Subjects -> EDUCATION (Total: 2346 journals)
    - ADULT EDUCATION (24 journals)
    - COLLEGE AND ALUMNI (10 journals)
    - E-LEARNING (38 journals)
    - EDUCATION (1996 journals)
    - HIGHER EDUCATION (140 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS (4 journals)
    - ONLINE EDUCATION (42 journals)
    - SCHOOL ORGANIZATION (14 journals)
    - SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATION (40 journals)
    - TEACHING METHODS AND CURRICULUM (38 journals)

ADULT EDUCATION (24 journals)

Showing 1 - 23 of 23 Journals sorted alphabetically
Adult Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Aikuiskasvatus     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Andragoška spoznanja     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Career and Technical Education Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Concept : The Journal of Contemporary Community Education Practice Theory     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
EJA em Debate     Open Access  
Empirical Research in Vocational Education and Training     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
European Journal for Research on the Education and Learning of Adults (RELA)     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
European Journal of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
International Journal of Adult Education and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Adult and Continuing Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Adult Theological Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Music, Technology and Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
New Horizons in Adult Education and Human Resource Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Nordic Journal of Vocational Education and Training     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pedagogia Social. Revista Interuniversitaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Recruiting & Retaining Adult Learners     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Revista Brasileira de Orienta     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Teaching in Lifelong Learning : a journal to inform and improve practice     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Teknologi Kejuruan     Open Access  
Widening Participation and Lifelong Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
European Journal of Training and Development
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.477
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 14  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 4 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 2046-9012 - ISSN (Online) 2046-9020
Published by Emerald Homepage  [360 journals]
  • Exploring the authenticity, or lack thereof, of the discourse of talent
           management

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rita A. Gardiner , Wendy Fox-Kirk , Syeda Tuba Javaid
      Abstract: This paper aims to examine the ways in which discourses of talent management (TM) reinforce and perpetuate structural barriers of exclusion and discrimination. The argument is made that dominant TM discourses must be interrogated if authentic talent development (ATD) practices are to succeed. This interrogation will require a shift from an organizational emphasis on talent identification towards ATD’s focus on talent cultivation. A conceptual approach is used to critically analyse TM discourses to assess the degree to which they are inclusive. Building upon the work of Debebe (2017), an alternative ATD approach is suggested that, together with the novel concept of authentic otherness, may enable scholars and practitioners to reflect upon current organizational practices and devise new approaches that encourage talent cultivation in diverse employees. This, in turn, may foster a greater sense of organizational belonging. Findings identify a number of ways in which organizational norms and structures are maintained and perpetuated through dominant, mainstream TM practices. This hinders ATD for many due to social ascription processes. By exploring the concept of “authentic otherness” (Gardiner, 2017), alongside Debebe’s (2017) approach to ATD, the argument is made that systemic inequities in the workplace may be addressed when we create conditions to support the cultivation of talent for all employees. This paper builds on recent arguments in the critical TM literature concerning the exclusionary nature of mainstream TM practices in organizations. The concept of authentic otherness is clarified and defined with a view to using this new term as a heuristic device to encourage a reflective understanding of how ATD practices can be developed.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-07-29
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-12-2021-0203
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Empowering leadership and employee creativity: the mediating roles of work
           engagement and knowledge sharing

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Baek-Kyoo Joo , Jeong-Ha Yim , Young Sim Jin , Soo Jeoung Han
      Abstract: This study aims to investigate the relationship between empowering leadership and employee creativity and the mediating roles of work engagement and knowledge sharing in this relationship. Using the results of a survey of 302 knowledge workers from a leading telecommunications company in South Korea, the relationships among the variables empowering leadership, work engagement and knowledge sharing on employee creativity were analyzed using conducted confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling. This study conducted bootstrap analyses to test the mediating effects. Empowering leadership was positively and significantly associated with work engagement and knowledge sharing. Work engagement was significantly related to knowledge sharing and employee creativity. In turn, knowledge sharing was significantly associated with employee creativity. The direct effect of empowering leadership on employee creativity was nonsignificant, but this study found a significant indirect effect of empowering leadership on employee creativity via the significant mediating roles of work engagement and knowledge sharing. This study introduced empowering leadership that may work for knowledge workers who create new ideas by analyzing data from the knowledge workers’ perceptions of their leaders in the workplace. The intuitive linkage between work engagement and knowledge sharing was empirically verified in this study. This study’s findings and implications provide direction for knowledge workers and how their managers should support employees’ work environment and activities.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-07-26
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-02-2022-0016
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Relationship between educational mismatches and job satisfaction: evidence
           from Korean young employees’ lifelong learning

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kyung Hee Park , Nan Luo
      Abstract: This study aims to demonstrate whether the educational mismatch prevalent in society can be overcome by various types of lifelong learning and whether lifelong learning can contribute to job satisfaction. The participants were 2,559 young Korean employees who graduated from general or specialized vocational high school. This study applied structural equation modeling to verify the mediating effects of lifelong learning on the relationship between educational mismatch and job satisfaction. In addition, this study compared whether the conceptual model results were applied to those who graduated from general school and specialized vocational school through multigroup analysis. Regarding the horizontal mismatch, the mediating effect of lifelong learning correlated with job satisfaction was significantly measured in all multigroup models, including the conceptual model. Nevertheless, regarding the vertical mismatch, this study confirmed that informal learning influences job satisfaction differently according to the type of high school from which employees graduated. Furthermore, for those who graduated from specialized vocational school, the relationship between vertical mismatch and job satisfaction was significantly indicated. However, there was no influence of informal learning at the workplace. This study empirically demonstrated the alternative value of lifelong learning in overcoming the preceding educational mismatch. Moreover, the evidence that such lifelong learning effects may vary depending on the vocational education experiences before entering the labor market is valuable.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-07-20
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-02-2022-0013
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • How job complexity fosters employee creativity: a contextualized growth
           perspective and the mechanism of feedback-seeking

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Wa Yang , Jinqiang Zhu , Shiyong Xu , Yanjun Liu , Dongying Luo , Yixiao Wang , Jia Yu
      Abstract: Drawing on the work design growth model (WDGM), this paper aims to explore the relationship between job complexity and employee creativity through feedback-seeking and the moderating effect of team leaders with a growth creative mindset. The authors used an online survey to test the hypotheses. Data was collected in three waves from 74 supervisors and 349 paired employees in China. Job complexity had a positive association with employees’ feedback-seeking, which further linked to employee creativity. This indirect effect was stronger in work teams with leaders endorsing a growth creative mindset. Job complexity has become prevalent in organizations today. Taking daily complexity as a resource for nurturing employee creativity may balance organizations’ costs on formal training and give them more initiatives in long-term development. In addition, as the growth creative mindset is relatively easy to assess and change, it may bring insights in terms of creativity development. By empirically testing the behavioural mechanism of WDGM, the learning and development perspective of work design offers a new explanation of the relationship between job complexity and employee creativity. The authors further extend WDGM by identifying leaders’ growth creative mindset to be a boundary condition.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-07-18
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-03-2022-0024
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Global scientific literature on human resource development: a bibliometric
           analysis using Scopus database

