Subjects -> EDUCATION (Total: 2346 journals)
    - ADULT EDUCATION (24 journals)
    - COLLEGE AND ALUMNI (10 journals)
    - E-LEARNING (38 journals)
    - EDUCATION (1996 journals)
    - HIGHER EDUCATION (140 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS (4 journals)
    - ONLINE EDUCATION (42 journals)
    - SCHOOL ORGANIZATION (14 journals)
    - SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATION (40 journals)
    - TEACHING METHODS AND CURRICULUM (38 journals)

ADULT EDUCATION (24 journals)

Showing 1 - 23 of 23 Journals sorted alphabetically
Adult Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Aikuiskasvatus     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Andragoška spoznanja     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Career and Technical Education Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Concept : The Journal of Contemporary Community Education Practice Theory     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
EJA em Debate     Open Access  
Empirical Research in Vocational Education and Training     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
European Journal for Research on the Education and Learning of Adults (RELA)     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
European Journal of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
International Journal of Adult Education and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Adult and Continuing Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Adult Theological Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Music, Technology and Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
New Horizons in Adult Education and Human Resource Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Nordic Journal of Vocational Education and Training     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pedagogia Social. Revista Interuniversitaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Recruiting & Retaining Adult Learners     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Revista Brasileira de Orienta     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Teaching in Lifelong Learning : a journal to inform and improve practice     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Teknologi Kejuruan     Open Access  
Widening Participation and Lifelong Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Adult and Continuing Education
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.109
Number of Followers: 29  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1477-9714 - ISSN (Online) 1479-7194
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Organisational learning during the coronavirus pandemic: A case study on
           models for extended learning and complexity management

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      Authors: Ilpo Laitinen, Jarkko Ihalainen
      Abstract: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines learning in an exceptional situation. The study was carried out during the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic, when the organisations’ operations changed suddenly as the crisis broke out. The aim of the study is to structure activities during the crisis and the learning related to the adaptation of organisations. The study compares organisational learning in two different types of organisations, one in the health care sector and the other in the social construction and property sector.
      Citation: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education
      PubDate: 2022-06-18T09:58:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14779714221079367
       
  • Why overseas' Vietnamese doctoral students’ motivations for a
           doctoral study abroad

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      Authors: Anh Ngoc Quynh Phan
      Abstract: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education, Ahead of Print.
      This article reports a study that investigated Vietnamese doctoral students’ motivations to pursue their doctoral study outside their home country. Analyses of in-depth interviews with 19 participants revealed what made a PhD abroad imaginable to them, thus revealing the motivational factors for Vietnamese doctoral students to sojourn for their academic undertakings, including professional requirement and academic development, life enrichment and self-exploration, prior transnational experiences and funding availability. Using the conceptual tools of imagination and capacity to aspire, the study highlights not only the capacity to navigate the horizons of aspirations of Vietnamese doctoral students but also the unevenness of imaginative spaces among them. Going beyond the push-pull framework or the traditional binary of external-internal motivation, this study, with a particular focus on imagination and aspiration, emphasises the capacity of the doctoral students and the socio-cultural context that made a PhD abroad a possibility for them. It further illuminates how their capacity to aspire was different from one another, leading to dissimilarities in their imaginative space and maps of horizons.
      Citation: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education
      PubDate: 2022-06-02T07:54:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14779714221105912
       
  • Mature Students’ Experience: A Community of Inquiry Study During a
           COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Damien Homer
      Abstract: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound effect on university students across the world. In a short period of time from 2020 to 2022, Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) had to pivot their modes of delivery to ensure they could meet the needs of their students. The move to digital platforms has been challenging for students from all ages, but particularly mature students. This study sought to explore mature students’ experiences of university during the COVID-19 pandemic through the lens of the Community of Inquiry (CoI) model. Utilising a qualitative approach, twenty semi-structured interviews were conducted with students from across the University of Warwick. The interviews were conducted by a staff member and a mature student during the pandemic and four themes were identified: Adapting to online learning, relationships, external factors and response of the university. This research study has identified that some participants responded well to the emergency situation, others had caring responsibilities which impacted on their studies but that peer relationships and collaborative learning is key to their success.
      Citation: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education
      PubDate: 2022-05-27T11:52:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14779714221096175
       
  • Factors affecting teachers’ transfer of ICT training: Considering
           usefulness and satisfaction in a PLS-SEM transfer training model

