Subjects -> EDUCATION (Total: 2346 journals)
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    - E-LEARNING (38 journals)
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    - HIGHER EDUCATION (140 journals)
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    - TEACHING METHODS AND CURRICULUM (38 journals)

TEACHING METHODS AND CURRICULUM (38 journals)

Showing 1 - 34 of 34 Journals sorted alphabetically
Action in Teacher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 70)
Ámbito Investigativo     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Éducation & Didactique     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Educational Studies in Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Forum Exegese und Hochschuldidaktik: Verstehen von Anfang an     Full-text available via subscription  
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Interactive Technology and Smart Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Education through Art     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Learning and Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
International Journal of Mobile Learning and Organisation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
ISAA Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Jahrbuch für Pädagogik     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Journal of Immersion and Content-Based Language     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Learning Spaces     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Montessori Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Teacher Education for Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 42)
Jurnal Pendidikan Nonformal     Open Access  
Medical Teacher     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Middle School Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mimbar Sekolah Dasar     Open Access  
Profile Issues in Teachers´ Professional Development     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Psychology Learning & Teaching     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Reading and Writing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Revue française de pédagogie     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
RMLE Research in Middle Level Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Teaching Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Technology of Education Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Tréma     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Writing & Pedagogy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Yearbook of the National Society for the Study of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Psychodrama und Soziometrie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Educational Studies in Mathematics
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.056
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 17  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0013-1954 - ISSN (Online) 1573-0816
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Making sense of student mathematical thinking: the role of teacher
           mathematical thinking

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      Abstract: Abstract In mathematical whole-class discussions, teachers can build on various student ideas and develop these ideas toward mathematical goals. This requires teachers to make sense of their students’ mathematical thinking, which evidently involves mathematical thinking on the teacher’s part. Teacher sense-making of student mathematical thinking has been studied and conceptualized as an aspect of teacher noticing and has also been conceptualized as a mathematical activity. We combine these perspectives to explore the role of teacher mathematical thinking in making sense of student mathematical thinking. In this study, we investigated that role using video-based teacher discussions in a teacher researcher collaboration in which five Dutch high school mathematics teachers and one researcher developed discourse based lessons in cycles of design, enactment, and evaluation. In video-based discussions, they collaboratively reflected on whole-class discussions from the teachers’ own lessons. We analyzed these discussions to explore the mathematical thinking that teachers articulated during sense-making of students’ mathematical thinking and how teachers’ mathematical thinking affected their sense-making. We found five categories concerning the role of teacher mathematical thinking in their sense-making: flexibility, preoccupation, incomprehension, exemplification, and projection. These categories show how both the content and the process of teacher mathematical thinking can support or impede their sense-making. In addition, we found that the teachers often did not articulate explicit mathematical thinking. Our findings suggest that sense-making of students’ mathematical thinking requires teachers to (re-)engage in reflective thinking with regard to the mathematical content as well as the process of their own mathematical thinking.
      PubDate: 2022-07-01
       
  • Affect graphing: leveraging graphical representations in the study of
           students’ affect in mathematics

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      Abstract: Abstract Affect (e.g., beliefs, attitudes, emotions) plays a crucial role in mathematics learning, but reliance on verbal and written responses (from surveys, interviews, etc.) limits students’ expression of their affective states. As a complement to existing methods that rely on verbal reports, we explore how graphing can be used to study affect during mathematical experiences. We analyze three studies that used graphing to represent, stimulate recall, and reflect on affect. In each, students were asked to draw their perception of an affective construct, such as confidence or intensity of emotion, against time. The studies differed in participant populations, target affect, timescales of participant experience, and structural features of the graphs. The affordances of graphing include reduced dependence on verbal data, temporal ordering of participants’ recollections, explicit representation of change over time, and the creation of objects (the graph) for discussion. These studies as examples show that well-structured graphing can productively supplement existing methods for studying affect in mathematics education, as a different medium through which students can communicate their experience.
      PubDate: 2022-07-01
       
  • Constructing a system of covariational relationships: two contrasting
           cases

