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TEACHING METHODS AND CURRICULUM (38 journals)

Showing 1 - 34 of 34 Journals sorted alphabetically
Action in Teacher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 70)
Ámbito Investigativo     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Éducation & Didactique     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Educational Studies in Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Forum Exegese und Hochschuldidaktik: Verstehen von Anfang an     Full-text available via subscription  
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Interactive Technology and Smart Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Education through Art     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Learning and Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
International Journal of Mobile Learning and Organisation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
ISAA Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Jahrbuch für Pädagogik     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Journal of Immersion and Content-Based Language     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Learning Spaces     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Montessori Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Teacher Education for Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 42)
Jurnal Pendidikan Nonformal     Open Access  
Medical Teacher     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Middle School Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mimbar Sekolah Dasar     Open Access  
Profile Issues in Teachers´ Professional Development     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Psychology Learning & Teaching     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Reading and Writing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Revue française de pédagogie     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
RMLE Research in Middle Level Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Teaching Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Technology of Education Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Tréma     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Writing & Pedagogy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Yearbook of the National Society for the Study of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Psychodrama und Soziometrie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
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International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.426
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 30  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 1 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 2046-6854 - ISSN (Online) 2046-6862
Published by Emerald Homepage  [360 journals]
  • Students' experiences of academic coaching in Norway: a pilot study
         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Beate Brevik Saethern , Anne Margrethe Glømmen , Ricardo Lugo , Pål Ellingsen
      Abstract: The purpose of this study was to identify and describe how students experience academic coaching in higher education in Norway. The study employed a descriptive and exploratory qualitative design where semi-structured interviews formed the basis for data collection. Thematic analysis was used as an analytic strategy to identify, organise and find patterns or themes that emerged from the data. The findings showed that academic coaching positively influenced the respondents' ability to identify the necessary and efficient cognitive processes and metacognitive skills needed to cope with everyday scholastic challenges. Academic coaching affected the respondents' metacognitive skills and cognitive processes in terms of evolving their self-efficacy, self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, stress identification, goal identification, goal setting and development of new strategies. The findings in this study reflect the respondents' subjective opinions and further research is needed to validate these findings. This article addresses a gap in the field of research by offering a descriptive pilot study and thematic analysis of students' experiences with academic coaching in Norway.
      Citation: International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education
      PubDate: 2022-06-24
      DOI: 10.1108/IJMCE-07-2021-0077
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Mentoring roles in an afterschool STEM mentoring program: an investigation
           of why mentors enact different roles

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      Authors: Virginia Snodgrass Rangel , Jerrod A. Henderson , Victoria Doan , Rick Greer , Mariam Manuel
      Abstract: The purposes of this study were to describe the roles mentors enacted as part of an afterschool science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) program and how those roles varied across three sites and to explain those differences. The authors used a comparative case study design and collected data primarily from interviews with program mentors and observations of the sessions. The authors found that the mentors played four roles, depending on the school site: teachers, friends, support and role models. Mentors interpreted cues from the environment in light of their own identities, which ultimately led them to construct a plausible understanding of their roles as mentors. The authors identify four mentoring roles that are somewhat consistent with prior research and demonstrate that the roles mentors enact can vary systematically across sites, and these variations can be explained by sensemaking. This study also contributes to research on mentoring roles by elaborating each identified role and offering a framework to explain variability in mentor role enactment. The authors recommend that mentoring program directors discuss the roles that mentors may enact with mentors as part of their training and that they engage mentors in identity work and also recommend that program managers create unstructured time for mentors to socialize outside STEM activities with their mentees. This study contributes to mentoring research by using sensemaking theory to highlight how and why mentoring roles differ across school sites.
      Citation: International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education
      PubDate: 2022-05-31
      DOI: 10.1108/IJMCE-11-2021-0103
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The perceived benefits of instructional coaching for teachers