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Binh Pham-Duc , Trung Tran , Dung Huu Hoang , Chau Bao Do
      Abstract: This paper aims to analyze the development of global human resource development (HRD) articles published in journals indexed in the Scopus database since 1960s until present time. A publication collection of 1,905 articles collected from the Scopus database was downloaded and analyzed by using bibliometric techniques available in the VOSviewer and Biblioshiny software. Three different development stages of HRD research have been identified: a seeding stage between 1962 and 1989, a growth stage between 1990 and 2007 and a development stage from 2008 onward. The USA and the UK were the biggest contributors who participated to 30.02% and 12.55% of articles in the collection and received 43.82% and 19.54% of the total number of citations, respectively. Scholars with the most publications and citations are mostly from the USA and the UK, and nine over ten most cited articles having first author’s affiliation located there. Emerald Group is the most popular publishing house, as five over ten most popular journals belong to this publishing house. After six decades of development, it is necessary to examine the evolution of HRD research, its characteristics and its intellectual framework as this type of analysis is not yet available in the literature. This study helps scholars better understand this research field, as well as better prepare for future work in HRD.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-28
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-01-2022-0004
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Trainees’ aversions of employee training programs

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Raphael Papa Kweku Andoh , Elizabeth Cornelia Annan-Prah , Emmanuel Afreh Owusu , Paul Mensah Agyei
      Abstract: Training evaluation is an important part of training programs and evaluating the reactions of trainees is of immense value, but there are few studies on this level of evaluation, as it is a neglected area of research. More so, when trainee reactions to training are poor, human resource managers together with learning and development professionals are able to improve on training programs. Nonetheless, no study has focussed on the aversions of trainees to training, and so this study aims to investigate the aversions of trainees regarding employee training. This study uses the exploratory research design and obtains data from trainees in an online survey using an open-ended question. Thematic text analyses of the statements of 118 respondents are performed using a two-level coding process. A total of 15 first-level codes are identified from the texts and categorized into five second-level codes. Further analyses culminate in the identification of two broad themes; trainers’ presentation aversions and organization of training aversions. Attention must be given to the aversions of trainees in the training evaluation literature. This is because of the considerable amount of information that can be generated and based on that, identify the weaknesses inherent in employee training programs and ultimately improve this critical human resource function within organizations. In attending to the trainee aversions, the least and most reported should be resolved holistically for training objectives to be achieved. Trainee reaction studies are scarce in the training literature. In addition, most of the existing trainee reaction studies focus on satisfaction while using closed-ended questionnaires. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study that focuses on the aversions of trainees and which uses an open-ended question.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-28
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-02-2022-0022
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Impact of supervisory delegation on employee voice behavior: role of felt
           obligation for constructive change and voice climate

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Um-e Rubbab , Sayyed Muhammad Mehdi Raza Naqvi , Muhammad Irshad , Ramsha Zakariya
      Abstract: The research linking organizational change-oriented activities with employee voice behavior is still in its initial stages. This study aims to contribute to this line of research by proposing felt obligation for constructive change, an underlying mechanism through which supervisory delegation enhances teachers’ voice behavior. This study tested the interactive effect of felt obligation for constructive change and voice climate on teachers’ voice behavior. The proposed model is supported by proactive motivation theory which states that environmental factors lead to motivational states which further result in employee proactive behaviors. In this study, 415 teachers with their 74 supervisors (head of departments) from educational institutes completed the surveys. Structural equation modeling was used to find the results. The results supported the mediation and moderation hypotheses, which proved that felt obligation for constructive change mediates the relationship between supervisory delegation and teachers’ voice behavior, and voice climate moderates the relationship between felt obligation for constructive change and teacher voice behavior. This paper will provide an insight to the practitioners about the role of supervisory delegation for engagement in employee voice. This paper will also help managers understand that the workplace effectiveness can be enhanced by creating opportunities for employees to voice their concern. This study recommends that head of departments at the workplace should cultivate an environment that is conducive for their faculty for engaging in voice behavior for improved functioning of educational institutes. Findings provide an insightful approach on organizational strategies in the form of supervisory delegation to trigger voice behavior among employees to meet the uncertainty of the ever-changing business environment.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-22
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-01-2022-0006
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Emotion in teams: a scoping literature review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lei Xie , Jonathan Wilson , Todd Sherron
      Abstract: The empirical findings of the roles of emotions in teams are mixed. This study, a scoping literature review, aims to synthesize extant research on the roles of emotions in work teams and offers future research directions. Sixty-nine empirical studies from the past ten years (2012 to 2021) were identified and reviewed. The authors then analyzed these 69 papers based on their research design, focus and nomological network of emotions. The authors found that there is a clear increasing research trend of studying emotions in a team setting. In the extant literature, team emotions were studied from three major perspectives: emotions, emotional management and emotion measurement. The authors also summarized findings into the nomological network of team emotions. Last but not least, future research directions regarding the research context, focus and design and analysis were recommended. The role of emotions in teams has not been extensively reviewed or synthesized, and the empirical findings are mixed. This paper synthesized the role of emotions in teams and critical factors that affect emotions in teams. In particular, the research recommendations for critical human resource development scholars cover three aspects: research context advancement, research focus advancement and research design and analysis advancement.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-14
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-01-2022-0002
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Department chairs’ perceptions of union membership on academic human
           resource decision-making