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      Abstract: Abstract Although there is much research exploring students’ covariational reasoning, there is less research exploring the ways students can leverage such reasoning to coordinate more than two quantities. In this paper, we describe a system of covariational relationships as a comprehensive image of how two varying quantities, having the same attribute across different objects, each covary with respect to a third quantity and in relation to each other. We first describe relevant theoretical constructs, including reasoning covariationally to construct relationships between quantities and reasoning covariationally to compare quantities. We then present a conceptual analysis entailing three interrelated activities we conjectured could support students in reasoning covariationally to conceive of a system of covariational relationships and represent the system graphically. We provide results from two teaching experiments with four middle school students engaging in tasks designed with our conceptual analysis in mind. We highlight two different ways students reasoned covariationally compatible with our conceptual analysis. We discuss the implications of our results and provide areas for future research.
      PubDate: 2022-07-01
       
  • Pre-service primary teachers’ shame experiences during their schooling
           time: characteristics and effects on their subject-choices at university

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      Abstract: Abstract Emotions play an essential role in pre-service teachers’ competence development, particularly in mathematics. However, the emotion of shame in mathematics has been largely neglected so far. This article deals with shameful experiences of pre-service primary school teachers during their mathematical education at school and the various effects of shame on their decision to study mathematics as a subject at university. The research consists of a qualitative and a quantitative study with 311 prospective primary school teachers who responded to a survey about their experiences of shame in mathematics at school when they were students. Results of the qualitative study emphasize the different experiences in mathematics during the school years and reveal the characteristics of these situations, for example, social exposure or competition games. In the quantitative study, pre-service primary teachers’ subject choice was analyzed in relation to their experienced shame in mathematics at school. Results reveal that shame experienced at school has effects on the initial choice in favor of mathematics at university. Implications for primary teacher education are finally discussed.
      PubDate: 2022-07-01
       
  • The role of relational preference in word-problem solving in 6- to
           7-year-olds

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      Abstract: Abstract Several studies have shown that children do not only erroneously use additive reasoning in proportional word problems, but also erroneously use proportional reasoning in additive word problems. Traditionally, these errors were contributed to a lack of calculation and discrimination skills. Recent research evidence puts forward an additional explanation, namely, children’s relational preference (i.e., in tasks where both, additive and multiplicative reasoning, are appropriate, some children have a preference for additive relations, while others have a preference for multiplicative relations). Children’s relational preference offers a unique explanation for erroneous word-problem solving, after taking into account computation and discrimination skills in 8- to 12-year-olds. However, it is still unclear whether relational preference is also associated with word-problem solving at an earlier age, before the start of formal instruction in word-problem solving. A task measuring children’s relational preference as well as three additive and three proportional word problems was administered to a large group (n = 343) of 6- to 7-year-olds. Results show that relational preference is also associated with word-problem solving behavior at this young age: an additive preference is related with better performance on additive word problems but also with more erroneous additive reasoning in proportional word problems. Similarly, a multiplicative preference is related with better performance on proportional word problems but not yet with more erroneous proportional reasoning in additive word problems. The latter is possibly due to the low number of proportional errors that were made in the additive word problems at this young age. The implications of these findings for further research and educational practice are discussed.
      PubDate: 2022-07-01
       
  • Teaching toddlers the meaning of numbers—connecting modes of
           mathematical representations in book reading

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      Abstract: Abstract In this article, we direct attention to what becomes critical in teaching activities for toddlers (1–3-year-olds) to learn the meaning of numbers. One activity we thoroughly explore is interactive book reading, based on previous research indicating positive learning outcomes from this type of mathematical activity, as it has shown to simultaneously embrace the child’s perspective and encourage interaction and ‘number talk.’ A specially designed picture book presenting small quantities was developed, and variation theory principles were embedded in both the book design and the teaching acts. Through qualitative analyses, we aim to identify what is critical in the interactive book reading sessions for toddlers to discern essential aspects of numbers, with a specific focus on the conditions for making modes of representations into resources for learning. Preschool teachers frequently read the book to 27 toddlers over the course of a year. Video documentation of their reading sessions was analyzed, and exposed the significance of addressing the child’s perspective when choosing what representation to emphasize and in what ways connections within and between representations can be made. Thus, the study contributes knowledge on the teaching of numbers with toddlers, and problematizes as well as extends the potential of interactive book reading as a quality-enhancing educational tool.
      PubDate: 2022-07-01
       
