Subjects -> EDUCATION (Total: 2346 journals)
    - ADULT EDUCATION (24 journals)
    - COLLEGE AND ALUMNI (10 journals)
    - E-LEARNING (38 journals)
    - EDUCATION (1996 journals)
    - HIGHER EDUCATION (140 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS (4 journals)
    - ONLINE EDUCATION (42 journals)
    - SCHOOL ORGANIZATION (14 journals)
    - SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATION (40 journals)
    - TEACHING METHODS AND CURRICULUM (38 journals)

ADULT EDUCATION (24 journals)

Showing 1 - 23 of 23 Journals sorted alphabetically
Adult Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Aikuiskasvatus     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Andragoška spoznanja     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Career and Technical Education Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Concept : The Journal of Contemporary Community Education Practice Theory     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
EJA em Debate     Open Access  
Empirical Research in Vocational Education and Training     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
European Journal for Research on the Education and Learning of Adults (RELA)     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
European Journal of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
International Journal of Adult Education and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Adult and Continuing Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Adult Theological Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Music, Technology and Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
New Horizons in Adult Education and Human Resource Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Nordic Journal of Vocational Education and Training     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pedagogia Social. Revista Interuniversitaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Recruiting & Retaining Adult Learners     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Revista Brasileira de Orienta     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Teaching in Lifelong Learning : a journal to inform and improve practice     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Teknologi Kejuruan     Open Access  
Widening Participation and Lifelong Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Adult Learning
Number of Followers: 33  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1045-1595 - ISSN (Online) 2162-4070
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • The Voices of Adult Education

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      Authors: Carol Rogers-Shaw, Lilian H. Hill, Davin Carr-Chellman
      Pages: 47 - 50
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Volume 33, Issue 2, Page 47-50, May 2022.

      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T05:14:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10451595221091533
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • The Super-vision of Autoethnographic Dissertation Studies: Transformative
           Stories of the Supervisor and the Supervised Revealed

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      Authors: Elizabeth J. Tisdell, Gina C. Whalen, Mira Johnson
      Pages: 51 - 60
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Volume 33, Issue 2, Page 51-60, May 2022.
      The purpose of this paper is to explore the super-vision of dissertations, from the perspective of the supervisor and two supervisees who did dissertations that had an evocative autoethnographic component. We argue that autoethnography in context of scholarly writing encourages both an inner looking, and an outward looking that results in a super-vision, that is the result of the relationship between the supervisor and the supervisee, which evokes further insights, analysis, and reflexive stories.
      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T05:14:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10451595211059568
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • “I’ll Take Two Please … Sike”: Paying the Black
           Tax in Adult Education

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      Authors: Edith Gnanadass, Daryl R. Privott, Dianne Ramdeholl, Lisa R. Merriweather
      Pages: 61 - 70
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Volume 33, Issue 2, Page 61-70, May 2022.
      We live in a society wherein anti-Black racism is pervasive. It infiltrates every aspect of life, including work life spaces. In spite of the recent call for higher education to become antiracist, a tall order for an institution literally and figuratively built on racist attitudes and behaviors, higher education continues to be a cesspool for racism. Literature is replete with stories of the toll working in such environments takes on Black and Brown people. Some have called it “The Black Tax.” Palmer and Walker (2020) riff off of Rochester’s (2018) popularization of the financial “Black Tax” to relate it to psycho-social realities of Black people. Palmer and Walker define it as “the psychological weight or stressor that Black people experience from consciously or unconsciously thinking about how White Americans perceive the social construct of Blackness” (para. 2). Black and Brown adult educators pay this tax multiple times in the course of working in academe and that tax is doubled when they teach subjects that center equity and social justice. This paper will share through dialogic reconstruction multivocal layered accounts of Black and Brown adult educators, each with a different positionality, but all who understand what it means to pay the Black tax in adult education. Working from a critical race lens, the authors engage in a collaborative evocative autoethnography to analyze their experiences with the impact of the Black tax on their role as adult education professors in higher education. We determined the following themes as salient to our Black Tax experience: A sick place, moving the line, bring me a rock, and weaponizing our power. Understanding how anti-Black racism operates is key to adult education as a discipline moving toward its ever-elusive goal of parity and justice and reflecting on its theories and practices that stymie those efforts.
      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T05:14:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10451595211069075
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • An Autoethnographic Reflection of Adult Learning and Paternal Grief

