Subjects -> ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (Total: 913 journals)
    - ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (810 journals)
    - POLLUTION (31 journals)
    - TOXICOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY (54 journals)
    - WASTE MANAGEMENT (18 journals)

TOXICOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY (54 journals)

Showing 1 - 47 of 47 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Universitatis Sapientiae, Agriculture and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Aerosol Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
American Journal of Industrial Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
American Journal of Pharmacology and Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Annals of Environmental Science and Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Archives of Ecotoxicology     Open Access  
Computational Toxicology     Hybrid Journal  
Current Opinion in Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Current Protocols in Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Research in Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Cutaneous and Ocular Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Environmental Pollutants and Bioavailability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Environmental Science : Processes & Impacts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Ethiopian Journal of Health Development     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Exposure and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Frontiers in Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Green Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Pharmacology and Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Analytical Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Clinical Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Ecophysiology and Occupational Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Environmental & Analytical Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Environmental Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part C : Toxicology and Carcinogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Hazardous Materials Advances     Open Access  
Journal of Hazardous, Toxic, and Radioactive Waste     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Immunotoxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Part A: Current Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Part B: Critical Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Toxins     Open Access  
Journal of Translational Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription  
Research & Reviews : A Journal of Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Revista de Toxicologia     Open Access  
Toxicologic Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Toxicological Research     Hybrid Journal  
Toxicologie Analytique et Clinique     Full-text available via subscription  
Toxicology and Environmental Health Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Toxicology Communications     Open Access  
Toxicology International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Toxicology Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Toxicology Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 8)
Toxicology Research and Application     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Toxics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Toxins     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Analytical Toxicology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.065
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 12  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0146-4760 - ISSN (Online) 1945-2403
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [425 journals]
  • Correction to: Evaluation of biochemical assays and optimization of
           LC–MS-MS analysis for the detection of synthetic urine

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: e1 - e1
      PubDate: Fri, 29 Dec 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/jat/bkad091
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Correction to: Urine and hair drug test results associated with daily
           consumption of codeine-predominant poppy seed food products

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: e2 - e2
      PubDate: Wed, 27 Dec 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/jat/bkad090
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Bibliometric evaluation of Journal of Analytical Toxicology as a
           scholarly publication according to the Web-of-Science citation database

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      Pages: 1 - 8
      Abstract: AbstractSoon approaching its 50th anniversary, Journal of Analytical Toxicology (JAT) is an international scholarly publication specializing in analytical and forensic aspects of toxicology. Science Citation Index (SCI) and Journal Citation Reports (JCR), both of which are part of the Web-of-Science (WOS) database, were used to make a bibliometric evaluation of JAT articles. Between 1977 (volume 1) and 2023 (volume 47), a total of  n = 4,785 items were published in JAT; the top-ten most highly cited articles and the most prolific authors were identified. Changes in the journal impact factor (JIF) were studied between 1997 and 2022, and this metric varied from a low of 1.24 (2006) to a high of 3.36 (2020).The most recent JIF (2022) dropped to 2.5 and the corresponding 5 year JIF was 2.6. JAT’s most highly cited article (590 cites) was a working group (SWGTOX) report dealing with standard practices for the validation of analytical methods in forensic toxicology laboratories. JAT published 62 articles each of which were cited over 100 times and the H-index for JAT was 89. The most prolific author of JAT articles was credited with 119 items, the first in 1980 (volume 4) and the latest in 2023 (volume 47). JAT articles were cited 4,537 times in 2022 by all journals in the JCR database, although 520 of these were self-citations (11.5%). Bibliometric methods are increasingly used to evaluate the published work of individual scientists, university departments, entire universities and whole countries. Highly cited articles are considered more influential and authoritative compared with papers that are seldom or never cited.
      PubDate: Fri, 27 Oct 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/jat/bkad080
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Preanalytical factors influencing the results of ethanol analysis
           in postmortem specimens

