Subjects -> EDUCATION (Total: 2346 journals)
    - ADULT EDUCATION (24 journals)
    - COLLEGE AND ALUMNI (10 journals)
    - E-LEARNING (38 journals)
    - EDUCATION (1996 journals)
    - HIGHER EDUCATION (140 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS (4 journals)
    - ONLINE EDUCATION (42 journals)
    - SCHOOL ORGANIZATION (14 journals)
    - SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATION (40 journals)
    - TEACHING METHODS AND CURRICULUM (38 journals)

HIGHER EDUCATION (140 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 141 of 141 Journals sorted alphabetically
+E Revista de Extensión Universitaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Academic Leadership Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Academic Leadership Journal in Student Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
African Journal of Teacher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
AISHE-J: The All Ireland Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Ámbito Investigativo     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Engineering Education     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Arab Journal For Quality Assurance in Higher Education     Open Access  
Arquivos do Museu Dinâmico Interdisciplinar     Open Access  
Asian Association of Open Universities Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AUDEM : The International Journal of Higher Education and Democracy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Aula Universitaria     Open Access  
Bangladesh Journal of Medical Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Campus Virtuales     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Medical Education Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Perspectives on Academic Integrity     Open Access  
Chronicle of Higher Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
College Student Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Critical Studies in Teaching and Learning (CriSTaL)     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Educate~     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Educational Research in Medical Sciences Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
EDUMECENTRO     Open Access  
ENGEVISTA     Open Access  
Enhancing Learning in the Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
European Journal of Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Excellence in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Extensión en red     Open Access  
Formación Universitaria     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Higher Education Evaluation and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Higher Education for the Future     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Higher Education of Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Higher Education Pedagogies     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Higher Education Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 58)
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Higher Learning Research Communications     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Högre utbildning     Open Access  
Informing Faculty (IF)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ingeniería Mecánica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Innovation in Teaching and Learning in Information and Computer Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Integración y Conocimiento     Open Access  
International Journal for Educational Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for Students as Partners     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of African Higher Education     Open Access  
International Journal of Doctoral Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Educational Technology in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Engineering Pedagogy     Open Access  
International Journal of Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 56)
International Journal of Higher Education and Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Kinesiology in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of STEM Education     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of the First Year in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Research in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Interpreter and Translator Trainer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
ISAA Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J3eA     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Jesuit Higher Education : A Journal     Open Access  
Journal for Education in the Built Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal for the Study of Postsecondary and Tertiary Education     Open Access  
Journal of Academic Writing     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Advanced Academics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Journal of Biomedical Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Collective Bargaining in the Academy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of College Counseling     Partially Free   (Followers: 4)
Journal of College Teaching & Learning     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Community Engagement and Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Critical Scholarship on Higher Education and Student Affairs     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 38)
Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Nursing Education and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Perspectives in Applied Academic Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Praxis in Higher Education : JPHE     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Problem Based Learning in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Science and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Service-Learning in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Student Affairs in Africa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Student Engagement : Education Matters     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Student Financial Aid     Open Access  
Journal of Teacher Education for Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Teaching and Learning for Graduate Employability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Technology and Science Education     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of the European Honors Council     Open Access  
Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Veterinary Medical Education     Partially Free   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Women and Gender in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Kentucky Journal of Excellence in College Teaching and Learning     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Kentucky Journal of Higher Education Policy and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Land Forces Academy Review     Open Access  
Maine Policy Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Makerere Journal of Higher Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Marketing Education Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Marketing of Scientific and Research Organizations     Open Access  
Medical Teacher     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Merrill Series on The Research Mission of Public Universities     Open Access  
National Teaching & Learning Forum The     Hybrid Journal  
Nauka i Szkolnictwo Wyższe     Open Access  
New Directions for Student Leadership     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Nordic Journal of Information Literacy in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Nursing Education Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
OUSL Journal     Open Access  
Papers in Postsecondary Learning and Teaching     Open Access  
Pedagogia Social. Revista Interuniversitaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pédagogie Médicale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Perspectiva Educacional     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Planet     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Policy Reviews in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Practical Assessment, Research, and Evaluation     Open Access  
PRISM : A Journal of Regional Engagement     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Prompt : A Journal of Academic Writing Assignments     Open Access  
Recherche & formation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Recruiting & Retaining Adult Learners     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Research Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Research Integrity and Peer Review     Open Access  
Revista d'Innovació Docent Universitària     Open Access  
Revista de Ensino em Artes, Moda e Design     Open Access  
Revista de la Universidad de La Salle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Revista Digital de Investigación en Docencia Universitaria     Open Access  
Revista Electronica Interuniversitaria de Formacion del Profesorado     Open Access  
Revista Gestão Universitária na América Latina - GUAL     Open Access  
Revista Interuniversitaria de Formacion de Profesorado     Open Access  
RT. A Journal on Research Policy and Evaluation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
RU&SC. Revista de Universidad y Sociedad del Conocimiento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Strategic Enrollment Management Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Student Engagement in Higher Education Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Student Journal of Professional Practice and Academic Research     Open Access  
Student Success : A journal exploring the experiences of students in tertiary education     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Summer Academe : A Journal of Higher Education     Open Access  
Tartu Ülikooli ajaloo küsimusi     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Teaching and Learning Inquiry : The ISSOTL Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
The Qualitative Report     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Transformation in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Trayectorias Universitarias     Open Access  
Triple Helix     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Uniped     Open Access  
Universidad en Diálogo : Revista de Extensión     Open Access  
Universidades     Open Access  
Widening Participation and Lifelong Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Women in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Университетское управление: практика и анализ     Open Access  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Higher Learning Research Communications
Number of Followers: 8  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 2157-6254
Published by Laureate Education, Inc Homepage  [1 journal]
  • A WINning Approach: Teaching Science Communication Skills through
           Small-Group Workshops