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      Authors: Rob E. Carpenter
      Pages: 71 - 81
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Volume 33, Issue 2, Page 71-81, May 2022.
      This study examined my experience as a doctoral student following the death of my son. The focus of this research is on the interaction of paternal grief and adult learning in the context of higher education. The central emphasis seeks to offer existential bearing to the interplay between the narrative identities of adult learner and paternal griever that is seldom considered in combination for adult learning scholarship. I employed the reflexive process of autoethnography through free writing and review of personal journals. I used the analytical lens of a dialogical narrator who held two opposing I-positions of the self, adult learner and grieving father. This methodological approach allowed the pursuit of adult learning to emerge into a position that promoted reorganization of my grief, bridging the divergence of loss and gain. This study placed focus on the dialogical I-positions of self as a vector for growth. The novelty of this research is the placement of andragogical considerations in adult learning following paternal grief. These considerations have capacity to endorse the paternal griever I-position to begin understanding grief transition through pursuit of knowledge. Characterizing the embodied transition is central to the bereavement process. Bringing the transition into dialogue with adult learning can provide educators with enhanced instructional precision when planning and conducting learning activities in a grief environment.
      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T05:14:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10451595221074731
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Utilizing Autoethnography Within a Course Structure to Support Developing
           Scholars

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      Authors: Carol A. Olszewski, Keli P. Pontikos, Kyle A. Znamenak, Matt L. Selker, Toni M. Paoletta, Karrie A. Coffman, Catherine A. Hansman
      Pages: 82 - 88
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Volume 33, Issue 2, Page 82-88, May 2022.
      Developing scholars sometimes struggle to situate their own position in the research and to comprehend how that affects their attitudes and behaviors. They frequently experience imposter syndrome and feelings of inadequacy, which lead to anxiety toward the research and publication processes. This paper presents a method for incorporating collective autoethnography into a graduate course context, aiming to demystify such processes and to cultivate scholarly identity. The doctoral students in a graduate seminar agreed to journal following course meetings. Following completion of the course, the journal entries were compiled. This compilation was reviewed and reflected on by each member individually, and then the group met to collectively discuss the data. Since that initial study, the developing scholars have elected to continue their work together, with each member continuing to benefit from additional scholarship creation, continued peer mentorship, and a supportive group in which to continue to develop scholarly identity. Brief reflections by the authors illustrate their experiences. Through this collective work, the journals resulting in the autoethnography empowered students to understand their positionality and intersectionality, resulting in rich and layered autoethnographic accounts of learning. Through their interests in the jointly conducted project, students gained a sense of authority and position from which to analyze their growing knowledge and identities as scholars.
      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T05:14:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10451595211060080
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Shorthand for Racism: Grade-Level Equivalencies and Everyday
           Anti-Blackness in Adult “Basic” Education

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      Authors: Amy Pickard
      Pages: 89 - 92
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Volume 33, Issue 2, Page 89-92, May 2022.

      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T05:14:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10451595211055719
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Advances in Autoethnography and Narrative Inquiry Edited by Tony E. Adams,
           Robin M. Boylorn, and Lisa M. Tillmann

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      Authors: Elizabeth A. Golba
      Pages: 93 - 94
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Volume 33, Issue 2, Page 93-94, May 2022.