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Leigh Settlemoir Dzwik , Sunyoung Park
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to explore unionization’s impact on university department chairs for academic human resource decision-making in terms of faculty hiring; re-employment, promotion and tenure; other faculty evaluation decisions; and discipline and discharge. The subjects were department chairs with more than one year of experience in institutions with faculty bargaining units in the USA. Half of the department chairs were members of the bargaining unit and half were not members of the bargaining unit. T-test and Chi square statistics were used to examine and compare 136 chair responses. While there were significant differences between the groups when making all academic human resource decisions based on role affiliation, there was a weak identification as a bargaining unit member. There was no difference between groups when determining how the participants perceived the process rules, and the majority of the responses indicated membership in the union does not complicate making academic human resource decisions. Based on these findings, this study provides the first empirical evidence against a long-held administrative belief department chairs should not be unionized as they will side with union colleagues in difficult academic human resource cases. The findings of this study also produce three key recommendations for practice and faculty development.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-10
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-11-2021-0185
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Human resource development in SMEs in a context of labor shortage: a
           profile analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Andrée-Anne Deschênes
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to examine small and medium-sized enterprises’ (SMEs) level of participation in human resource development activities during a labor shortage. Drawing on human capital theory, it examines whether SMEs’ profiles, determined according to their participation in different types of training activities, relate to perceived benefits of training, barriers to participation in training and learning culture. This study applies latent profile analysis (LPA) to 10 training practices of 427 SMEs in Quebec, Canada. The LPA distinguished four profiles of SMEs, reflecting differing capacities for mobilizing training resources during a labor shortage. These four profiles show differences with regard to perceived training benefits, barriers to participation in training and learning culture. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is among the first to focus on the specific ability of SMEs to invest in their human capital in the unique and recent context of a labor shortage.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-05-24
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-02-2022-0015
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Artificial intelligence in learning and development: a systematic
           literature review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Parag Bhatt , Ashutosh Muduli
      Abstract: The presented research explored artificial intelligence (AI) application in the learning and development (L&D) function. Although a few studies reported AI and the people management processes, a systematic and structured study that evaluates the integration of AI with L&D focusing on scope, adoption and affecting factors is mainly absent. This study aims to explore L&D-related AI innovations, AI’s role in L&D processes, advantages of AI adoption and factors leading to effective AI-based learning following the analyse, design, develop, implement and evaluate approach. The presented research has adopted a systematic literature review method to critically analyse, synthesise and map the extant research by identifying the broad themes involved. The review approach includes determining a time horizon, database selection, article selection and article classification. Databases from Emerald, Sage, Francis and Taylor, etc. were used, and the 81 research articles published between 1996 and 2022 were identified for analysis. The result shows that AI innovations such as natural language processing, artificial neural networks, interactive voice response and text to speech, speech to text, technology-enhanced learning and robots can improve L&D process efficiency. One can achieve this by facilitating the articulation of learning module, identifying learners through face recognition and speech recognition systems, completing course work, etc. Further, the result also shows that AI can be adopted in evaluating learning aptitude, testing learners’ memory, tracking learning progress, measuring learning effectiveness, helping learners identify mistakes and suggesting corrections. Finally, L&D professionals can use AI to facilitate a quicker, more accurate and cheaper learning process, suitable for a large learning audience at a time, flexible, efficient, convenient and less expensive for learners. In the absence of any systematic research on AI in L&D function, the result of this study may provide useful insights to researchers and practitioners.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-05-16
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-09-2021-0143
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Determinants of research performance of university academics and the
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Roziah Mohd Rasdi , Siti Zainab Tauhed , Zeinab Zaremohzzabieh , Seyedali Ahrari
      Abstract: This paper aims to identify the role of organizational and individual factors in predicting the research performance of academics when job crafting is a mediator variable and organizational culture is a moderating variable. This study was conducted by collecting responses from academics at five Malaysian research-based universities. The sample size was 273. Standard questionnaires were used to collect the data. The data were analyzed using partial least squares structural equation modeling. The most significant predictors of research performance were organizational culture, individual effort and professional development, whereby job crafting was most optimally predicted by work engagement and transformational leadership. While organizational culture moderated the relationship between transformational leadership and research performance, the mediating role of job crafting was insignificant between work engagement and research performance. The findings have important implications for human resource development practitioners (HRD) in terms of improving overall academic research performance. Practical interventions are suggested to assist academics in enhancing their performance. This study highlights how academic performance can be managed more effectively. The findings extend the HRD literature in higher education and offer a framework that enhances the understanding of the organizational and individual factors that influence academics' research performance within a specific context of research universities in a non-Western context.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-05-16
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-11-2021-0192
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • CSR, marketing capabilities and human resource development: the endogenous
           role of network capabilities

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tu Van Binh , Linh Nguyen Khanh Duong , Ngo Giang Thy , Huynh Dang Khoa
      Abstract: This study aims to examine the relationship between human resource development (HRD) and the interaction between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and marketing capabilities in small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in the food industry. This research uses the extended regression model on a sample of 2,649 food SMEs in Vietnam. This research found that CSR and marketing strategies positively influence HRD; the interaction of CSR and marketing capabilities has a negative effect on HRD; the endogenous role of network capabilities on the effects of CSR and marketing capabilities on HRD. This research helps food companies use their resources in allocating resources for CSR and conduct marketing reasonably and effectively. This study highlights that the impact of CSR and marketing on HRD is dominated by endogenous networking.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-05-13
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-02-2022-0014
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Understanding the talent development of notable artists and scientists of
           color and women: Why contextual factors matter

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Susan J. Paik , Lindsey T. Kunisaki , Vinh Q. Tran , Kenya R. Marshall-Harper
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to discuss the significance of “contextual factors” on the talent development of underserved populations. Understanding the “context” and background of an individual provides greater insight into their life experiences (Paik, 2013). Race, class and gender, in particular, play a role in one’s life, providing both barriers and opportunities. To examine contextual and other factors, in-depth biographical case studies were systematically studied across 10 diverse notable artists and scientists. Over 85 autobiographies, biographies and other sources were carefully content-analyzed for commonalities and differences in artists’ and scientists’ lives. Because of their ascribed statuses (e.g. race, class, gender), these individuals had to navigate their unique school and life circumstances. Within their sociocultural contexts, however, key relationships (e.g. parents, teachers, mentors and peers) helped mitigate the challenges. All artists and scientists had a “village” – key stakeholders who invested in them at every stage of their talent development. Parents, teachers, mentors and peers are not only critical, but they are lifelines for talent development. Key implications discuss the role of contextual factors and support networks for aspiring diverse artists and scientists. The theoretical framework for this study is based on the productive giftedness model (PGM) (Paik, 2013, 2015). PGM includes 10 key psychosocial and environmental factors and how they influence “productive giftedness” (e.g. achievements, accomplishments, leadership). Within the model, both “alterable” and “contextual factors” provide access to different opportunities, support and resources. The model is considered generalizable and applicable for diverse populations.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-05-05
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-07-2021-0100
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Design thinking: a cognitive resource for improving workforce analytics
           and training evaluation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Natasha Zafar , Muhammad Ali Asadullah , Muhammad Zia Ul Haq , Ahmad Nabeel Siddiquei , Sajjad Nazir
      Abstract: The firms use training evaluation practices (TEPs) to determine the return of billions of dollars spent on employee training and development activities. The firms need to modernize the set of TEPs for evidence-based workforce management decisions. This study aims to examine a mediation mechanism to explain how human resource (HR) professionals’ design thinking (DT) mindset strengthens the set of TEPs using predictive workforce analytics (PWAs). The authors used SPSS computational named MLMED to test the proposed relationships by collecting data from 180 management professionals serving in subsidiaries of multinational corporations in Pakistan. The statistical results demonstrated that DT is not directly related to firms’ TEPs. However, the statistical results supported the mediating role of firms’ use of PWAs between DT and TEPs. The findings offer a new perspective for firms to use HR professionals’ DT mindset for modernizing the set of existing HR practices.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-26
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-09-2021-0150
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • A study to explore the linkage between green training and sustainable
           organizational performance through emotional intelligence and green work
           life balance

