Subjects -> BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (Total: 3530 journals)
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BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (1229 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 | Last

Showing 1201 - 1400 of 1566 Journals sorted by number of followers
Sustainable Technology and Entrepreneurship     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
International Research Journal of Management Science     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Innovation & Knowledge     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Propel Journal of Applied Management     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Marine Economics and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Revista de Marketing y Publicidad     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Jurnal Ekonomi dan Bisnis Airlangga     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Behavioural Economics and Social Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Data Science in Finance and Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Digital Business     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asia-Pacific Journal of Rural Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Business Reflections     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Processus de Estudos de Gestão, Jurí­dicos e Financeiros     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cleaner and Responsible Consumption     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cleaner Logistics and Supply Chain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of New Business Ventures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
The African Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Management & Economics Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy (EE&P)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Continuity & Resilience Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Business, Humanities, Education and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Decision Analytics Journal     Open Access  
Sustainable Operations and Computers     Open Access  
International Entrepreneurship Review     Full-text available via subscription  
International Journal of Advanced Statistics and IT&C for Economics and Life Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Social and Economic Statistics     Open Access  
FIIB Business Review     Hybrid Journal  
Evaluation Journal of Australasia     Hybrid Journal  
Policy Design and Practice     Open Access  
Energy Conversion and Economics     Open Access  

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Evaluation Journal of Australasia
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1035-719X - ISSN (Online) 2515-9372
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Performance through the lens of evaluation: How to stretch evaluative
           thinking with strategic decision-making tools

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Benjamin Harris, Lyn Alderman
      Abstract: Evaluation Journal of Australasia, Ahead of Print.
      Australian higher education continues to be plagued with decreases in funding and increases in regulation. This is leading to a reality within many universities where quality alone is not enough to consider academic programs viable and sustainable. Today, universities compete fiercely for students, as increasing or retaining market share is required to remain financially sound. Universities usually make these difficult decisions through an analysis of internal student data as a metric of performance. Factors such as declining student enrolments, high attrition rates, low progression rates and poor student feedback would typically strike university executives as alarming; however, this is often not the full picture. This process can often become political and not grounded in evidence-based informed decision-making, as strategic decision-making to reduce academic programs may have direct impact on academic employment. Moreover, these analyses often lack independent evaluation and consideration of the broader environment. This can lead to tensions between faculty and university administration, which may lead to political outcomes guided by passionate academic debate rather than strategic evidence-based decision-making. This theoretical article outlines how an internal evaluation team can contribute to this exercise to stretch evaluative thinking by applying a range of strategic decision-making tools to evaluate academic program performance.
      Citation: Evaluation Journal of Australasia
      PubDate: 2022-08-28T01:51:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1035719X221120293
       
  • The continuous learning framework: Applying accountability for widespread
           organisational change

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lyn Alderman
      Abstract: Evaluation Journal of Australasia, Ahead of Print.
      This article introduces the Continuous Learning Framework for quality within higher education and other internal evaluation contexts. The framework maps the terrain of this special issue, and consists of four elements: accountability, improvement, performance and investment. The article briefly describes the evolution of the framework including its application to a government reform package, before focussing on its practical application within a specific university context to stimulate widespread organisational change and improve the use of data in academic decision-making. For internal evaluators, the framework offers a structured way to step into strategic decision-making conversations with executives and a structured approach to embed quality or internal evaluation within policy, protocols and practice of governments, organisations, teams and individuals. Moreover, it facilitates capacity building and creates an environment conducive to continuous improvement leading to continuous learning. The framework and its application directly align with Deming’s work from the 1980s.
      Citation: Evaluation Journal of Australasia
      PubDate: 2022-08-28T01:43:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1035719X221120294
       
  • Evaluator Perspective

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lyn Alderman
      Abstract: Evaluation Journal of Australasia, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Evaluation Journal of Australasia
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T11:08:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1035719X221121400
       
  • Editorial

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      Authors: Melissa Forbes
      Abstract: Evaluation Journal of Australasia, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Evaluation Journal of Australasia
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T10:03:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1035719X221121399
       
  • Developmental evaluation during the COVID-19 pandemic: Practice-based
           learnings from projects in British Columbia, Canada