  • Mathematics in the informal setting of an art studio: students’
           visuospatial thinking processes in a studio thinking-based environment

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      Abstract: Abstract This study aimed to investigate seventh-grade students’ visuospatial thinking processes in an art studio environment, where students were engaged with geometrically rich artworks. The students were asked to observe minimalist artworks, then create and critique their own and others’ artworks based on the Studio Thinking Framework. Data were collected through interviews conducted with students, video recordings in the studio, and students’ documents (sketches, artworks, and notes). The data were analyzed based on previous studies on spatial thinking and emergent data. The study’s findings indicate that the Studio Thinking-based environment has the potential to elicit students’ visuospatial thinking processes, mainly in recognizing shapes, decomposing and composing shapes, patterning, and transforming shapes rigidly and non-rigidly (scaling). The present study, which includes accounts of three studio works, suggests an emergent framework for the characterization of visuospatial thinking within a particular art-math-related environment. The findings of the study shed light on other studies on visual arts and mathematics education and on mathematical thinking and learning in informal learning settings.
      PubDate: 2022-07-01
       
  • A systematic review of factors associated with high schoolers’ algebra
           achievement according to HSLS:09 results

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      Abstract: Abstract In this study, the authors examined a group of related literatures that used the same large-scale nationally representative dataset with algebra achievement as the outcome to explore why results from the same dataset may differ across studies. More specially, the authors synthesized the extant research literature that utilized data from the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09) to investigate the student-, teacher-, school-, and parent-level characteristics associated with algebra achievement and whether these relationships were consistent across students’ backgrounds (i.e., race/ethnicity, gender, socio-economic status, and prior achievement). The authors have summarized the results of 21 studies across 2 outcome variables (ninth- and eleventh-grade algebra achievement) using optimal resource theory as a framework to summarize evidence-based practices for improving student outcomes.
      PubDate: 2022-07-01
       
  • Book Review: A fruitful resource emerging from collaboration within an
           ERME topic conference. Alison Clark-Wilson, Ana Donevska-Todorova,
           Eleonora Faggiano, Jana Trgalová and Hans-Georg Weigand (Eds.) (2021)
           Mathematics education in the digital age: learning, practice and theory

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      PubDate: 2022-07-01
       
  • When is less more' Investigating gap-filling in proofs without words
           activities

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      Abstract: Abstract In activities based on proof without words (PWW), we developed, students are given a PWW– a diagram that alludes to the proof of a mathematical theorem. The students work collaboratively to construct a proof alluded by the PWW, and then each student writes and submits a proof attempt. In a 3-year design-based study, we investigate and develop PWW-based activities for advancing upper secondary students' proficiency in constructing proofs. We use the concept of gap-filling as a theoretical framework. In a nutshell, gap-filling is an action of adding information absent in a text that a reader does for sense-making. We inquire whether secondary school students independently construct a proof when a PWW is at their disposal, what characterizes those gaps that students identify and fill, and how PWW design principles influence students’ gap-filling. We identified four categories of gaps: key idea, generality, constructional, and figure property justifications. We find that students mainly fill key idea gaps but not generality gaps and that PWWs that presented the construction procedure led more students to fill the constructional gaps. However, PWWs that did not explicitly present some figures’ property led more students to fill those justification gaps. We identify five PWW design principles that can enhance secondary students’ gap-filling and conclude that a meticulous design paves the way to implement PWW-based activities for fostering mathematical proving.
      PubDate: 2022-06-27
       
  • A bridging study analyzing mathematical model construction through a
           quantities-oriented lens

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      Abstract: Abstract Mathematical modelling is endorsed as both a means and an end to learning mathematics. Despite its utility and inclusion as a curricular objective, one of many questions remaining about learners’ modelling regards how modelers choose relevant situational attributes and express mathematical relationships in terms of them. Research on quantitative reasoning has informed the field on how individuals quantify attributes and conceive of covariational relationships among them. However, this research has not often attended to modelers’ mathematization in open modelling tasks, an endeavor that invites further attention to theoretical and methodological details. To this end, we offer a synthesis of existing theories to present a cognitive account of mathematical model construction through a quantity-oriented lens. Second, we use empirical data to illustrate why it is productive for theories of modelling to attend to and account for students’ quantitative reasoning while modelling. Finally, we identify remaining challenges to coordinating different theoretical accounts of model construction.
      PubDate: 2022-06-22
       
