Subjects -> EDUCATION (Total: 2346 journals)
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    - E-LEARNING (38 journals)
    - EDUCATION (1996 journals)
    - HIGHER EDUCATION (140 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS (4 journals)
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HIGHER EDUCATION (140 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 141 of 141 Journals sorted alphabetically
+E Revista de Extensión Universitaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Academic Leadership Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Academic Leadership Journal in Student Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
African Journal of Teacher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
AISHE-J: The All Ireland Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Ámbito Investigativo     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Engineering Education     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Arab Journal For Quality Assurance in Higher Education     Open Access  
Arquivos do Museu Dinâmico Interdisciplinar     Open Access  
Asian Association of Open Universities Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AUDEM : The International Journal of Higher Education and Democracy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Aula Universitaria     Open Access  
Bangladesh Journal of Medical Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Campus Virtuales     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Medical Education Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Perspectives on Academic Integrity     Open Access  
Chronicle of Higher Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
College Student Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Critical Studies in Teaching and Learning (CriSTaL)     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Educate~     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Educational Research in Medical Sciences Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
EDUMECENTRO     Open Access  
ENGEVISTA     Open Access  
Enhancing Learning in the Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
European Journal of Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Excellence in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Extensión en red     Open Access  
Formación Universitaria     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Higher Education Evaluation and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Higher Education for the Future     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Higher Education of Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Higher Education Pedagogies     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Higher Education Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 58)
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Higher Learning Research Communications     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Högre utbildning     Open Access  
Informing Faculty (IF)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ingeniería Mecánica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Innovation in Teaching and Learning in Information and Computer Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Integración y Conocimiento     Open Access  
International Journal for Educational Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for Students as Partners     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of African Higher Education     Open Access  
International Journal of Doctoral Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Educational Technology in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Engineering Pedagogy     Open Access  
International Journal of Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 56)
International Journal of Higher Education and Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Kinesiology in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of STEM Education     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of the First Year in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Research in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Interpreter and Translator Trainer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
ISAA Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J3eA     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Jesuit Higher Education : A Journal     Open Access  
Journal for Education in the Built Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal for the Study of Postsecondary and Tertiary Education     Open Access  
Journal of Academic Writing     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Advanced Academics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Journal of Biomedical Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Collective Bargaining in the Academy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of College Counseling     Partially Free   (Followers: 4)
Journal of College Teaching & Learning     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Community Engagement and Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Critical Scholarship on Higher Education and Student Affairs     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 38)
Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Nursing Education and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Perspectives in Applied Academic Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Praxis in Higher Education : JPHE     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Problem Based Learning in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Science and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Service-Learning in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Student Affairs in Africa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Student Engagement : Education Matters     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Student Financial Aid     Open Access  
Journal of Teacher Education for Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Teaching and Learning for Graduate Employability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Technology and Science Education     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of the European Honors Council     Open Access  
Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Veterinary Medical Education     Partially Free   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Women and Gender in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Kentucky Journal of Excellence in College Teaching and Learning     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Kentucky Journal of Higher Education Policy and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Land Forces Academy Review     Open Access  
Maine Policy Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Makerere Journal of Higher Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Marketing Education Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Marketing of Scientific and Research Organizations     Open Access  
Medical Teacher     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Merrill Series on The Research Mission of Public Universities     Open Access  
National Teaching & Learning Forum The     Hybrid Journal  
Nauka i Szkolnictwo Wyższe     Open Access  
New Directions for Student Leadership     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Nordic Journal of Information Literacy in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Nursing Education Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
OUSL Journal     Open Access  
Papers in Postsecondary Learning and Teaching     Open Access  
Pedagogia Social. Revista Interuniversitaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pédagogie Médicale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Perspectiva Educacional     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Planet     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Policy Reviews in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Practical Assessment, Research, and Evaluation     Open Access  
PRISM : A Journal of Regional Engagement     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Prompt : A Journal of Academic Writing Assignments     Open Access  
Recherche & formation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Recruiting & Retaining Adult Learners     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Research Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Research Integrity and Peer Review     Open Access  
Revista d'Innovació Docent Universitària     Open Access  
Revista de Ensino em Artes, Moda e Design     Open Access  
Revista de la Universidad de La Salle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Revista Digital de Investigación en Docencia Universitaria     Open Access  
Revista Electronica Interuniversitaria de Formacion del Profesorado     Open Access  
Revista Gestão Universitária na América Latina - GUAL     Open Access  
Revista Interuniversitaria de Formacion de Profesorado     Open Access  
RT. A Journal on Research Policy and Evaluation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
RU&SC. Revista de Universidad y Sociedad del Conocimiento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Strategic Enrollment Management Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Student Engagement in Higher Education Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Student Journal of Professional Practice and Academic Research     Open Access  
Student Success : A journal exploring the experiences of students in tertiary education     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Summer Academe : A Journal of Higher Education     Open Access  
Tartu Ülikooli ajaloo küsimusi     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Teaching and Learning Inquiry : The ISSOTL Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
The Qualitative Report     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Transformation in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Trayectorias Universitarias     Open Access  
Triple Helix     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Uniped     Open Access  
Universidad en Diálogo : Revista de Extensión     Open Access  
Universidades     Open Access  
Widening Participation and Lifelong Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Women in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Университетское управление: практика и анализ     Open Access  

           

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Journal Cover
International Journal of Doctoral Studies
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.201
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 6  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 1556-8881 - ISSN (Online) 1556-8873
Published by Informing Science Institute Homepage  [11 journals]
  • Printable Table of Contents. IJDS, Volume 17, 2022

    • Authors: Michael Jones
      Abstract: Table of Contents for Volume 17, 2022, of the International Journal of Doctoral Studies
      Citation: IJDS, Volume 17 (2022)
      PubDate: 2022-01-10
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/4905
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2022)
       
  • Pastoral Care in Doctoral Education: A Collaborative Autoethnography of
           Belonging and Academic Identity

    • Authors: Lynette Pretorius, Danielle Hradsky, Ali Soyoof, Shaoru Zeng, Elham M Foomani, Ngo Cong-Lem, Jacky-Lou Maestre
      Pages: 001 - 023
      Abstract: Aim/Purpose: It is increasingly recognized that doctoral education programs should better support doctoral students. In particular, it has been noted that students experience significant isolation during their PhD, which negatively affects their educational experiences and their personal wellbeing. Doctoral writing groups are collaborative learning communities that have in recent years received increasing attention to address this issue. This collaborative autoethnography explores the affective benefits (i.e., benefits associated with emotions and feelings) of these doctoral writing groups, particularly focused on the pastorally supportive nature of these learning communities.Background: Writing groups have been shown to promote academic writing skills and build reflective practice, personal epistemology, and academic identity. We have found that a much more significant benefit of our writing groups has been the pastoral care we have experienced, particularly in relation to the turbulent emotions often associated with academic writing. This should, perhaps, not be surprising since it is clear that academic writing is a form of identity work. There is, therefore, a clear need to better support doctoral students, particularly with regard to the more affective components of academic writing. This prompted us to write this collaborative autoethnography to showcase what we consider to be the primary role of doctoral writing groups: pastoral care.Methodology: We employ a collaborative autoethnographic methodology to integrate our personal reflections into the existing literature in the field.Contribution: We argue that doctoral writing groups are vehicles of pastoral care as they promote wellbeing, foster resilience, provide academic care, and build social capital.Findings: We demonstrate that doctoral writing groups foster students’ sense of belonging through self-reflection and the sharing of experiences in a safe space, which builds perceived self-efficacy and self-awareness. Furthermore, through the self-reflection and discussion that is inherent in doctoral writing groups, students also develop a better understanding of themselves and their place within the academy.Recommendations for Practitioners: Our research highlights that writing groups may be designed to teach academic communication skills, but they provide an affective benefit that cannot yet be quantified and which should not be underestimated. Incorporating writing groups into doctoral education programs can, therefore, have a positive influence on the educational experiences of PhD students and improve their overall wellbeing. This paper concludes by providing practical suggestions to help practitioners implement writing groups into doctoral education programs, particularly focused on how these groups can be made more pastorally supportive.Recommendation for Researchers: This paper also extends the theoretical understanding of pastoral care by providing a framework for pastoral care within the doctoral writing group environment. We show how pastoral care can be conceptualized as the promotion of self-awareness, self-efficacy, reflection, and empowerment of doctoral students through nurturing communities where all members are valued, encouraged, guided, and supported. Our experiences, which we have integrated throughout this paper, also highlight the importance of relationship-building within the educational community, particularly when these relationships are characterized by mutual respect and shared responsibility.Impact on Society: The poor well-being of doctoral students has now been well-established across the world, but strategies to improve the academic environment for these students are still lacking. This paper provides evidence that implementing writing groups as a strategy to embed pastoral care in a doctoral education environment helps doctoral students flourish. Ultimately, this can lead to an improved academic research culture into the future.Future Research: Future research should explore other methods of better integrating pastoral care interventions into doctoral education programs in order to reduce isolation and promote student wellbeing.
      Citation: IJDS, Volume 17 (2022)
      PubDate: 2022-01-11
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/4900
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2022)
       
  • Fostering the Success of Working-Class Latina Doctoral Students at
           Predominantly White Institutions