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      Authors: Jennifer Marie Warnock , Monica Gibson-Sweet , Christian J. van Nieuwerburgh
      Abstract: Coaching for teachers has evolved as a form of professional development. The benefits of such interventions have been examined with regard to student, teacher and school outcomes, but the purpose of this paper is to present an investigation relating to the benefits of instructional coaching (Knight, 2006) to teachers as perceived by the teachers themselves. The study utilises a subjectivist approach with a constructivist paradigmatic stance (Morgan and Burrell, 1985). Eleven semi-structured, face-to-face interviews were conducted (King, 2019) with teachers at a secondary (high) school in the UK. The data were interpreted and analysed using thematic analysis (Braun and Clark, 2006). The research suggests the following four benefits to the teachers who participated in the study, which aligned well with the literature review: improved relationships, awareness, reflectiveness and enhanced practice. A fifth perceived benefit reported by the participants was positive attitude, which captured a sense of increased confidence, motivation and positivity. Findings were based on the self-reported data of a small sample. Therefore it is not possible to generalise the findings but Thematic Analysis was used to understand perceptions and insights in a wider context (Ritchie and Lewis, 2003). This research builds on the literature focusing on perceived benefits to teachers. Findings generally support current theoretical understanding. The results of this exploration of the teacher perception of benefits of instructional coaching in one UK school contributes to the emerging literature about the benefits of coaching. The teacher perceived benefit of positive attitude does not appear to be identified in the literature. In practice, this study raised awareness of the possible benefits of coaching to educators. The authors recommend that educators, policymakers and educational leaders should further explore the potential benefits of coaching in education settings. Utilising teacher perception, the study further confirms coaching to be a useful way of supporting educators to enhance their practice. This paper fulfils an identified need to gain a better understanding of teacher-perceived benefits of coaching. This understanding will support school leaders and policymakers who may be considering how to best leverage coaching in educational settings.
      Citation: International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education
      PubDate: 2022-03-30
      DOI: 10.1108/IJMCE-01-2021-0030
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Examining coaches’ feedback to preservice teacher candidates on
           a core practice

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      Authors: Anne Henry Cash , Hilary Dack , William Leach
      Abstract: For preservice teacher candidates (PSTs), receiving feedback on core practices is an important component in supporting the development of their practice. However, coaches are often underprepared to support PSTs on core practices, and feedback can be infrequent or low quality (Anderson and Stillman, 2013; Clarke et al., 2014). Understanding such variation in the content and process for providing feedback to PSTs is important in evaluating and improving feedback effectiveness for amplifying their learning. The authors studied feedback provided by coaches in response to a video of a sample PST’s lesson. The authors examined the extent to which coaches’ feedback targeted the core practice of eliciting student thinking and whether this was associated with their assigned PSTs’ instructional practices during student teaching. The authors also questioned whether this aspect of coach feedback could be changed in response to professional development. The results provide preliminary evidence that coaches vary in the extent to which they focus feedback on a particular practice, even when directed to do so. Moreover, when coaches provide focused feedback on a core practice, the PSTs that they coach use the core practice during student teaching. Further, coaches’ feedback can be improved through professional development. This study contributes to a limited evidence base examining the association between feedback and PSTs’ observed practice. It also establishes that coach feedback can be improved with professional development. The authors discuss these results in the context of documenting and improving teacher preparation.
      Citation: International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education
      PubDate: 2022-03-09
      DOI: 10.1108/IJMCE-06-2021-0068
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The implementation of teacher coaching across eight New Zealand schools in
           a Kāhui Ako/Community of learning: a multiple case study

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      Authors: Paul Nathan Bennett
      Abstract: The purpose of this study was to explore how teacher coaching was implemented across eight schools. A subjectivist epistemological position was adopted as the most appropriate for this study, and a qualitative approach to methodology, data collection and analysis was used within an evaluative multiple case study framework in order to investigate three research questions. The findings indicate coaching has the potential to provide schools with a professional learning approach that allows staff to explore a wide variety of challenges of practice. However, inconsistencies in perceptions, staffing and coach development mean positive outcomes for students may not be guaranteed. One limitation of this study is that it provides a snapshot of teacher coaching in relation to a specific group of schools in a constantly changing New Zealand context. School leaders implementing teacher coaching programmes are encouraged to consider how they will evaluate whether their programmes are changing teachers’ practice and improving outcome for students. School leaders should also plan how to manage changes in personnel. The findings show the concept of teacher coaching is a social construct influenced by the unique environmental context and individual perceptions of those involved, leading to variations in its application. This study provides new knowledge in relation to the challenges that can be experienced when implementing teacher coaching across a community of schools.
      Citation: International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education
      PubDate: 2022-02-28
      DOI: 10.1108/IJMCE-09-2021-0090
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • “Should we get support or just guidelines'” (self) assessment
           on mentoring of early childhood education students