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      Pages: 9 - 26
      Abstract: AbstractExcessive drinking and drunkenness are underlying factors in many fatal accidents, which make the quantitative determination of ethanol in postmortem (PM) specimens an essential part of all unnatural death investigations. The same analytical methods are used to determine ethanol in blood taken from living and deceased persons although the interpretation of the results is more complicated in medical examiner cases owing to various preanalytical factors. The biggest problem is that under anaerobic conditions ethanol can be produced naturally in decomposed bodies by microbial activity and fermentation of blood glucose. Ways are needed to differentiate antemortem ingestion of ethanol from PM synthesis. One approach involves the determination of ethanol in alternative specimens, such as bile, cerebrospinal fluid, vitreous humor and/or urine, and comparison of results with blood alcohol concentration (BAC). Another approach involves the analysis of various alcohol biomarkers, such as ethyl glucuronide, ethyl sulfate and/or phosphatidylethanol or the urinary metabolites of serotonin 5-hydroxytryptophol/5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HTOL/5-HIAA). If ethanol had been produced in the body by microbial activity, the blood samples should also contain other low-molecular volatiles, such as acetaldehyde, n-propanol and/or n-butanol. The inclusion of 1–2% w/v sodium or potassium fluoride, as an enzyme inhibitor, in all PM specimens is essential to diminish the risk of ethanol being generated after sampling, such as during shipment and storage prior to analysis. Furthermore, much might be gained if the analytical cut-off for reporting positive BAC was raised from 0.01 to 0.02 g% when PM blood is analyzed. During putrefaction low BACs are more often produced after death than high BACs. Therefore, when the cadaver is obviously decomposed, a pragmatic approach would be to subtract 0.05 g% from the mean analytical result. Any remaining BAC is expected to give a more reliable indication of whether alcohol had been consumed before death.
      PubDate: Sat, 07 Oct 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/jat/bkad078
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Urine and hair drug test results associated with daily consumption
           of codeine-predominant poppy seed food products

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      Pages: 27 - 36
      Abstract: AbstractThis study examined the urine and hair opiate profiles associated with the daily consumption of presumptive codeine-predominant poppy seed food products. Ten participants consumed one of five food products at breakfast for 10 consecutive days. Baseline urine and hair samples were collected on Day 1. The urine samples were collected 4, 8 and 12 h following poppy seed consumption on Days 1 and 10, and the first morning void urine samples were collected on Days 2–10. A second hair specimen was collected on Day 20 ± 2. Urine drug test results: Three of the food products were associated with opiate-negative urine drug test results at all time points at a 300 ng/mL cut-off. Two of the food products were associated with opiate-positive drug test results at all non-baseline time points at a 300 ng/mL cut-off. Of these, all samples (n = 60) were codeine-positive, and 27 (45%) were morphine-positive. Codeine concentrations exceeded morphine concentrations in every sample and always by multiples. Thirty-nine of the 60 samples (65%) were codeine-positive at a 2,000 ng/mL cut-off, while none of these samples were morphine-positive at this cut-off. None of the 60 samples reached an opiate threshold of 15,000 ng/mL, although one participant produced a maximum codeine concentration of 13,161 ng/mL (13,854 ng/mg creatinine). There was no clear trend toward increasing urinary opiate concentrations over the course of the study. Hair drug test results: The hair samples of two participants produced quantifiable codeine (41 pg/mg and 51 pg/mg), but no sample reached a common reporting threshold of 200 pg/mg for codeine or morphine.
      PubDate: Tue, 07 Nov 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/jat/bkad083
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Evaluation of biochemical assays and optimization of LC–MS-MS
           analysis for the detection of synthetic urine

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      Pages: 37 - 43
      Abstract: AbstractEnsuring specimen validity is an essential aspect of toxicological laboratories. In recent years, substituting authentic urine specimens for synthetic urine (SU) has become increasingly popular. Such SU products consist of components expected in normal urine and show physiological values for specific gravity and pH. Thus, standard specimen validity testing may fail in revealing adulteration by SU. The present study investigated three methods to distinguish authentic and SU specimens: enzymatic detection of uric acid, the commercially available Axiom Test True SU and liquid chromatography coupled with (tandem) mass spectrometry (LC–MS-MS) analysis of 10 endogenous biomolecules. Additionally, novel direct markers of SU were investigated. Two specimen sets were analyzed by each method. Specimen set A consisted of eight SU products purchased from the Austrian/German market and 43 urine specimens from volunteers of known authenticity, which underwent double-blind analysis. Specimen set B consisted of 137 real urine specimens submitted for drug testing, which were selected due to initial suspicious test results in adulteration testing and reanalyzed by all three methods. Uric acid and LC–MS-MS-based endogenous biomolecule testing showed 100% sensitivity and specificity for set A. The commercial test had 87.5% sensitivity and 97.7% specificity for set A. For set B, uric acid and LC–MS-MS analysis showed almost similar results, even if uric acid was missing one presumptive authentic urine specimen according to LC–MS-MS findings. Nearly half of the SU assignments for the commercial test were presumptive false positives. New SU markers were observed for SU products from the Austrian/German market. One specimen in set B had both an endogenous biomolecule pattern and SU markers suggesting urine dilution with SU. In conclusion, several analytes or methods should be used rather than one, and the most reliable results are achieved if both indirect and direct markers of urine substitution are analyzed.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/jat/bkad082
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Simple and rapid detection of three amatoxins and three phallotoxins
           in human body fluids by UPLC–MS-MS and its application in 15
           poisoning cases