      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T05:14:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10451595221086744
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Continuous Challenges: Case Study of a Sustainable University Adult
           Education Graduate Program

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      Authors: Royce Ann Collins, Jeff Zacharakis
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Ahead of Print.
      Through their history, adult education graduate programs have flourished and dwindled and sustainability always seems to be in jeopardy. This case study examines one program’s growth, decline, and continuous rebirth in the competitive higher education market and academic stratification. Throughout its 55 years of existence, faculty have risen from the ranks to embrace an entrepreneurial spirit and leadership. Through flexibility and diversification, the program has evolved to meet the needs of the current learners. This model is sustainable if all faculty focus on the program first and their own professional reputations second.
      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2022-05-30T11:45:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10451595221106171
       
  • Co-Occurrence of Sociocultural Elements and Self-Direction in Learning
           Situations: A Police Organization Case Study

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      Authors: Soila Lemmetty, Kaija Collin
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Ahead of Print.
      Adult’s self-direction and self-directed learning (SDL) have become topics in the discussion of work-related adult learning and an autonomous approach, emphasizing responsibility and independence, has received increasing attention in studies of learning. In the context of SDL, in contrast, the importance of the learning environment and community has received less empirical attention. The aim of this article is to increase the understanding of the co-occurrence of sociocultural elements and self-direction in learning situations at work. From a practical viewpoint, it is important to understand both, the sociocultural and self-directed nature of different learning situations at daily work, so that organizations and workplaces can develop the practices that support learning and self-directedness in the work environment and create appropriate expectations for individual self-direction. In this study, we examined the elements of sociocultural learning and self-direction in police organization. The content analysis focused on interviews with 26 police officers, examining their descriptions of learning situations. The findings show that in learning situations at work, individual responsibility alternates with collectivity, peers, supportive supervisory work, and tools. The theoretical and practical implications of the findings are highlighted.
      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2022-05-30T06:27:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10451595221094072
       
  • Emergency Distance Education Experiences of EFL Instructors and Students
           During the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Merih Ugurel Kamisli, Aylin Akinlar
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Ahead of Print.
      This qualitative phenomenological study was designed to gain an in-depth understanding of the lived experiences of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) instructors and learners with emergency distance education in response to the COVID-19 pandemic using the lens of the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) model. Data was collected through a survey including open-ended questions and a series of in-depth interviews with participants from a large state university. The content analysis method was used for the data analysis. Our research showed that instructors experienced challenges of emergency distance education, emotional stress due to the uncertainties and unplanned nature of the abrupt shift. The findings also identified issues that affect instructors’ and students’ motivation such as unstable internet connection, lack of student–teacher and peer interaction, as well as insufficient resources and access due to the digital divide. Implications for improving the teacher training programs and teachers’ application of the TPACK framework are discussed.
      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2022-05-23T09:35:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10451595221094075
       
  • Book Review: Rituals for Virtual Meetings: Creative Ways to Engage People
           and Strengthen Relationships

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      Authors: Shannon A.B. Perry
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2022-05-18T08:40:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10451595221099569
       
  • Beginners: The Joy and Transformative Power of Lifelong Learning (Book
           Review)

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      Authors: Tonkia T. Bridges
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T09:26:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10451595221089709
       
  • Adult Learning as Metamorphosis and Popular Education for Lesbian, Gay,
           Bisexual, Transgender/Gender Diverse, and Queer+ Equality: The Story of
           Leonard Matlovich

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      Authors: Trevor G. Gates, Dyann Ross, Bindi Bennett
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Ahead of Print.
      Critical events in Leonard Matlovich’s life depict a reluctant activist for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender/gender diverse, and queer+ (LGBTQ+) equality. He served in the US military and subsequently came to personify the broad social challenges to the military’s homophobic culture and recruitment practices. Matlovich’s experience of a series of life metamorphoses made a difference beyond the individual. His example inspired multitudes of other concerned citizens in how to undertake their metamorphoses to challenge institutionalized homophobia. Breakthrough learning experiences in Matlovich’s life are presented to explore and refine aspects of transformative learning theory by applying Jane Martin’s metamorphosis model. The learning nexus between individuals and society is shown to be a dynamic interaction where both aspects of Matlovich’s story and his influence are explored in the context of today’s LGBTQ+ equality struggles. The article shows the conducive personal and societal conditions that enabled his various metamorphoses as whole-of-individual identity and sociocultural crossings toward transformational change. Additionally, the implications of Martin’s educational metamorphosis are discussed. Adult educators are encouraged to emphasize learning located in the learner’s life circumstances, exemplary case studies to inspire cultural crossings against injustice, and transformations as being about grasping in situ learning opportunities in the cross-influence between the whole person and their socio-historical context. Matlovich’s experiences show how relevant dimensions of Martin’s theoretical approach, coupled with support from allies, can contribute to personal agency and can build a groundswell of learning needed to support activism for social justice movements.
      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2022-04-20T04:57:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10451595221084413
       