    • Authors: Loni Crumb
      Pages: 025 - 038
      Abstract: Aim/Purpose: Latina doctoral students’ educational experiences are often mediated by their social class status, race, and gender. Latinas have sustained an increasing presence in doctoral programs at various colleges and universities across the United States; yet, they are continually underrepresented in doctoral programs at predominantly White institutions. The author identifies evidence-supported, personal and institutional factors that may contribute to working-class Latina doctoral students’ successful persistence at predominantly White institutions.Background: The tension between personal identities versus academic capability can make the doctoral education experience academically, socially, emotionally, and financially challenging for Latinas from low-income backgrounds. Latina/Latino Critical Race Theory and Multiracial Feminist Theory are introduced as lenses to examine aspects of the doctoral education experience that may impede or support Latina students’ retention.Methodology: As a conceptual article, this paper is an examination of research regarding the experiences of doctoral students of color at predominantly White institutions in the United States and summarizes how Latina doctoral students from economically disadvantaged backgrounds can succeed in these environments. Contribution: This article outlines evidence-supported strategies that may influence working-class Latina doctoral students’ successful persistence at predominantly White institutions. Findings: The research highlighted in this article emphasizes how factors such as embracing familismo, increasing faculty diversity, establishing peer networks, and creating inclusive class-concious academic programs and new student orientations, may contribute to the doctoral persistence of Latinas from economically disadvantaged backgrounds attending predominantly White institutions.Recommendations for Practitioners: Personal and institutional factors are recommended for faculty and student affairs professionals to support the doctoral persistence of Latina students such as embracing personal agency and academic efficacy, embracing familismo, recognizing the myth of meritocracy, establishing peer support networks, creating inclusive academic environments, establishing formal faculty mentorships, and fostering class conscious faculty.Recommendation for Researchers: The literature presented in this paper provides ideas for future research opportunities that could further examine how supportive relationships and inclusiveness promote Latina doctoral students’ educational success. Impact on Society: Latinas experience overlapping forms of privilege and subordination depending on their race, social class, gender, sexual orientation, and academic setting.Future Research: Further development of transformative research on this topic may improve inclusive educational practices and potentially increase access to doctoral-level education for Latinas and other economically disadvantaged students of color.
      Citation: IJDS, Volume 17 (2022)
      PubDate: 2022-01-23
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/4886
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2022)
       
  • Progress-Oriented Workshops for Doctoral Well-being: Evidence From a
           Two-Country Design-Based Research

    • Authors: Luis P. Prieto, Paula Odriozola-González, María Jesús Rodríguez-Triana, Yannis Dimitriadis, Tobias Ley
      Pages: 039 - 066
      Abstract: Aim/Purpose: This paper explores an intervention approach (in the form of workshops) focusing on doctoral progress, to address the problems of low emotional well-being experienced by many doctoral candidates.Background: Doctoral education suffers from two severe overlapping problems: high dropout rates and widespread low emotional well-being (e.g., depression or anxiety symptoms). Yet, there are few interventional approaches specifically designed to address them in the doctoral student population. Among structural, psychosocial, and demographic factors influencing these problems, the self-perception of progress has emerged recently as a crucial motivational factor in doctoral persistence. Methodology: This paper reports on an iterative design-based research study of workshop interventions to foster such perception of progress in doctoral students’ everyday practice. We gathered mixed data over four iterations, with a total of 82 doctoral students from multiple disciplines in Spain and Estonia.Contribution: An approach to preventive interventions that combines research-backed education about mental health and productivity, peer sharing and discussion of experiences, and indicators of progress, as well as self-tracking, analysis, and reflection upon everyday evidence of their own progress. The paper provides initial evidence of the effectiveness of the proposed interventions, across two institutions in two different countries. Further, our data confirms emergent research on the relationships among progress, emotional well-being, and dropout ideation in two new contexts. Finally, the paper also distills design knowledge about doctoral interventions that focus on progress, relevant for doctoral trainers, institutions, and researchers.Findings: Our quantitative and qualitative results confirm previous findings on the relationships among progress, burnout, and dropout ideation. Our iterative evaluation of the workshops also revealed a large positive effect in students’ positive psychological capital after the workshops (Cohen’s d=0.83). Our quantitative and qualitative analyses also started teasing out individual factors in the variance of these benefits.Recommendations for Practitioners: Intervention design guidelines for doctoral trainers include: focusing on actionable productivity and mental health practices, the use of activities targeting perception biases and taboos, or the use of active practices and real (anonymous) data from the participants to make progress visible and encourage reflection.Recommendation for Researchers: The construct of progress, its components, and its relationships with both emotional well-being and doctoral dropout need to be more deeply studied, using multiple methods of data collection, especially from more frequent, ecologically valid data sources (e.g., diaries).Impact on Society: The proposed interventions (and focusing on doctoral progress more generally) hold promise to address the current emotional well-being and dropout challenges facing hundreds of thousands of doctoral students worldwide, ultimately helping increase the research and innovation potential of society as a whole.Future Research: More rigorous evaluative studies of the proposed approach need to be conducted, with larger samples and in other countries/contexts. Aside from the proposed one-shot training events, complementary longitudinal interventions focusing on supporting everyday progress and reflection throughout the doctoral process should be trialed.
      Citation: IJDS, Volume 17 (2022)
      PubDate: 2022-01-23
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/4898
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2022)
       
  • The Evolution of Personal Frames of Reference: Metaphors as Potential
           Space

    • Authors: Aden-Paul Flotman, Antoni Barnard
      Pages: 067 - 086
      Abstract: Aim/Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the value of metaphors as part of a reflexive practice in the context of the evolving frame of reference journey of PhD students in a consulting psychology programme.Background: This study reports on the journey of how the personal frames of reference of PhD students in consulting psychology had evolved at a large open-distance and e-learning university in South Africa. As their respective journeys of becoming consulting psychologists unfolded, participants’ evolutionary journeys were viewed through metaphors. Few studies have investigated how metaphors could be used as a powerful evocative tool to go beyond the rational, conscious and sanitized responses of participants, to explore their underlying frames of reference by surfacing and eliciting implicit meaning. Methodology: This study was based on a hermeneutic phenomenological methodological stance and congruently employed principles of socio-analytic inquiry. The context of this inquiry was a PhD programme in consulting psychology presented at a large open-distance e-learning tertiary institution. Participants comprised ten PhD students. These students were required to engage in various self-reflective exercises throughout their first year, such as journaling and self-reflective essays. Their final exercise was to present their evolving frame of reference as a consulting psychologist, in the form of a visual or tangible metaphor. These final presentations became the protocols for hermeneutic phenomenological analysis in this study. Metaphors were selected through purposive sampling, and they became the “data sources” of the study.Contribution: The study contributes to the teaching of reflexivity in consulting practice. It has implications for the training of doctoral students by making a process available through which students and consultants could access and develop their personal frames of reference. The study shares valuable pedagogical and growth experiences from the perspective of the student in consulting psychology. The research advances the field of consulting psychology by introducing the notion of metaphors as potential space and stimulates further engagement in art-based qualitative inquiry from a socio-analytic stance.Findings: The findings suggest that metaphors have value because they create a connection to emotions, emotional processes and emotional work, facilitate the professional identity construction and reconstruction process and enable a shift from self-reflection to self-reflexivity. It is proposed that metaphors have the inherent capacity to act as potential space.Recommendations for Practitioners: Identity tensions could be alleviated through conscious identity work, when psychologists from different categories transition into consulting psychologists. We pose questions for practitioners to consider.Recommendation for Researchers: Doctoral programmes and research on doctoral studies should explicitly engage with both conscious and unconscious dynamics. This could relate to identity work, relationships and the power of reflexive practices.Impact on Society: Dropout rates of doctoral students are high. The time to complete the degree is also long. This comes at a price for the student, the institution and society. Aspects related to frame of reference, philosophical assumptions, and identity work to be done by the doctoral student should be considered as critical to doctoral programmes and doctoral education.Future Research: Future studies could investigate how consulting frames of reference relate to anxiety, identity and the well-being of doctoral students. Studies could also be conducted to see how the participants’ frames of reference in this study have further evolved over their consulting careers.
      Citation: IJDS, Volume 17 (2022)
      PubDate: 2022-02-27
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/4919
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2022)
       
  • Chinese International Doctoral Students’ Cross-Cultural Socialization:
           Leveraging Strengths and Multiple Identities

    • Authors: Shihua Chen Brazill
      Pages: 087 - 114
      Abstract: Aim/Purpose: The purpose of this study is to use narrative inquiry to discover and understand how Chinese students leverage their strengths and multiple identities in socializing to American higher education and their profession. Chinese students engage with American academic culture while embracing their multiple identities. I will explore the cultural strengths they use to socialize and develop their personal, social, cultural, and professional identities in their doctoral educational experience.Background: Chinese international doctoral students encounter a unique socialization experience during their doctoral studies because they lack meaningful cross-cultural support. Likewise, it is problematic that Chinese students are often viewed as a homogeneous group and much prior research has emphasized the traditional deficit perspective in explaining how Chinese students must adjust and assimilate to the university environment.Methodology: This qualitative research uses narrative inquiry to study Chinese international doctoral students’ socialization experiences while retaining their authentic voices. Narrative inquiry allows for a more nuanced understanding of the experiences of Chinese students compared to the perceptions imposed by other stakeholders. The narrative methodology provides diverse ways to understand Chinese student interactions within American culture, place, and context. This study applies the three-dimensional approach to retell participants’ stories. The three-dimensional approach is more holistic and provides a broad lens to learn about the interactions, past, present, and future experiences of individuals through time and space.Contribution: This research shifts the narrative from the deficit view to a strength-based perspective as to how Chinese international doctoral students can rely on their cultural values and multiple identities as strengths to succeed academically, socially, and emotionally.Findings: Findings related to the literature in two important ways. First, findings support how the six cultural strengths of Yosso’s community cultural wealth apply to Chinese international doctoral students. Chinese students’ stories align with these strengths and through these strengths, they explore and develop their personal, social, cultural, and professional identity. Second, Chinese students’ stories as a counternarrative challenged and contradicted the essentialist view and misconception that Chinese students are a homogenous group personally, socially, culturally, or academically.Recommendations for Practitioners: The findings from this study offer insight for practitioners into what institutions and departments might do to support Chinese international doctoral students in their socialization journey. It is vital to support the whole student through understanding their multiple identities.Recommendation for Researchers: Chinese students and other diverse learners may benefit from peer and faculty mentors in different ways. Therefore, understanding the unique cross-cultural socialization needs and strength-based perspective will help tailor social activities and inclusive learning environments.Impact on Society: The current political, economic, and social relationships between the U.S. and China make it vital for American institutions to consider Chinese international doctoral students’ cross-cultural socialization journey. Future Research: Though it is hoped that this study is transferable, specific issues of how it can be generalized to other Chinese international doctoral students in other areas of the U.S. are beyond the scope of this study. Future research might explore how Chinese International doctoral students’ socialization experiences differ depending on where they study in the U.S.
      Citation: IJDS, Volume 17 (2022)
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/4925
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2022)
       
