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Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy (EE&P)
Number of Followers: 1  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Online) 2515-1274
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • In the Eye of the Beholder Visualising Students’ Implicit
           Entrepreneurship Theories

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Katarina Ellborg
      Abstract: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy, Ahead of Print.
      Teaching methods and students’ preconceptions are considered a crucial basis for entrepreneurship education, not least when entrepreneurship is taught outside business schools with differentiated learning outcomes. This qualitative study seeks to explore students’ experiences of a visual-based teaching exercise––“Images of entrepreneurship”––and examines how the exercise contributes to making their preconceptions of entrepreneurship explicit. The study presents the exercise and its theoretical underpinnings and then, via interviews with 28 students from various educational backgrounds, gives a unique insight into their experiences of the exercise. The purpose is to contribute to the development of theory on pedagogical practices in classroom settings in entrepreneurship education in higher education. In order to systematically discuss the students’ relationship to the exercise and to their preconceptions of entrepreneurship, implicit theories are proposed and developed as a theoretical framework. Based on the students’ views, this study shows that entrepreneurship educators can use visual material to initiate reflective conversations about students’ implicit entrepreneurship theories, and involve students in evaluations of teaching methods in order to promote their perspective.
      Citation: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy
      PubDate: 2022-09-28T12:18:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25151274221130005
       
  • The Arts Alumni Have Spoken: The Impact of Training in Higher Education on
           Entrepreneurial Careers

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      Authors: Wen Guo, David J. McGraw
      Abstract: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy, Ahead of Print.
      Studies of alumni from arts-focused degree programs in American higher education have revealed the need for arts entrepreneurship training for self-reliant careers, resulting in the creation of at least 168 programs and course offerings for students in a range of arts disciplines. Using factor analysis of datasets from the 2015–2017 administrations of the Strategic National Arts Alumni Project, a multi-institution online alumni survey, this paper divides the skills most relevant to arts entrepreneurship training into four latent categories: critical thinking, leadership, business management, and artistic specialty. A logistic regression revealed statistically significant associations between the latent variables with alumni’s propensity for freelancing and new venture creation. We also identified that race interacts with both student loan amount and family social and cultural capital. Arts-focused higher education programs should consider how they can offer training in these skill groups and complementary opportunities for financially challenged college students and those with fewer familial connections to the arts without creating additional barriers to careers in the arts.
      Citation: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy
      PubDate: 2022-08-28T01:00:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25151274221120071
       
  • Entrepreneurship Education as a Vehicle for K-12 Inclusion: A Case with
           Boys & Girls Clubs of America

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      Authors: Lise Anne Slatten, Geoffrey Stewart, Patricia Lanier, Keith R. Credo, Joshua S. Bendickson
      Abstract: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy, Ahead of Print.
      This learning innovation offers a model by which university faculty can increase community engagement, provide greater opportunities to under-served populations, and advance inclusive programming in entrepreneurship education. We present a learning innovation to enhance working with local K-12 focused nonprofit organizations to positively influence individuals, communities, and local entrepreneurship ecosystems.
      Citation: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy
      PubDate: 2022-08-13T07:10:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25151274221117881
       
  • The Impacts of a Blended Entrepreneurship Course on Secondary Students'
           Entrepreneurial Self-Efficacy and Entrepreneurial Intentions

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      Authors: Toi E. Hershmann, Jiangmei Yuan, Jake Follmer, Ugur Kale, Carrie White
      Abstract: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy, Ahead of Print.
      This mixed-methods study examined the impacts of a blended entrepreneurial course on secondary students’ entrepreneurial self-efficacy (ESE) and intentions, which were measured with pre- and post-surveys. The artifacts students created (elevator pitches and business canvas models) were collected. Survey results revealed no improvement in ESE, but significant improvements in two dimensions of intentions: professional attraction and entrepreneurial capacity. Artifact results showed that students could identify problems and generate solutions, but they could not project revenues. These findings suggest that blended courses can increase students’ professional attraction of entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial capacity and enable them to identify problems and generate solutions.
      Citation: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T02:26:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25151274221108433
       
  • Perceptions of Entrepreneurship and Online Learning During the
           Coronavirus-2019 (COVID-19) Pandemic