  • Book Review: Designing the Online Learning Experience: Evidence-Based
           Principles and Strategies

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      Authors: Leann M.R. Kaiser
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2022-03-31T02:46:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10451595221084411
       
  • Older Adults in Adult Learning 1989–2020: A Literature Review

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      Authors: Lisa M. Baumgartner, Bora Jin, Junghwan Kim
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Ahead of Print.
      Older adults are a growing population. This article reviews the literature on older adults in Adult Learning from its inception in 1989 through 2020. Topics focus primarily on program reports, programmatic learning needs, personal reflections, and classroom methods. Key findings include that “older adult” is not well-defined and adults are portrayed as active learners. In addition, the demographics of authors and study participants are discussed. Findings have implications for researchers and practitioners.
      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2022-03-29T06:55:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10451595221077464
       
  • A Trauma-Informed Inquiry of COVID-19’s Initial Impact on Adult
           Education Program Administrators and Instructors in the United States

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      Authors: David A. Housel
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound impact on adult education programs globally, transforming in-person operations to distance, online enterprises often overnight. Many administrators, instructors, and program staff have been inordinately burdened physically, economically, and socially by the pandemic in ways that could be considered traumatic. The pandemic has also revealed how the insufficient access to educational technology and limited digital literacy has affected program administrators, instructors, and adult students alike. Can the pandemic create the opportunity to elevate adult learning and restructure existing policies and practices moving forward' To grapple with the answers to this question, this exploratory qualitative study sought the perspectives and insights of program administrators and instructors in adult education programs in the northeastern United States. Through an online, mostly open-ended questionnaire, self-reflections of lessons learned were analyzed through a trauma-informed lens (Gross, 2020). Through multiple rounds of coding, the following themes emerged: (1) balancing multiple stressors; (2) coping with pandemic uncertainty; and (3) addressing virtual classroom engagement, remote work, and the digital divide. Recommendations for modifying preservice preparation and ongoing professional development and making programmatic policies and instructional practices that promote distance teaching/learning and digital literacy in more trauma-responsive and inclusive ways were proposed as were areas for future research.
      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2022-03-03T03:10:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10451595211073724
       
  • The Hidden Labors of Adult Learning: Emotional, Gendered, and the
           Intersection

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      Authors: Makena Neal, Benjamin D. Espinoza
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Ahead of Print.
      Arlie Hochschild’s theory of emotional labor (1983) has become a staple framework for understanding the tension that exists between outward emotional expression and inward emotional realities. In it, Hoschild (1983) introduces us to the idea of emotional management, the expectations that are put on us to manipulate the display of our emotions—act—in order to put the experiences of others first. Recently, however, several articles in popular media have used emotional labor to describe labor that deviates from Hochschild’s (1983) original definition. In doing so, popular discourse has highlighted a kind of labor that has historically gone unnamed in the academy. The implications of not naming this other form of labor and instead morphing Hochschild’s original definition yield many consequences if left unchecked. The purpose of this article is to step into the conversation on emotional labor, highlight the gap in language to describe the various types of labor performed by adult learners, and introduce the idea of gendered labor as a way to be better informed in serving adult learners in ongoing development.
      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2022-02-25T03:29:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10451595211051079
       
  • Developing Effective Recruitment Strategies for African American Men to
           Earn Alternative High School Credentials

