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  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
Showing 1 - 200 of 382 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Universitaria     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Universitatis Sapientiae, Social Analysis     Open Access  
Advanced Journal of Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Applied Sociology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Advertising & Society Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
AFFRIKA Journal of Politics, Economics and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
African and Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
African Identities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
African Sociological Review : Revue Africaine de Sociologie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ageing & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
AlterNative : An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
American Journal of Cultural Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
American Journal of Human Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American Journal of Sociological Research     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
American Journal of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 323)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 260)
American Sociologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Análise Social     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Anduli : Revista Andaluza de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Annales Universitatis Mariae Curie-Sklodowska, sectio I – Philosophia-Sociologia     Open Access  
Annals in Social Responsibility     Full-text available via subscription  
Annuaire du Collège de France     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annual Review of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 217)
Anthropological Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 53)
Anthropologie et Sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
AntropoWebzin     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Antyajaa : Indian Journal of Women and Social Change     Hybrid Journal  
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Arabian Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Argumentos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arte, Individuo y Sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Artes Humanae     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arys: Antigüedad, Religiones y Sociedades     Open Access  
Asian Journal for Poverty Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ateliers d'anthropologie     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Atenea (Concepción)     Open Access  
Aztlan : A Journal of Chicano Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Barn : Forskning om barn og barndom i Norden     Open Access  
Behavior Analysis in Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Behavioural Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Berliner Journal für Soziologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
BOGA : Basque Studies Consortium Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Bronte Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Caderno CRH     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos CERU     Open Access  
Cahiers de l'Urmis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cahiers Jean Moulin     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Cahiers Société     Open Access  
Canadian Ethnic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Graduate Journal of Sociology and Criminology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Canadian Journal of Sociology / Cahiers canadiens de sociologie     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Canadian Journal of Women and the Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Canadian Review of Sociology / Revue Canadienne De Sociologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Canadian Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Caribbean Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Catalyst : A Social Justice Forum     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Celebrity Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
CERN IdeaSquare Journal of Experimental Innovation     Open Access  
Chinese Journal of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Chinese Sociological Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Chinese Sociology & Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Chophayom Journal     Open Access  
Chrétiens et sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciência & Tecnologia Social     Open Access  
Ciência & Trópico     Open Access  
Ciencia e Cultura     Open Access  
Ciencia, Cultura y Sociedad     Open Access  
Cities in the 21st Century     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Citizenship Teaching & Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
City & Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
City, Culture and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
City: analysis of urban trends, culture, theory, policy, action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Ciudad Paz-ando     Open Access  
Clio. Femmes, Genre, Histoire - Articles     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clivatge. Estudis i testimonis sobre el conflicte i el canvi socials     Open Access  
Columbia Journal of Law and Social Problems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Communication Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Community Empowerment     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Comparative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Comparative Studies in Society and History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 55)
Configurações     Open Access  
Conflict and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Conflicto Social     Open Access  
Confluences Méditerranée     Full-text available via subscription  
Contemporary Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Contemporary Pacific     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Contemporary Sociology : A Journal of Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Contemporary Voice of Dalit     Full-text available via subscription  
COnTEXTES     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Contexts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Contributions to Indian Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Controversias y Concurrencias Latinoamericanas     Open Access  
Cosmopolitan Civil Societies : An Interdisciplinary Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Crime, Histoire & Sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Criminologie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Critical Discourse Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Critical Horizons     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Critical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Critical Studies on Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Cross-cultural Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Cuadernos de Extensión Universitaria de la UNLPam     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Cuadernos del CENDES     Open Access  
Cuban Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Cultura y Representaciones Sociales     Open Access  
Culturales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Culture - Society - Education     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Cultures & conflits     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Current Research in Ecological and Social Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Current Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Dalogue and Universalism     Full-text available via subscription  
Debates en Sociología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Design and Culture : The Journal of the Design Studies Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Dhaulagiri Journal of Sociology and Anthropology     Open Access  
Diferencia(s)     Open Access  
Dilemas : Revista de Estudos de Conflito e Controle Social     Open Access  
disClosure : A Journal of Social Theory     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Distinktion : Scandinavian Journal of Social Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Diversité urbaine     Full-text available via subscription  
East Central Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Economy and Sociology / Economie şi Sociologie     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ecopolítica     Open Access  
Educação, Escola e Sociedade     Open Access  
Éducation et socialisation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Em Debate     Open Access  
Emotion Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Emotions and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Enfances, Familles, Générations     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Entramados : educación y sociedad     Open Access  
Entramados y Perspectivas     Open Access  
Environmental Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Environnement Urbain / Urban Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Espacio Abierto     Open Access  
Espiral     Open Access  
Espirales     Open Access  
Estudios Geográficos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Estudios sobre las Culturas Contemporáneas     Open Access  
Estudios Sociologicos     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Estudos de Sociologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ethnicities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Ethnologia Actualis     Open Access  
Ethnologia Fennica     Open Access  
Ethnologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Études françaises     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
European Journal for Sport and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Cultural and Political Sociology     Hybrid Journal  
European Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
European Review of Applied Sociology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Societies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
European Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Eutopía - Revista de Desarrollo Económico Territorial     Open Access  
Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Facta Universitatis, Series : Philosophy, Sociology, Psychology and History     Open Access  
Families, Relationships and Societies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Family & Community History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Family Relations     Partially Free   (Followers: 11)
Finance and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Fokus pa familien     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Forum Sociológico     Open Access  
Frontiers in Human Dynamics     Open Access  
Frontiers in Sociology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Games and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Gender and Behaviour     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Genre & histoire     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Genre, sexualité & société     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Glottopol : Revue de Sociolinguistique en Ligne     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Good Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Grounded Theory Review : an International Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Group Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Hábitat y Sociedad     Open Access  
Health Sociology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Health, Culture and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Heritage & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Hispania     Partially Free   (Followers: 2)
Homo Ludens     Open Access  
Hospitality & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Housing and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Human Behavior, Development and Society     Open Access  
Human Figurations : Long-term Perspectives on the Human Condition     Open Access  
Humanidades em diálogo     Open Access  
Humanity & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
identidade!     Open Access  
Inclusión y Desarrollo     Open Access  
Indes : Zeitschrift für Politik und Gesellschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Sociology and Education Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Information, Communication & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Insights into Regional Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Interdisciplinary Journal of Partnership Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Interfaces Brasil/Canadá     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Area Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Applied Sociology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Community Well-Being     Hybrid Journal  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Qualitative Sociology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.984
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 46  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-7837 - ISSN (Online) 0162-0436
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Ethnography Upgraded