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      Authors: Katerina Tzafilkou, Maria Perifanou, Anastasios A Economides
      Abstract: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education, Ahead of Print.
      The success of the teachers’ trainers’ transfer of training can be affected by several factors like teaching self-efficacy, motivation to learn and transfer, and intention to transfer the gained skills and knowledge. This study seeks to analyze the structural relationships among the above-mentioned constructs by integrating the constructs of perceived usefulness and satisfaction of the ICT training programme. The analysis is conducted on quantitative data collected from 117 teacher educators participating in a national programme on “Teachers training on the use and application of digital technologies in the teaching practice” in Greece. Results of the partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) revealed that perceived usefulness and satisfaction of the training programme had a significant positive effect on the teachers’ self-efficacy and intention to transfer the gained ICT training knowledge and skills. Also, pre-training and post-training self-efficacy exerted a direct influence on the teachers’ intention to transfer, motivation to transfer, and motivation to learn. The potential contribution and practical implications in the field of adult education and teachers’ continuing professional development are discussed in the paper.
      Citation: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T03:41:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14779714221096500
       
  • Moderating effects of emotion regulation difficulties and resilience on
           students’ mental health and well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Katrina A Rufino, Stephanie J Babb, Ruth M Johnson
      Abstract: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined whether emotion regulation difficulties and resilience in college students moderated changes in mental health over the course of the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants (N = 321) completed surveys assessing mental health, in addition to levels of emotion dysregulation, and resilience during the pandemic, then utilized an anchoring prompt to recall mental health experiences before the pandemic. Correlations revealed participants with higher levels of emotion dysregulation also reported lower levels of resilience. Analyses using the SPSS Macro MEMORE (Montoya, 2019) revealed participants with higher levels of emotion regulation difficulties had greater increases in depression and insomnia, and greater decreases in well-being over the course of the COVID-19 pandemic, while participants with lower levels of resilience had greater increases in depression, anxiety, and insomnia over the course of the pandemic. These results highlight the importance of additional support services and mental health training at universities to meet college students’ immediate and long-term emotional needs stemming from the pandemic.
      Citation: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education
      PubDate: 2022-05-06T02:19:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14779714221099609
       
  • Adult unmet educational needs: Higher education options amongst adults in
           rural and small towns in Ghana

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      Authors: Boadi Agyekum
      Abstract: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education, Ahead of Print.
      Access to higher education is often limited to adults because of their location. This is particularly challenging for adults who live in rural communities and small towns and can lead to unmet expectations. While policy makers have long recognised the potential impact of lifelong education for adults, the educational needs of adults have received relatively less attention. For adults residing in rural areas who rely, more often than not, on distance education, mostly in the form of blended learning there is usually limited access to public universities. For policy makers to respond effectively to the educational needs of the adult population in the rural areas, the first step is to understand the educational barriers of adults living in such areas, particularly as they are constrained with lack of minimal transportation and information communications technology. This paper reports on qualitative research exploring the educational challenges and needs faced by adults in rural areas of Ghana.
      Citation: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education
      PubDate: 2022-05-02T06:25:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14779714221096499
       
  • Reflecting on the experiences of Syrian refugee young adults in adult
           education in Quebec: The practitioners’ perspective

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      Authors: Arianne Maraj, Milagros Calderón-Moya, Domenique Sherab, Ratna Ghosh
      Abstract: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education, Ahead of Print.
      Much research focuses on schooling for refugee children in resettlement contexts; however, limited research addresses young adult refugees (YAR) between 16–24 years in the adult education (AE) system. This paper strives to fill this gap by providing the perspectives of 12 AE practitioners who welcomed and worked with Syrian YAR in Quebec, Canada. Practitioners’ experiences and challenges faced with this refugee population reveal strategies needed to enable YAR to flourish and attain their objectives, including a call for systemic change in AE. Critical race theory and the capabilities approach set the conceptual framework guided by a narrative inquiry methodology. Semi-structured interviews provided the data that were thematically analyzed through collaborative work. From our understanding of the effectiveness of AE approaches for YAR, it is clear, based on the insights provided by the practitioners, that the face of AE has changed, and its current approach does not work for the YAR population.
      Citation: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T09:53:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14779714221089362
       
  • Linking assessments to program outcomes in practitioner-oriented EdD
           programs: An alternative to comprehensive examinations