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      Authors: Michael T. Miller, David M. Deggs, Valerie H. Hunt, Lona J. Robterson, Callie Embry
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Ahead of Print.
      African American men have among the worst high school completion rates of any population in the United States. The consequences of dropping out of school are serious and include high levels of unemployment and incarceration. Attempts at recruiting these men to return to complete a high school credential have not been broadly successful, and the current study was designed to identify the best ideas and practices of recruiting African American men into high-school equivalency completion programs. Using a snowball-generated sample of eight adult education program directors, interviews were conducted to identify strategies and approaches for recruiting African American men. Ultimately, program directors comments resulted in three broad categories of successful recruitment: using personal relationships that connect with men where they are, strategically using social media and online resources that are directly targeted toward these men, and utilizing the relationships and support networks of African American church communities. Responding program directors also stressed the need to meet these men at the physical and psychological places where they are, recognizing that these points of contact can and will change as the men age and face different personal circumstances. The findings provide key information for high-school equivalency program directors as they construct purposeful recruitment plans that also include measures for assessing the effectiveness of their recruitment campaigns.
      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2022-02-24T09:45:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10451595211073725
       
  • Designing and Delivering Effective Online Instruction, How to Engage the
           Adult Learner

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      Authors: Linda Dale Bloomberg
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Ahead of Print.
      Access to different forms of education has become more prevalent in recent years. Online learning design requiresinnovative pedagogical practices. Dr. Bloomberg provides strategies for online course design, student engagement, andpedagogical methodology.
      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2022-02-15T05:13:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10451595211069079
       
  • Public Libraries: Your Partner in Increasing College Literacy Among
           Nontraditional Prospective Students

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      Authors: Africa S. Hands
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Ahead of Print.
      The Netflix docudrama, Operation Varsity Blues: The College Admissions Scandal, illustrates how college admissions, particularly at elite colleges, favors the privileged. Higher educational attainment overall favors the informed. Prospective students have many options when it comes to earning a college degree, with some of the more visible options (e.g. for-profit institutions) to degree attainment resulting in time and money wasted for nontraditional students. Thus, higher education professionals must educate prospective students on their options—sometimes at nontraditional locations. The local public library is one such uncommon, yet ideal location for reaching adult prospective students. Written from the perspective of a former higher education admission and advising professional now library science faculty, this article proposes that the reopening of public libraries post-quarantine is an opportune moment for colleges and universities to create partnerships to recruit adult students. Following a discussion of degree attainment among nontraditional students, barriers experienced, and public library services for adults, I offer four practical suggestions for higher education practitioners to collaborate with public libraries to broaden nontraditional, adult prospective students’ awareness of postsecondary opportunities.
      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2022-02-05T08:16:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10451595211069092
       
  • Rising from the Ashes of Academic Burnout: Beneficial Effects of Humor in
           Adult Education

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      Authors: Mohammad Ali Heidari-Shahreza
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2022-02-03T08:23:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10451595211055718
       
  • Using Group Messaging to Facilitate Peer Support Among Early Doctoral
           Students: A Thematic Analysis of One Cohort’s Text Messages

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      Authors: Julie M. Galliart, Elaine Thornton, Robin Freeman, Susan Bradley Pospisil, Brendan Csaposs, Kathleen Dorn, James Eller, Kenda S. Grover
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Ahead of Print.
      Students face multiple stressors while earning their doctorates. Since peer support is a common recommendation for easing this stress, we realized graduate students, faculty, and academic program administrators might have interest in how our cohort used group messaging to facilitate peer support early in our studies. We conducted a thematic analysis examining how group messaging helped new doctoral students in a hybrid program maintain ongoing engagement with course content and build interpersonal relationships. McClusky’s Theory of Margin provided a theoretical framework for this project. Results of thematic analysis emphasize that students utilized this communication medium to reach out to peers for support and to form interpersonal relationships with peers at a distance.
      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2022-02-01T11:07:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10451595211050072
       
  • Motivations and Barriers for Adult Learner Achievement: Recommendations
           for Institutions of Higher Education

