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TEACHING METHODS AND CURRICULUM (38 journals)

Showing 1 - 34 of 34 Journals sorted alphabetically
Action in Teacher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 81)
Ámbito Investigativo     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Éducation & Didactique     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Educational Studies in Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Forum Exegese und Hochschuldidaktik: Verstehen von Anfang an     Full-text available via subscription  
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Interactive Technology and Smart Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Education through Art     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Learning and Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
International Journal of Mobile Learning and Organisation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
ISAA Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Jahrbuch für Pädagogik     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Journal of Immersion and Content-Based Language     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Learning Spaces     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Montessori Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Teacher Education for Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 44)
Jurnal Pendidikan Nonformal     Open Access  
Medical Teacher     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Middle School Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mimbar Sekolah Dasar     Open Access  
Profile Issues in Teachers´ Professional Development     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Psychology Learning & Teaching     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Reading and Writing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Revue française de pédagogie     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
RMLE Research in Middle Level Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Teaching Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Technology of Education Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Tréma     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Writing & Pedagogy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Yearbook of the National Society for the Study of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Psychodrama und Soziometrie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
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Psychology Learning & Teaching
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.179
Number of Followers: 10  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Online) 1475-7257
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Editorial PLAT 21(2) 2022

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      Authors: Birgit Spinath
      Pages: 97 - 98
      Abstract: Psychology Learning & Teaching, Volume 21, Issue 2, Page 97-98, July 2022.

      Citation: Psychology Learning & Teaching
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T10:19:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14757257221097289
      Issue No: Vol. 21, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Abstracts of recent articles published in Teaching of Psychology

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      Pages: 182 - 189
      Abstract: Psychology Learning & Teaching, Volume 21, Issue 2, Page 182-189, July 2022.

      Citation: Psychology Learning & Teaching
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T10:21:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14757257221079193
      Issue No: Vol. 21, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Refuting misconceptions in an introductory psychology course for
           preservice teachers

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      Authors: Maria Tulis
      Abstract: Psychology Learning & Teaching, Ahead of Print.
      This experimental field study (pre-post-follow-up design) with 184 student teachers examined the effectiveness of an intervention to reduce misconceptions about psychology within an introductory psychology course. For this purpose, over the course’s one-semester duration, all students attended six lectures and, in addition, worked individually on six assignments in between. In both, the intervention and control group, assignments covered the same learning content but assignments for the intervention group particularly addressed six topic-related misconceptions, and were designed to bring about conceptual change. These assignments included refutational texts and other tasks that triggered conceptual inconsistency and emphasized students’ use of scientific concepts. Students in the control group completed assignments designed for rehearsal of and elaboration on the topics at hand but were not exposed to the respective misconceptions. The findings demonstrate the efficacy of this slight modification of tasks in reducing students’ misconceptions around psychology. While the groups did not differ in exam performance, the positive associations found between exam performance and high-confidence rejection of psychological myths, and their correlation with evaluativist epistemic beliefs and critical thinking, underline the importance of early interventions in teacher education with the aim of dispelling misconceptions about psychology.
      Citation: Psychology Learning & Teaching
      PubDate: 2022-08-05T07:13:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14757257221117833
       
  • Pre-service Teachers’ Evidence-Informed Reasoning: Do Attitudes,
           Subjective Norms, and Self-Efficacy Facilitate the Use of Scientific
           Theories to Analyze Teaching Problems'

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      Authors: Martin Greisel, Christina Wekerle, Theresa Wilkes, Robin Stark, Ingo Kollar
      Abstract: Psychology Learning & Teaching, Ahead of Print.
      Using the theory of planned behavior, we investigated whether attitudes, subjective norms, and self-efficacy facilitate pre-service teachers’ engagement in evidence-informed reasoning about classroom problems. N = 157 pre-service teachers were asked about these motivationally relevant antecedents to engaging in evidence-informed reasoning about classroom-related challenges and analyzed case scenarios of problematic teaching situations. Results revealed that self-reported evidence-informed reasoning was directly predicted by intention to engage in evidence-informed reasoning, self-efficacy, and attitude toward evidence-informed reasoning. However, the objectively coded quality of teachers’ evidence-informed reasoning was seemingly negatively predicted by perceived costs and self-efficacy. Thus, the theory of planned behavior partly explained self-reported evidence-informed reasoning, but not objectively observed reasoning. Pre-service teachers might not be skilled enough to assess their own competency accurately and might be unaware of external conditions facilitating or hindering evidence-informed reasoning. Thus, interventions aiming to foster pre-service teachers’ motivation to engage in evidence-informed reasoning might not be effective until such teachers gain the necessary skills.
      Citation: Psychology Learning & Teaching
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T07:18:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14757257221113942
       