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      Pages: 44 - 53
      Abstract: AbstractAmatoxins and phallotoxins are toxic cyclopeptides found in the genus Amanita and are among the predominant causes of foodborne sickness and poisoning-related fatalities in China. This study introduces and validates a simple, rapid and cost-effective ultra-performance liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous determination and quantification of α-amanitin, β-amanitin, γ-amanitin, phallisacin, phallacidin and phalloidin in human blood and urine. Quick therapeutic decision-making is supported by a 9 min chromatographic separation performed on a Waters Acquity UPLC HSS T3 column (100 mm × 2.1 mm, 1.8 µm) using a gradient of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-grade water and methanol:0.005% formic acid. The analyte limit of quantification was 1–3 ng/mL in blood and 0.5–2 ng/mL in urine. Calibrations curves, prepared by spiking drug-free blood and urine, demonstrated acceptable linearity with mean correlation coefficients (r) greater than 0.99 for all phallotoxins and amatoxins. Acceptable intraday and interday precision (relative standard deviation <15%) and accuracy (bias, −4.8% to 13.0% for blood and—9.0% to 14.7% for urine) were achieved. The validated method was successfully applied to analyze 9 blood samples and 2 urine samples testing positive for amatoxins and/or phallotoxins. Amatoxins and/or phallotoxins were identified in each whole blood sample at a range of 1.12–5.63 ng/mL and in two urine samples from 1.01–9.27 ng/mL. The method has the benefits of simple sample preparation (protein precipitation) and wide analyte coverage, making it suitable for emergency quantitative surveillance toxicological analysis in clinics and forensic poisoning practice.
      PubDate: Tue, 31 Oct 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/jat/bkad081
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Immunoassay testing for barbiturates using alternative matrices
           in postmortem tissues from cats and dogs

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      Pages: 54 - 61
      Abstract: AbstractThe barbiturate drug pentobarbital is commonly used by veterinarians for the euthanasia of domestic animals. During the veterinary forensic autopsy, it is sometimes necessary to determine whether the animal was chemically euthanized with pentobarbital. The use of a human immunochromatographic test for barbiturate screening utilizing dog or cat urine has been previously validated; however, the use of alternative matrices for this purpose is yet to be explored when urine is not available. Postmortem heart, liver, spleen, skeletal muscle, blood and/or urine samples from 20 dogs and 26 cats with a reported chemical euthanasia status were processed using two different methods, bead homogenization and sonication, and screened for barbiturates using a human immunochromatographic test. There was 100% agreement of the immunochromatographic test results using the sonication method with the reported euthanasia status of both dogs and cats. Using the bead homogenization method, agreement with the reported euthanasia status was 93.3% and 96.7% for dogs and cats, respectively, due to invalid test results from four dog and two cat samples. A subset of liver samples (10 canine and 10 feline) was analyzed via gas chromatography–mass spectrometry, and there was 100% agreement between the immunochromatographic test results and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry results for both cats and dogs. Overall, our results support the use of a variety of alternative matrices for barbiturate screening in cats and dogs.
      PubDate: Sat, 18 Nov 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/jat/bkad087
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • High-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry method
           for measuring cotinine and trans-3′-hydroxycotinine
           in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of patients with e-cigarette, or vaping,
           product use-associated lung injury

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      Pages: 62 - 69
      Abstract: AbstractIn 2019, nearly 3000 U.S. residents developed severe lung injury associated with recent use of e-cigarette or vaping products. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention responded to the outbreak, which was formally defined as e-cigarette, or vaping, product use-associated lung injury (EVALI). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Laboratory rapidly developed assays to analyze potentially harmful and addictive substances in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid collected from EVALI case patients. This report describes the development and validation of a high-throughput isotope-dilution high performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry method for measuring two nicotine biomarkers, cotinine (COT) and trans-3′-hydroxycotinine (HCT), in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples. COT and HCT are the major metabolites of nicotine, the addictive alkaloid presents in tobacco products. This method had good specificity and sensitivity. The limit of detection is 0.033 and 0.0165 ng/mL for COT and HCT, respectively, using only 200 µL of sample volume. The within-run and between-run precision were 2–10%. The overall accuracy, calculated from recovery in three different sample matrices spiked at three concentrations, was 94.8% and 93.6% for COT and HCT, respectively. This novel HPLC–MS-MS method was utilized to characterize recent tobacco exposure in EVALI case patients. This method is useful for characterizing tobacco exposure that may be related to acute and chronic lung injury.
      PubDate: Thu, 28 Sep 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/jat/bkad077
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Methoxetamine and its metabolites: Postmortem determination in body
           fluids of human cadaver