  • Sameness in algebra: views of isomorphism and homomorphism

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      Abstract: Isomorphism and homomorphism are topics central to abstract algebra, but research on mathematicians’ views of these topics, especially with respect to sameness, remains limited. This study examines open response survey data from 197 mathematicians on how sameness could be helpful or harmful when studying isomorphism and homomorphism. Using thematic analysis, we examined whether sameness was viewed as helpful or harmful for isomorphism and homomorphism before examining rationales for those views. Making use of values of the mathematical community, we note that mathematicians saw conceptual and pedagogical benefits to connecting isomorphism and sameness, which connects to leveraging intuition and valuing ways of increasing understanding. Mathematicians’ concerns around using sameness largely revolved around the violation of the mathematical community’s idealized value of expressing a priori truth via a-contextual justifications. However, these concerns can be addressed through only targeted usage of sameness and explicit discussions around the utility and relevance of sameness. Implications include the importance of considering how interventions proposed by mathematics educators align with or provoke tension between values held by the mathematical community in order to mitigate or lean into those tensions and encourage fruitful dialogue between the mathematics and mathematics education communities.
      PubDate: 2022-06-20
       
  • Instructions and recipes in mathematical proofs

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      Abstract: Abstract In mathematics education research, proofs are often conceptualized as sequences of mathematical assertions. We argue that this ignores proofs that contain instructions to perform mathematical actions, often in the form of imperatives, which are common both in mathematical practice and in undergraduate mathematics textbooks. We consider in detail a specific type of proof which we call a recipe proof, which is comprised of sequence of instructions that direct the reader to produce mathematical objects with desirable properties. We present a model of what it means to understand a recipe proof and use this model in conjunction with process-object theories from mathematics education research, to explain why recipe proofs are inherently difficult for students to understand.
      PubDate: 2022-06-10
       
  • The Framework for Posing Elementary Mathematics Problems (F-PosE):
           Supporting Teachers to Evaluate and Select Problems for Use in Elementary
           Mathematics

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      Abstract: Abstract An essential task for mathematics teachers is posing problems. Selecting mathematics problems that develop mathematical proficiency and engage students in desirable mathematical practices is a critical decision-making process. We present the Framework for Posing Elementary Mathematics Problems (F-PosE) developed to focus prospective teacher noticing on desirable features of mathematics problems and inform decision-making processes around the selection of problems for use in elementary classrooms. Development of the framework was informed by a three-phase design research process consisting of an extensive review of the literature, document content analysis and successive testing of mathematics problems in elementary classrooms in partnership with teachers and children. Consequently, it draws from emergent practice informed by the collective endeavour of a community of educators. The framework consists of eight indicators: use of a motivating and engaging context, clarity in language and cultural context, curriculum coherence, attention to cognitive demand, an appropriate number of solution steps to support reasoning, a variety of solution strategies, facilitating multiple solutions and opportunity for success. This F-PosE provides a critical focusing lens for prospective teachers when creating and selecting mathematics problems specifically for use in elementary classrooms.
      PubDate: 2022-06-08
       
  • The process of problem posing: development of a descriptive phase model of
           problem posing

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      Abstract: Abstract The aim of this study is to develop a descriptive phase model for problem-posing activities based on structured situations. For this purpose, 36 task-based interviews with pre-service primary and secondary mathematics teachers working in pairs who were given two structured problem-posing situations were conducted. Through an inductive-deductive category development, five types of activities (situation analysis, variation, generation, problem-solving, evaluation) were identified. These activities were coded in so-called episodes, allowing time-covering analyses of the observed processes. Recurring transitions between these episodes were observed, through which a descriptive phase model was derived. In addition, coding of the developed episode types was validated for its interrater agreement.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • How transition students relearn school mathematics to construct multiply
           quantified statements