  • Examining Skills and Abilities During the Pandemic – Psychology
           Students’ and Examiners’ Perceptions of a Digital OSCE

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      Authors: Camilla Hakelind, Anna E Sundström
      Abstract: Psychology Learning & Teaching, Ahead of Print.
      Finding valid and reliable ways to assess complex clinical skills within psychology is a challenge. Recently, there have been some examples of applying Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) in psychology for making such assessments. The aim of this study was to examine students’ and examiners’ perceptions of a digital OSCE in psychology regarding quality and students’ feelings about the OSCE. Participants were 51 students enrolled in the Programme for Master of Science in Clinical Psychology during two semesters and nine examiners assessing each OSCE occasion, at Umeå University, Sweden. Web-based questionnaires were used for data collection. Psychometric analyses indicated that the subscales in the student questionnaire had adequate or close to adequate levels of item and scale reliability. Both students and examiners felt that the digital OSCE was realistic, valid and well-aligned with professional practice. Although students perceived the digital OSCE as stressful, the results showed that they were focused and concentrated and found the OSCE to be a positive learning experience, implying that the stress did not affect performance to any significant extent. Based on the examiners’ experiences, it can be concluded that there are both advantages and disadvantages which need to be considered when planning future digital OSCEs.
      Citation: Psychology Learning & Teaching
      PubDate: 2022-07-22T07:31:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14757257221114038
       
  • Does the use of Gender-Fair Language Impair the Comprehensibility of Video
           Lectures' – An Experiment Using an Authentic Video Lecture
           Manipulating Role Nouns in German

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      Authors: Marcus C. G. Friedrich, Jennifer Muselick, Elke Heise
      Abstract: Psychology Learning & Teaching, Ahead of Print.
      Gender-fair language makes women and other genders, their interests, and their achievements more visible and is particularly relevant to grammatical gender languages such as German, in which most nouns and personal pronouns are assigned to a specific gender. The present study tested the often repeated critical claims that gender-fair language impairs the comprehensibility and aesthetic appeal of videos. In an experiment with N = 105 students, participants watched a video on self-determination theory, either with masculine-only forms or using the glottal stop, a form of spoken gender-fair language that inserts an abrupt and sustained closure of the vocal cords in the larynx between the masculine form or the stem and the feminine ending of words (e.g. in German “Leserʔinnen”, ∼feʔmale readers). Subsequently, participants completed a questionnaire regarding the video's comprehensibility. The results show no statistically significant impairment regarding the general subjective comprehensibility (partial η2 < .01), the ease of ascribing meaning to the words (partial η2 < .01), the ease of decoding the syntax of the sentences (partial η2 = .03), or the aesthetic appeal of the videos (partial η2 = .02). The critics’ claims are therefore questioned.
      Citation: Psychology Learning & Teaching
      PubDate: 2022-06-24T03:19:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14757257221107348
       
  • Technostress During COVID-19: Action Regulation Hindrances and the
           Mediating Role of Basic Human Needs among Psychology Students

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      Authors: Nathalie Schauffel, Lena Maria Kaufmann, Mona Rynek, Thomas Ellwart
      Abstract: Psychology Learning & Teaching, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic led to an abrupt change from in-person to online teaching in higher education, resulting in increased use of information and communication technology (ICT) and students’ stress and uncertainty. Integrating theories of human motivation, stress, and humane work design, we investigated whether different types of action regulation hindrances (ARH) pertaining to human (ICT competence deficits), technology (technical problems), interaction (coordination difficulties), and task aspects (work overload) related to technostress (H1). Furthermore, we examined if this relationship was mediated by satisfaction of the basic human needs for competence, autonomy, and relatedness (H2). Our analysis of causes and mechanisms of technostress is based on cross-sectional survey data (self-report) from 205 psychology students attending an organizational psychology class that was switched from an in-person to an online format due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Structural equation modeling revealed that different types of ARH (i.e., ICT competence deficits, technical problems, coordination difficulties, work overload) positively predicted technostress (β  =  .17 to β  =  .42, p 
      Citation: Psychology Learning & Teaching
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T05:59:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14757257221102563
       
  • Teaching Research in Principle and in Practice: What Do Psychology
           Instructors Think of Research Projects in Their Courses'