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Pallavi Deshpande , Anugamini Priya Srivastava
      Abstract: This study aims to review the role of green training and green work life balance (GWLB) on sustainable organizational performance (SOP) with a moderating variable “Emotional Intelligence” (EI). For the development of the construct of the present study, a Scopus database was selected and research papers published in indexed journals were considered. Relevant keywords were selected and literature was searched on green training, EI, SOP, GWLB. The literature was reviewed to find out the linkage and possibility of development of integrated model. The main focus was on highlighting the relevance of green training on GWLB and its influence on SOP. SOP can be achieved with the intervention of EI and GWLB; further green training is one of the influential practices of human resource development (HRD) which helps to develop the green behavior. It can give new insight to the organization for application of green human resource practices for SOP. Development and designing the cohesive environmental work culture and willingness to protect environment through green training can be implemented by HRD. Perhaps, the application of green training encourages GWLB. Quantitative research and cross sectional study is required to find out the intervening role of EI and work–life balance between green training and SOP across a broader range of sectors. This research extends the literature review and developed a new integrated model which shows the link between green training and SOP.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-26
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-11-2021-0182
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Exploring learning outcomes for managers who coach

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Beth Adele , Andrea D. Ellinger , Rochell R. McWhorter , Toby M. Egan
      Abstract: As a part of a larger study, the purpose of this study was to explore the learning outcomes for the “manager as coach” when exemplary managers are engaged in coaching their respective employees. A qualitative, multi-case study using an adaptation of the critical incident technique (CIT) and semistructured interviews was employed with 12 managers and their respective direct reports totaling 24 interviews. Content and constant comparative analyses were used to analyze the data. A total of five themes and 19 subthemes were identified regarding managers’ learning outcomes from managers’ perspectives. From the perspectives of their employees as coachees regarding their managers’ learning outcomes, one theme with three subthemes emerged. Limited empirical research has explored the developmental outcomes for managers who serve as coaches for their employees. This study examined the outcomes associated with managerial coaching from both the perspectives of the managers who coach and their direct reports. The findings of this research provide more insight into the benefits managers derive from coaching their employees.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-26
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-12-2021-0198
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Winterizing the Egyptian spring: why might business schools fail to
           develop responsible leaders'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mohamed Mousa
      Abstract: This paper aims to theoretically answer the question: why might business schools in Egypt fail to develop responsible leaders' The author starts by discussing modernization theory (Lipset, 1959) – which highlights the idea that the more educated people there are in a given society/nation, the more calls for democracy, social citizenship and social justice will be launched – to address the strong association between the quality of business learning and the development of responsible leadership norms. Moving forward by focusing on the theory of education (Dewey, 1916) and institutional theory (DiMaggio and Powell, 1983), the author finds the main conditions needed to develop responsible leadership norms among business school students. The author identified the following three necessary conditions: implementing responsible management education, sustaining management learning and ensuring that a purposive hidden curriculum is well-planned in business schools. The author sees these as the main priorities for developing responsible leadership skills among business school students in Egypt and similar post revolution countries. This paper contributes by filling a gap in responsible leadership, public administration and higher education literature, in which conceptual studies on the role of business schools in post-revolution periods and conflict zones has been limited until now.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-11
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-11-2021-0194
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Forgetting to learn and learning to forget: the call for organizational
           unlearning

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mandolen Mull , Clayton Duffy , Dave Silberman
      Abstract: The purpose of this conceptual paper is to provide a foundation for human resource development (HRD) scholars in attempts to devise mechanisms for establishing and facilitating actionable pathways through which unlearning can be acknowledged and serve as a contributing agent for HRD interventions. This paper concludes with a call to action for our HRD colleagues to join us in further examination of unlearning interventions within the organizational context. This paper narratively details the literature associated with the myriad social science domains that have investigated the unlearning process. Additionally, a cross-disciplinary literature review provides the basis for an operational definition of unlearning provided herein. The field of HRD is devoted to creating learning organizations as well as utilizing change initiatives to develop organizations. However, unlearning has been largely ignored within the field of HRD. The first contribution is by answering the call of scholars across varied disciplines to further investigate unlearning within the organizational context (Bettis and Prahalad, 1995; Hedberg, 1981; Nystrom and Starbuck, 1984). Additionally, this paper seeks to specifically address the role that unlearning holds within the field of HRD as it builds upon the definition provided by Wang et al. (2017) and offers its own operational definition. Finally, this paper provides the only known review of cross-disciplinary research pertaining to unlearning.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-03-30
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-10-2021-0162
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Skills mismatch and change confidence: the impact of training on change
           recipients’ self-efficacy

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Filippo Ferrari
      Abstract: Drawing on Bandura’s social learning theory (SLT), the purpose of this paper is to investigate, analytically, the impact that after-training skills level (i.e. perceived skill match) has on change self-efficacy. Moreover, this research also aims to identify which specific skills sets (if any) act as a protective factor during organizational change, supporting the change confidence (CC) level of the people involved. Quantitative research was carried out on a sample of 200 workers in the bank sector. Findings of this study suggest that skill match has a significant impact on the CC level. Furthermore, this study demonstrates that, even in front-office jobs, a perceived skill match of soft skills does not have a significant impact on staff CC, unlike that suggested by common sense and by literature. Future research should investigate if and how a training process enables change self-efficacy over time or instead shows its utility only when it is relating to a specific and limited period. This study suggests that in designing training, top and middle management should pay specific attention to change recipients’ needs by adopting a bottom-up approach. Moreover, to improve training effectiveness, it would be advisable to also train change recipients’ supervisors. This study has social implications in suggesting how to foster the adaptive capabilities of change recipients in current turbulent times. In doing so, it suggests how to prevent some undesirable change consequences such as anxiety, intention to quit, work-related stress and change cynicism. This paper shows that, from a methodological point of view, it is necessary to evaluate training effectiveness at the level of a specific skill area and not simply by comparing the trained/not trained people, as typically practiced until now.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-03-23
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-06-2021-0072
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Multilevel and multisite leadership development from a
           leadership-as-practice perspective: an integrative literature review

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Salla Lehtonen , Hannele Seeck
      Abstract: This paper reviews what has been written on leadership development from the leadership-as-practice (L-A-P) perspective, which views leadership as emerging in everyday activities and interactions of a collective in a specific context. This paper aims to deepen the theoretical understanding of how leadership can be learned and developed from the L-A-P perspective. An integrative literature review was undertaken to review and synthesise what has been written on the topic in journal articles and scholarly books. The importance of the context and the practices that are embedded in it is the most central aspect affecting leadership development from the L-A-P perspective. This places workplace leadership development centre stage, but several papers also showed that leadership programmes have an important role. Not only collective capacity building is emphasised in the papers, but the importance of individual-level leader development is also recognised. The contribution of this study is twofold: First, it brings the currently fractured information on L-A-P development together to enhance theory building by providing a synthesis of the literature. Second, a conceptual framework is constructed to show how the L-A-P perspective on leadership development can take both leadership development at the collective and individual levels into account, as well as the learning that takes place either inside or outside the workplace. This study’s results and framework show that the development has its own specific purpose and suggested methods in both levels, in both learning sites.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-03-18
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-09-2021-0135
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Integrative model of the leader competences