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      Authors: Adrijana Visnjic Jevtic , Edita Rogulj
      Abstract: The aim of this research was to find out students' and mentors' attitudes toward the quality of mentoring support during teaching practicums. The research sought to determine whether there is any difference in (self) assessment between teacher mentors and early childhood education students. Through the quantitative research methodology, the Crisp (2009) College Student Mentoring Scale (CSMS) instrument was used to assess the quality of mentoring support during teaching practicums. Assessments were made in relation to the following variables: support in the areas of psychological and emotional needs, support in professional development and the development of professional competencies and the role of mentors as models. Early childhood education students (n1 = 105) and mentors (n2 = 54) of teaching practicums at the Faculty of Teacher Education, University of Zagreb, participated in the research. The results of the research show that there is a statistically significant difference between student assessments and mentor self-assessment with regard to all researched areas of support. Mentors rated their mentoring skills higher than students did. An approach in which mentoring is assessed in the context of support to students in different areas (e.g. psychological, emotional, professional) is rarely used in early childhood teacher education. Results indicate the need for a systematic evaluation of mentoring and the design of programs to strengthen mentoring competences.
      Citation: International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education
      PubDate: 2022-02-01
      DOI: 10.1108/IJMCE-03-2021-0048
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Co-teaching as an opportunity for mentor teacher professional growth

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      Authors: Katya Karathanos-Aguilar , Lara Ervin-Kassab
      Abstract: A growing body of research has pointed to the potential benefits of a co-teaching clinical residency model in preservice education. Preservice co-teaching research has focused primarily on conditions necessary for effective co-teaching to occur, factors that inhibit successful co-teaching implementation, and teacher candidate development. Researchers have called for further exploration into potential benefits of preservice co-teaching models for the mentor teacher. In this study, the authors explored ways in which mentor teachers who participated in a co-teaching pre-service program experienced professional growth. In order to gain insights into the perspectives of mentor teachers and ways in which they experienced professional growth through their experiences in the co-teaching program, the authors used a qualitative, descriptive approach. The authors’ primary data source included interviews conducted with 42 mentor teachers from five content-areas. Researcher communication and interactions with co-teachers over time, along with artifacts including field notes, co-teacher reflections on practice, and program documents, served as peripheral data sources. Results indicated that co-teachers experienced meaningful professional growth in areas represented by the following themes: (1) critical reflection, (2) pedagogical renewal, (3) in situ feedback and refining practice and (4) application of learning to leadership roles. This study, which is one of only a few studies focusing explicitly on mentor co-teacher professional growth, provided new insights into learning opportunities afforded to mentor teachers through a participation in a blended model of co-teaching and communities of practice.
      Citation: International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education
      PubDate: 2022-01-24
      DOI: 10.1108/IJMCE-06-2021-0070
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • A comparative study of formal coaching and mentoring programmes in higher
           education

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      Authors: Jenni Jones , Helen A. Smith
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate two coaching and mentoring programmes focused on the ever-increasingly important aim of enhancing the chances of professional level employment for undergraduate students, at two UK universities. In addition, to offer recommendations to enhance coaching and mentoring success within higher education (HE). Two similar programmes are compared; the first study is a coaching programme delivered in two phases involving over 1,500 students within the business school. The second study is a mentoring programme involving over 250 students over a ten-year period within the business school at a different institution. The two programmes have been compared against the key success criteria from the literature, endorsed by coaching and mentoring experts. The results highlight the importance of integrating with other initiatives, senior management commitment, budget, an application process, clear matching process, trained coaches and mentors, induction for both parties, supportive material, ongoing supervision and robust evaluation and record keeping. The research focuses on two similar institutions, with comparable student demographics. It would have been useful to dig deeper into the effect of the diverse characteristics of coach/mentor and coachee/mentee on the effectiveness of their relationships. In addition, to test the assumptions and recommendations beyond these two institutions, and to validate the reach and application of these best practice recommendations further afield. The results identify a number of best practice recommendations to guide HE institutions when offering coaching and mentoring interventions to support career progression of their students. There are limited comparison studies between universities with undergraduate career-related coaching and mentoring programmes and limited research offering best practice recommendations for coaching and mentoring programmes in HE. The top ten factors offered here to take away will add value to those thinking of running similar programmes within HE.
      Citation: International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education
      PubDate: 2022-01-10
      DOI: 10.1108/IJMCE-03-2021-0054
      Issue No: Vol. 11 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Unpacking effective mentorship practices for early career academics: a
           mixed-methods study