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      Authors: Yamini Bellare, Adam Smith, Kelcee Cochran, Samuel Garcia Lopez
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Ahead of Print.
      Recent trends in higher education indicate a steady increase in the number of adult and non-traditional learners returning to complete college degrees. Though higher education can provide numerous economic and career enhancement opportunities, adult learners experience several challenges when they return to college. The purpose of this qualitative research study was to gather and analyze data from employees from companies in the Midwest to determine the challenges and motivations of adult learners who plan to return to higher education. The results highlight that it is important for institutions of higher education to collaborate with employers to identify ways to modify their student recruitment methods to attract more adult student learners and identify supportive resources to help them complete their degrees successfully.
      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2021-12-27T05:10:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10451595211059574
       
  • Individual Learning Accounts: A Comparison of Implemented and Proposed
           Initiatives

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      Authors: Phyllis A. Cummins, A. Katherine Harrington, Takashi Yamashita
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Ahead of Print.
      Access to lifelong learning opportunities has long been discussed in terms of the economic benefits conferred by access to and engagement in further education by members of the labor force, particularly within the global knowledge economy. However, equitable access to lifelong education opportunities, particularly for low-skilled adults in the labor force, has been lacking. The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) identified three models for funding adult learning: (1) individual learning accounts, (2) individual savings accounts, and (3) training vouchers. The current study discusses examples of these models, either proposed or implemented, across four countries or economic blocks—France, Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States. In addition, to understand the importance of providing funding for education and training to adults with low levels literacy skills, we use data from the Program for the International Assessment for Adult Competencies (PIAAC) to compare participation in adult education and training (AET) by literacy skill levels. In all countries examined, adults with low literacy skills participated in AET at lower rates than those with middle and high levels of literacy skills. To be successful in reaching adults most in need of skill upgrading, financing models need to provide adequate funds for meaningful skill upgrades, have well-structured information sources (e.g., websites) that are easily navigated by the target population, and include policies to screen educational providers for program quality.
      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2021-12-11T10:25:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10451595211046971
       
  • Educational Attainment, Literacy Skills, Nativity, and Motivation to Learn
           Among Middle-Aged Adults in the United States

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      Authors: Shalini Sahoo, Roberto J. Millar, Takashi Yamashita, Phyllis A. Cummins
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Ahead of Print.
      Research on factors associated with motivation to learn (MtL) is limited, particularly among middle-aged adults and immigrants. This study examines educational attainment, literacy skills, and nativity (foreign-born vs. native-born) as predictors of MtL in middle-aged adults living in the United States. Nationally representative data of middle-aged adults between the ages of 40 and 65 years were obtained from the 2012/2014 Program for International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC). Structural equation models were used to assess the validity of the latent MtL construct and to examine the associations with the selected determinants in middle-aged adults. Postsecondary education degrees and higher literacy skills were linked with greater MtL. However, foreign-born individuals had lower MtL than their US-born counterparts. Educators and researchers should be aware of lower educational attainment, limited literacy skills, and being an immigrant as possible demoting factors of MtL, and in turn, barriers to lifelong learning participation among middle-aged adults.
      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2021-12-04T02:44:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10451595211048554
       
  • The Centrality of Cultural Considerations in Facilitating Training for
           Adults

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      Authors: Corinne Brion
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Ahead of Print.
      Teaching and learning are social and cultural activities. Across cultures, people have different ways of communicating, interacting, and learning. Consequently, learning may not occur without understanding the role national cultures play on organizing and facilitating training events. This study is part of a larger study that took place over a period of 6 years, from 2013 to 2019, in West Africa. Using Hofstede et al.’s Six Cultural Dimensions model as a conceptual framework, the researcher sought to examine the extent to which factors of national culture influence the facilitation of professional learning among school principals in two West African countries. Findings indicated that facilitators adapted to national culture in the dimensions of Power Distance, Uncertainty Avoidance, and Long-Term Orientation. This study is significant because teaching does not always equate to learning, and understanding the role of cultural factors can improve learning transfer. If facilitators and practitioners understood how national cultures influence teaching, they would adapt and adjust their practices to the national cultures they serve to improve learning outcomes. Based on the study findings, the researcher offers recommendations for those practitioners who work with adults in international contexts and/or who attend to learners from various cultural backgrounds.
      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2021-08-27T10:08:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10451595211037310
       