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ihoghosa Iyamu, Mai Berger, Saranee Fernando, M Elizabeth Snow, Amy Salmon
      Abstract: Evaluation Journal of Australasia, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we explore experiences and learnings from adapting to challenges encountered in implementing three Developmental Evaluations (DE) in British Columbia, Canada within the evolving context of the COVID-19 pandemic. We situate our DE projects within our approach to the DE life cycle and describe challenges encountered and required adaptations in each phase of the life cycle. Regarding foundational aspects of DEs, we experienced challenges with relationship building, assessing and responding to the context, and ensuring continuous learning. These challenges were related to suboptimal embeddedness of the evaluators within the evaluated projects. We adapted by leveraging online channels to maintain communications and securing stakeholder engagement by assuming non-traditional DE roles based on our knowledge of the context to support project goals. Additional challenges experienced with mapping the rationale and goals of the projects, identifying domains for assessment, collecting data, making sense of the data and intervening were adapted to by facilitating online workshops, collecting data online and through proxy evaluators, while sharing methodological insights within the evaluation team. During evolving crises, like the COVID-19 pandemic, evaluators must embrace flexibility, leverage, and apply their knowledge of the evaluation context, lean on their strengths, purposefully reflect and share knowledge to optimise their DEs.
      Citation: Evaluation Journal of Australasia
      PubDate: 2022-08-13T01:01:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1035719X221119841
       
  • Course enhancement conversations: A holistic and collaborative evaluation
           approach to quality improvement in higher education

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Melissa Forbes, Angela Murphy, Lyn Alderman
      Abstract: Evaluation Journal of Australasia, Ahead of Print.
      This practice article describes the use of collaborative evaluation for institutional improvement leading to continuous learning at a regional university in Australia. The University of Southern Queensland’s Academic Quality Framework (2019–2022) was developed in response to external drivers to improve practices relating to the comprehensive and systematic analysis of academic data. One aspect of the response was to introduce ‘course enhancement conversations’, which were a collaboration between the central Academic Quality Unit and academic staff, including course teams and learning and teaching leaders within schools and faculties. A feature of these conversations was the use of sentinel rather than performance indicators of course (not teaching) quality to prompt the holding of conversations. Conversations were conducted in a spirit of constructive collaboration, where the shared goal was to support course teams to deliver an outstanding student experience. Through adopting a collaborative approach to evaluation, Academic Quality Unit staff were evaluation champions who gradually acculturated academic staff and learning and teaching leaders to evaluative thinking and data-informed decision-making. Issues brought to light during these conversations have informed changes in practice at the university level, including the development of a new evaluation procedure to embed best-practice monitoring and evaluation across all levels of curriculum delivery.
      Citation: Evaluation Journal of Australasia
      PubDate: 2022-08-11T07:01:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1035719X221120295
       
  • Design roadmapping: Guidebook for future foresight techniques

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      Authors: Emily Montgomery
      Abstract: Evaluation Journal of Australasia, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Evaluation Journal of Australasia
      PubDate: 2022-08-11T06:49:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1035719X221120296
       
  • Reflections on COVID-19 and internal evaluation in a humanitarian
           non-profit

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Leanne M Kelly
      Abstract: Evaluation Journal of Australasia, Ahead of Print.
      This article uses reflective practice and social interdependence theory to unpack the ways in which our practice as internal evaluators was impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, using the development of a monitoring and evaluation framework as a case study. The reflections are separated into six stages: description, feelings, evaluation, analysis, conclusion and action plan. Initial reflections on the impact of COVID-19 drew out the negative effects of the pandemic and associated restrictions, which limited our ability to build rapport and stretched our capacity to balance work and home commitments. Deeper investigation revealed that the disaster pushed us to develop new ways of working that will augment and improve our future efforts. We foresee that these learnings will enable a future with greater ability to offer hybrid online/face-to-face collaborative opportunities that will enhance inclusion and active participation, thereby promoting monitoring and evaluation with greater collective ownership and relevance to a wider audience.
      Citation: Evaluation Journal of Australasia
      PubDate: 2022-06-27T02:31:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1035719X221109310
       
  • Editorial

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      Authors: John Guenther
      First page: 139
      Abstract: Evaluation Journal of Australasia, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Evaluation Journal of Australasia
      PubDate: 2022-07-13T02:40:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1035719X221112981
       
  • Critical appraisal of the establishment of a theory-informed evaluation
           capacity building function in a large government department