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      Pages: 70 - 74
      Abstract: AbstractWe report the forensic case of a 42-year-old man, a known drug user, who died at home and whose body was only discovered 2 months later. Autopsy was performed on a corpse in the late postmortem stage where no apparent cause of death was found. A toxicological screening of biological materials (blood, urine and gastric content) using liquid chromatography with different types of mass detection (ion trap and high-resolution) revealed the presence of methoxetamine (MXE), a ketamine analog, and its metabolites. MXE and a number of its metabolites (e.g., O-desmethyl, N-desethyl, hydroxy, glucuronides and sulfates) were identified in urine. Based on the results, a method using liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry was developed and validated for the determination of MXE concentration in biological materials. The following values of MXE concentration were found: blood—3.6 ng/mL, urine—70.5 ng/mL and gastric content—18.0 ng/mL. Given the absence of other drugs, medications and poisons, it can be inferred that despite relatively low blood concentrations, MXE contributed to the victim’s death. The present case demonstrates that even after 2 months, MXE and its several metabolites can be detected and determined in the human cadaver at a relatively advanced stage of decomposition.
      PubDate: Sat, 18 Nov 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/jat/bkad084
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Five cases of unintentional exposure to BZO-4en-POXIZID among nightclub
           attendees in New York City

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      Pages: 75 - 80
      Abstract: AbstractA new class of synthetic cannabinoids called OXIZIDs has emerged in recent years. This class consists of compounds with oxindole cores and hydrazide/hydrazone linker moieties and has often been described as being designed to circumvent a Chinese class-wide ban that was effective as of 1 July 2021. However, through hair testing of nightclub attendees in New York City—a high-risk population for recreational drug use—we have evidence suggesting exposures to an OXIZID called BZO-4en-POXIZID (4en-pentyl MDA-19) prior to the effective ban. Through analysis of 6 cm segmented hair samples from attendees collected in 2021, we detected five cases of exposure. Specifically, we detected a cluster of three cases based on hair samples collected on 20 June 2021, and then two additional cases from samples collected on 16 July 2021. Four of these hair samples were long enough to analyze two 6 cm hair segments (representing approximately two 6-month timeframes) and three of four of these cases tested positive for repeated exposure (for an estimated exposure over 6 months prior to hair collection). All cases included young adult females reporting past-year cannabis use but all tested negative for tetrahydrocannabinol exposure. Three cases also reported past-year use of cocaine, ecstasy, and/or ketamine, and four cases tested positive for exposure to cocaine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), methamphetamine and/or eutylone. These subjects were exposed to BZO-4en-POXIZID—likely as an adulterant in other drugs, and these cases are among the first documented cases which occurred approximately half a year before the Chinese legislative ban.
      PubDate: Fri, 10 Nov 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/jat/bkad086
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 1 (2023)
       
 
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  Subjects -> ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (Total: 913 journals)
    - ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (810 journals)
    - POLLUTION (31 journals)
    - TOXICOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY (54 journals)
    - WASTE MANAGEMENT (18 journals)

TOXICOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY (54 journals)

Showing 1 - 47 of 47 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Universitatis Sapientiae, Agriculture and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Aerosol Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
American Journal of Industrial Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
American Journal of Pharmacology and Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Annals of Environmental Science and Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Archives of Ecotoxicology     Open Access  
Computational Toxicology     Hybrid Journal  
Current Opinion in Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Current Protocols in Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Research in Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Cutaneous and Ocular Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Environmental Pollutants and Bioavailability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Environmental Science : Processes & Impacts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Ethiopian Journal of Health Development     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Exposure and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Frontiers in Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Green Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Pharmacology and Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Analytical Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Clinical Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Ecophysiology and Occupational Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Environmental & Analytical Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Environmental Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part C : Toxicology and Carcinogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Hazardous Materials Advances     Open Access  
Journal of Hazardous, Toxic, and Radioactive Waste     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Immunotoxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Part A: Current Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Part B: Critical Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Toxins     Open Access  
Journal of Translational Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription  
Research & Reviews : A Journal of Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Revista de Toxicologia     Open Access  
Toxicologic Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Toxicological Research     Hybrid Journal  
Toxicologie Analytique et Clinique     Full-text available via subscription  
Toxicology and Environmental Health Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Toxicology Communications     Open Access  
Toxicology International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Toxicology Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Toxicology Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 8)
Toxicology Research and Application     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Toxics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Toxins     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
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JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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