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      Abstract: Abstract The basic practice of ethnography has essentially remained unchanged in hundreds of years. How has online life changed things' I contrast two transformative inventions, the telephone and the internet, with respect to their impact on fieldwork. I argue that our current era has created entirely new constraints and opportunities for ethnographic research.
      PubDate: 2022-08-02
       
  • How Social Media Use Mitigates Urban Violence: Communication Visibility
           and Third-Party Intervention Processes in Digital Urban Contexts

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      Abstract: Abstract There is growing alarm among the media and public that digital social media amplify the frequency and severity of urban violence. Contrary to popular imagination, however, emerging research suggests that social media may just as readily offer novel tools for informal social control and de-escalation. Toward building an empirically grounded theory of urban violence in the digital age, we examine a key mechanism by which social media afford communities newfound capacities to mitigate conflicts. Drawing on digital, urban, ethnographic fieldwork in Harlem and Chicago’s South Side, we argue that social media afford a historic level of what new media scholars refer to as “communication visibility.” Specifically, social media allow onlookers to observe others’ online behavior and, in turn, exert influence over subsequent relationships, exchanges, and actions in ways that can prevent and reduce violence. First, we examine how young women protectors and a street pastor exert direct third-party influence by monitoring and manipulating social media communication to extricate potential combatants from risky situations. Second, we examine indirect third-party influence whereby potential combatants, in anticipation of onlookers’ intervention, proactively alter their own behavior in ways that encourage peaceful conflict resolution. These findings not only improve contemporary theories of violence, but also provide actionable lessons for enhancing the life-saving work of violence intervention and street outreach programs.
      PubDate: 2022-08-02
       