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      Authors: Julia Sargent , Bart Rienties
      Abstract: Mentoring can be an important source of support, particularly for those who are in the early stages of their career in academia. Drawing upon data from a larger study, the authors investigated opportunities for mentorship, factors that hinder or support mentorship and the value of mentorship from the perspective of early career academics (ECAs). Using a mixed-methods approach and social identity theory, the authors collected data via a survey and follow-up interviews with members of staff at the Open University, of which 19 ECA experiences were contrasted with 17 academics who received mentorship but were not early career. ECAs and non-ECAs had equal access to mentoring, but mentoring seemed to be more visible and accessible to ECAs. Factors deemed to support mentorship included mentors having empathy and confidentiality. Mentorship was valued by ECAs because it helped to provide them with support that was in addition to their line management and to help them make sense of “being an academic”. From the data presented, mentorship supported ECAs in their academic career and identity development in higher education. This research provides a mixed-methods approach to investigating early career mentoring within the context of a higher education institution in the United Kingdom. It considers the topic of mentoring of both junior and more senior staff who are often working at a distance to the institutional setting and provides a theoretical perspective in terms of social identity for academics.
      Citation: International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education
      PubDate: 2022-01-07
      DOI: 10.1108/IJMCE-05-2021-0060
      Issue No: Vol. 11 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Meaning making of mentorship for the tuition-free student

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      Authors: Ceceilia Parnther , Daniel Collier
      Abstract: The study aimed to explore how student recipients of a full-tuition scholarship envision, define and experience mentorship and the types of relationships they have and expect from mentors. The study adds to the growing body of literature on mentorship as supplemental support for college student success. Semi-structured interviews of 20 first-year college students in the Mid-West United States were collected as a part of a more extensive mixed-methods study. The authors used a four-phase process to refine, derive meaning and develop themes. Kegan's orders of consciousness explain how students make meaning of mentorship. Students described mentoring as a service that could provide specific transactional features. Ten participants were unable to acknowledge a mentoring relationship at all, despite describing mentoring experiences and opportunities. Students often align with Kegan's second order, which focuses on self and valuing transactional, short-term relationships. Adjusting approaches to explaining mentorship and the value of building relationships appear to be an opportunity for research and practice. This study illustrates an apparent disconnect between the intent of mentorship and the experiences of mentees. The students' experiences add a valuable perspective that supports the need to further refine mentoring practices in meaningful ways to impact student success, persistence and retention.
      Citation: International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education
      PubDate: 2021-12-28
      DOI: 10.1108/IJMCE-03-2021-0052
      Issue No: Vol. 11 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Primary preservice teachers' perspectives of their literacy mentoring
           experiences during professional placement

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      Authors: Sarah Margaret James , Suzanne(Sue) M. Hudson , Alexandra Lasczik
      Abstract: Being literate can change the lives of Australian students. Therefore, graduating effective teachers of literacy is an imperative for Australian schools. Professional experience provides an opportunity for preservice teachers to refine their skills for teaching literacy under the guidance of a mentor teacher. This study investigates from the perspective of preservice teachers, the attributes and practices primary mentor teachers demonstrate when mentoring literacy teaching during professional experience. This investigation utilised survey design to gather data from primary preservice teachers (n = 402) from seven Australian universities. The 34 survey items were underpinned by the Five Factor Model of Mentoring and literacy practices prescribed by the Australian curriculum. Preservice teachers self-reported their responses about their literacy mentoring experiences on a five-point Likert scale. The Five Factor Model of Mentoring provided a framework to analyse and present the data using descriptive statistics. Findings revealed 70% or more of preservice teachers agreed or strongly agreed mentor teachers had the personal attributes, shared the pedagogical knowledge, modelled best practice and provided feedback for effective literacy teaching. Conversely, only 58.7% of the participants reported their mentor teachers shared the system requirements for effective literacy teaching. The preservice teachers self-reported their experiences, and although this may be their experience, it does not necessarily mean the mentor teachers did not demonstrate the attributes and practices reported, it may mean they were not identified by the preservice teachers. While there were 402 participants in this study, the viewpoints of these preservice teachers' may or may not be indicative of the entire population of preservice teachers across Australia. This study included primary preservice teachers, so the experiences of secondary and early childhood teachers have not been reported. An extended study would include secondary and early childhood contexts. This research highlighted that not all mentor teachers shared the system requirements for literacy teaching with their mentee. This finding prompts a need to undertake further research to investigate the confidence of mentor teachers in their own ability to teach literacy in the primary school. Teaching literacy is complex, and the curriculum is continually evolving. Providing professional learning in teaching literacy will position mentor teachers to better support preservice teachers during professional experience. Ultimately, the goal is to sustain high quality literacy teaching in schools to promote positive outcomes for all Australian school students. While the role of mentor teacher is well recognised, there is a dearth of research that explores the mentoring of literacy during professional experience. The preservice teachers in this study self-reported inconsistencies in mentor teachers' attributes and practices for mentoring literacy prompting a need for further professional learning in this vital learning area.
      Citation: International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education
      PubDate: 2021-12-24
      DOI: 10.1108/IJMCE-07-2021-0080
      Issue No: Vol. 11 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Mentoring, research self-efficacy, work–life balance and psychological
           well-being of doctoral program students