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Paula Cristina Nunes Figueiredo , Maria José Sousa , Eduardo Tomé
      Abstract: The aim of the paper is to propose an integrative model of the leader competences through the analysis of the several models of competence found in the literature review. The methodology used was qualitative, based partially on an integrative literature review (Torraco 2016). This paper aims to review, update and criticize the literature related to the competences approach in the organizational context and, on the other hand, to review, criticize and synthesize the literature, namely, the models and competences. Difficulties in choosing and implementing a leader competency model led to the integration of competencies in a single model, seeking to simplify the choice and implementation process in organizations. The integrative model of leader competences arises from the literature review, more specifically from the analysis of the different approaches found. This model is grouped into four dimensions – intellectual competences, management competences, social competences and emotional competences. This research is a contribution to reduce the fragmentation of leadership and management theories and facilitates the choice and implementation of a leader competence model suited to the organization’s needs, contributing to the leadership effectiveness. The integrative model of the leader competences allows the choice and implementation of a competence model with a wide range of competences considered as essential in the organizational context by several researchers. This model simplifies the process of identifying the competences that need to be developed, feeding the human resources development process within the organization.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-03-16
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-08-2021-0121
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Academic supports, motivation to learn, motivation to transfer and
           transfer of training: a comparative analysis of public and private
           universities

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Shahbaz Sharif , Mary Braimah , Alice Emmanuela Dogbey
      Abstract: Public and private universities keep facilitating knowledge transfer and sharing within academic institutions. Multiple factors have been investigated to strengthen the infrastructure of these universities; however, the researchers have always been trying to explore the best one. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of academic supports on motivation to learn (MTL) and transfer, in turn, influence transfer of training (TOT). Interestingly, the sector (i.e. public or private universities) unveils TOT to see whether the public sector has best practices or private. This study adopts valid measurement instruments from the literature studies. This study pretests the validity and reliability of the instruments. This study administers the designed survey questionnaire among the faculty members of both public and private universities. This study uses a convenient sampling approach using a quantitative research method. By applying Smart partial least square (PLS) 3.3.3, this study uses structural equation modeling. This study supports that organization, supervisor and peer support significantly and positively influence TOT. Additionally, MTL and motivation to transfer (MTT) significantly and positively mediate the link between TOT and organizational, supervisor and peer support. MTL also significantly and positively influences MTT. Most interestingly, the sector significantly and positively moderates the link between TOT and organizational, supervisor and peer support, MTL and transfer. The results support the public and private universities that they should develop the infrastructure containing learning motivation and transfer for easy TOT. This would be more effective if the in higher educational institutions (HEIs) follow research findings. This study empirically tests the impacts of academic supports on MTL and transfer, which boosts the TOT. The novelty of the research can be implemented in HEIs’ rules and regulations.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-03-14
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-05-2021-0068
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Principal self-efficacy, mindset and performance outcomes: exploring the
           connection

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kristen Justus , Vishal Arghode , David Barker
      Abstract: This study aims to explore the relationship between principals’ performance on the Pennsylvania Framework for Leadership evaluation tool and the corresponding self-reported degree of self-efficacy and growth mindset. The data analysis involved linear regression of principal performance on principals’ mindset, moral leadership self-efficacy and instructional self-efficacy scores. Additionally, correlation matrices identified the presence and direction of relationships between self-efficacy levels and the degree of growth mindset reported by principals. The results demonstrated a positive association between principals’ instructional self-efficacy reports and their overall performance evaluation. Alternatively, both growth mindset and moral leadership self-efficacy evidenced a negative association. There was no association reflected between growth mindset and either the overall self-efficacy measure or the sub-scale self-efficacy measures. A secondary relationship revealed a negative association between school performance profile and growth mindset. This relationship held true in subsequent regression analyses. The study adds to the limited research available on examining the relationship between principals’ self-efficacy levels and their performance ratings on a common tool.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-03-10
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-07-2021-0092
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • A proposed research agenda concerning supervisor training for newcomer
           organizational socialization

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Andrew Sanghyun Lee
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to identify extant training needs for preparing supervisors to support newcomers’ organizational socialization and to develop a research agenda concerning aspects that conduce to making supervisors efficacious in the process of organizational socialization. A review of the literature on the development of socialization agents for organizational socialization generally indicates that relatively minimal research has been undertaken on this topic. Most articles have focused on the effects of organizational socialization on other variables – such as newcomers’ work outcomes, turnover intention and organizational commitment. The review was conducted in light of this phenomenon. It is based on the structured literature review method, per Rocco, Stein and Lee (2003). Supervisor training is suggested as a means for enhancing organizational socialization. However, supervisor training is not often studied in organizational socialization research. Therefore, the verification of the impact of supervisor training on organizational socialization is required. Given the proposed research agenda, identifying the impact of supervisor training on different areas of organizational socialization domains and inspiring increased interest on supervisor training as an effective program for organizational socialization are logical outcomes. The concept of socialization is used in broad areas of research, such as education, military and engineering. However, it was reviewed here vis-à-vis human resource development (HRD). Therefore, the focus was on the notion of organizational socialization, which is appropriate for employee training development. The concept of organizational socialization in this paper, therefore, was delimited, as it failed to include all meanings of socialization. This paper sought to review all studies related to organizational socialization. However, some research was not considered and, thus, not discussed in this paper. This was because of time and resource constraints. The author sorted previous studies by personal standards and, thus, may have inadvertently included non-germane or excluded relevant citations. Supervisory training for organizational socialization can be proposed as a potential area for leading to an effective organizational socialization program. So HRD professionals should study further about the topic and develop such programs. Increased attention on supervisor training for organizational socialization may increase the number and quality of supervisor training programs. Such studies would augment HRD professionals’ knowledge about organizational socialization and eventually enhance performance in organizations. This paper can expand the area in which social learning theory can be applied. According to Bandura and Walters (1977), the social learning theory posits that learning new behaviors can usually be acquired by observing and imitating others. This implies that newcomers emulate other organizational members to adapt to the organization and their assigned roles. In this process, supervisors can play a key role through showing them the appropriate behaviors, supporting their learning and providing appropriate feedback. Presumably, then, new employees may perform better if supervisors receive training on crucial socialization efforts. Significantly, socialization agents are uniquely situated to greatly impact the organizational socialization process of newcomers. Among the socialization agents, supervisors garner enormous influence on newcomers’ organizational socialization. However, relatively few studies investigated the training of supervisors for organizational socialization.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-03-08
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-06-2021-0082
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Comparative study of the perceptions of Mexican and Colombian employees
           about managerial and leadership behavioural effectiveness