  • Convivial Quarantines: Cultivating Co-presence at a Distance

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      Abstract: Abstract Sociology’s focus on sociality and co-presence has long oriented studies of commensality—the social dimension of eating together. This literature commonly prioritizes face-to-face interactions and takes physical proximity for granted. The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in March 2020 largely halted in-person gatherings and altered everyday foodways. Consequently, many people turned to digital commensality, cooking and eating together through video-call technology such as Zoom and FaceTime. We explore the implications of these new foodways and ask: has digital commensality helped cultivate co-presence amidst pandemic-induced physical separation' If so, how' To address these questions, we analyze two forms of qualitative data collected by the first author: interviews with individuals who cooked and ate together at a distance since March 2020 and digital ethnography during different groups’ online food events (e.g., happy hours, dinners, holiday gatherings, and birthday celebrations). Digital commensality helps foster a sense of co-presence and social connectedness at a distance. Specifically, participants use three temporally oriented strategies to create or maintain co-presence: they draw on pre-pandemic pasts and reinvent culinary traditions to meet new circumstances; they creatively adapt novel digital foodways through online dining; and they actively imagine post-pandemic futures where physically proximate commensality is again possible.
      PubDate: 2022-07-28
       
  • Do I Know You' Managing Offline Interaction in Acquainted Stranger
           Relationships

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      Abstract: Abstract Sociology has a long history of analyzing relationships between strangers in everyday life. The ubiquity of social media and mobile technologies, however, necessitates refined theories of how people relate to and interact with strangers in a social world where online and offline contexts are intertwined. This study examines public encounters between acquainted strangers, a type of connection fostered through social media wherein people are both digital acquaintances and offline strangers. Drawing on ethnographic data of queer men who use mobile dating and hookup apps, I find that queer men experience these encounters as routine yet problematic, which past theories of stranger relationships cannot fully explain. I argue that offline interactions with acquainted strangers amplify interactional uncertainties around identification (e.g. “I know them, but do they know me'”) and recognition (e.g. “What are the moral demands of our relationship'”). Managing these uncertainties is socially significant as the decision to regard or ignore an acquainted stranger marks not only interpersonal acceptance/rejection but also broader forms of belonging and exclusion. These findings underscore how mobile technologies are fundamentally transforming what it means to be a “stranger.”
      PubDate: 2022-07-28
       
  • Diagnosis as Subculture: Subversions of Health and Medical Knowledges in
           the Orthorexia Recovery Community on Instagram

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      Abstract: Abstract Diagnoses are powerful tools that fulfill various practical and symbolic functions. In this paper, I examine how a contested diagnosis called orthorexia nervosa has been taken up by users on Instagram, where tens of thousands of posts engage with the topic, many of them from individuals who identify with the condition. I put scholarship on medicalization and diagnosis in conversation with literature on subcultures to foreground the subversive work that is enabled through this diagnosis. Drawing on more than 350 hours of online ethnographic fieldwork and 34 in-depth interviews, I examine how participants construct a shared identity, draw on common language and norms, and undertake collective practices, as they negotiate dominant understandings of health. I show how they draw on the legitimacy endowed by the diagnostic label to validate and make sense of experiences of suffering but also to counter dominant health-seeking discourses, practices, and aesthetics in an online space where these are highly visible and valued. I also discuss some ways Instagram as a digital platform shapes its uptake by this community in meaningful ways. On the one hand, participants draw heavily on the language and framing of medicine to make sense of their fraught experiences with food and their bodies, effectively advocating for the medicalization of their own suffering while also creating a sense of community and shared identity. However, on the other hand, they actively use the diagnosis and the recovery process enabled through it to effectively resignify dominant beliefs, values, and practices that are experienced as injurious, including some that are particularly prevalent on Instagram.
      PubDate: 2022-07-27
       