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      Authors: Jordan R. Wagge, Michelle A. Hurst, Mark J. Brandt, Ljiljana B. Lazarevic, Nicole Legate, Jon E. Grahe
      Abstract: Psychology Learning & Teaching, Ahead of Print.
      Psychology majors typically conduct at least one research project during their undergraduate studies, yet these projects rarely make a scientific contribution beyond the classroom. In this study, we explored one potential reason for this—that student projects may not be aligned with best practices in the field. In other words, we wondered if there was a mismatch between what instructors teach in principle and what student projects are in practice. To answer this, we asked psychology instructors (n = 111) who regularly teach courses involving research projects questions about these projects. Instructors endorsed many of the commonly assumed pitfalls of student projects, such as not using rigorous methodology. Notably, the characteristics of these typical student projects did not align with the qualities instructors reported as being important in research practice. We highlight opportunities to align these qualities by employing resources such as crowdsourced projects specifically developed for student researchers.
      Citation: Psychology Learning & Teaching
      PubDate: 2022-05-30T06:42:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14757257221101942
       
  • Curricular Approaches to Supporting University Student Academic Success
           and Wellbeing

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      Authors: Jenny L. Richmond, Jacquelyn Cranney
      Abstract: Psychology Learning & Teaching, Ahead of Print.
      The goal of this work was to determine whether contextualized prompting can promote student engagement with resources designed to develop self-management skills. In a second-year social and developmental psychology unit, a special section of the learning management system (LMS) contained multiple self-management tools/resources which covered topics such as time-management, study strategies, and emotional regulation. “Just-in-time” (JIT) prompts regarding selected self-management tools were delivered through LMS reminders (e.g., time-management tools early in the term). The primary measures were the number of hits on each resource and the percentage of students who accessed each resource, which allowed comparison between those resources selected for JIT LMS prompts, and those that were not. Across two studies (whereby in the second study, the LMS section was simplified, and the frequency of JIT prompts was increased), it was found that there were more hits on the JIT-prompted resources than those resources that were not prompted, and that the percentage of students accessing the JIT resources generally dropped off across the term. In addition, Study 2 suggested that increasing the frequency of JIT prompts did not increase student engagement. Limitations, implications, and future directions for this initiative are discussed.
      Citation: Psychology Learning & Teaching
      PubDate: 2022-05-12T01:22:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14757257221098763
       
  • Mechanisms of Epistemic Change: The Roles of Reflection and Social
           Interaction

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      Authors: Tom Rosman, Martin Kerwer
      Abstract: Psychology Learning & Teaching, Ahead of Print.
      Fostering students’ epistemic beliefs is key for achieving a more nuanced approach to psychological knowledge. The Bendixen-Rule model on epistemic change posits epistemic doubt (questioning one's prior epistemic beliefs), epistemic volition (the will to change one's beliefs) and resolution strategies (strategies to overcome epistemic doubt by epistemic change) as three interrelated process components that lead to the development of more advanced epistemic beliefs. However, while the model has risen to relative prominence over the last years, the postulated mechanisms of change still lack empirical backing. In this article, we report on an experimental study with N = 153 psychology students that aimed at testing the effects of two specific resolution strategies—reflection and social interaction. This was realized by developing intervention components that target the two strategies, and by analyzing these components’ incremental effects on epistemic change. Results showed that reflection and social interaction might be promising strategies to address epistemic doubt. Psychology lecturers should thus give students room for reflecting on and discussing their beliefs once doubt has arisen.
      Citation: Psychology Learning & Teaching
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T06:36:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14757257221098860
       
  • Promoting Student Wellbeing Through Dedicated Units on the Psychological
           Science of Wellbeing: Rationale, Nature, and Student Evaluations

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      Authors: Sue Morris, Jacquelyn Cranney
      Abstract: Psychology Learning & Teaching, Ahead of Print.
      The Complete State model of mental health differentiates between the dimensions of psychiatric disorders and wellbeing. The latter dimension is consistent with educators proactively creating learning-supportive curricular environments by, for example, translating the Basic Needs Satisfaction (BNS) theory into practical curricular strategies. One gap in the literature on curricular approaches to supporting student wellbeing is descriptions of innovations in the design of specific units focusing entirely on the psychological science of student self-management, success and wellbeing. The aim of this report was to address this gap by describing the nature and student evaluations of two such units. The curricula of these units, whose design and delivery were guided by BNS theory, are described. Institutional unit evaluation surveys over four years and eight unit deliveries revealed that the units were well received by students, regardless of variations in internal (e.g., online vs. flipped classroom mode of delivery) and external (e.g., presence of COVID-19 pandemic) factors. Moreover, students agreed with the statement that the unit “provided me with knowledge and skills I can apply”. By considering BNS theory during curriculum design and delivery, the success and wellbeing of students were supported while they learned about the science of wellbeing.
      Citation: Psychology Learning & Teaching
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T06:36:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14757257221098024
       