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      Authors: Melati Nungsari, Denise Wong, Chin Jia Wei, Ngu Kirjane, Chee Shu Yee, Samuel Flanders, Phoon Yong Shian
      Abstract: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy, Ahead of Print.
      Coronavirus-2019 (COVID-19) restrictions significantly influenced the learning and delivery of educational programs, especially traditionally hands-on educational programs. Entrepreneurship education and training (EET) studies on learners’ perceptions have so far focused on formal EET in university settings or Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). This paper explores youth perceptions of a non-formal, online EET program conducted during the pandemic. Perceptions matter since they tend to translate into attitudes, which in turn potentially translate into achieving learning outcomes (or not). Using hermeneutic content analysis (HCA), transcripts from 35 youth participants were analyzed, where the participants were categorized into four groups based on completion of the program and household income. Individual motivations were very important for all and the lack of social support was a concern for low-income youth. Almost a third of the dropouts who were part of the study did so to actually start their own business during the pandemic versus only one out of 18 of non-dropouts. The pandemic was disruptive to livelihoods and to their families, which sometimes made learning more difficult. Future online EET programs should relate learners’ motivations for learning entrepreneurship with learning outcomes by instilling social support structures and taking contextual influences into consideration.
      Citation: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy
      PubDate: 2022-06-15T07:51:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25151274221104706
       
  • Exploring the Transition to Working Life of Entrepreneurship Education
           Graduates: A Longitudinal Study

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      Authors: Nils Magne Killingberg, Elin Kubberød, Inger Beate Pettersen
      Abstract: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy, Ahead of Print.
      In this research, we explore the transition of entrepreneurship education (EE) graduates to working life. Even though many EE graduates find employment in established organisations rather than starting a new venture, few studies have empirically investigated the relevance of EE in this context. This paper addresses this gap by providing an in-depth longitudinal analysis of graduates’ transition from EE to working life, from entering the labour market to becoming an effective operator. In the study we interview 10 graduates from three master’s programmes directly after their graduation and then follow up with an interview 2 years into their careers. It explores how these graduates learn to become legitimate members of their workplace and how they apply their entrepreneurial competencies in this process. This study contributes to the broader debate on the relevance of EE for employability by demonstrating how entrepreneurial competencies foster the transition from EE to working life.
      Citation: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy
      PubDate: 2022-06-15T06:42:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25151274221108354
       
  • The Impact of Contingencies on Entrepreneurship Education Outcomes

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      Authors: Anna Vuorio, Giulio Zichella, Olukemi Sawyerr
      Abstract: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy, Ahead of Print.
      The results of Entrepreneurship Education (EE) impact research have been equivocal, and one suggested explanation is the influence of contingencies such as the types of learning experiences, gender, and field of study. In this paper we aim to answer the question of which contingencies shape the outcome of EE by examining the outcome variables of entrepreneurial intentions (EI) and creative self-efficacy (CSE). Utilizing a quasi-experimental pre-post survey design, we surveyed 209 students from three universities who were exposed to three different learning experiences: writing a business plan, achieving proof-of-concept, and achieving proof-of-business. Through multi-value qualitative comparative analysis, we found six unique combinations associated with high levels of EI and CSE, respectively, after a learning experience. High EI and CSE are both associated with developing proof-of-concept and proof-of-business, but not with writing a business plan. Also, students’ fields of study play a role in high levels of EI regardless of the learning experience, while students’ prior work experience seems to play a role in EI and CSE.
      Citation: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy
      PubDate: 2022-05-27T06:49:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25151274221104702
       
  • Latour-Marliac, Since 1875

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      Authors: Robert Charles Sheldon
      Abstract: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy, Ahead of Print.
      This case follows Charlie Zerzan as he tries to save Latour-Marliac, the cash-strapped but historically important company he owns in the south of France. Rather than devastate the company, the global pandemic of 2020 was a boon, leaving it with a stock of cash just as a handful of unique opportunities for growth arrived. Dumaurier must decide how far to go in pursuing these opportunities. On one hand, the company needs growth to break a decades-long period of stagnation, while on the other it cannot go back to the dangerously precarious cash position it had been in. How much debt is too much' How will revenue trend in the future' In order to seize the moment, Zerzan must project cash flows for the next 4 years, choose a growth strategy, and present his banker with corresponding pro forma income statements.
      Citation: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy
      PubDate: 2022-05-23T10:45:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25151274221087471
       
  • Adopting Entrepreneurship Education—Teachers′ Professional
           Development