  • Digital Ethnography for Sociology: Craft, Rigor, and Creativity

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      Abstract: Abstract This special issue gathers empirical papers that develop and employ digital ethnographic methods to answer core sociological questions related to community, culture, urban life, violence, activism, professional identity, health, and sociality. Each paper, in its own right, offers key sociological insights, and as a collection, this special issue demonstrates the need to bring ethnographic methods to digital communities, interactions, practices, and tools. Both as a topic and a methodological approach, “the digital” points us to the need to update, rethink, and grow qualitative sociology. The exemplary papers comprising this special issue exhibit this curiosity and expansiveness, with lessons and implications for an interdisciplinary set of fields and research problems.
      PubDate: 2022-07-16
       
  • Collective Memory and Collective Forgetting: A Comparative Analysis of
           Second-Generation Somali and Tamil Immigrants and Their Stance on Homeland
           Politics and Conflict

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      Abstract: Abstract The concept of collective memory derived from Maurice Halbwachs’ (1925) seminal work can serve as an excellent analytical tool to understand the integration processes of diaspora groups. In this article, we examine how a diaspora’s social standing vis-à-vis the “host country” combines with relationships to the “home country” and their stance towards their respective “homeland conflict” to develop collective memory. Based on 118 in-depth qualitative interviews with 1.5 and second-generation Somali immigrants, and 50 in-depth interviews with 1.5 and second-generation Tamil immigrants in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), Canada, we examine how contemporaneous features of diasporas and home countries shape, and are shaped by, processes of collective memory formation and collective forgetting. In so doing, we argue that active “remembering” that is predominately present in the Tamil diaspora contributes to the facilitation of community cohesion, whereas the process of collective “forgetting,” which shapes much of the memory work in the Somali diaspora, has contributed to a slower development of community cohesion therein.
      PubDate: 2022-05-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s11133-022-09508-4
       
  • “Hurry up and wait”: Stigma, Poverty, and Contractual
           Citizenship

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      Abstract: Abstract The emergence of welfare contractualism in the United States in the 1970s marked a shift from viewing welfare as an entitlement to viewing welfare as a right to be earned through work. Combined with the continual degradation of labor markets since the 1970s, the rise of neoliberal ideology emphasizing individualism, and the passage of the 1996 Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act, the devolved welfare system – most often managed by a myriad of social service nonprofits – has exacerbated the difficulties of the poor. Scholars have noted, for instance, the loss of civil rights and the proliferation of administrative burdens – including incessant waiting – with which poor people seeking aid are increasingly faced. But “contractual citizenship,” I argue, has not just remade relations between the poor and the state. Rather, as a diffuse cultural ethos, contractual citizenship has also remade relations between and amongst the poor themselves, exacerbating stigmatization, distancing, and denigration. Drawing upon an ethnography of a soup kitchen based in Syracuse, New York, I argue that as a consequence of contractual citizenship, prospective recipients of aid and the poor more broadly adapt their behavior to appear as deserving, worthy citizens and, simultaneously, externally defame their peers for their lesser behaviors. Those who take maximum advantage of free resources – such as attending multiple emergency food programs and taking more than one plate of food – are often deemed by other poor recipients of aid as greedy, ungrateful, and selfish. Thus, the repetitious and time-consuming nature of interacting with the state for basic resources – such as housing or welfare – is further complicated by this intraclass stigma. These findings not only shed light on the challenges of building solidarity amongst the poor but show how political and economic shifts influence how poor people interact with each other and the state.
      PubDate: 2022-04-26
      DOI: 10.1007/s11133-022-09507-5
       
  • Focused, Exploratory, or Vigilant: Reproduction, Mobility, and the
           Self-Narratives of Second-Generation Immigrant Youth