  • The (National) Doctoral Dissertations Assessment in China: An Interpretive
           Phenomenological Analysis

    • Authors: Ahmed Mohammed Saleh Alduais, Abdulghani Muthanna, Fabian William Nyenyembe, Jim Chatambalala, Md Shahabul Haque, Markos Tezera Taye, Mjege Kinyota, Patrick Severine Kavenuke
      Pages: 115 - 140
      Abstract: Aim/Purpose: Our study explores the perspectives of international doctoral graduates on ‎‎(national) dissertation assessment in China.‎Background: In the absence of national standards or in the presence of impractical ones ‎for assessing doctoral dissertations, these factors have inevitably led to what ‎‎Granovsky et al. (1992, p. 375) called “up to standard rejected” and “below ‎standard accepted.” Improving upon this debate, this study examines the ‎lived experiences of seven doctoral graduates who have completed their ‎doctoral degrees in a leading university in China.‎Methodology: An interpretive phenomenological analysis (IPA) method was used, which ‎entails seven participant observations, seven semi-structured e-interviews, and ‎‎29 external reviews.‎Contribution: In the present study, we addressed the issue of doctoral dissertation assessment ‎standards ‎with a view to enhancing understanding of the quality of doctoral ‎education. It ‎emphasizes the strengths of this aspect in China and critically describes the ‎weaknesses based on the experiences of doctoral ‎graduates in China.‎Findings: Among the major findings of this study are: (a) the external review of the ‎dissertations presented in the literature review appears to be extremely unique ‎in comparison to the countries discussed in the literature and the countries of ‎the participants (Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Malawi, Tanzania, and Yemen); (b) the ‎national assessment strengthens higher education on a macro level, but is ‎detrimental at the micro-level; and (c) while external reviews appear credible ‎as a policy towards the standardization of doctoral dissertation assessment, ‎this credibility evaporates when one considers the quality of reviews provided ‎and the motivation of reviewers to pass or reject a dissertation, including the ‎supervisor’s exclusion from this process.‎Recommendations for Practitioners: Students seeking a doctoral degree or dissertation should become familiar ‎with the A-Z detail of the requirements for the degree and thesis. In addition ‎to meeting this overt requirement, their efforts must also be directed to meet ‎the covert requirements, including the requirements of the ‎external reviewers, their supervisors, and the country’s laws. There is a ‎necessity for external reviewers to rethink their decisions and attempt to ‎assess objectively, putting aside their personal views and preferences. There is ‎a need to re-examine the flexibility granted to external reviewers for making ‎decisions regarding doctoral degrees.‎Recommendation for Researchers: Future research should consider involving an increased number of parties in ‎the conflict between doctoral students, supervisors, and external reviewers.‎Impact on Society: The Chinese government allocates ‎substantial resources for doctoral studies for both international and local students. The spending of government funds on a doctoral student for four years or more, and then the degree is decided by an external reviewer, is uneconomical on the level of financial capital and human capital. Doctoral students are also human beings, and it does not seem ‎logical that one should judge the quality of their efforts over the course of ‎three or more years by reading the doctoral dissertation once. While they were ‎pursuing their doctoral degrees, they kept their families apart, they lived alone, ‎struggled to make it through hardships, and were easily ‎destroyed.‎Future Research: In the future, more interviews may be conducted with respondents belonging ‎to a variety of universities in China, including Chinese students. Additionally, ‎supervisors and external reviewers (if available) should be included. Last but ‎not least, including decision-makers in Chinese higher education can give ‎future research more credibility.‎
      Citation: IJDS, Volume 17 (2022)
      PubDate: 2022-03-24
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/4938
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2022)
       
  • A Thematic Analysis of the Structure of Delimitations in the Dissertation

    • Authors: David C Coker
      Pages: 141 - 159
      Abstract: Aim/Purpose: The purpose of the research was to examine the function and application of delimitations—what the researcher includes and excludes in a study—in the dissertation process. The aim was to map the delimitations process to improve research, rigor and relevance of findings, and doctoral completion rates using a formalized and standardized approach applied flexibly.Background: All research is bounded whether formally defined or not. Unlike limitations, which are issues which the researcher addressed after the completion of a study and cannot control, delimitations are what a researcher includes and excludes to make a project manageable and focused on the research question. Yet, there was no research identified which specifically discussed delimitations. Researching the structure and utility of delimitations in educational administration dissertations provided a systematic analysis of the formation of the scope and boundary of research in doctoral studies. Methodology: The structure of delimitations in dissertations were examined using descriptive quantitative statistics and a qualitative thematic analysis from 28 universities. The first stage included delimitations from 30 dissertations. Triangulation was conducted using the findings with a training set of delimitations in 15 dissertations with a rubric generated from the primary sample.Contribution: The thematic analysis presented a description and interpretation of the nature of delimitations and a systematic framework to improve the research process in dissertations. Mapping the delimitations process gave a detailed portrait of internal and external characteristics which could aid doctoral students in completing the dissertation. Doctoral attrition rates, poorly completed dissertations, and lack of relevance or applicability of results need remedied. Furthermore, the delimitations rubric provided a systematic method to focus communities of learners around a common goal.Findings: Findings suggested doctoral students used delimitations haphazardly and lacked a systematic application to research. Three major themes emerged from the delimitations sections: rituals, equifinality, and pragmatism. Topics within delimitations sections centered around two axes: the internal topics of sampling procedures and factors/variables and external topics of research design and conceptual/theoretical framework. Recommendations for Practitioners: Poorly understood and developed delimitations negatively impacted findings in dissertations, completion rates, and future research skills of doctoral students. By applying delimitations to a design of research framework in a community of learners, doctoral students and dissertation chairs could improve the dissertation completion process and improve research results using a Delimitations Evaluation Rubric.Recommendation for Researchers: Developing a rules-based process with a formalized and standardized process could give researchers a way to evaluate and plan the dissertation process. Developing and applying rubrics to delimitations could serve as a conduit to effective mentoring, feedback, and empowerment.Impact on Society: Improving doctoral completion rates in a timely manner would be beneficial to students’ long-term and personal interests. A well-defined delimitations process could improve the dissertation, and strengthened dissertations could add to the research base.Future Research: Delimitations are listed in one section, but the scope and boundaries are often fragmented and disjointed throughout a dissertation. By examining complete dissertations for delimitations, there could be further insight. Expanding rubrics as a tool to build a community of learners could develop a holistic approach to doctoral education.
      Citation: IJDS, Volume 17 (2022)
      PubDate: 2022-03-28
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/4939
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2022)
       
  • Doctoral Writers’ Resiliency in the COVID-19 Pandemic

    • Authors: Alice Shu-Ju Lee, William J Donohue, Shelah Simpson, Kathleen Vacek
      Pages: 161 - 180
      Abstract: Aim/Purpose: The COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent lockdown required doctoral writers to demonstrate resiliency to continue their culminating projects. This study examines the socioecological factors that fostered that resiliency.Background: Resiliency is a key factor in determining whether doctoral writers continue with their culminating projects. Thus far, studies on doctoral student experiences during the pandemic have yet to investigate doctoral students’ adaptive strategies to continue with their projects.Methodology: The qualitative study uses in-depth interviews to document the narrative journeys of four research participants pre-pandemic and in-pandemic. Those narratives are analyzed using an infectious disease resilience framework as a metaphor to highlight the resilience within each participant’s writing ecology.Contribution: The study seeks to reframe the approach to doctoral writing beyond the individual student toward a broader ecological system to better serve those students and the knowledge produced, regardless of a disruptive crisis.Findings: The disruptions that the four participants experienced are documented through their narratives. The participants described their coping strategies related to their workspace, technology, loss of connection, and their breaking point.Recommendations for Practitioners: The resilience shown by the four participants demonstrates areas where institutions can provide assistance to alleviate the pressures placed on doctoral writers. Reframing the dissertation writing process as a socioecological system rather than a cognitive one allows for solutions to problems that are not limited to individual writers.Recommendation for Researchers: Extending the socioecological systems metaphor, further research should investigate other stakeholders in a writer’s ecology to obtain different perspectives on a particular system.Impact on Society: The pandemic has presented an opportunity for educational institutions to reassess how they can cultivate students’ resilience to positively impact their socioecological balance.Future Research: It would be worthwhile to document the post-pandemic experiences of doctoral writers to find out how they seek balance in their ecology as they continue to deal with the post-pandemic fallout.
      Citation: IJDS, Volume 17 (2022)
      PubDate: 2022-05-01
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/4956
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2022)
       