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Carlos Enrique Ruiz , Robert Hamlin , Luis Eduardo Torres
      Abstract: The purpose of this qualitative study is to compare the perceptions of employed people in Mexico and Colombia about managerial and leadership behavioural effectiveness. A qualitative multiple cross-case and cross-nation comparative analysis of findings obtained from the two past emic replication (Mexico and Colombia) studies was conducted. The study suggests that people within Mexican and Colombian organizations perceive “managerial and leadership behavioural effectiveness” in very similar ways. The findings support those researchers whose studies indicate that culture may not, as previously thought, play a significant role in the way managers should manage and lead their subordinates. The authors acknowledge two main limitations related to the sample size and scope of the two compared sets of empirical source data. The number of critical incidents about perceived managerial behavioural effectiveness obtained from the two compared studies was unbalanced (318 from the Mexican study and 267 from the Colombian study). Thus, the authors suggest more indigenous replication managerial behaviour studies be carried out in both Mexico and Colombia with the objective of identifying (if possible) the existence of critical incidents that could lead to different findings. Furthermore, the authors suggest conducting replica studies focused on specific industries rather than a diverse range of organizations to test the generalizability of the findings. The findings of the comparative study are relevant to those human resource development professionals in international companies with operations in Mexico and/or Colombia when preparing their executives for international assignments in these Latin American countries. The comparative study attempts to generate new insights and better understanding within the context of “managerial and leadership behavioural effectiveness” research, which the authors hope will make a useful contribution to the existing small body of knowledge regarding similarities and differences in managerial practices across culturally diverse Latin American countries.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-02-22
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-06-2021-0076
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Co-created employer brands: the interplay of strategy and identity
         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Anna Näppä
      Abstract: The study aims to explore strategic employer brand management by combining experiences of multiple organizations. In particular, the purpose is to identify what strategic management processes managers consider relevant to employer brand management for small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). This study took an inductive approach, observing a practitioner project in Sweden. The data were gathered during four full-day workshops, where 14 SMEs from different industries were chosen to participate and to actively work their employer brand(ing) activities. The results show that organizations have difficulty understanding and comparing employer branding practices, and thus, evaluating their own brand. The major themes show that organizations have two focus points for their employer branding work: building strategic structures (processes) on one hand, and a collective identity that aligns with the brand values, on the other. However, organizations differ in these dimensions, affecting what needs to be done to become successful. This contributes to the limited knowledge about employer branding, human resources development (HRD) and SMEs. In addition, most of the previous studies have neglected to take into account the differences between organizations, approaching employer branding as a universal process. This paper summarizes different positions for employer brands that affect strategy: the unmanaged, the non-strategic, the impersonal and finally, the co-created. Co-creation can be facilitated with the help of constructive and collaborative HRD. Then, it can be turned into a dynamic capability that builds competitive advantage.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-02-15
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-05-2021-0065
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Manager-as-coach and use of scenistic tools for instruction

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Paul Lyons , Randall P. Bandura
      Abstract: The purpose of this essay is the provision of a conceptual approach for a manager-as-coach to use for instructional purposes with an employee. Using scenistic materials (cases, incidents, stories), the aim of the essay is to assist the practitioner apply a practical and relatively adaptable instructional approach. While it is intended for application with a single employee, the approach, with modifications, may be used in a small group environment. The methodology was directed to the study of manager-as-coach, application of a class of instructional tools, theories of constructivism and situated cognition and the joint (manager–employee) implementation of an action guide aimed at learning and performance improvement. Review and coordination of these areas resulted in a detailed guide for action. Use of scenistic materials for instructional purposes adds to the repertoire of tools for a manager desiring to act in a coaching capacity. A step-by-step program of activities is offered for practical application. Created for experimentation and use is a research result-driven practical guide/action plan. The design of the approach expressed requires the manager-as-coach to prepare for instruction and participate in it to the extent that the manager likely contributes to her/his own knowledge and skills in the areas under study. The step-by-step design not only guides the instructional process, it demands that the participants are fully engaged in creating new knowledge, assumptions and examples of practical implementation of what has been learned. Currently, there is little information or research available to guide a manager in a coaching capacity in the use of situation-based (scenistic) instructional materials. The approach offered in this essay not only considers employee knowledge apprehension but also aims at performance3 improvement in a particular context. Additionally, the approach presented requires dialog, negotiation and focused application, all of which may help the participants improve the quality of their relationship.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-02-14
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-07-2021-0114
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Emotional intelligence, intercultural competence and online instruction:
           Review and reflection

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Vishal Arghode , Gandhi Lakshmanan , Fredrick Muyia Nafukho
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to explain how emotional intelligence (EI) influences intercultural competence (IC), which in turn may influence online instruction. The authors further explored the varying attributes of EI and the extent to which it intersects with IC in the workplace. Literature on EI and IC from the fields of education, business and leadership was reviewed. The search entailed articles related to EI and IC using the following databases: Business Search Premier, ERIC, JSTOR and ProQuest. The authors used the following key search terms in researching the articles: EI, IC, learning and online instruction. Title and abstract analyses judged each article’s suitability for the study. To better perceive, understand and appreciate others and their cultures, we need to understand our own emotions and the way we interact with others. EI is thus the foundation on which IC can be built. It takes a higher level of EI to develop higher IC quotient. An online instructor should be cognizant about the emotional issues involved in the online learning and suitably modify the instruction to improve learner engagement to ensure better and improved student learning. Findings of this study should provide useful information for theory building and practice. Further, it is hoped the findings of this study will stimulate more scholarly interest in this relatively untapped research area exploring how EI can influence IC and ultimately influence online instruction and improve student learning. The findings will serve as useful pointers for instructors and scholars who strive to improve ICs and appreciate the nuances that enable an emotionally intelligent instructor to perform better and connect with learners from a different culture. Based on empirical literature reviewed, EI is the ability to perceive, understand and control our own emotions to better connect and relate with other individuals. It is the ability to recognize the emotional cues and change our behavior accordingly. IC is the ability to understand and appreciate the cultural differences to better function in a culture different from our own. The two constructs are therefore interrelated and have a significant overlap. However, while EI has been studied exclusively in different contexts, surprisingly, the researchers have not given adequate attention to the important theme of using EI in improving IC or even the role EI can play in improving instructors’ IC. Moreover, the interrelationship between EI, IC and online learning has not been explored previously. This paper seeks to address this gap.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-01-25
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-05-2021-0064
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The link between HRD professionals’ social capital and career
           adaptability: a moderated mediation analysis of social network