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      Authors: Zain Haider , Rabia Dasti
      Abstract: The present correlational research study examined the theoretical and statistical relationship between mentoring, research self-efficacy, work–life balance and the psychological well-being of doctoral program students. The study highlights the positive role of mentoring for uplifting the eudemonic aspects of well-being of doctoral program students of natural sciences. A purposive sample (N = 72) of natural sciences doctoral program students was selected from the Higher Education Commission recognized universities of Lahore and Sargodha. Participants' experiences regarding mentoring were operationalized utilizing the Mentorship Effectiveness Scale (Berk et al., 2005). Similarly, their levels of research self-efficacy, work–life balance and psychological well-being were operationalized via the Self-Efficacy in Research Measure (Phillips and Russell, 1994), Work–life Balance Scale (Brough et al., 2014) and Psychological Well-Being Scale (Ryff, 1989), respectively. Results indicated that mentoring, research self-efficacy, work–life balance and psychological well-being were significantly positively related to one another. The parallel mediation analysis through the process established the path model of mentoring and psychological well-being. The model highlights the importance of mentoring mechanisms in strengthening research self-efficacy and work–life balance and in turn enhancing the psychological well-being of doctoral program students. This paper highlights the significance of mentoring for the psychological well-being of doctoral program students. It can guide policymakers and mentors to acknowledge and address the research-based needs of these students in terms of improved well-being and productivity.
      Citation: International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education
      PubDate: 2021-11-15
      DOI: 10.1108/IJMCE-07-2020-0036
      Issue No: Vol. 11 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Exploring the role of faculty and staff mentors in fostering ethical
           leadership among undergraduate students: “We have to narrow the
           distance”

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      Authors: Meg E. Evans , Rebecca M. Taylor , Laila McCloud , Katherine Burr
      Abstract: The purpose of this interdisciplinary study is to identify the aspects that faculty, student affairs educators and students indicate as salient for effective mentoring relationships that enhance ethical leadership development. This exploratory qualitative inquiry used the Relational-Ethical-Affective-Dialogic (READ) mentoring model as a framework to examine the experiences of 13 undergraduate mentees and faculty/staff mentors in a formal mentoring program. Each study participant engaged in one semi-structured interview. Researchers coded and analyzed data using the sort and sift, think and shift process identifying power quotes to guide the thematic analysis. The data collected in this study revealed insights into the aspects of mentor relationships that both undergraduate mentees and their mentors perceived as contributing to students' ethical leadership development. Salient elements included: (1) relational features of the mentee-mentor dynamic including trust and reciprocity; (2) structural features of the mentoring program including its focus on ethics; and (3) mentoring approaches that were attentive to power and positionality within the mentoring relationship and involved professional judgment about self-disclosure. This study adds to the literature by exploring effective mentoring for ethical leadership development across disciplines. With colleges and universities serving a vital role in preparing the next generation of leaders for ethical engagement in their democratic and professional roles after graduation, it is imperative to broaden our understanding of how faculty and staff can support students' ethical leadership development.
      Citation: International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education
      PubDate: 2021-10-22
      DOI: 10.1108/IJMCE-09-2020-0058
      Issue No: Vol. 11 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Understanding coaching efficacy in education through activity systems:
           privileging the nuances of provision

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      Authors: Rachel M. Lofthouse , Anthea Rose , Ruth Whiteside
      Abstract: The research demonstrates the role of activity systems based in Cultural Historical Activity Theory as a means of analysing characteristics and efficacy of specific provisions of coaching in education. Three examples of coaching in education were selected, involving 51 schools in England. The three examples were re-analysed using activity systems. This drew on existing evaluation evidence, gathered through interviews, questionnaires, focus groups and recordings of coaching. In each example, the object of the coaching was to address a specific challenge to secure the desired quality of education. Using activity systems it is possible to demonstrate that coaching has a range of functions (both intended and consequential). The individual examples illustrate the potential of coaching to support change in complex and diverse education settings. The use of existing data from evaluations means that direct comparisons between examples are not made. While data were collected throughout the duration of each coaching programme no follow-up data was available. The analysis of the examples of coaching using activity systems provides evidence of the efficacy of specific coaching provision in achieving individually defined objectives related to sustaining and improving specific educational practices. The research offers insights into how coaching in education might be better tuned to the specific needs of contexts and the challenges experienced by the individuals working in them. In addition, it demonstrates the value of activity systems as an analytical tool to make sense of coaching efficacy.
      Citation: International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education
      PubDate: 2021-10-14
      DOI: 10.1108/IJMCE-02-2021-0036
      Issue No: Vol. 11 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education

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