  • Book Review: David Hansen and the Call to Teach: Renewing the Work That
           Teachers Do, by De Marzio, D. (Ed.)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Erin A. Galfer
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2021-08-25T06:53:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10451595211036512
       
  • Enhancing Leadership Training Through an Experiential Approach: An Online
           Model for the 21st Century

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      Authors: Anita Samuel, Steven J. Durning
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Ahead of Print.
      Billions of dollars are spent annually on leadership training and development courses. Unfortunately, this training, both at organizational and university levels, does not appear to consistently result in significant adult learning or better organizational performance. These programs tend to focus on the theories of leadership within closed classroom environments and sometimes present case studies to encourage application of knowledge. The content is typically dissociated from both context and leadership experiences and a “one size fits all” approach is adopted. This approach does not account for the corporate culture that is unique to every organization, even every department. In this innovation in practice article, we present a leadership practicum course tailored for adult learners that provides an experiential approach to leadership training enhanced by expert coaching. Initial results indicate that health care professionals appreciate the ability to transfer theory to practice and the feedback they receive from expert coaches. We present the practicum course and provide two cases to explicate the process; we share initial findings from the course and end with our next steps.
      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2021-05-06T10:17:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10451595211012473
       
  • Challenges, Changes, and Choices: Immigrant Academics of Color in American
           Academia

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      Authors: Rosite K. G. Delgado, Qi Sun
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Ahead of Print.
      Immigration is a hotly debated and deeply polarizing topic in American society. The past few decades have seen an influx of immigrants from Asia, Africa, and the Americas who contend with having a double-minority status. This qualitative study advances an understanding of the lived experiences and acculturation process of immigrant academics of color within American academia. Findings indicate struggles of cultural disequilibrium, marginalization, and the challenges of gaining or regaining cultural, professional, and social capital. Their experiences and perspectives have explicit implications for adult learning.
      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2021-04-28T05:15:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1045159521997583
       
  • Low-Skilled Return Migrants as Adult Learners: A Case of Mongolian
           Migrants Returning From South Korea

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      Authors: Kyoungjin Jang, Battuya Lkhagvadulam, Wonsup Chang
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Ahead of Print.
      This is an exploratory study on returning migrants as adult learners preparing to return to their home countries. We examined the educational needs and learning experiences of nine Mongolian migrants returning from South Korea who participated in vocational education programs for imminent returnees. Our qualitative analysis found that returning migrants have (a) the need to bring viable skills back to their home countries, (b) the need to learn how to start a business, and (c) the need to prove their experience and skills acquired in South Korea. Participants’ vocational education experiences revealed that current educational practices (a) provide knowledge that is too basic and abstract to meet migrants’ needs, and (b) lack variety to meet individuals’ needs to develop their skills; however, (c) they did enable migrants to share information and ideas about their upcoming return to Mongolia. Based on the findings, we identified key issues that must be considered to support migrants’ sustainable return to their home countries. The study’s limitations and suggestions for future research are provided to support various types of return migrants and their needs.
      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2021-04-24T09:23:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10451595211007939
       
  • Collective Memory Work: A Method for Turning Adult Learners’ Work-Life
           

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      Authors: Mette Wichmand, Ditte Kolbaek
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this article is to examine collective memory work (CMW) as a method for turning the work-life experiences of adult learners in a part-time master’s program into a collective knowledge resource, thereby strengthening the interplay between theory and practice in the students’ learning processes. CMW is a well-known qualitative research method, but only a limited amount of research has been done on its use in the context of higher education. This article is based on a case study of five CMW workshops executed between 2015 and 2019 as part of the program ‘Master’s in ICT and Learning’ provided by four collaborating Danish universities. The data consist of an educational design, in-class observations, and 103 memories written by students. This study shows how CMW enables students to share and analyze their work-life experiences as a relevant and rich collective knowledge resource, which allows them to discover shared structures between their work-life experiences and strengthen the interplay between theory and practice in their learning. The conclusion is that even though CMW is not designed to be used in an educational setting, the method can be applied with great results to turn students’ work-life experiences into a collective knowledge resource.
      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2021-04-17T08:50:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10451595211004767
       