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jihye Oh , Shinhee Jeong , Seung Won Yoon , Daeyeon Cho
      Abstract: From a social capital perspective, this study aims to shed light on the link between social capital and career adaptability by focusing on how social connections and interactions shape and nurture career adaptability. Drawing on socioemotional selectivity theory, the authors further examined the critical moderating role of age on the above relationship. Survey responses from 208 HRD professionals were analyzed via a moderated mediation analysis. The results showed that there is a positive relationship between social capital (network size and intimate network) and career adaptability; frequent interaction increases intimacy, in turn enhancing career adaptability; and the indirect effect of social capital on career adaptability (via intimate network) is stronger when the employee is younger. The most novel theoretical contribution of this study is that the authors lend empirical support to the connection between social capital and career adaptability moderated by age. The study also contributes to understanding how core aspects of social capital are inter-related each other and have directional relationships.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-01-18
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-09-2021-0134
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The multiple mediating effects of Korean workers’ perception of the
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hanna Moon , Sungpyo Hong
      Abstract: This study aims at analyzing the impact of perceptions of the fourth industrial revolution (crisis and opportunity) in the relationship between workers’ career attitudes and future learning intentions. This study analyzed the multiple mediating effect of the perception of the fourth industrial revolution in the relationship between career attitudes and future learning intention using data of 305 Korean workers. As career attitude variables, boundaryless and protean career orientation variables were used, and perception of the fourth industrial revolution was analyzed (opportunity and crisis perception). Both workers’ boundaryless career orientation and protean career orientation influenced future learning intention through the perception of opportunity for the fourth industrial revolution. This result suggested that flexible career attitudes positively recognized the changes of the fourth industrial revolution and had an effect on promoting attitude toward future learning. The study confirmed that workers’ flexible career attitudes could promote perception of opportunity rather than crisis in changing situation and strengthen their intention to prepare for the future by mediating this perception. These results suggest that lifelong learning and competency development can be reinforced by facilitating perception of an opportunities for external change for individual career development. Insights for personal career development were provided by analyzing the relationship between flexible career attitudes, which are increasing in importance in the modern society, and perceptions of changes in external environment.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-01-11
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-06-2021-0073
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The moderating effect of coworkers’ training participation on the
           influence of peer support in the transfer process

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Janos Salamon , Brian D. Blume , Gábor Orosz , Tamás Nagy
      Abstract: The impact of the number of coworkers participating in training on transfer outcomes has largely been overlooked. This paper aims to examine whether the number of coworkers participating in training interacts with peer support (PS) to influence training motivation and transfer. Data were collected using a cross-sectional survey from a sample of 688 employees working in 14 midsize and large companies. All participants were recent trainees in various open skill (e.g. leadership) training programs. Moderated mediation was used to test the hypotheses. Motivation to transfer (MTT) mediated the relationship between PS and perceived training transfer. When more coworkers participated in the training, PS had a stronger influence on trainee MTT. Organizations should consider training coworker cohorts at the same time to influence MTT and training transfer. Generally, whole-team training programs could be used to boost training transfer outcomes, although it could potentially have a negative impact on transfer if PS is low. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this was the first study to demonstrate that the number of coworkers participating in training can moderate the effect of PS on MTT and training transfer.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-01-03
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-07-2021-0102
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Introduction: innovation in qualitative research in HRD

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Yonjoo Cho , Robin Grenier , Peter Williams
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to offer a collection of articles that explore some of the many innovative approaches to qualitative inquiry and to challenge HRD scholars and practitioners to consider using innovative approaches in their work. In doing so, qualitative research in HRD can better capture and honour voices, experiences and meaning making of individuals, teams, organizations and communities. Using Lê and Schmid’s (2022) definition of innovation in qualitative research, the authors selected four innovative approaches to qualitative research that have the potential to enhance HRD research and practice: use of multiple-case study designs in case study research in HRD, a new take on critical incident technique, a narrative approach of testimonio and a visual approach of participant photography. Innovative approaches to qualitative research in this special issue include a review of case study research in HRD by Tkachenko et al., a new take on the familiar critical incident technique of Watkins et al., a narrative approach to testimonio by Salcedo et al. and a visual approach to participant photography by Hurtienne et al. The last article, by Grenier et al., addresses the implications of these articles to the field of HRD and points to additional directions for innovative qualitative approaches that can help to understand and create more inclusive, democratic and just organizations. The articles in this special issue are intended to spark a dialogue about the meaning of innovation in qualitative research in HRD. It also can serve as an impetus for considering how innovative approaches to qualitative research can better tackle questions that come from the new normal of the workplace, society and diverse contexts. This special issue will give HRD scholars and practitioners a realistic, practical view on how innovation in qualitative research can help in exploring specific problems in the workplace. The articles will offer a glimpse into how specific social complex issues can be explored and addressed through innovative approaches, new and tried/modified, to qualitative inquiry. Four articles introduce new and tried/modified qualitative methods, and their value is in prompting HRD scholars and practitioners to consider some of the innovative approaches in exploring, understanding and transforming the workplace. The final article is a review of more innovative qualitative approaches for HRD scholars and practitioners to understand complex organizational phenomena and promote positive and inclusive change accordingly.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-14
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-05-2022-0058
      Issue No: Vol. 46 , No. 7/8 (2022)
       
  • Moving the needle on qualitative approaches to studying HRD

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Robin S. Grenier , Peter Williams , Yonjoo Cho
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to conclude this special issue on innovation in qualitative research by addressing the preceding papers in relation to the work of Human Resource Development (HRD) scholars and scholar-practitioners, consider the implications to the field of HRD and point to additional directions for innovative qualitative approaches. The authors use the term “innovative” to mean either an approach (or technique) that is newly conceived or one that is new to HRD (or little used). The authors reviewed the papers in the special issue, identified other innovative qualitative approaches from the HRD literature and described briefly additional innovative approaches from other fields to suggest future directions for HRD professionals. In this review, the authors noted the relatively few approaches to qualitative research that have been used regularly in HRD literature and suggested further innovative approaches that could deepen the understanding of organizations, including narrative, visual and indigenous methods, among others. This paper provides for HRD scholars an overview of a few qualitative research methodologies that are new to HRD and identifies additional approaches and epistemological challenges that could be valuable for future inquiry into complex organizations by HRD scholars and practitioners. The authors suggest various feasible approaches and tools for HRD professionals to inquire into their practice in organizations to identify needs, evaluate outcomes and inquire into socially complex issues. This study’s intent is to encourage the use of various innovative qualitative inquiry approaches when appropriate to understand and transform organizations. In particular, this study encourages the approaches that center the voices and experiences of those being studied and emphasizes the ways of listening to voices from the margins that may have been ignored previously.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-08
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-02-2022-0019
      Issue No: Vol. 46 , No. 7/8 (2022)
       
  • Further evolving the critical incident technique (CIT) by applying
           different contemporary approaches for analyzing qualitative data in CIT
           studies

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Karen E. Watkins , Andrea D. Ellinger , Boyung Suh , Joseph C. Brenes-Dawsey , Lisa C. Oliver
      Abstract: The critical incident technique (CIT) is widely used in many disciplines; however, scholars have acknowledged challenges associated with analyzing qualitative data when using this technique. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to address the data analysis issues that have been raised by introducing some different contemporary ways of analyzing qualitative critical incident data drawn from recent dissertations conducted in the human resource development (HRD) field. This article describes and illustrates different contemporary qualitative re-storying and cross-incident analysis approaches with examples drawn from previously and recently conducted qualitative HRD dissertations that have used the CIT. Qualitative CIT analysis comprises two processes: re-storying and cross-incident analysis. The narrative inquiry–based re-storying approaches the authors illustrate include poetic narrative and dramatic emplotting. The analytical approaches we illustrate for cross-incident analysis include thematic assertion, grounded theory, and post-structural analysis/assemblages. The use of the aforementioned approaches offers researchers contemporary tools that can deepen meaning and understanding of qualitative CIT data, which address challenges that have been acknowledged regarding the difficulty of analyzing CIT data. The different contemporary qualitative approaches that we have introduced and illustrated in this study provide researchers using the CIT with additional tools to address the challenges of analyzing qualitative CIT data, specifically with regard to data reduction of lengthy narrative transcripts through re-storying as well as cross-incident analyses that can substantially deepen meaning, as well as build new theory and problematize the data through existing theory. A strength of the CIT is its focus on actual events that have occurred from which reasoning, behaviors, and decision-making can be examined to develop more informed practices. The CIT is a very popular and flexible method for collecting data that is widely used in many disciplines. However, data analysis can be especially difficult given the volume of narrative qualitative data that can result from data collection. This paper describes and illustrates different contemporary approaches analyzing qualitative CIT data, specifically the processes of re-storying and cross-incident analysis, to address these concerns in the literature as well as to enhance and further evolve the use of the CIT method.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-11
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-07-2021-0107
      Issue No: Vol. 46 , No. 7/8 (2022)
       