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      Authors: Sarah A Capello
      Abstract: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education, Ahead of Print.
      For decades, the field of education has been criticized for failing to distinguish between the PhD and EdD degrees. However, the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate has recently redefined the EdD as a professional practice doctorate and offered a framework for program (re)design that includes the generation and application of practitioner knowledge to identify, investigate, and solve problems of practice. This renewed focus on (re)designing EdD programs provides a timely segue into rethinking doctoral assessments in EdD programs. This document analysis demonstrates how one near-ubiquitous assessment, the comprehensive examination, can be reimagined to serve as a site for reinforcing practitioner-oriented program outcomes. This manuscript reports how an EdD program implemented alternative comprehensive examinations to support student growth toward a variety of practitioner-oriented program outcomes. The findings indicate that the alternative assessments fostered student growth in all program outcomes and allowed students to meet several purposes of traditional comprehensive exams while also demonstrating that other purposes of comprehensive exams are misaligned with revised visions for EdD education. The implications of this study are that EdD assessments should be aligned with program outcomes and that program administrators should abandon traditional comprehensive exams for assessments that support practitioner growth and development.
      Citation: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T08:46:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14779714221093091
       
  • A paradigm shift in guiding the operations of open schools in Tanzania:
           Praxis of emerging controversies and dynamics

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      Authors: Gennes Hendry Shirima
      Abstract: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education, Ahead of Print.
      This paper reports the findings of a study that had examined the operations of open schools for out-of-secondary-school youth and adults in Tanzania. Its objective was to establish the practicality of the policy guidelines in guiding the operations of open schools and the emerging controversies and dynamics in their daily operations. This qualitative study collected data using documentary review and interviews, which was later subjected to thematic analysis. The study found contradictory and incongruous policy guidelines for open schools that largely rendered them impractical. Moreover, misinterpretations, varying understandings and inconsistencies in practices among open schools were common occurrences. There also emerged several dynamics in guiding the operations of open schools such as un-standardised practices, erratic registrations and persistence of uncontrolled open schools in the black market. In consequence, it was difficult to rationally manage their practices. Overall, the rather misplaced policy priority governing the operations of open schools calls for a special attention and impetus to bring about the desired positive change in this education sub-sector.
      Citation: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T12:38:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14779714221089360
       
  • Transforming lives through a literacy program: An exploration of adult
           learners’ experiences

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      Authors: Bo Klauth, Regina L Garza Mitchell
      Abstract: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education, Ahead of Print.
      Nearly one-quarter of American adults have low-level literacy skills. Existing research provides a great deal of quantitative information about skill levels and attainment, but little information exists that highlights the contextualized experiences of adult learners. In this phenomenological study, we explored individual adult learners’ experiences in a community-based literacy program. A purposive sample of eight adult learners participated in semi-structured interviews. The study shows that the tutors’ caring and understanding attitude towards the learners, friendship relationships between the tutors and learners, and the tutors’ use of individualized interventions for their learners were vital in shaping their positive learning experience. The study also highlights how the learners’ motivation and support system played in helping them persist in the program. The literacy program transformed their lives and meant “a chance” for making a change.
      Citation: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education
      PubDate: 2022-04-13T07:46:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14779714221087277
       
  • Part-time adult students’ satisfaction with online learning during
           the COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Luke A Fiorini, Anna Borg, Manwel Debono
      Abstract: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in many tertiary institutions switching overnight from taught to online lectures without much preparation. Studies suggest that the sudden change has impacted on students’ satisfaction with online learning in differing ways. Yet, little is known about how this change impacted specifically on adult part-time students, which is the focus of this study. Methods: Part-time adult undergraduate students responded to a mixed methods online questionnaire. Close-ended questions were analysed quantitatively in order to determine levels of satisfaction with online learning during COVID-19 as well as its correlates. Open-ended questions were analysed qualitatively in order to explore the perceived benefits and challenges associated with online learning during this period. Results: Levels of satisfaction with online learning were found to be high, especially among students who were female, those who did not have young children, had partners who worked in excess of 40 hours, were able to follow lectures from locations other than the home, and those following non-technical courses. Several benefits of online learning were identified, including time saved on commuting, the ability to study from the comfort of home and the fact that lectures could now be recorded. Challenges included those related to technology, a lack of interaction amongst students and part-time lecturers who struggled with the sudden switch to online learning. Despite this, most students indicated they would like online lectures to continue to various degrees even after it was safe to return to class. Conclusion and implications: Online lectures were generally rated positively by adult part-time students. In view of the benefits and some of the challenges associated with online learning, it is recommended that future academic programmes adopt a blended approach whilst more support is provided to those who find it challenging to follow lectures from home.
      Citation: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education
      PubDate: 2022-04-01T12:16:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14779714221082691
       