  • Research Supervision of International Doctoral Students: Perspectives of
           International Students in Two Comprehensive Universities in China

    • Authors: Marinette Bahtilla
      Pages: 181 - 199
      Abstract: Aim/Purpose: This study aimed to explore the challenges faced by international doctoral students in Chinese universities and find out what international doctoral students perceive to be effective supervision.Background: As higher education internationalization is proliferating, there is a need for adjustment in every educational system. Despite the rise in the internationalization of higher education in China, very little research has been carried out on internalization at the doctoral level. Since research forms an essential part of doctoral programs, it is necessary to examine the challenges international students face as far as research supervision is concerned.Methodology: This study employed the exploratory case study research design adopting the qualitative research methodology. The study participants were 68 doctoral students from two comprehensive universities in China. A comprehensive university consists of diverse programs and students: for example, master’s programs, doctoral programs, undergraduate programs, and professional programs. Data were collected using a semi-structured interview guide. The qualitative data collected was analyzed thematically.Contribution: This study offers new insights into the research supervision of international doctoral students. This study suggests that every university hosting international students should pay attention to doctoral students’ research supervision and implement appropriate strategies such as those proposed in this study to allow international students to acquire new knowledge and skills as far as research is concerned. This study also proposed some strategies based on what doctoral students perceive to be effective supervision that universities can implement to improve research supervision.Findings: The study found that international doctoral students faced many challenges regarding research supervision. These challenges are language barriers, ineffective communication with supervisors, insufficient time to discuss with supervisors, cultural differences and adapting to a new environment, depression, and forcing students to change research topics. Moreover, this study found that the following strategies can be implemented to improve research supervision of international students: considering student’s research interests when assigning them to supervisors, the need for a specific time to meet with supervisors, providing or directing students where to get research materials, in-service training for research supervisors, and evaluating and modifying criteria for selecting supervisors. Recommendations for Practitioners: University administrators can establish informal research supervision learning communities that can enable supervisors from different universities to share cross-cultural supervision ideas and learn from one another. Moreover, it is necessary for supervisors to guide and direct students both in academics and social life to help them overcome depression; isolation, and adapt to a new environment.Recommendation for Researchers: This study was limited to two universities, and the participants were international doctoral students in English-taught programs. However, the situation may differ with international doctoral students in Chinese-taught programs. As a result, the researchers suggest that another study should be carried out focusing on international doctoral students in Chinese taught programs; their experiences may differ.Impact on Society: Doctoral students are significant contributors to the research productivity of an institution. It is, therefore, necessary to ensure that they acquire sustainable research skills to solve the complex problems affecting the education sector and society at large.Future Research: It is vital to explore international doctoral supervision in other disciplines as well as universities.
      Citation: IJDS, Volume 17 (2022)
      PubDate: 2022-05-22
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/4970
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2022)
       
  • Education Doctoral Students’ Self-Study of Their Identity
           Development: A Thematic Review

    • Authors: Xingya Xu, Margret Hjalmarson
      Pages: 201 - 225
      Abstract: Aim/Purpose: Doctoral students’ experiences in PhD programs could be a journey of identity evolution. Existing research on doctoral students’ identities has typically been conducted by faculties. As the main character in the identity evolution process, it is critical to understand doctoral students’ interpretation of their own identities and identity development in PhD programs. The purpose of this paper is to examine how and what education doctoral students discovered when they used self-study and relevant qualitative methodologies (e.g., auto-ethnography) to investigate their identities and identity development through their own practices in PhD programs.Background: This research began as part of a larger project to synthesize studies on doctoral students’ identities. A cluster of articles was identified in which students were examining their experiences as developing individuals from the perspective of identities and identity development. In contrast to most of the previous research on doctoral education, this collection of articles was written by doctoral students as part of their academic and professional practice.Methodology: The larger qualitative systematic review (i.e., qualitative evidence synthesis) of doctoral students’ identity development began with database searches that were not restricted by year (e.g., PsycINFO, Education Research Complete, and Education Resources Information Center). Thirteen articles written by doctoral students discussing their identities and identity development in PhD programs were further identified from selected articles ranging from 2009 to 2021. These articles and their implications were analyzed using a qualitative research synthesis approach. Contribution: Although scholars have looked at doctoral students’ identities and identity development from various viewpoints, the current investigation deepens the understanding of this focus from doctoral students’ own perspectives. Doctoral students are trained investigators with research skills and mindsets. As novice researchers and educators, their open and honest reflections about their challenges, opportunities, and development are worthwhile to identify significant aspects of their identities and identity development in PhD programs.Findings: There are two dimensions to the findings: the Approach Dimension and the Content Dimension. The Approach Dimension is concerned with how doctoral students investigated their identities and identity development, whereas the Content Dimension is concerned with what they found. Findings in the Approach Dimension show that doctoral students applied the self-study inquiry approach or used the notion of self-study inquiry to interpret their identity and identity development. The self-study inquiry encompasses five main features, including (1) Self-Initiated and Focused, (2) Improvement-Aimed, (3) Collaborative/Interactive, (4) Reflective Data Collection, and (5) Exemplar-Based Validation. Doctoral students examined the five self-study features both directly and indirectly in their studies. The investigation revealed four major themes in the Content Dimension, including (1) Identity Development as a Dynamic Process, (2) Multiple Identities, (3) Learning Contexts, and (4) Socialization. Recommendations for Practitioners: The findings suggest that practitioners in PhD programs should be aware of the existence, process, and dynamics of identity evolution in doctoral programs. The best possible way for PhD program administrators, faculties, and advisors to support doctoral students’ growth and identity development is to incorporate doctoral students’ own insights into practice. Given the unprecedented influence of the COVID-19 pandemic on the educational environment and the diversity of doctoral students, it is crucial to discover how doctoral students use structured research methods to reflect, learn, and self-support their identity development during their PhD programs. The self-study inquiry process would be a helpful and effective approach to support doctoral students’ advancement. For instance, PhD programs could create self-evaluation assignments or courses that incorporate both self-study and identity development concepts.Recommendation for Researchers: When studying doctoral students’ identity development, it is critical to emphasize the essence of identity, which is people’s perceptions of who they are. We recommend that researchers who study doctoral students could further integrate doctoral students’ insights about their own identity status (e.g., multiple identities) into research.Impact on Society: Successful completion of PhD programs is a critical foundation for doctoral students to serve society as expert researchers and educators. Support for the growth and development of doctoral students could facilitate the completion of their doctoral programs and strengthen their sense of agency through the lens of identity.Future Research: Future research could go beyond the field of education and expand to more disciplines to identify common and diverse factors influencing doctoral students’ identity and identity development across domains. Future research on the post-COVID-19 era and its implications for online programs must also be studied in connection with doctoral students’ identities and identity development.
      Citation: IJDS, Volume 17 (2022)
      PubDate: 2022-05-23
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/4965
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2022)
       
  • Iranian Ph.D. Candidates’ Perceptions Toward Their Supervisors’
           Responsibilities and Activities

    • Authors: Farzad Rostami, mohammad hosseein Yousefi
      Pages: 227 - 241
      Abstract: Aim/Purpose: The present qualitative study examined the perceptions of Iranian Ph.D. candidates toward the responsibilities and activities that supervisors should take during the dissertation writing.Background: Writing the dissertation is the main concern for Ph.D. candidates. In the view of doctorate students, supervisors are the main contributors to establishing a well-prepared dissertation.Methodology: To this end, 15 Ph.D. candidates who either graduated recently or were about to have their viva sessions participated in the study. The data were collected through phone interviews as well as narrative inquiry. The current study adopted the mentorship model as its theoretical framework. The framework is well suited because the supervisors as mentors and persons that are more competent transfer their experience and knowledge to the supervisees as less competent students. The multiple case study has been applied as the design of the current study. Geared toward the objectives of the qualitative study, the data analysis process embraced Braun and Clarke’s (2006) thematic analysis approach. Contribution: The study has a number of theoretical and practical implications for both supervisors of Ph.D. students as well as teacher educators. Findings: The authors presented and discussed their perceived themes, and they consented to the following four major themes: practicality, professionalism, emotional engagement, and career traits.Recommendations for Practitioners: To ease the burden of writing a Ph.D. dissertation and to soothe the stress of Ph.D. candidates’ experience, supervisors should take the responsibility for their task of supervision by providing moment-by-moment care and guidance to their students.Recommendation for Researchers: The researchers utilized the two instruments of telephone interviews and narrations to collect data. It is suggested that other sources of data collection like observations and focus group interviews be included to gain further conceptions of the attendants. The researchers interviewed the dissertation writer in various majors; however, the topic was not questioned. It is recommended to evaluate the extent of the supervisor’s interest in the topic on the success rate of the project. Impact on Society: The present study revealed that students have different and varying needs and expectations of their supervisors. To meet these needs, supervisors should ask their students to submit a weekly report of their work as well as possible problems and questions. Future Research: The findings were based on the Ph.D. candidates’ perspectives; it is recommended that future research include the voices of the supervisors, too, particularly the supervisors of the same supervisees.
      Citation: IJDS, Volume 17 (2022)
      PubDate: 2022-06-06
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/4974
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2022)
       