  • Participant photography for HRD: method, benefits, and ethics

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Matthew W. Hurtienne , Jennifer Knowles , Laura E. Hurtienne
      Abstract: This paper aims to look at how participant photography can be used in human resource development (HRD) as a research method that is innovative and inclusive. In published work on traditional photo elicitation methods, the participant is shown previously prepared visual images to create knowledge. This can provoke an inaccurate depiction due to the images being previously prepared. Participant photography differs greatly from the traditional photo-elicitation method. In participant photography, the participant is provided with the opportunity to capture their own visual images of the surrounding environment, allowing for data to be captured through their own eyes. More notably, participants voice their own experiences after taking the photographs as a means for providing rich data for researchers. Participant photography is an innovative qualitative research method where the research participant is encouraged to document their lived experiences through images taken by the participant. Additionally, the participants take part in individual interviews and group individual sessions to further explain the images. The research findings can lead to deeper insight into the research topic and even accommodate potential issues related to literacy and language barriers. By introducing a new qualitative research method to HRD, the lived experiences can be documented and examined in a new, different and arguably more accurate way. Literature discussing participant photography in HRD is limited. Although this limitation puts constraints on this study, it creates an opportunity to further define how participant photography can be used in HRD. This method offers a means for HRD researchers and practitioners to focus on the voices of participants to improve organizations. This study addresses how participant photography can be used in the field of HRD by describing the process of participant recruitment, implementation of the method, participant interviews, group discussion and analysis. Specifically, this study focused on the practical application, including the method’s strengths, potential weaknesses and ethical challenges. The method of participant photography has been commonly used in community-based studies, public health projects and medical research projects, yet in ever-changing HRD needs, there are many advantages for the field of HRD to implement this method. Although the concept of participant photography is still in its infancy in HRD, this study explains how participant photography can be used for both researchers and practitioners to gain a deeper understanding and knowledge of topics related to HRD.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-03-17
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-07-2021-0116
      Issue No: Vol. 46 , No. 7/8 (2022)
       
  • Future direction in HRD: the potential of testimonio as an approach to
           perturb the dominant practices in the workplace

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Abbie Salcedo , Peter Williams , Simone Elias , Maxine Valencia , Jonathan Perez
      Abstract: Marginalization exists in many organizations, despite a zero-tolerance stance on discrimination, abuse and harassment. Human resource development (HRD) professionals are increasingly asked to respond to the calls for crucial conversations on race and diversity. However, traditional HRD methods and tools may not be sufficient to address and eradicate racism in the workplace. The usage of testimonio could enable oppressed groups to communicate their narratives to counter stereotypes. This paper aims to describe testimonio and the various ways it can be used as a research methodology and to perturb the dominant practices in the workplace. This conceptual paper uses testimonio, a narrative methodology with Latin American roots in indigenous oral storytelling, to expand beyond Eurocentric qualitative approaches to capture the voices of marginalized groups. This study gives examples and theorizes how leaders, including human resource professionals, may use this approach to give voice to underrepresented stakeholders in the margins of organizations. Testimonio serves as a non-Eurocentric framework and venue to legitimize their stories. Their voices are assets, enriching while transforming and perturbing and so are needed for communities and organizations to foster a just and sustainable culture and climate. The use of testimonio as an HRD approach to amplify unrepresented voices in the workplace may be an asset to HRD professionals. However, to realize the full potential of this research tradition in HRD, researchers and practitioners must create more space where trust is present for these groups to tell stories that matter most to them. This study on the testimonio approach provides a view into organizational power dynamics and voices from the margins. It serves as a means to acknowledge the voices of underrepresented stakeholders in the workplace. HRD scholars should contribute to organizational effectiveness and inclusive workplace climate by using scholarship to highlight the harm of marginalizing policies and behaviors. Testimonio implies that HRD practitioners in positions of privilege should use their authority to foreground the voices of marginalized individuals who are typically silenced. This can be accomplished by prioritizing unheard voices in the work of HRD professionals. Testimonio as a methodological approach and workplace tool highlights the personal experiences of oppressed groups who experience social injustice, particularly racism. This method encourages organizations that do not operate in a culturally sensitive and inclusive environment to reconsider the discourse that influences their social position. While there is a clear need to address inequities, few practical inquiry tools are presented. Moreover, through their epistemologies and research procedures, scholars and practitioners may unintentionally maintain and reinforce existing inequitable structures and processes. This paper presents testimonio as a non-Western alternative to Eurocentric qualitative research methodologies to perturb dominant practices in HRD.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-03-15
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-07-2021-0109
      Issue No: Vol. 46 , No. 7/8 (2022)
       
  • Case study research in HRD: a review of trends and call for advancement

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Oleksandr Tkachenko , Jaekyo Seo , Alexandre Ardichvili
      Abstract: This study aims to examine how case study research has been applied in the field of human resource development (HRD). The authors examined HRD case study research by analyzing 118 refereed, empirical case study articles published between 2000 and 2020 in three Academy of HRD-sponsored journals. Findings suggest that case studies have an established place in HRD research. The disciplinary convention has been exploratory case studies, which, to a greater extent, draw on single-case research designs. When examining the proportion of case study articles in relation to all empirical, peer-refereed publications in the journals, the authors found a slight decline in case study research publications in recent years. The results of our post hoc exploratory analysis indicate that HRD case study research that contributes to theory development by eliciting concepts and their relationships is likely to receive more scholarly attention than case studies that provide rich descriptions of the phenomenon. The results also suggest that it is rather case study’s contribution to theory than selected features of case study that attracts scholars’ attention. The study identified several approaches to conducting case study research that have received less attention by HRD researchers. The authors encourage HRD researchers to expand their repertoire of case study approaches. The authors also provide recommendations addressing the issues of methodological self-awareness, rigor and transparency in case study research.
      Citation: European Journal of Training and Development
      PubDate: 2022-02-15
      DOI: 10.1108/EJTD-10-2021-0160
      Issue No: Vol. 46 , No. 7/8 (2022)
       
  • European Journal of Training and Development

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 35.168.110.128
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-