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      Authors: Lea Oksanen, Elena Oikkonen, Timo Pihkala
      Abstract: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy, Ahead of Print.
      This study explores teachers’ professional development in entrepreneurship education (EE). It examines empirically the change in teachers’ EE practices among Finnish teachers in 2011–2017. Overall, the quantitative analysis reveals that entrepreneurship education practices are increasing, albeit unevenly. Three groups of teachers, EE experimenters, EE critics, and EE selectors show different profiles in their use of EE practices. Furthermore, these groups seem to represent different stages of EE professionalization. The analysis shows that teachers’ EE practices increase on the introductory stage but decrease deeply after. Moreover, the study suggests that teachers’ implementation of EE evolves along with their teaching experience. As regards implications it reveals that teachers in different stages of professional development need different types of support. The adoption of EE practices depends on the institutional and social support offered to teachers. The results of the investigation contribute to the literature of EE by introducing a new typology of teachers, also presenting empirical evidence of the teachers’ ability to absorb EE as a new approach. Furthermore, the study shows that for the adoption of EE it is not enough to emphasize the introductory stage but instead also the later stages of teacher’s professionalization need to be considered.
      Citation: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy
      PubDate: 2022-05-23T07:04:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25151274221091698
       
  • Why Should I Become an Intrapreneur' Introducing the Concept of
           Intrapreneurial Outcome Expectations

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      Authors: Sanna Ilonen, Kaisa Hytönen
      Abstract: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy, Ahead of Print.
      This study increases the understanding of students’ beliefs concerning intrapreneurial behaviour and its consequences. Based on previous studies of intrapreneurship and entrepreneurial outcome expectations and qualitative data collected from university students, we aimed to conceptualise students’ intrapreneurial outcome expectations and expose the possible differences between entrepreneurial and intrapreneurial outcome expectations related to entrepreneurship education. The qualitative research material comprised 74 learning diaries of students participating in bachelor-level intrapreneurship courses. The qualitative research material was analysed according to a qualitative content analysis. Intrapreneurial outcome expectations respond to the question, ‘If I engage in intrapreneurship, what will happen'’ The findings revealed that students perceived positive and negative consequences of intrapreneurial outcome expectations at three levels: individual, organisational, and societal. The findings also revealed differences between intrapreneurial and entrepreneurial outcome expectations regarding the level at which the students handled the content. The study highlights the importance of levels of outcome expectations other than the individual level, which dominates general and entrepreneurship outcome expectations research. It demonstrates that intrapreneurial outcome expectations should be considered different from entrepreneurial outcome expectations and understood not only from the individual level, as the consequences of intrapreneurial behaviour influence people, organisations, and beyond.
      Citation: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy
      PubDate: 2022-05-07T08:08:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25151274221091692
       
  • A Characterization and Pedagogical Analysis of Youth Entrepreneurship

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      Authors: Gregory R. L. Hadley
      Abstract: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy, Ahead of Print.
      This paper proposes a characterization of the youth entrepreneur and, subsequently, explores pedagogies that can assist in the development of entrepreneurial knowledge, skills and attitudes (KSAs) among youth in a secondary school context. Data was collected via a mixed methods approach. A small cross-section of high school students from the Canadian province Nova Scotia participated in a semi structured interview on entrepreneurship and pedagogy, while a larger cross-section completed a survey that assessed perceived degree of entrepreneurialism. The study concluded that young people possess, to varying degrees, a variety of entrepreneurial knowledge, skills and attitudes. Furthermore, it was found that those KSAs are largely gathered, refined and mobilized in extra-curricular contexts, leaving secondary schools to consider how to better support the entrepreneurialism of their students. The various implications of these findings, as they relate to pedagogy, practice, and educational policy are explored in detail.
      Citation: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T02:54:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25151274221096035
       
  • Acting as a Business Angel to Become a Better Entrepreneur: A Learning
           Innovation

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      Authors: Vincent Lefebvre, Gilles Certhoux
      Abstract: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy, Ahead of Print.
      TV shows such as “Dragons’ Den” and “Shark Tank” have become common teaching materials in entrepreneurial finance classrooms because they offer a window into the process of pitching to investors. TV exposure to pitch communication and business angels’ feedback is certainly a well-documented source of vicarious learning. It enables students to observe varying investment situations and learn from other entrepreneurs’ success as well as failure. Observation, however, does not replace direct experience. We combined vicarious learning and direct experience in order to enable students to learn how to take initial investment decisions, in practice. We originally proposed this training session in an entrepreneurship graduate program in France. This learning activity invites participants to become observers and actors in a real-life experience with entrepreneurs and angel investors. Students participate in a pitch session within a Business Angels Network (BAN). The BAN chooses entrepreneurs based on their applications and an evaluation meeting for the first round of a live pitch in their usual deal flow. Students are first spectators to the real-life pitch session, in which entrepreneurs face a team of five to 10 business angels (BAs). Then, students play the role of an active participant, making their own investment decisions in a report on each entrepreneurial project, as if they were BAs themselves.
      Citation: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy
      PubDate: 2022-02-21T11:32:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25151274211070243
       
  • Do the Winners Really Take It all' Exploring Entrepreneurial Learning
           in Start-Up Competitions