  • The Open Cage: A Force for Transformative Learning in Professional
           Doctoral Studies During COVID-19

    • Authors: John Anthony Fulton, Lynne Hall, Derek Watson, Gillian Hagan-Green
      Pages: 243 - 261
      Abstract: Aim/Purpose: This paper explores how professional doctorate candidates responded to the restrictions and changed context of COVID-19. Using connectivism as a theoretical framework, it explores the ways in which their patterns of study were recalibrated in light of the restrictions caused by the pandemic. Specifically, this study aims to: explore the experience of the professional doctorate student during the pandemic; and demonstrate the ways in which networks are recalibrated and adapt to changing circumstances.Background: In 2020, in response to COVID-19 many countries, including the UK, went into lockdown resulting in most doctoral candidates being confined to their homes and restricted to online contact with peers and supervisors. Part-time students have a finely balanced pattern of work which was required to be recalibrated and refocused which required considerable adaptation on the part of the candidates.Methodology: A qualitative methodology was used comprising four focus groups, each consisting of four professional doctorate candidates. Participants were professional doctorate candidates and as such were all mid-career professionals from a variety of backgrounds. Purposeful sampling was combined with theoretical sampling, which ensures the sample is deliberately selected and ensures the emergent development of the theoretical ideas. The focus groups were recorded and transcribed. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data and identify the main findings, allowing themes to be identified. Contribution: The findings indicated that professional doctorate candidates were highly adaptable and were able to adjust rapidly in response to COVID-19 restrictions. The networks they had previously established had to be refocused through adapting and adjusting patterns of study and developing digital skills to enable them to progress in their doctoral studies.Findings: Three themes emerged from the analysis: recalibrating work-life-study balance; adaptivity in studies and research; and empowerment through Information and Communications Technology (ICT). To progress their doctoral studies, the networks they had previously established had to be refocused through adapting and adjusting patterns of study. Recommendations for Practitioners: While lockdown was an unusual experience, some factors can inform future developments for doctoral education, mainly: the importance of establishing a pattern of study; the importance of connectivism and Information Technology (IT); and how such use can enhance and expand the research process.Recommendation for Researchers: Adaptivity achieved through IT; connectivity and the recalibration of networks were key to enabling doctoral candidates to continue their research. The use of connectivism as a theoretical framework for research merits further exploration, as do methods for online learning and approaches to incorporating digital skills into doctoral studies. Impact on Society: According to connectivism, learning is through the establishment of net-works, and these consist of both the means of gaining and accessing knowledge and the work-life study balance. It is important to examine and improve these networks. Many of the changes imposed by the COVID-19 restrictions are here to stay and this study highlights the ways in which the student experience can be enhanced through digital learning.Future Research: This research could be expanded through further analysis of how IT can enhance research practice. The interaction with digital learning sources could be explored and highlighted. The pattern of networks could also be explored and developed, and the positive and negative aspects could be highlighted.
      Citation: IJDS, Volume 17 (2022)
      PubDate: 2022-07-20
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/4987
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2022)
       
  • ‘Smile and Nod’ or More' Reassessing the Role of the Silent
           Supervisor in the Doctoral Viva

    • Authors: Vijay Kumar, Amrita Kaur, Sharon Sharmini, Mohammad Noman
      Pages: 263 - 277
      Abstract: Aim/Purpose: The study examines the perspectives of convenors, examiners, supervisors, and candidates to gather their views on the presence of the supervisor in oral examinations (doctoral viva) and to reassess the role of the mainly silent supervisor in the doctoral viva.Background: Supervisors are central to candidates’ doctoral journey, and their roles have been well documented. However, supervisors’ role in the doctoral viva remains elusive, insignificant, and misunderstood.Methodology: The study adopts a qualitative survey method and qualitative interviews to examine the perspectives of 94 participants, including conveners, examiners, supervisors, and candidates. Data were collected through in-depth interviews and an open-ended survey and was later analyzed using a qualitative approach.Contribution: The findings have implications for the doctoral viva and policies that seek to make it a collegial and equitable practice.Findings: The findings offer two main explanations that warrant supervisors’ physical presence in oral examinations: psycho-emotional support and procedural/regulatory purposes. Supervisors’ voices serve psycho-emotional and technical purposes and aid in dialogue and knowledge construction.Recommendations for Practitioners: It is recommended that practitioners need to move on from the customary ‘smile and nod’ role of supervisors to allowing their voices to be heard, perhaps at the end of the viva. This would not only facilitate candidates’ performance by offering affirmation and assurance through psychological and moral support but also provide an opportunity for discussion.Recommendation for Researchers: This study furthers our understanding of the ‘anatomy of a doctoral viva’ and examines a comprehensive picture of the supervisor’s role in a doctoral oral exam from all stakeholders’ perspectives.Impact on Society: The role of supervisors in the doctoral viva, beginning from the medieval period, has consistently evolved. The research provides a fresh outlook on supervision where the supervisor is not only recommended to be present during the viva, but also to play an active role.Future Research: Future research should include diverse cultural, institutional, and disciplinary contexts to advance our understanding of the supervisor’s role during oral exams. Also, whether supervisors should have a more active role independent of what a convenor may desire should be investigated.
      Citation: IJDS, Volume 17 (2022)
      PubDate: 2022-07-23
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/5002
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2022)
       
  • Academic Identity Development of Doctoral Scholars in an Online Writing
           Group

    • Authors: Khim Raj Subedi, Krishna Bista, Shyaam Sharma
      Pages: 279 - 300
      Abstract: Aim/Purpose: This study explores how online writing groups facilitate the academic identity development of doctoral scholars.Background: Academic institutions around the world, and especially in developing societies, are demanding increasing amounts of research and publications from their doctoral scholars. The current study used an online writing group to facilitate writing skills development, which bolstered the academic identity development of participating scholars. Academic identity is defined as the becoming and being of an academic scholar, with writing skills as a means of acquiring and performing the status and skills of a scholar. It is reflected in the confidence, contribution, and relationship carried out in writing as a member of the academic community. Methodology: This study utilizes narrative inquiry as a research methodology to capture the experiences of six doctoral scholars from two universities in Nepal. We explore the academic identity of doctoral scholars from a sociocultural perspective, employing unstructured interviews, meeting notes, and entry and exit surveys of the online writing group.Contribution: This article shows how online writing groups offer unique and impactful opportunities for networking, collaboration, and problem-solving, which can significantly enhance their writing abilities and prospects of publication, thereby fostering their intellectual agency and academic identity.Findings: This study reports three findings of the value of online writing groups: addressing gaps in formal education, community as a form of accountability, and virtual community as a platform for identity development. On the final finding of identity development, we identify and discuss four themes from data analysis: growth of self-image as scholars, strengthening of commitment to scholarship, identification of venues for expanding the scope of publication, and enhancement of digital skills. The informal and collaborative nature of online writing support facilitated socially constructivist learning, which was highly conducive to the development of academic identity among emerging scholars.Recommendations for Practitioners: It is recommended that institutions implement and encourage online writing support programs as an effective means of addressing gaps in doctoral education. While this program can fill gaps in the low-resource contexts of developing countries, it can bolster formal mentoring in any context.Recommendation for Researchers: Further research should use large-scale or longitudinal studies to explore how informal, especially online writing support and collaboration, accelerate research and writing skills, scholarly productivity, and overall academic identity formation of doctoral scholars. Impact on Society: As societies around the world accelerate their demand for doctoral degrees and also require research and publications for degree completion, new and creative approaches utilizing emerging technologies could help to fill gaps in curriculum and support systems for their doctoral scholars.Future Research: Future research could expand the scope and take a longitudinal approach for more fine-grained data and developing broader perspectives.
      Citation: IJDS, Volume 17 (2022)
      PubDate: 2022-07-28
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/5004
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2022)
       
  • Cohort-Based Doctoral Programs: What We Have Learned Over the Last 18
           Years
    • Cohort-Based Doctoral Programs: What We Have Learned Over the Last 18 Years

      Authors: Krishna Bista, David W Cox

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014). Details

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1941
      Issue No: Vol. 9
       
  • Understanding Race in Doctoral Student Socialization
    • Understanding Race in Doctoral Student Socialization

      Authors: Pamela Petrease Felder, Howard C. Stevenson, Marybeth Gasman

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014). Details

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1947
      Issue No: Vol. 9
       
  • Postgraduate Research Supervision: An ‘Agreed’ Conceptual View of Good
           Practice through Derived Metaphors
    • Postgraduate Research Supervision: An ‘Agreed’ Conceptual View of Good Practice through Derived Metaphors

      Authors: Kevin Grant, Ray Hackney, David Edgar

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014). Details

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1952
      Issue No: Vol. 9
       
  • Utilizing a Co-Teaching Model to Enhance Digital Literacy Instruction for
           Doctoral Students
    • Utilizing a Co-Teaching Model to Enhance Digital Literacy Instruction for Doctoral Students

      Authors: Paige Alfonzo, Jennifer Batson

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014). Details

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1973
      Issue No: Vol. 9
       
  • Supporting a Humanizing Pedagogy in the Supervision Relationship and
           Process: A Reflection in a Developing Country
    • Supporting a Humanizing Pedagogy in the Supervision Relationship and Process: A Reflection in a Developing Country

      Authors: Caroline Khene

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014). Details

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/2027
      Issue No: Vol. 9
       
  • The Dissertation Topic Selection of Doctoral Students Using Dynamic
           Network Analysis
    • The Dissertation Topic Selection of Doctoral Students Using Dynamic Network Analysis