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      Abstract: Abstract The transition from late adolescence to early adulthood represents a key moment in trajectories of social reproduction and mobility. A central mechanism influencing these trajectories is the cultivation of specific versions of selfhood. Research shows that socialization within various class locations shapes individuals’ sense of self in ways that impact how they imagine the future and the actions they take in pursuit of goals. Thus far, however, existing literature has neglected to consider the experiences of youth from immigrant families, a population that encounters unique challenges in the transition to adulthood. This paper relies on 40 in-depth interviews to explore the self-narratives of second-generation immigrant (SGI) youth. We seek to understand how these narratives relate to their future orientations and approaches to planning. Additionally, given the findings of prior research, we consider variation in SGI youths’ self-narratives by social class background. Respondents from middle-class families displayed a durable sense of agency, crafting either a focused self with a clear trajectory toward a white-collar occupation or an exploratory self, open to unbounded personal discovery. By contrast, most respondents from working-class backgrounds exhibited a more tentative sense of agency and narrated a vigilant self that was proactive but cautious in the face of uncertainty. Divergence in participants’ self-narratives related to different strategies for planning for the future. Our findings extend the literature on the construction of agentic selfhood for college-going youth in the transition to adulthood.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11133-021-09489-w
       
  • ‘It Isn't Charity because We've Paid into it’: Social Citizenship and
           the Moral Economy of Welfare Recipients in the Wake of 2012 UK Welfare
           Reform Act

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      Abstract: Abstract Drawing on interviews with welfare claimants living in Essex, UK, this article examines the material and symbolic effects of the UK government’s 2012 Welfare Reform Act, and it highlights the participants’ interpretations of and responses to that. In reaction to their sense of material and symbolic exclusion, participants made moral claims for their inclusion through a notion of social citizenship based on collective reciprocity and care. They claimed to have paid-in to the national purse in various material and moral ways until circumstances outside of their control meant they could no longer do so. They thus asserted a moral-economic right to social inclusion and an ensuing right to receive adequate, non-stigmatised, and non-punitive welfare. These moral-economic claims differ from other, more public, counter-narratives to welfare reform and government austerity, and they assert a clear but subtle opposition to the market-bound logic of the reform.
      PubDate: 2022-02-10
      DOI: 10.1007/s11133-021-09505-z
       
  • How Place Matters for Migrants’ Socio-Legal Experiences: Local Reasoning
           about the Law and the Importance of Becoming a “Moral Insider”

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      Abstract: Abstract In this article, we argue that migrants’ socio-legal experiences in the places where they settle are formed in interaction with how local residents morally reason about the law. Specifically, based on nine months of fieldwork in an impoverished Italian town, we argue that aligning with how local residents approach the law, including when they justify disobeying it, matters a great deal for migrants’ lives. Focusing on the workings of a reception center for asylum seekers, we first show how local residents regularly support various violations of the law by referring to alternative—and in their view higher—principles of justice. Migrants find themselves caught up in these local moral tensions, at times even becoming involved in illegal practices unbeknownst to them. We then show how migrants’ reactions to the marginality of the law in the town affect their access to local support. Those who align with local nonlegal moral norms obtain access to opportunities, while those who in similar situations invoke the primacy of legality tend to experience ostracization. By investigating the dynamic role of local moralities in situated interaction, this article contributes to both the sociology of morality and the sociology of migration. It shows how moral decision-making processes can and should be studied in their collective dimension, beyond individual-level experiments. Further, with its focus on processes of moral (mis)alignment, it allows us to grasp how place matters for migrants’ lives beyond overly general notions of ‘hostile’ versus ‘hospitable’ localities.
      PubDate: 2022-01-28
      DOI: 10.1007/s11133-021-09503-1
       
  • Sticking to it or Opting for Alternatives: Managing Contested Work
           Identities in Nonstandard Work

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      Abstract: Abstract Research shows that people who face stigmatized work identities attempt to reconfigure their employment more positively, such as by concealing their involvement with their jobs or reframing the value of it. Yet, in an era of rising nonstandard work, how might managing work identities also involve managing multiple jobs across fluid employment contexts' We draw insights from two cases of nonstandard workers facing differing degrees of contested work identity—frontline restaurant workers and sex workers. We find that these workers use similar strategies to manage their employment that involve identity work and job searching, yet their decision to stick to their line of work or opt for alternatives stems in part from the symbolic characteristics of their respective jobs. We conclude by laying out a broader framework for how workers manage contested work identities in an era of nonstandard employment.
      PubDate: 2022-01-19
      DOI: 10.1007/s11133-021-09506-y
       
  • When Global Scripts Do Not Resonate: International Minority Rights and
           Local Repertoires of Diversity in Southern Turkey