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      Authors: Lennard Stolz, Rolf Sternberg
      First page: 599
      Abstract: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy, Ahead of Print.
      Originating from business plan competitions at universities, start-up competitions (SUCs) are nowadays a widely used policy tool to foster entrepreneurial learning among a larger group of potential and nascent entrepreneurs. While the literature on entrepreneurial learning highlights the importance of participants’ prior experiences, studies on learning in SUCs often ignore these experiences, but detect different perceptions of the learning outcomes from SUCs. To address this research gap, we explore configurations of prior experience and the participation routines of entrepreneurs at SUCs. To do so, we apply fuzzy-sets qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA) to in-depth interview data from 26 participants at two German SUCs. Based on theories on entrepreneurial learning, insights from the interviews, and our empirical results from fsQCA, we identify one necessary condition and two specific configurations of conditions that lead to the outcome. The absence of entrepreneurial knowledge was found to be a necessary condition for entrepreneurial learning in SUCs. Prior industry experience is part of both solutions, but whether the presence or absence of it is important depends on whether it is combined with active participation in the competition. We present implications for policymakers, entrepreneurs, and researchers.
      Citation: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy
      PubDate: 2022-02-02T04:28:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25151274211068191
       
  • Teacher entrepreneurial ecosystems: How local communities support teacher
           entrepreneurs

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      Authors: Philip T. Roundy
      First page: 627
      Abstract: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy, Ahead of Print.
      Teacher entrepreneurs pursue innovative opportunities to create value for their students and colleagues; however, it is unclear how local communities enable teacher entrepreneurs and why some communities provide fertile ground for teacher entrepreneurship while others stifle teacher entrepreneurs. To address the limited understanding of how communities can support teacher entrepreneurship, this paper draws from entrepreneurial ecosystems research and the micro-foundations approach to develop a multi-level framework to explain the attributes of “teacher entrepreneurial ecosystems.” The main insight is that where teachers engage in entrepreneurship matters and that, in addition to teacher- and school-based characteristics, important contextual differences exist at the community-level in the depth of support for teacher entrepreneurs. Specifically, the theory explains how key differences in teacher entrepreneurial ecosystems influence teacher entrepreneurship and, in turn, how the activities of teacher entrepreneurs influence the diversity, coherence, and resilience of their ecosystems. The theory contributes by explaining how teacher entrepreneurial ecosystems function, motivating an agenda for studying teacher entrepreneurial ecosystems that catalyzes research at the entrepreneurial ecosystem and education interface, and generating insights that can help teachers and school administrators to harness their local communities and empower teacher entrepreneurs.
      Citation: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy
      PubDate: 2022-02-03T07:30:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25151274211069032
       
  • Enabling Entrepreneurial Empowerment Through a Three-Day Entrepreneurship
           Camp

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      Authors: Gunn-Berit Neergård, Lise Aaboen, Diamanto Politis
      First page: 658
      Abstract: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of a 3-day entrepreneurship camp on nursing students’ empowerment to act entrepreneurially. Data were collected through individual semi-structured interviews with 17 nursing students conducted both before and after the camp. The data also included student drawings, as well as documents and interviews with 10 stakeholder representatives. Our findings show that students had very limited knowledge of entrepreneurship and had disregarded any valuable or natural link between nursing and entrepreneurship before entering the camp. The four changes in the empowerment process are as follows: (a) From ‘Entrepreneurship is not something nurses are supposed to do’ to ‘Nurses are potential actors in entrepreneurial processes’. (b) From ‘Observing problems in practice’ to ‘Nurses can shape healthcare’. (c) From ‘Not knowing how to define problems sufficiently small to act upon’ to ‘Knowing how to approach problem definition’. (d) From ‘Knowing little about the potential steps of realising a solution’ to ‘Knowing the first steps to testing a solution’s feasibility’. Our study provides insights into the meaning of empowerment to act entrepreneurially in the context of an entrepreneurship education for nursing students and has implications for the entrepreneurship education literature for non-business students.
      Citation: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy
      PubDate: 2022-02-05T02:25:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25151274211070457
       
  • The Need for Modification: The Impact of COVID-19 on Pitch Competitions

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      Authors: Douglass Smith, Jeffrey Muldoon, Geethalakshmi S. Lakshmikanth
      First page: 686
      Abstract: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy, Ahead of Print.
      COVID-19 has had a dramatic impact on academics. Academic programs that require experiential learning, such as entrepreneurship, were presented with severe problems. At the time, the pandemic hit, Liguori and Winkler (2020) speculated on how entrepreneurship professors would respond to the challenge. Our article is an examination of how COVID-19 has impacted pitch competitions, a vital part of the entrepreneurship curriculum. We found that COVID-19 shut down pitch competitions for a year, and they returned last year using virtual web conferencing technologies such as Zoom. Our findings indicate that COVID-19 caused permanent changes to pitch competitions even though directors and other stakeholders may desire traditional face-to-face interactions.
      Citation: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy
      PubDate: 2022-03-08T11:40:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25151274221079119
       