  • “Oh, I thought we’d be different”: A multifocal, interdisciplinary
           examination of the fidelity/adaptation challenge

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      Authors: William J Davis, Michael Esposito, Jennifer Brown Urban, Miriam R Linver
      Abstract: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this instrumental, multisite case study is to examine fidelity, adaptation, and differentiation challenges found at Wood Badge, a nationwide Boy Scouts of America training for adult volunteer leaders. Our iterative analysis of more than 900 pages of fieldnotes and 400 pages of documents revealed facilitators often explicitly taught syllabus content during the trainings. Observers noted 119 minor differentiations across trainings, notably involving facilitator delivery methods and the duration and scheduling of training segments. Facilitators observed 16 adaptations, which appeared to be based on external conditions at trainings or facilitator preferences, and just three instances of differentiation. Our analysis of the trainings surfaced key fidelity/adaptation issues like overadherence, conflicting notions of deviation, and the impact of preparation on fidelity. In addition, we identified factors influencing facilitators’ use of adaptation and differentiation. Recommendations for large-scale trainings are made based on the study’s findings.
      Citation: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education
      PubDate: 2022-03-25T02:31:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14779714221075829
       
  • Changing attitudes about online continuing education and training: A
           Singapore case study

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      Authors: Stephen Billett, Anthony Leow, Shuyi Chua, Anh H Le
      Abstract: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic has precipitated an unprecedented education crisis, causing severe disruption to global education systems. One consequence has been an increased demand for online educational platforms, leading to a shift from face-to-face to online teaching. This was the case in Singapore where online educational provisions were quickly adopted and implemented by institutions providing continuing education and training to adult learners. This paper reports on the data from a survey of 258 participants on the accessibility and effectiveness of the different modes of learning (i.e. online learning, face-to-face learning, and a combination of both) based on comparisons prior to and after the onset of COVID-19. The findings indicate that familiarity with online platforms enhances the potential efficacy of online provisions of continuing education and training, but also illuminate issues concerning the kinds of experiences required for effective continuing education and training, with implications for providers and educators in and beyond Singapore.
      Citation: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education
      PubDate: 2022-03-23T05:53:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14779714221084346
       
  • Applying andragogy to service-learning in graduate education: An
           interpretive phenomenological analysis

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      Authors: Lisa Roe
      Abstract: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education, Ahead of Print.
      Service-Learning is a form of experiential learning where faculty integrate a service or community engagement component into academic coursework. Supported by a growing body of literature documenting the impact of service-learning on undergraduate students as a high-impact practice in the United States, the scholarship and practice of service-learning frequently neglects graduate students as an important and unique demographic of learners. Graduate students pursue master’s degrees to achieve their career goals, but employers claim that students are graduating ill-prepared for the workforce. The disconnect between employers’ perspectives and students’ educational goals presented an opportunity to explore the relationship between service-learning and career preparation using Knowles’ andragogy as a theoretical framework. The purpose of this interpretive phenomenological analysis study was to explore the relationship between service-learning and career preparation from the perspective of graduate students as adult learners. Findings suggest that (1) service-learning is both as a professional experience itself and is an opportunity to further prepare for their future careers and (2) service-learning is a genuine way for students to develop skills and self-efficacy important to their career trajectory. Recommendations are provided for educators who are considering integrating service-learning into their teaching to support the professional goals of graduate students.
      Citation: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education
      PubDate: 2022-03-08T04:35:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14779714221079368
       
  • Examining key challenges in adult community learning centres’ programme
           of KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa

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      Authors: Morakinyo Akintolu, Chinaza Uleanya, Moeketsi Letseka
      Abstract: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education, Ahead of Print.
      Education is a major tool for development and equalizer. This somewhat accounts for the quest for education, at various levels, including adults who were unable to attain an education degree earlier in life. Thus, Adult Education and Training (AET) programmes are established in different community centres to promote adult literacy in different parts of the world inclusive of South Africa. However, many AET community centres tend not to be achieving the aim for their establishment due to various challenges. Hence, this study examined the challenges that are facing adult community learning centres using KwaZulu-Natal Province of South Africa following that it has one of the highest rates of illiteracy that causes unemployment and poverty. Social Cognitive Theory was employed for theoretical framework. Qualitative method was adopted for the study; hence, face-to-face interviews were conducted for nine purposively selected centre managers from both rural and urban KwaZulu-Natal. The collected data was coded and thematically analysed. The findings show that adult learners, facilitators and government factors inhibit the community learning centres progress. Meanwhile, centre managers strive to support adult community learning by involving different stakeholders in adult education and prioritize same. The study recommends amongst others the adoption of systemic approach where visions of AET are clearly stated to all stakeholders such as learners, facilitators, and the government.
      Citation: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education
      PubDate: 2022-02-21T11:23:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14779714211070307
       