  • Culture: The Link to Learning Transfer

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      Authors: Corinne Brion
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Ahead of Print.
      Organizations worldwide spend large amounts of money and resources on developing their employees, yet the money invested in professional learning (PL) yields low to moderate results at best. Because culture is a predominant force in people’s life, multinational corporations and other institutions should take culture into account at every stage of the PL process or they will not obtain the desired return on their investments. Despite the numerous studies on learning transfer, practitioners continue to experience challenges when it comes to altering their practices and generate better outcomes. Scholars have not yet fully taken into consideration culture when developing learning transfer models. Although some learning transfer models address transfer climate as an enhancer or a hindrance to learning transfer, none have considered the overall influence of culture on the transfer phenomenon. This article proposes a culturally grounded multidimensional model of learning transfer (MMLT). The MMLT is designed to assist practitioners and PL organizers before, during, and after the PL event. This innovative model aims at enhancing the implementation of new knowledge, skills, or behaviors in the workplace. The MMLT is based on qualitative data collected and analyzed over 6 years in educational institutions in five African nations. The model is relevant to any organizations across sectors whose aspirations are to maximize learning transfer and obtain a return on their investments that would in turn positively affect organizations’ outcomes.
      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2021-04-15T09:22:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10451595211007926
       
  • A Blueprint of Leadership Development for Female Marriage Migrants: A
           Pilot Exploration in Taiwan

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      Authors: Pi-Chi Han
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Ahead of Print.
      In 2020, more than 560,617 female marriage migrants (FMMs) live in Taiwan. For over three decades, they have been victims of social, gender, and cultural discrimination and have been considered as an inferior group of “desirable others” from “undeveloped countries.” Until today, literature about FMMs has focused on the problems and challenges they encountered, whereas there is no literature on their leadership development (LD) in Taiwan. By exploring 10 FMM leaders and their LD, this study charts their journey to success. The research has the following aims: (a) to explore life experiences as a pathway to LD, (b) to find an LD blueprint for FMMs, and (c) to bridge the literature gap for FMMs’ LD and provide implications to adult learning (AL) and human resources development (HRD) practitioners in planning and conducting training programs for FMMs’ LD. The theory of transformative learning (TTL) was applied as a theoretical framework whereas the qualitative research design was utilized as the methodology to explore 10 FMM leaders in Taiwan. The LD blueprint was built with seven themes derived from individual interviews and three themes from the focus group discussion. Resilience was found as the salient marker of building a successful mental model in FMMs’ LD. Implications are provided.
      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2021-03-18T07:21:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1045159520981164
       
  • Contributing Factors, Attribution, and Coping in Academic Boredom: An
           Exploratory Case Study of Graduate Students in Education

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      Authors: Jianling Xie, Jianzhong Xu, Tianlan Wei, Katarzyna Gallo, Mary Everett Giles, Yan Zhan, Yan Zeng, Xiang Huang, Xia Liu
      Abstract: Adult Learning, Ahead of Print.
      This exploratory qualitative case study investigates how graduate students in education experience, attribute, and combat academic boredom. Three areas of concern are addressed: (a) the contributing factors to boredom, (b) how attributional style (internal vs. external) relates to coping with boredom, and (c) the differences between combating class-related boredom and learning-related boredom. Results showed that the onset of boredom was mostly influenced by a lack of interest, lack of utility value, and autonomy frustration. This study extended the existing literature by discovering an interaction between students’ attributional style and their coping strategies for boredom during classroom instruction. Specifically, students who argued that the instructor should hold more responsibility for boredom in class tended to take avoidance coping as their primary strategy (e.g., doodling). By comparison, students who opted to approach the problem positively (e.g., taking notes) are prone to attribute internally. Attribution does not appear to have a mediating effect on the relationship between experience of boredom and coping strategies for learning-related boredom. Implications for graduate and adult education and findings in the context of recent theoretical frameworks are discussed.
      Citation: Adult Learning
      PubDate: 2021-01-27T11:48:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1045159520987304
       
 
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