      Authors: Anthony Olalere, Edward De lulio, Amin Marei Aldarbag, Mehmet Akif Erdener

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014). Details

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/2031
      Issue No: Vol. 9
       
  • Survival Strategies: Doctoral Students’ Perceptions of Challenges
           and Coping Methods
    • Survival Strategies: Doctoral Students’ Perceptions of Challenges and Coping Methods

      Authors: Valerie Tharp Byers, Rachel N. Smith, Eunjin Hwang, Kay E. Angrove, Jason I. Chandler, Kelsey M. Christian, Shirley H. Dickerson, Leah McAlister-Shields, Stephen P. Thompson, Magdalena A. Denham, Anthony J. Onwuegbuzie

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014). Details

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/2034
      Issue No: Vol. 9
       
  • Preparing for Practice: Parallel Processes of Identity Development in
           Stage 3 of Doctoral Education
    • Preparing for Practice: Parallel Processes of Identity Development in Stage 3 of Doctoral Education

      Authors: Vicki L. Baker, Meghan J. Pifer

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014). Details

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/2041
      Issue No: Vol. 9
       
  • By Design: How Departments Influence Graduate Student Agency in Career
           Advancement
    • By Design: How Departments Influence Graduate Student Agency in Career Advancement

      Authors: KerryAnn O'Meara, Audrey Jaeger, Jennifer Eliason, Ashley Grantham, Kelly Cowdery, Allison Mitchall, Kate Jingjing Zhang

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014). Details

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/2048
      Issue No: Vol. 9
       
  • Poverty and Persistence: A Model for Understanding Individuals’ Pursuit
           and Persistence in a Doctor of Education Program
    • Poverty and Persistence: A Model for Understanding Individuals’ Pursuit and Persistence in a Doctor of Education Program

      Authors: Amanda Rockinson-Szapkiw, Lucinda S. Spaulding, James Swezey, Carolyn Wicks

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014). Details

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/2049
      Issue No: Vol. 9
       
  • Motivations for Pursuing an Engineering PhD and Perceptions of its Added
           Value: A U.S.-based Study
    • Motivations for Pursuing an Engineering PhD and Perceptions of its Added Value: A U.S.-based Study

      Authors: Jeremi London, Monica Farmer Cox, Benjamin Ahn, Sara Branch, Tasha Zephirin, Ana Torres-Ayala, Jiabin Zhu

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014). Details

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/2050
      Issue No: Vol. 9
       
  • Reflecting, Iterating, and Tolerating Ambiguity: Highlighting the Creative
           Process of Scientific and Scholarly Research for Doctoral Education
    • Reflecting, Iterating, and Tolerating Ambiguity: Highlighting the Creative Process of Scientific and Scholarly Research for Doctoral Education

      Authors: Amanda E. Cravens, Nicola Ulibarri, Marilyn Cornelius, Adam Royalty, Anja Svetina Nabergoj

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014). Details

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/2058
      Issue No: Vol. 9
       
  • Research as Design: Developing Creative Confidence in Doctoral Students
           Through Design Thinking
    • Research as Design: Developing Creative Confidence in Doctoral Students Through Design Thinking

      Authors: Nicola Ulibarri, Amanda E. Cravens, Marilyn Cornelius, Adam Royalty, Anja Svetina Nabergoj

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014). Details

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/2062
      Issue No: Vol. 9
       
  • Strategies for Doctoral Students Who Desire to Become Higher Education
           Faculty Members at Top Ranked Programs
    • Strategies for Doctoral Students Who Desire to Become Higher Education Faculty Members at Top Ranked Programs

      Authors: Sydney Freeman Jr.

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014). Details

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/2063
      Issue No: Vol. 9
       
  • Completion of Educational Doctorates: How Universities Can Foster
           Persistence
    • Completion of Educational Doctorates: How Universities Can Foster Persistence

      Authors: Amanda Rockinson-Szapkiw, Lucinda S. Spaulding, Bob Bade

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014). Details

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/2072
      Issue No: Vol. 9
       
  • Adult Learning and Doctoral Student Research Forum Participation: Insights
           into the Nature of Professional Participatory Experience
    • Adult Learning and Doctoral Student Research Forum Participation: Insights into the Nature of Professional Participatory Experience

      Authors: Joellen Coryell, Kayon Murray-Johnson

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014). Details

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/2075
      Issue No: Vol. 9
       
  • PhD Candidate Expectations: Exploring Mismatch with Experience
    • PhD Candidate Expectations: Exploring Mismatch with Experience

      Authors: Allyson Holbrook, Kylie Shaw, Jill Scevak, Sid Bourke, Robert Cantwell, Janene Budd

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014). Details

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/2078
      Issue No: Vol. 9
       
  • Layers of Consciousness: An Autoethnographic Study of the Comprehensive
           Exam Process
    • Layers of Consciousness: An Autoethnographic Study of the Comprehensive Exam Process

      Authors: Allyson Kelley

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014). Details

      IJDS, Volume 9 (2014)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/2079
      Issue No: Vol. 9
       
  • Extending Bell’s Concept of Interest Convergence: A Framework for
           Understanding the African American Doctoral Student Experience
    • Extending Bell’s Concept of Interest Convergence: A Framework for Understanding the African American Doctoral Student Experience

      Authors: Pamela P. Felder, Marco Barker

      IJDS, Volume 8 (2013). Details

      IJDS, Volume 8 (2013)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1754
      Issue No: Vol. 8
       
  • The Impact of Cross-Disciplinary Culture on Student-Supervisor Perceptions
    • The Impact of Cross-Disciplinary Culture on Student-Supervisor Perceptions

      Authors: Gina Wisker, Silwa Claesson

      IJDS, Volume 8 (2013). Details

      IJDS, Volume 8 (2013)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1763
      Issue No: Vol. 8
       
  • Striving to Obtain a School-Work-Life Balance: The Full-Time Doctoral
           Student
    • Striving to Obtain a School-Work-Life Balance: The Full-Time Doctoral Student

      Authors: Edna Martinez, Chinasa Ordu, Matthew R. Della Sala, Adam McFarlane

      IJDS, Volume 8 (2013). Details

      IJDS, Volume 8 (2013)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1765
      Issue No: Vol. 8
       
  • Experiences of Disengagement – A Study of Doctoral Students in the
           Behavioral Sciences
    • Experiences of Disengagement – A Study of Doctoral Students in the Behavioral Sciences

      Authors: Jenna Vekkaila, Kirsi Pyhältö, Kirsti Lonka

      IJDS, Volume 8 (2013). Details

      IJDS, Volume 8 (2013)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1870
      Issue No: Vol. 8
       
  • Issues in Doctoral Studies - Forty Years of Journal Discussion: Where have
           we been and where are we going'
    • Issues in Doctoral Studies - Forty Years of Journal Discussion: Where have we been and where are we going?

      Authors: Michael Jones

      IJDS, Volume 8 (2013). Details

      IJDS, Volume 8 (2013)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1871
      Issue No: Vol. 8
       
  • Perceived Assessment Requirements in the Contemporary Biomedical
           Doctorate: A Case-Study from a Research Intensive Australian University
    • Perceived Assessment Requirements in the Contemporary Biomedical Doctorate: A Case-Study from a Research Intensive Australian University

      Authors: Matthew Kemp, Marina Pajic, Timothy Molloy, Elaine Chapman

      IJDS, Volume 8 (2013). Details

      IJDS, Volume 8 (2013)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1893
      Issue No: Vol. 8
       
  • Access or Egress' Questioning the “Ethics” of Ethics Committee
           Review for an Ethnographic Doctoral Research Study in a Childbirth Setting
           
    • Access or Egress? Questioning the “Ethics” of Ethics Committee Review for an Ethnographic Doctoral Research Study in a Childbirth Setting

      Authors: Elizabeth Newnham, Jan Pincombe, Lois McKellar

      IJDS, Volume 8 (2013). Details

      IJDS, Volume 8 (2013)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1895
      Issue No: Vol. 8
       
  • Rhizomatic Research Cultures, Writing Groups and Academic Researcher
           Identities
    • Rhizomatic Research Cultures, Writing Groups and Academic Researcher Identities

      Authors: Cally Guerin

      IJDS, Volume 8 (2013). Details

      IJDS, Volume 8 (2013)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1897
      Issue No: Vol. 8
       
  • Preparing Underrepresented Students of Color for Doctoral Success: The
           Role of Undergraduate Institutions
    • Preparing Underrepresented Students of Color for Doctoral Success: The Role of Undergraduate Institutions

      Authors: Valerie Lundy-Wagner, Julie Vultaggio, Marybeth Gasman

      IJDS, Volume 8 (2013). Details

      IJDS, Volume 8 (2013)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1901
      Issue No: Vol. 8
       
  • Themes of Tension Surrounding Research Methodologies Education in an
           Accelerated, Cohort-Based Doctoral Program
    • Themes of Tension Surrounding Research Methodologies Education in an Accelerated, Cohort-Based Doctoral Program

      Authors: James A. Bernauer, George Semich, Jacqueline Courtney Klentzin, E. Gregory Holdan

      IJDS, Volume 8 (2013). Details

      IJDS, Volume 8 (2013)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1921
      Issue No: Vol. 8
       
  • Academic Involvement in Doctoral Education: Predictive Value of Faculty
           Mentorship and Intellectual Community on Doctoral Education Outcomes
    • Academic Involvement in Doctoral Education: Predictive Value of Faculty Mentorship and Intellectual Community on Doctoral Education Outcomes