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      Authors: Delyth Lloyd, Eleanor Williams, Desiree Terrill
      First page: 142
      Abstract: Evaluation Journal of Australasia, Ahead of Print.
      Evaluation Capacity Building (ECB) is a critical function that can increase uptake, quality and impact of evaluation activity in large organisations. This article describes how ECB theory has been applied in the design and implementation of foundational evaluation training in a large state government department. Appraisal of the first three years (2018–21) establishing the training component of the capacity building function is explored, in light of contemporary capacity building literature. Post-training feedback indicated high degree of participant satisfaction and met need among department staff. One-year follow-up of training workshops indicated that over two-thirds of respondents (68 percent) found evaluation training had a lasting impact on their work, and that participants continued to use evaluation support materials and apply what they had learned. The article provides practical information on this theory-informed approach, to support others who are commencing or delivering evaluation capacity initiatives within public sector agencies or other large organisations, including for those who are adapting training for online delivery during COVID-19. The article identifies lessons learned, including through the experience of moving training online during the COVID-19 pandemic, and presents opportunities to increase the impact of evaluation capacity building.
      Citation: Evaluation Journal of Australasia
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T10:54:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1035719X221109311
       
  • Suicide story: An evaluation of ‘tackling suicide Our Way’

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      Authors: John Guenther, Mona Roberts, Keith Buzzacott, Danielle Dyall
      First page: 157
      Abstract: Evaluation Journal of Australasia, Ahead of Print.
      Despite concerted efforts to improve strategic responses to suicide, it remains a major concern in Australia. Among Indigenous communities the rates of suicide are up to three times higher than among non-Indigenous communities. Indigenous males are three times as likely to suicide than Indigenous females. The death rates for the Northern Territory are second highest in Australia, at 27.4 deaths per 100,000 population. In the Northern Territory, a program called Suicide Story is working to empower Indigenous people, creating a language to talk about suicide, and giving them tools to respond to the warning signs of suicide. The program was developed by Indigenous people and is run by Indigenous people in response to community needs. This paper draws from an evaluation of the program conducted in the Northern Territory at its 10-year mark, in 2018. Although it is impossible to assess how many lives have been saved, this paper takes a position that resilience is an indicator of prevention. One way to achieving this is through culturally safe processes. Based on the evaluation findings, we consider what that means for Suicide Story and other culturally safe suicide prevention programs designed with and for Indigenous people in Australia.
      Citation: Evaluation Journal of Australasia
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T02:47:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1035719X221104841
       
  • Assessing achievements in place-based initiatives – developing a
           tailor-made tool

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Patricia M O’Connor, Eleanor Clune, Tracey Marriner, Shantanu Sheshgir, Jill Waddell
      First page: 173
      Abstract: Evaluation Journal of Australasia, Ahead of Print.
      Assessing achievements of place-based initiatives (PBIs) has become increasingly important in contemporary evaluation practice. While key characteristics of successful PBIs have been described in the literature, the practicalities of assessing implementation progress across multiple PBIs under the umbrella of a single program invoke complex challenges. This article presents the process used to develop a tool for assessing implementation progress across a 14-site PBI aimed at improving health and education outcomes for First Nations children in Australia. Sites included a mix of metropolitan, regional, remote and very remote locations around Australia and varying levels of PBI maturity. A literature scan identified the attributes of successful PBIs and indicators/measures that could be used to evaluate them. These attributes were condensed into eight domains, and a further two were added due to their importance for this evaluation. The identified indicators and measures were mapped against these domains to generate a question bank. A process of consistently rating sites against the measures relevant to each of them enabled the identification of achievements within each site, comparisons between sites and evaluation of the progress of the program overall. The development of this tool provides a case study for developing a practical, fit-for-purpose tool to evaluate PBIs.
      Citation: Evaluation Journal of Australasia
      PubDate: 2022-05-22T11:57:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1035719X221102278
       
  • Evaluator Perspective

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Amy Gullickson
      First page: 193
      Abstract: Evaluation Journal of Australasia, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Evaluation Journal of Australasia
      PubDate: 2022-01-11T12:04:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1035719X211069710
       
  • Book Review: Evaluation in Today’s world: Respecting diversity,
           improving quality and promoting usability

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Charlie Tulloch
      First page: 198
      Abstract: Evaluation Journal of Australasia, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Evaluation Journal of Australasia
      PubDate: 2022-04-18T02:11:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1035719X221088344
       
 
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