  • Come As You Are – Small Groups in an Online Statistics Course for Highly
           Heterogeneous Students

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      Authors: Lena Schützler, Oliver Christ
      Abstract: Psychology Learning & Teaching, Ahead of Print.
      Statistics is not the subject most psychology students are feverishly looking forward to. Fears and doubts about its relevance are quite common. This is especially pronounced at our institution, a large distance-teaching university with highly heterogeneous students. We recognized three clusters of students that might need special support: (1) students with fear of statistics, (2) students whose school time was a long time ago, (3) students who already failed the statistics exam. We gave those students the opportunity to participate in small, supervised groups to discuss learning strategies, problems, or fears. Students who did not participate served as a control group. We exploratively evaluated which kind of students were interested, and if the groups affected attitudes towards statistics, general self-efficacy, and exam-related variables. Interest and activity in the groups were low. No unique effect of participation in the groups on attitudes and grades were observable. Students stated that the groups did not help them to deal with the course. If these results prove stable in further studies with an improved design, one might conclude that setting up such small groups is not worth the effort.
      Citation: Psychology Learning & Teaching
      PubDate: 2022-04-12T07:59:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14757257221089334
       
  • What to Blend' Exploring the Relationship Between Student Engagement
           and Academic Achievement via a Blended Learning Approach

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      Authors: Paraskevi Argyriou, Kenza Benamar, Milena Nikolajeva
      First page: 126
      Abstract: Psychology Learning & Teaching, Ahead of Print.
      The present study investigated whether student engagement with different online blended learning activities predicts academic performance as measured via a multiple-choice online exam for an undergraduate cognitive psychology course. Higher completion rates of weekly online quizzes predicted final exam performance. Findings are discussed in relation to using online learning resources to enhance student engagement and performance and learning analytics to identify students in need of further support. Since findings only revealed one significant predictor, more research is required to identify additional factors influencing academic achievement in an online blended learning approach.
      Citation: Psychology Learning & Teaching
      PubDate: 2022-04-11T03:35:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14757257221091512
       
  • Combine Statistical Thinking With Open Scientific Practice: A Protocol of
           a Bayesian Research Project

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      Authors: Alexandra Sarafoglou, Anna van der Heijden, Tim Draws, Joran Cornelisse, Eric-Jan Wagenmakers, Maarten Marsman
      First page: 138
      Abstract: Psychology Learning & Teaching, Ahead of Print.
      Current developments in the statistics community suggest that modern statistics education should be structured holistically, that is, by allowing students to work with real data and to answer concrete statistical questions, but also by educating them about alternative frameworks, such as Bayesian inference. In this article, we describe how we incorporated such a holistic structure in a Bayesian research project on ordered binomial probabilities. The project was conducted with a group of three undergraduate psychology students who had basic knowledge of Bayesian statistics and programming, but lacked formal mathematical training. The research project aimed to (1) convey the basic mathematical concepts of Bayesian inference; (2) have students experience the entire empirical cycle including collection, analysis, and interpretation of data and (3) teach students open science practices.
      Citation: Psychology Learning & Teaching
      PubDate: 2022-02-17T04:37:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14757257221077307
       
  • Implementation of Interdisciplinary Health Technologies as Active Learning
           Strategies in the Classroom: A Course Redesign

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      Authors: Guido G. Urizar, Karissa Miller
      First page: 151
      Abstract: Psychology Learning & Teaching, Ahead of Print.
      The number of health psychology courses offered in higher education institutions has dramatically increased over the past 30 years. Health psychology courses provide students a unique opportunity to learn about important public health issues and health disparities affecting our society from a biopsychosocial perspective. Prior research indicates that students taking these courses, many of whom are non-biology majors, often report feeling anxious about learning the underlying biological mechanisms that affect health outcomes, particularly as they relate to stress and disease. Therefore, innovative teaching strategies, such as the use of active learning approaches, are needed to promote student confidence and engagement in learning these interdisciplinary models of health. Despite rapid advancements and innovations in health technologies, few health psychology courses have integrated these technologies as a modality of active learning. This article describes the implementation of health technologies (e.g., biosensors, biofeedback equipment, wearable technologies) as an active learning modality and innovative teaching approach to promote student engagement and learning outcomes in an undergraduate health psychology course taught in the U.S. Eighty students from a minority-serving university participated in this pilot course redesign. Student responses to the use of health technologies in their course were very positive. A description of the course curriculum is provided and results from student responses and feedback are presented. Implications and recommendations for implementing these technologies and pedagogies in future health courses are also discussed, including university support for sustaining these high impact teaching practices.
      Citation: Psychology Learning & Teaching
      PubDate: 2022-04-04T08:56:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14757257221090643
       