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      Abstract: Abstract Under what conditions do global scripts resonate among ordinary people' Neo-institutional world polity theory has tended to sideline this question by privileging macro-comparative explanations of states’ adoption and social movement activists’ framing of global scripts. Adopting a negative case approach, we draw on concepts from cultural sociology to explain why global scripts fail to resonate among ethno-religious minorities in Antakya, Turkey. Antakya has been exposed intensely to global minority rights and multiculturalism discourses; it has been targeted by various ethnic movement activists, and its diverse population has long experienced stigma and discrimination stemming from Turkey’s model of nationhood. Yet, ordinary people there have seldom utilized global diversity scripts in their everyday struggles for recognition. Drawing on longitudinal qualitative fieldwork between 2004 and 2015, we find that global scripts fail to match people’s cultural schemas of perceiving and reproducing boundaries—their local repertoires of diversity—due to a deep-seated ambivalence toward the category of “minority.” This lack of resonance potentially weakens popular support for substantial policy reforms advancing minority rights and is one among several factors explaining why Turkey’s turn from an exclusionary to an inclusionary model of nationhood has remained largely ceremonial.
      PubDate: 2021-12-27
      DOI: 10.1007/s11133-021-09504-0
       
  • Symposium: What is Qualitative about Qualitative Research'

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      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11133-021-09502-2
       
  • Power, Positionality, and the Ethic of Care in Qualitative Research

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      Abstract: Abstract Building on the definition offered by Aspers and Corte, I argue that qualitative research is not qualitative simply because it encodes for the ability “to get closer” to the phenomenon being studied, so much as it is anchored by a methodological obligation to critically examine how and why that closeness matters. Qualitative research considers the positionality of both the researcher and the researched as core aspects of inquiry to understand how knowledge and experience are situated, co-constructed, and historically and socially located. This methodological expectation for reflexivity does not just allow for richer data, but also requires researchers to consider power within and surrounding the research process and to employ an ethic of care for their subjects and for the overall work of qualitative research.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11133-021-09500-4
       
  • The Microsociology of Aesthetic Evaluation: Selecting Runway Fashion
           Models

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      Abstract: Abstract Fashion model selection is a targeted case of aesthetic evaluation. For almost 100 years—beginning with data which Herbert Blumer collected in the 1930s—scholars have tried to understand how models are selected. Most have taken a critical and structural approach. I rely instead on a microsociology which centers endogenous decision processes. It highlights the agency and constraints of situational perception and situational stratification, yielding a novel analysis of the casting encounter. Data comes from an ethnography of a fashion week in a semi-peripheral city. It includes backstage evaluations gathered during a stint as a casting agent. I find that agents surprisingly ignore faces, instead focusing on the embodied cues of height/heels, the walk, and body size. Sustained microsociological analysis opens a layered mode of perception highlighting the dynamics of time, attention, emotion, and situations.
      PubDate: 2021-11-20
      DOI: 10.1007/s11133-021-09496-x
       
  • Whose Advice is Credible' Claiming Lay Expertise in a Covid-19 Online
           Community

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      Abstract: Abstract During the initial months of the Covid-19 pandemic, credentialed experts—scientists, doctors, public health experts, and policymakers—as well as members of the public and patients faced radical uncertainty. Knowledge about how Covid-19 was spread, how best to diagnose the disease, and how to treat infected patients was scant and contested. Despite this radical uncertainty, however, certain users of Covid-19 Together, a large online community for those who have contracted Covid-19, were able to dispense advice to one another that was seen as credible and trustworthy. Relying on Goffman’s dramaturgical theory of social interaction, we highlight the performative dimension of claims to lay expertise to show how credibility is accrued under conditions of radical uncertainty. Drawing on four months of data from the forum, we show how credible performances of lay expertise necessitated the entangling of expert discourse with illness experience, creating a hybrid interlanguage. A credible performance of lay expertise in this setting was characterized by users' ability to switch freely between personal and scientific registers, finding and creating resonances between the two. To become a credible lay expert on this online community, users had to learn to ask questions and demonstrate a willingness to engage with biomedical knowledge while carefully generalizing their personal experience.
      PubDate: 2021-11-03
      DOI: 10.1007/s11133-021-09492-1
       