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      Abstract: Abstract Understanding the intricate quantifier relations in the formal definitions of both convergence and continuity is highly relevant for students to use these definitions for mathematical reasoning. However, there has been limited research about how students relearn previous school mathematics for understanding multiply quantified statements. This issue was investigated in a case study in a 5-week teaching unit, located in a year-long transition course, in which students were engaged in defining and proving sequence convergence and local continuity. The paper reports on four substantial changes in the ways students relearn school mathematics for constructing quantified statements: (1) endorse predicate as formal property by replacing metaphors of epsilon strips with narratives about the objects ε, Nε, and ∣an − a∣; (2) acknowledge that statements have truth values; (3) recognize that multiply quantified statements are deductively ordered and that the order of its quantifications is relevant; and (4) assemble multiply quantified statements from partial statements that can be investigated separately. These four changes highlight how school mathematics enables student to semantically and pragmatically parse multiply quantified statements and how syntactic considerations emerge from such semantic and pragmatic foundations. Future research should further investigate how to design learning activities that facilitate students’ syntactical engagement with quantified statements, for instance, in activities of using formal definitions of limits during proving.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Analysing senior secondary mathematics teaching using the Knowledge
           Quartet

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      Abstract: Abstract The multi-faceted nature of mathematics knowledge for teaching, including pedagogical content knowledge (PCK), has been studied widely in elementary classrooms, but little research has focused on senior secondary mathematics teaching. This study utilised the Knowledge Quartet (Rowland et al., Research in Mathematics Education, 17(2), 74–91, 2005) to analyse mathematics teaching at the senior secondary level using excerpts from a lesson on differential calculus and another on discrete probability distributions. The findings reveal that, at this level, there is a complex interplay among aspects of the Knowledge Quartet, including the impact of foundational knowledge on contingent moments. Horizon content knowledge is shown to play an important role in teaching decisions, as do perceived constraints. This has implications for future research into how teachers’ horizon knowledge might be expanded and into teachers’ perceptions of mathematics course constraints on the enactment and development of their mathematics knowledge for teaching.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Abstraction and embodiment: exploring the process of grasping a general

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      Abstract: This paper reports from a case study which explores kindergarten children’s mathematical abstraction in a teaching–learning activity about reflection symmetry. From a dialectical perspective, abstraction is here conceived as a process, as a genuine part of human activity, where the learner establishes “a point of view from which the concrete can be seen as meaningfully related” (van Oers & Poland Mathematics Education Research Journal, 19(2), 10–22, 2007, p. 13–14). A cultural-historical semiotic perspective to embodiment is used to explore the characteristics of kindergarten children’s mathematical abstraction. In the selected segment, two 5-year-old boys explore the concept of reflection symmetry using a doll pram. In the activity, the two boys first point to concrete features of the sensory manifold, then one of the boys’ awareness gradually moves to the imagined and finally to grasping a general and establishing a new point of view. The findings illustrate the essential role of gestures, bodily actions, and rhythm, in conjunction with spoken words, in the two boys’ gradual process of grasping a general. The study advances our knowledge about the nature of mathematical abstraction and challenges the traditional view on abstraction as a sort of decontextualised higher order thinking. This study argues that abstraction is not a matter of going from the concrete to the abstract, rather it is an emergent and context-bound process, as a genuine part of children’s concrete embodied activities.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Book Review: A review of the book by Liping Ma (2020) Knowing and teaching
           elementary mathematics: teachers’ understanding of fundamental
           mathematics in China and the United States (3rd ed.)

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      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Beyond categories: dynamic qualitative analysis of visuospatial
           representation in arithmetic

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      Abstract: Abstract Visuospatial representations of numbers and their relationships are widely used in mathematics education. These include drawn images, models constructed with concrete manipulatives, enactive/embodied forms, computer graphics, and more. This paper addresses the analytical limitations and ethical implications of methodologies that use broad categorizations of representations and argues the benefits of dynamic qualitative analysis of arithmetical-representational strategy across multiple semi-independent aspects of display, calculation, and interaction. It proposes an alternative methodological approach combining the structured organization of classification with the detailed nuance of description and describes a systematic but flexible framework for analysing nonstandard visuospatial representations of early arithmetic. This approach is intended for use by researchers or practitioners, for interpretation of multimodal and nonstandard visuospatial representations, and for identification of small differences in learners’ developing arithmetical-representational strategies, including changes over time. Application is illustrated using selected data from a microanalytic study of struggling students’ multiplication and division in scenario tasks.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
 
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