  • Lessons Learned and Preliminary Results from Implementing Simulation-Based
           Elements in a Clinical Psychology Programme

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      Authors: Terese Glatz, Sofia Bergbom, Sara Edlund
      First page: 162
      Abstract: Psychology Learning & Teaching, Ahead of Print.
      In a clinical psychology training context, there is a need to examine students’ theoretical knowledge as well as their professional competence. One promising method to assess students’ professional competence is the Objective and Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). In this report, we describe and discuss the implementation of OSCE on a clinical psychology programme at a university in Sweden, including lesson learned regarding the structure and content for this examination. We also report on preliminary results, in which we explored students’ perceived competence and worries, and their supervisors’ reports regarding their clinical practicum, in relation to a new curriculum that includes more simulation-based elements (including the OSCE) than the old curriculum. Results showed that students on the new curriculum reported lower levels of perceived competence before the clinical practicum, but increased significantly more over time in comparison to students on the old curriculum. These results are discussed in relation to the potential role of OSCE in clinical psychology students’ development of professional competence. Due to methodological limitations, these results should be interpreted with caution and should be viewed as exploratory. All in all, this report can be viewed as a guideline for implementation of OSCE on similar programmes in psychology.
      Citation: Psychology Learning & Teaching
      PubDate: 2022-04-18T09:38:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14757257221093490
       
  • Retrieval Practice Effects in a Psychology Lecture: Illustrating the
           Relevance of Study Design, Item Difficulty, and Selection of Dependent
           Measures

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      Authors: Jonathan Barenberg, Stephan Dutke
      First page: 99
      Abstract: Psychology Learning & Teaching, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigated the effects of retrieval practice on the cognitive and metacognitive learning outcome in a psychology lecture at university. In a within-subjects design, N  =  180 students completed an intermediate knowledge test in the 9th session and a final test in the 13th session of the semester. Both tests assessed students’ correctness of answering and confidence in their answers. In the final test, items that were intermediately tested were answered as correctly as items that were not intermediately tested. The failure to find a testing effect at the level of cognitive performance could not be attributed to interference with item difficulty, as intermediately tested and not tested items were balanced according to their a priori difficulty. However, testing improved performance at the metacognitive level. Confidence ratings were more accurate and less biased in items that were intermediately tested compared to items not intermediately tested. The results are discussed in the context of metacognitive monitoring as a condition of self-regulated learning in an authentic psychology learning context.
      Citation: Psychology Learning & Teaching
      PubDate: 2021-10-20T12:40:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14757257211049312
       
  • The Implicit Association Test in Introductory Psychology Textbooks: Blind
           Spot for Controversy

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      Authors: Jared M. Bartels, Patricia Schoenrade
      First page: 113
      Abstract: Psychology Learning & Teaching, Ahead of Print.
      The Implicit Association Test (IAT) has been widely discussed as a potential measure of “implicit bias.” Yet the IAT is controversial; research suggests that it is far from clear precisely what the instrument measures, and it does not appear to be a strong predictor of behavior. The presentation of this topic in Introductory Psychology texts is important as, for many students, it is their first introduction to scientific treatment of such issues. In the present study, we examined twenty current Introductory Psychology texts in terms of their coverage of the controversy and presentation of the strengths and weaknesses of the measure. Of the 17 texts that discussed the IAT, a minority presented any of the concerns including the lack of measurement clarity (29%), an automatic preference for White people among African Americans (12%), lack of predictive validity (12%), and lack of caution about the meaning of a score (0%); most provided students with a link to the Project Implicit website (65%). Overall, 82% of the texts were rated as biased or partially biased on their coverage of the IAT. The implications for the perceptions and self-perceptions of students, particularly when a link to Project Implicit is included, are discussed.
      Citation: Psychology Learning & Teaching
      PubDate: 2021-11-13T04:28:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14757257211055200
       
 
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