members of socially marginalized families and communities. Our findings highlight the importance of three overlapping networks - family networks, local school and community networks, and elite recruitment networks- to students’ ability to achieve mobility into education’s upper echelons. We argue that place shapes both network access and the meaning educational mobility has in youths’ lives.
      PubDate: 2022-11-29
      DOI: 10.1007/s11133-022-09523-5
       
  • Making a Market for NGOs: Chinese Neo-Corporatism and Its Divergent
           Patterns of Regulating Migrant Labor

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      Abstract: How do authoritarian regimes remain in power in the context of market transition' By investigating China’s dialectical relationship between marketization on the one hand and the trajectory from corporatism to neo-corporatism on the other, this research suggests that the state may adopt the market logic to reconfigure its relationship with civil associations and marginalized groups. In the case of migrant laborers and grassroots NGOs, the Chinese state has undergone a transition of tactics from political exclusion to market incorporation. Through the institutionalization of the government’s procurement of social services, the state attempts to reconfigure its relationship with the previously excluded social forces to create a state–society framework that can be conceptualized as “neo-corporatism.” However, as ethnographic data show, the practice of neo-corporatism is more heterogeneous than what the state has envisioned. Depending on different state logic and NGO strategies, the state–NGO–migrants relationship can be established through either a top-down or a bottom-up approach. However, neither of these approaches fulfill the corporatist promise of a general scheme that incorporates the state, NGOs, and marginalized populations. The Chinese neo-corporatism is instead caught in a dilemma between disengagement with the migrant community and the precarious relationship with the state.
      PubDate: 2022-11-18
      DOI: 10.1007/s11133-022-09522-6
       
  • “It’s the Seeing and Feeling”: How Embodied and Conceptual
           Knowledges Relate in Pipeline Engineering Work

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      Abstract: This paper examines the relationship between conceptual and embodied reasoning in engineering work. In the last decade across multiple research projects on pipeline engineering, we have observed only a few times when engineers have expressed embodied or sensory aspects of their practice, as if the activity itself is disembodied. Yet, they also often speak about the importance of field experience. In this paper, we look at engineers’ accounts of the value of field experience showing how it works on their sense of what the technology that they are designing looks, feels, and sounds like in practice, and so what this means for construction and operation, and the management of risk. We show how office-based pipeline engineering work is an exercise in embodied imagination that humanizes the socio-technical system as it manifests in the technical artifacts that they work with. Engineers take the role of the other to reason through the practicability of their designs and risk acceptability.
      PubDate: 2022-10-20
      DOI: 10.1007/s11133-022-09520-8
       
  • “I Want to Get on the Next Bus and Leave This City Now”: A Study of
           Violence and Deportation on the Texas-Tamaulipas Border

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      Abstract: The rapid increase in deportations during the last decade has provided multiple avenues to analyze the experiences of deportees immediately after deportation. More than 90% of the deportations to Mexico occur in border cities. Deporting people to the border is problematic since most of these deportees are not familiar with the area and do not have a social support network. On top of that, Mexican border cities are experiencing a growing spiral of violence due to the aftermath effects of the “Mexican drug war.” Within this context, migrant shelters have become one of the few survival resources for deportees. Using an ethnographic approach, in this study, I investigate how violence is not singular but multiple and multilayered by inspecting deportation policies and practices as the junction where migrant shelters interact with cartel forces and state-made violence to support deported migrants. The paper demonstrates how deportation policies produce or perpetuate various forms of violence toward Mexican deportees in already hyper-violent border cities in Tamaulipas. The empirical findings shed light on how violence against migrants is not exclusively about cartel forces. It is a matter of institutional and structural violence coming from US deportation policies and practices that migrant shelters can hardly handle. Therefore, in this paper, I approach violence not exclusively as direct violence that inflicts physical pain but as a complex process that uncovers other more subtle forms of structural and symbolic violence, carrying nonphysical injuries that can be more enduring and traumatic than those caused by physical pain.
      PubDate: 2022-10-11
      DOI: 10.1007/s11133-022-09521-7
       
  • “I don’t know what’s racist”: White Invisibility Among Explicitly
           Color-conscious Volunteers

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      Abstract: Americans are increasingly aware of structural racial disadvantages, and especially aware of Black disadvantage. In turn, this paper asks to what degree do whites interested in undermining systems of oppression and privilege understand their own place within those systems (if at all)' Based on participant observation of four grassroots organizations serving the unhoused and 30 semi-structured interviews with volunteers, I show that even explicitly color-conscious white volunteers, many of whom spoke about structural inequality and systemic racism without prompting, struggled to see how their race was important in their day-to-day service interactions. A general inability to speak about interracial interactions despite many interracial service experiences highlights the pervasive power and privilege embedded in the taken-for-granted nature of whiteness and provides empirical support to the idea that racialized social systems discourage racial self-awareness among whites. These findings have implications for social justice- and/or service-oriented whites who seek to undermine the systems they identify as problematic and emphasize that antiracism is a continuous process.
      PubDate: 2022-08-06
      DOI: 10.1007/s11133-022-09511-9
       
  • Ethnography Upgraded

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      Abstract: The basic practice of ethnography has essentially remained unchanged in hundreds of years. How has online life changed things' I contrast two transformative inventions, the telephone and the internet, with respect to their impact on fieldwork. I argue that our current era has created entirely new constraints and opportunities for ethnographic research.
      PubDate: 2022-08-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s11133-022-09519-1
       
 
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