      Authors: Baaska Anderson, Marc Cutright, Stoerm Anderson

      IJDS, Volume 8 (2013). Details

      IJDS, Volume 8 (2013)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1923
      Issue No: Vol. 8
       
  • My World Is Not My Doctoral Program…Or Is It': Female Students’
           Perceptions of Well-Being
    • My World Is Not My Doctoral Program…Or Is It?: Female Students’ Perceptions of Well-Being

      Authors: Cliff Haynes, Marievic Bulosan, Jeff Citty, Michelle Grant-Harris, JoCynda Hudson, Mirka Koro-Ljungberg

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1555
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • Educating Knowledgeable and Skilled Researchers in Doctoral Programs in
           Schools of Education: A New Model
    • Educating Knowledgeable and Skilled Researchers in Doctoral Programs in Schools of Education: A New Model

      Authors: Nancy Leech

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1558
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • Using Contextual Constructs Model to Frame Doctoral Research Methodology
    • Using Contextual Constructs Model to Frame Doctoral Research Methodology

      Authors: Shirlee-Ann Knight , Donna Cross

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1559
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • The Part-Time Doctoral Student Experience
    • The Part-Time Doctoral Student Experience

      Authors: Susan K. Gardner, Bryan Gopaul

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1561
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • The Role of Scholar Status in the Academic Publication Process
    • The Role of Scholar Status in the Academic Publication Process

      Authors: Laura Casey Amo, Serkan Ada, Raj Sharman

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1564
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • Academic Pathways to University Leadership: Presidents’ Descriptions of
           Their Doctoral Education
    • Academic Pathways to University Leadership: Presidents’ Descriptions of Their Doctoral Education

      Authors: Sydney Freeman, Jr., Frances K. Kochan

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1567
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • From One Culture to Another: Years One and Two of Graduate School for
           African American Women in the STEM Fields
    • From One Culture to Another: Years One and Two of Graduate School for African American Women in the STEM Fields

      Authors: Joretta Joseph

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1571
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • Selecting a Research Topic: A Framework for Doctoral Students
    • Selecting a Research Topic: A Framework for Doctoral Students

      Authors: Andy Luse, Brian Mennecke, Anthony Townsend

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1572
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • Who are the Job Seekers' Explaining Unemployment among Doctoral
           Recipients
    • Who are the Job Seekers? Explaining Unemployment among Doctoral Recipients

      Authors: Mara Yerkes, Rens van de Schoot, Hans Sonneveld

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1573
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • Identifying Effects of Institutional Resources and Support on Computing
           Faculty Research Productivity, Tenure, and Promotion
    • Identifying Effects of Institutional Resources and Support on Computing Faculty Research Productivity, Tenure, and Promotion

      Authors: Monica M. McGill, Amber Settle

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1581
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • Hearing their Voices: Factors Doctoral Candidates Attribute to their
           Persistence
    • Hearing their Voices: Factors Doctoral Candidates Attribute to their Persistence

      Authors: Lucinda S. Spaulding, Amanda Rockinson-Szapkiw

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1589
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • Equity Theory Based Strategies for Students on Overcoming Problems in
           Ph.D. Dissertation Committees
    • Equity Theory Based Strategies for Students on Overcoming Problems in Ph.D. Dissertation Committees

      Authors: Dara Gale Schniederjans, Marc Schniederjans, Yair Levy

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1590
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • Using Education Informatics to Improve Library Services to Doctoral
           Students: An Embedded Approach
    • Using Education Informatics to Improve Library Services to Doctoral Students: An Embedded Approach

      Authors: Lynette L. Ralph

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1591
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • Should Online Doctoral Instructors Adopt Audio Feedback as an
           Instructional Strategy' Preliminary Evidence
    • Should Online Doctoral Instructors Adopt Audio Feedback as an Instructional Strategy? Preliminary Evidence

      Authors: Amanda Rockinson-Szapkiw

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1595
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • Motivation, Satisfaction, and Innate Psychological Needs
    • Motivation, Satisfaction, and Innate Psychological Needs

      Authors: Michelle M. Mason

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1596
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • Doctoral Students’ Perceptions of Characteristics of Effective College
           Teachers: A Mixed Analysis
    • Doctoral Students’ Perceptions of Characteristics of Effective College Teachers: A Mixed Analysis

      Authors: Monika R. Anderson, Jacqueline M. Ingram, Brandie J. Buford, Roslinda Rosli, Michelle L. Bledsoe, Anthony J. Onwuegbuzie

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1693
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • Navigating the Doctoral Experience: The Role of Social Support in
           Successful Degree Completion
    • Navigating the Doctoral Experience: The Role of Social Support in Successful Degree Completion

      Authors: Dharmananda Jairam, David H. Kahl

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1700
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • The Employment Status of Doctoral Recipients: An Exploratory Study in the
           Netherlands
    • The Employment Status of Doctoral Recipients: An Exploratory Study in the Netherlands

      Authors: Rens van de Schoot, Mara Yerkes, Hans Sonneveld

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1718
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • Relationships among Attitudes, Coping Strategies, and Achievement in
           Doctoral-Level Statistics Courses: A Mixed Research Study
    • Relationships among Attitudes, Coping Strategies, and Achievement in Doctoral-Level Statistics Courses: A Mixed Research Study

      Authors: Julie P. Combs, Anthony J. Onwuegbuzie

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1742
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • Interdisciplinary Doctoral Student Socialization
    • Interdisciplinary Doctoral Student Socialization

      Authors: Susan K. Gardner, Jessica Jansujwicz, Karen Hutchins, Brittany Cline, Vanessa Levesque

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1743
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • Exploring the Fit between Doctoral Students’ and Supervisors’
           Perceptions of Resources and Challenges vis-à-vis the Doctoral Journey
    • Exploring the Fit between Doctoral Students’ and Supervisors’ Perceptions of Resources and Challenges vis-à-vis the Doctoral Journey

      Authors: Kirsi Pyhältö, Jenna Vekkaila, Jenni Keskinen

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJDS, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1745
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • Printable Table of Contents: IJDS, Volume 6, 2011
    • Printable Table of Contents: IJDS, Volume 6, 2011

      Authors:

      IJDS, Volume 6 (2011). Details

      IJDS, Volume 6 (2011)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1352
      Issue No: Vol. 6
       
  • An Evaluation of the Psychometric Properties of the Graduate Advising
           Survey for Doctoral Students
    • An Evaluation of the Psychometric Properties of the Graduate Advising Survey for Doctoral Students

      Authors: Benita Barnes, Linda A. Chard, Edward W. Wolfe, Martha L.A. Stassen, Elizabeth A. Williams

      IJDS, Volume 6 (2011). Details

      IJDS, Volume 6 (2011)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1353
      Issue No: Vol. 6
       
  • Feeling the Doctorate: Is Doctoral Research that Studies the Emotional
           Labor of Doctoral Students Possible'
    • Feeling the Doctorate: Is Doctoral Research that Studies the Emotional Labor of Doctoral Students Possible?

      Authors: Liora Nutov, Orit Hazzan

      IJDS, Volume 6 (2011). Details

      IJDS, Volume 6 (2011)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1354
      Issue No: Vol. 6
       
  • Empowering Doctoral Candidates in Finding Relevant Concepts in a
           Literature Set
    • Empowering Doctoral Candidates in Finding Relevant Concepts in a Literature Set

      Authors: Naomi Dreher, Heinz Dreher

      IJDS, Volume 6 (2011). Details

      IJDS, Volume 6 (2011)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1378
      Issue No: Vol. 6
       
  • The Road to Doctoral Success and Beyond
    • The Road to Doctoral Success and Beyond

      Authors: Veronica Castro, Elda E. Garcia, Javier Cavazos, Jr., Alma Y. Castro

      IJDS, Volume 6 (2011). Details

      IJDS, Volume 6 (2011)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1428
      Issue No: Vol. 6
       
  • A Cultural Repertoire of Practices in Doctoral Education
    • A Cultural Repertoire of Practices in Doctoral Education

      Authors: Karri A. Holley

      IJDS, Volume 6 (2011). Details

      IJDS, Volume 6 (2011)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1430
      Issue No: Vol. 6
       
  • Guiding the Use of Grounded Theory in Doctoral Studies – An Example from
           the Australian Film Industry
    • Guiding the Use of Grounded Theory in Doctoral Studies – An Example from the Australian Film Industry

      Authors: Michael Jones, Irit Alony

      IJDS, Volume 6 (2011). Details

      IJDS, Volume 6 (2011)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1429
      Issue No: Vol. 6
       
  • A Mixed Research Investigation of Factors Related to Time to the Doctorate
           in Education
    • A Mixed Research Investigation of Factors Related to Time to the Doctorate in Education

      Authors: Hesborn O. Wao, Anthony J. Onwuegbuzie

      IJDS, Volume 6 (2011). Details

      IJDS, Volume 6 (2011)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1505
      Issue No: Vol. 6
       
  • Printable Table of Contents: IJDS Volume 5, 2010
    • Printable Table of Contents: IJDS Volume 5, 2010

      Authors:

      IJDS, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJDS, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/708
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • Potential Predictors of Timely Completion among Dissertation Research
           Students at an Australian Faculty of Sciences
    • Potential Predictors of Timely Completion among Dissertation Research Students at an Australian Faculty of Sciences