  • Redemption Performance in Exoneration and Parole: Two Pathways Home

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      Abstract: Abstract This article, drawing from interviews, provides an examination of life after prison for two distinct groups returning from prison: people on parole and people exonerated of crimes. There is extensive research concerning people’s experiences after prison; however, the post-prison trajectories of those who have been subsequently exonerated after being falsely convicted of crimes is a far less studied topic. Exonerees benefit after prison from social support arising from various sources such as their families and non-profit organizations. Social networks allow exonerees to be successful in the job market, as well as assist them financially. I find that with the help of dense social networks exonerees must perform their redemption in order to have their basic needs met. Redemption performances are labor that aim to prove that previously incarcerated individuals are worthy of assistance from society. The various negative social and economic consequences of prison are more notable for individuals on parole who are less likely than exonerees to be equipped with networks to draw on for their redemption performances. However, despite exonerees having more support during their return home, they, like individuals on parole, were also left feeling isolated, lost, and de-humanized. I show how resources and the brokering of stigma of incarceration leads to diverging outcomes for people returning from prison, but that trauma still remains.
      PubDate: 2021-09-15
      DOI: 10.1007/s11133-021-09495-y
       
  • “I’m trying to create, not destroy”: Gendered Moralities and the
           Fate of IVF Embryos in Evangelical Women’s Narratives

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      Abstract: Abstract Although conservative evangelical Protestants advocate for protecting the embryo in their opposition to abortion and embryonic stem-cell research, they generally support the use of in vitro fertilization (IVF), a procedure that routinely results in embryo loss. This study draws on 42 interviews with Protestant women experiencing infertility—the majority of whom are evangelicals who ascribe personhood to embryos—to examine how these women navigate issues of fertility, religion, and reproductive technologies. In their pursuit of parenthood, these women drew on cultural ideals of femininity, such as nurturance and protection, in forming attachments to embryos. These ideals of femininity were also invoked in the women's moral reasoning surrounding embryo loss, where women emphasized their procreative intention as the creation, not the destruction, of embryos. In doing so, the women described themselves as embracing motherhood. Embryo loss was often understood as a means to create the family formations that God intended. I develop the concept of gendered moralities to show how evangelical women mobilize and enact culturally valued forms of femininity in their reasoning about embryo loss. These findings shed light on larger debates about when and why embryo loss becomes a moral issue. I argue that because embryo loss in the fertility clinic occurs in a space where women are striving to become mothers, the clinic and its largely white, middle-class clientele are shielded from moral condemnation that occurs in other settings. This suggests that the fertility clinic, along with its patients and practitioners, occupies a privileged space within the moral hierarchies of reproduction.
      PubDate: 2021-09-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s11133-021-09493-0
       
  • How Do the Urban Poor Survive' A Comparative Ethnography of
           Subsistence Strategies in Argentina, Ecuador, and Mexico

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      Abstract: Abstract Drawing on ethnographic data collected in three informal communities, one in Argentina, one in México, and one in Ecuador, we address the long-standing question posed by Larissa Lomnitz’s and Carol Stack’s now-classic studies of how impoverished people not only survive but what strategies they adopt in an attempt to build a dignified life. By focusing on the diversity of strategies by which the urban poor solve the everyday problems of individual and collective reproduction, we move beyond the macro-level analysis of structural constraint and material deprivation. Our findings show a remarkable continuity in the difficulties residents of these informal communities confronted and the problem-solving strategies they resorted to. We found that networks of kin and friends continue to play a crucial role in how poor people not only survive but attempt to get ahead. Additionally, we highlight the role of patronage networks and collective action as central to strategies by which the urban poor cope with scarcity and improve their life chances, while also paying close attention to ways in which they deal with pressing issues of insecurity and violence. The paper shows that poor people’s survival strategies are deeply imbricated in routine political processes.
      PubDate: 2021-09-11
      DOI: 10.1007/s11133-021-09494-z
       
 
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