  • Heritage’s: MOOving Forward

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      Authors: Renee D. Watson
      First page: 714
      Abstract: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy, Ahead of Print.
      The first Heritage’s Dairy Store opened in Westville New Jersey on October 10, 1957. The chain of convenient stores is known for their quality lunchmeats, fresh coffee, and their own brand of milk and ice cream. The company wholesales candy, tobacco, and groceries from its Heritage’s Wholesale Company, which supplies more than 75% of products sold in its 33+ locations. Additionally, Heritage’s now offers customizable food options throughout the day. As the business transitions to the next generation, the leadership has noticed changes within their markets, new trends within the industry, and several marketing related challenges. Following marketing research, Heritage’s found the majority of their consumers were over the age of 50. Research also showed many respondents under 25 were unaware of the company. Additionally, many within the 20–39 age bracket who had heard of the company still did not have a clear understanding of the product offerings or overall brand. Heritage’s is faced with maintaining their current consumer base while simultaneously attracting the younger demographic. Additionally, major changes in technology, store design, marketing, and branding would come at a significant cost. Lastly, the management of Heritage’s seeks to honor their company history while looking toward the future.
      Citation: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy
      PubDate: 2022-01-11T07:33:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25151274211068867
       
  • The Night Dr. Lupo “Blew Up” the Tennessee Peanut Company

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      Authors: Jeff G. Cohu
      First page: 717
      Abstract: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy, Ahead of Print.
      This short caselet focuses on the challenges and opportunities presented by an unanticipated “viral” moment for the Tennessee Peanut Company, a small start-up company still in its infancy. After receiving unsolicited recognition from a leading Twitch streamer, Dr Lupo, the company experienced explosive sales orders which repeatedly crashed their website and sales order inventory system, leading to massive levels of sales of sold-out products. The case challenges students to determine how they would respond to a similar viral moment which simultaneously presents growth opportunities and many operational challenges and risks.
      Citation: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy
      PubDate: 2022-02-23T08:08:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25151274211070854
       
  • Unstacking the Russian Doll: An Integrative Interdisciplinary Analysis of
           Restaurant Operations

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      Authors: Olga Petrova, Natallia Gray, Nick Johnston, Steven Stovall
      First page: 721
      Abstract: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy, Ahead of Print.
      Russian Doll, an independently owned and operated small ethnic restaurant serving handcrafted Russian food, opened its doors on January 1, 2015 in a rural river town in Southeast Missouri. The owner, Ana, had mastered many of her home country’s recipes and excelled in the kitchen. Her restaurant focused on introducing American audience to Russian culinary delights and culture, featuring authentic, made-to-order fare and a neighborly atmosphere. Ana had long dreamed of her own restaurant but without prior industry experience or formal training running the business wasn’t easy. In December 2015, after 1 year of operations, Ana found herself wondering how to proceed. Was Russian Doll a feasible entrepreneurial enterprise to begin with' Could Ana’s business be saved or was it time to call it quits and shut down'
      Citation: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T06:56:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25151274221096053
       
  • Philosophizing About Entrepreneurship: Introducing Entrepreneurship
           Through the Debate of Fundamental Questions

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      Authors: Jonathan P. Allen
      First page: 734
      Abstract: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy, Ahead of Print.
      Debate is an active learning tool used across many disciplines. We report on the use of debates in an introductory Masters’ level entrepreneurship course as a learning innovation, both face-to-face and online. Based on McBride’s definition of the philosophy of entrepreneurship, the debates focus on fundamental questions in entrepreneurship research and thought. Rotating teams debate in front of their classmates, with the audience evaluating their debate performance immediately afterwards during a short debriefing led by the instructor. For half of the debates, teams are able to choose which side of argument to take, but for the other half they might be forced to defend positions that they believe are weaker or incorrect. The debate format embraces active learning theories, requiring both speakers and audience to make choices and evaluate peer-reviewed evidence, with an intent to develop higher-order critical thinking skills. We discuss the self-reported effects that entrepreneurial debates have on self-efficacy, moving from intention to action, and on the creation of memorable entrepreneurial events for this specific audience.
      Citation: Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy
      PubDate: 2022-02-24T05:27:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/25151274221075742
       
 
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