      Authors: Vladimir Jiranek

      IJDS, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJDS, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/709
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • Motives and Aspirations for Doctoral Study: Career, Personal, and
           Inter-personal Factors in the Decision to Embark on a History PhD
    • Motives and Aspirations for Doctoral Study: Career, Personal, and Inter-personal Factors in the Decision to Embark on a History PhD

      Authors: Ian Brailsford

      IJDS, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJDS, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/710
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • Managing Perceived Coping Behavior While Mentoring Doctoral Students
    • Managing Perceived Coping Behavior While Mentoring Doctoral Students

      Authors: Robert Samuel, Frederick Kohun

      IJDS, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJDS, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1288
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • Faculty Perspectives on Doctoral Student Socialization in Five Disciplines
    • Faculty Perspectives on Doctoral Student Socialization in Five Disciplines

      Authors: Susan K. Gardner

      IJDS, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJDS, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1310
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • Doctoral Students’ Perceptions of Barriers to Reading Empirical
           Literature: A Mixed Analysis
    • Doctoral Students’ Perceptions of Barriers to Reading Empirical Literature: A Mixed Analysis

      Authors: Cindy L. Benge, Anthony J. Onwuegbuzie, Marla H. Mallette, Melissa L. Burgess

      IJDS, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJDS, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1331
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • Starting to Publish Academic Research as a Doctoral Student
    • Starting to Publish Academic Research as a Doctoral Student

      Authors: Dorian Stoilescu, Douglas McDougall

      IJDS, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJDS, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1333
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • Book Review: Write to the Top! How to Become a Prolific Academic
    • Book Review: Write to the Top! How to Become a Prolific Academic

      Authors: Dorian Stoilescu

      IJDS, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJDS, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1334
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • Printable Table of Contents: IJDS Volume 4, 2009
    • Printable Table of Contents: IJDS Volume 4, 2009

      Authors:

      IJDS, Volume 4 (2009). Details

      IJDS, Volume 4 (2009)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/633
      Issue No: Vol. 4
       
  • The Need for Teaching Doctoral Students How to Teach
    • The Need for Teaching Doctoral Students How to Teach

      Authors: ArrayHarvey J. Brightman

      IJDS, Volume 4 (2009). Details

      IJDS, Volume 4 (2009)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/42
      Issue No: Vol. 4
       
  • Volunteer Support of English as an Additional Language (EAL) for Doctoral
           Students
    • Volunteer Support of English as an Additional Language (EAL) for Doctoral Students

      Authors: Susan Carter

      IJDS, Volume 4 (2009). Details

      IJDS, Volume 4 (2009)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/43
      Issue No: Vol. 4
       
  • The Business Professional Doctorate as an Informing Channel: A Survey and
           Analysis
    • The Business Professional Doctorate as an Informing Channel: A Survey and Analysis

      Authors: T. Grandon Gill, Uwe Hoppe

      IJDS, Volume 4 (2009). Details

      IJDS, Volume 4 (2009)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/44
      Issue No: Vol. 4
       
  • The Experience of Nurse Faculty Members Enrolled in Doctoral Study
    • The Experience of Nurse Faculty Members Enrolled in Doctoral Study

      Authors: Carolyn J. Lee

      IJDS, Volume 4 (2009). Details

      IJDS, Volume 4 (2009)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/45
      Issue No: Vol. 4
       
  • Differential Item Functional Analysis by Gender and Race of the National
           Doctoral Program Survey
    • Differential Item Functional Analysis by Gender and Race of the National Doctoral Program Survey

      Authors: Benita Barnes, Craig S. Wells

      IJDS, Volume 4 (2009). Details

      IJDS, Volume 4 (2009)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/46
      Issue No: Vol. 4
       
  • Doctoral Dissertations by Publication: Building Scholarly Capacity Whilst
           Advancing New Knowledge in the Discipline of Nursing
    • Doctoral Dissertations by Publication: Building Scholarly Capacity Whilst Advancing New Knowledge in the Discipline of Nursing

      Authors: Karen Francis, Jane Mills, Ysanne Chapman, Melanie Birks

      IJDS, Volume 4 (2009). Details

      IJDS, Volume 4 (2009)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/695
      Issue No: Vol. 4
       
  • Printable Table of Contents: IJDS Volume 3, 2008
    • Printable Table of Contents: IJDS Volume 3, 2008

      Authors:

      IJDS, Volume 3 (2008). Details

      IJDS, Volume 3 (2008)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/631
      Issue No: Vol. 3
       
  • Development of English Academic Writing Competence by Turkish Scholars
    • Development of English Academic Writing Competence by Turkish Scholars

      Authors: Louisa Buckingham

      IJDS, Volume 3 (2008). Details

      IJDS, Volume 3 (2008)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/47
      Issue No: Vol. 3
       
  • Situating Educational Computing Doctoral Students in a Community of
           Practice: A Rubric-driven, Online Portfolio System
    • Situating Educational Computing Doctoral Students in a Community of Practice: A Rubric-driven, Online Portfolio System

      Authors: Mary Jo Dondlinger , James G. Jones

      IJDS, Volume 3 (2008). Details

      IJDS, Volume 3 (2008)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/48
      Issue No: Vol. 3
       
  • The Social Side of Theory: A Community-Based Narrative of Research and
           Theory
    • The Social Side of Theory: A Community-Based Narrative of Research and Theory

      Authors: Bernd Carsten Stahl , Jehad Al-Amri, Suad Almullah, Muneeb Dawood, Christine Fidler, Mohanad Halaweh, Osita Ibekwe, Raed Kareem Kanaan, Mick Phythian, Abdullah Al-Shery, Khaled Swesi, Sarai Tangai

      IJDS, Volume 3 (2008). Details

      IJDS, Volume 3 (2008)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/49
      Issue No: Vol. 3
       
  • Explication of Tacit Knowledge in Higher Education Institutional Research
           through the Criteria of Professional Practice Action Research Approach: A
           Focus Group Case Study at an Australian University
    • Explication of Tacit Knowledge in Higher Education Institutional Research through the Criteria of Professional Practice Action Research Approach: A Focus Group Case Study at an Australian University

      Authors: Edward Sek Wong

      IJDS, Volume 3 (2008). Details

      IJDS, Volume 3 (2008)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/50
      Issue No: Vol. 3
       
  • Selecting an Appropriate Publication Outlet: A Comprehensive Model of
           Journal Selection Criteria for Researchers in a Broad Range of Academic
           Disciplines
    • Selecting an Appropriate Publication Outlet: A Comprehensive Model of Journal Selection Criteria for Researchers in a Broad Range of Academic Disciplines

      Authors: Linda V. Knight, Theresa A. Steinbach

      IJDS, Volume 3 (2008). Details

      IJDS, Volume 3 (2008)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/51
      Issue No: Vol. 3
       
  • Book Review: Doctorates Downunder: Keys to Successful Doctoral Study in
           Australia and New Zealand
    • Book Review: Doctorates Downunder: Keys to Successful Doctoral Study in Australia and New Zealand

      Authors: Victoria Wise

      IJDS, Volume 3 (2008). Details

      IJDS, Volume 3 (2008)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/52
      Issue No: Vol. 3
       
  • Printable Table of Contents: IJDS Volume 2, 2007
    • Printable Table of Contents: IJDS Volume 2, 2007

      Authors:

      IJDS, Volume 2 (2007). Details

      IJDS, Volume 2 (2007)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/629
      Issue No: Vol. 2
       
  • A Proposed Ph.D. Student Bill of Rights
    • A Proposed Ph.D. Student Bill of Rights

      Authors: Marc Schniederjans

      IJDS, Volume 2 (2007). Details

      IJDS, Volume 2 (2007)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/53
      Issue No: Vol. 2
       
  • Successfully Navigating the Stages of Doctoral Study
    • Successfully Navigating the Stages of Doctoral Study

      Authors: Varun Grover

      IJDS, Volume 2 (2007). Details

      IJDS, Volume 2 (2007)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/54
      Issue No: Vol. 2
       
  • Selecting a Doctoral Dissertation Supervisor: Analytical Hierarchy
           Approach to the Multiple Criteria Problem
    • Selecting a Doctoral Dissertation Supervisor: Analytical Hierarchy Approach to the Multiple Criteria Problem

      Authors: Subhajyoti Ray

      IJDS, Volume 2 (2007). Details

      IJDS, Volume 2 (2007)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/55
      Issue No: Vol. 2
       
  • Dealing with Social Isolation to Minimize Doctoral Attrition – A
           Four Stage Framework
    • Dealing with Social Isolation to Minimize Doctoral Attrition – A Four Stage Framework

      Authors: Azad Ali , Frederick Kohun

      IJDS, Volume 2 (2007). Details

      IJDS, Volume 2 (2007)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/56
      Issue No: Vol. 2
       
  • Printable Table of Contents: IJDS Volume 1, 2006
    • Printable Table of Contents: IJDS Volume 1, 2006

      Authors:

      IJDS, Volume 1 (2006). Details

      IJDS, Volume 1 (2006)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/627
      Issue No: Vol. 1
       
  • Designing an Indonesian Leadership Training Program: Reflections upon
           Decisions Made
    • Designing an Indonesian Leadership Training Program: Reflections upon Decisions Made

      Authors: Alison Atwell

      IJDS, Volume 1 (2006). Details

      IJDS, Volume 1 (2006)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/57
      Issue No: Vol. 1
       
  • Dealing with Isolation Feelings in IS Doctoral Programs
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      IJDS, Volume 1 (2006). Details

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      IJDS, Volume 1 (2006). Details

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