  • Preventing academic burnout and ensuring the wellbeing of teachers
           returning to academic studies

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      Authors: Elaine Hoter, Reina Rutlinger Reiner
      Abstract: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines how mature Israeli teachers returning to academia after many years cope with the burden of their masters' studies in addition to their work as teachers and how the college can improve the well-being of these students and help avoid academic burnout. The study is based on repeated in-depth interviews with 18 female teachers. The analysis of the interviews and observations points to four areas that need to be considered. First, transformation, how returning to academic studies while working full-time changed the students’ lives. Second, the academic climate, the clarity of the elements in the program, coordination between the lecturers, relationships with teaching staff, as well as the facilities offered in the college. Third, academic burnout, which includes time management, challenges of balancing work, family and studies, and coping with frustration. The final theme is support, the importance of support by families, workplace, the staff, and their peers on their learning experience. The results point to the need for more coordination between staff, involving students in academic and administrative decisions and to introduce an ongoing program accompanying the M.Ed program that includes a support system to help reduce stress and avoid academic burnout.
      Citation: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education
      PubDate: 2022-02-14T01:43:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14779714211072304
       
  • Adult educational ‘lateness’ norms: hysteresis in mid-career
           retraining in law

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      Authors: Edgar Alan Burns
      Abstract: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education, Ahead of Print.
      Mid-career men and women professionals describe their pervasive sense of ‘lateness’ retraining in law. Against industry patterns of lawyers wishing to leave the profession, these individuals had chosen to assert or reassert a desire to become lawyers partway through existing careers. What cultural narratives mediate the process of making this professional career shifts' In contrast to younger students, these ‘later’ career changers differed in career experiences and expected career trajectories. They all spoke about their personal sense of career lateness relative to time-flow norms, but only some reflected on the subsequent implications of their career shift. Interviewees worked in Victoria, Australia and in New Zealand. This article applies Bourdieu’s concept of hysteresis to career lateness along with other career transition concepts to explore career changers’ internal disquiet about their ‘off time’ career transitions. Perceptions of career lateness – hysteresis in Bourdieu’s terms – arise from changing fields, losing/re-positioning occupational capital or stretching between old and new habitus in their post-transition career as lawyers or work using their new law degrees.
      Citation: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education
      PubDate: 2022-01-20T05:42:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14779714211056962
       
  • Editorial

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      Authors: Michael Osborne
      First page: 3
      Abstract: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education
      PubDate: 2022-04-13T01:23:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14779714221094903
       
  • Lifelong learning and African development

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      Authors: Idowu Biao
      First page: 167
      Abstract: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education, Ahead of Print.
      This article that is located within the alternative knowledge systems paradigm, discusses both the ancient and modern concepts of lifelong learning in relation to Africa’s development. It identifies ancient Greece’s education and African traditional education as two ancient lifelong learning typologies relevant to the current discussion. Ancient Greece’s education is a forerunner to modern education while African traditional education is one typology of education that remains relevant to African developmental aspirations. The modern concept of lifelong learning highlighted in this article is the one made popular by the United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO). The article reviews the socialisation processes and worldviews prevalent within the West and Africa alongside the 50%, 40% and 7% Africa’s best primary, secondary and tertiary education success rates respectively and concludes that incongruity between the two socialisation processes and worldviews are responsible for this nearly two-century-old modest contribution of modern education to Africa’s development. Consequently, the article concludes that only a combination of both modern and African lifelong learning would expedite Africa’s socio-economic development.
      Citation: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education
      PubDate: 2022-04-21T09:27:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14779714221087756
       
  • Book Review: The Role of Higher Education in the Professionalisation of
           Adult Educators

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      Authors: Susanne Lattke
      First page: 304
      Abstract: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Adult and Continuing Education
      PubDate: 2022-04-18T03:16:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14779714221094989
       
 
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