    • Authors: Serena B. Gumusoglu et al.
      Abstract: Objectives: Research almost always culminates in the communication of findings. Despite the necessity of grant and manuscript writing throughout academic careers, scientific trainees often receive little guided practice in written communication. To fill this gap, we designed, implemented, and evaluated a voluntary writing initiative for biomedical students at a research-intensive (R1) university in the midwestern United States called Writing Initiative in Neuroscience (WIN).Method: WIN consisted of didactic and workshop components. The didactic component included discussions with topic-specific experts on writing grants and manuscripts for the public and for non-academic scientific careers. The workshop component consisted of small group-based peer review of participant writing samples. Student self-enrollment consistently filled all available seats over three separate cohorts, including those formed during the COVID-19 pandemic. Student self-assessments were implemented to determine improvements quantitatively and qualitatively in writing and peer-review across 3 years of WIN programming.Results: Student self-assessment of writing skills before and after programming revealed improved scientific writing competency with medium or large effect sizes. Qualitative self-assessments indicated perceived improvements in writing competency and confidence. Collectively, students who participated in WIN improved their writing and communication skills and gained experience in providing and receiving feedback.Conclusions: Ultimately, peer-led writing initiatives, such as WIN, may enhance scholarly training and lay a foundation for future trainee writing success across scientific disciplines.Implications for Theory or Practice: These results support the utility of a student-centered writing workshop for biomedical students. Our study combined aspects of multiple existing resources, including peer feedback, interdisciplinary student backgrounds, and professional editing guidance. Together, these features formed a flexible and practical writing workshop, which can be used as a template for biomedical training programs.
      PubDate: Wed, 03 Aug 2022 20:07:32 PDT
       
  • Audio - Article Summaries Volume 12, Issue 1 (English)

    • Authors: Gary J. Burkholder et al.
      Abstract: As an added service to those visiting the journal, the HLRC provides in English and Spanish a brief audio summary of the articles published in the issue. This is the English version.
      PubDate: Fri, 29 Jul 2022 20:22:59 PDT
       
  • “I Did Not Sign Up For This”: Student Experiences of the Rapid Shift
           from In-person to Emergency Virtual Remote Learning During the COVID
           Pandemic

    • Authors: Jeff Kuntz et al.
      Abstract: AbstractObjectives: The main objective of this study was to explore students’ experiences of the emergency virtual remote teaching, which was implemented as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.Method: 439 students enrolled at a community college in Canada responded to a survey that had Likert-scale and open-ended questions. Anderson’s model for online learning was used as an analytic lens to gain insight on student experiences. Descriptive statistics were used to make meaning of the data. Thematic analysis was done on student responses to open-ended questions.Results: Findings were organized according to Anderson’s six factors in online teaching, namely: (a) Independent Study; (b) Peer, Family, & Professional Support; (c) Structured Learning Resources; (d) Community of Inquiry; (e) Communication; and (f) Paced, Collaborative Learning. The study revealed both challenges and opportunities that students experienced during their transition to emergency virtual remote learning.Conclusions: The invitation to students to share what worked—and what didn’t—yielded a wealth of specific suggestions for engaging students, promoting accountability, and supporting collaborative learning.Implication for Practice: This study looked past anticipated pressure points to reveal critical teaching factors that challenge—or enable—students as they transition to emergency virtual remote teaching. Post-secondary instructors would be well served to consider how they promote self-efficacy, provide access to supports, fashion an online learning environment, develop community, communicate expectations, and encourage collaboration.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Jul 2022 20:42:56 PDT
       
  • Analyzing Impact of Aesthetic Visual Design on Usability of E-Learning: An
           Emerging Economy Perspective

    • Authors: Akanksha Ghai et al.
      Abstract: Objectives: The purpose of the study is to examine various dimensions of aesthetic visual design and their role in predicting usability in e-learning in higher education institutions of northern India. Using quantitative means of data collection, this research identified, ways and means to make learning content effectively usable, that is, attractive, interesting, motivating, and engaging for the learners.Method: A survey questionnaire was developed through focused group discussions with field experts. Data were collected through online as well as offline modes. A Google form was created and its weblink was shared with the students pursuing degree courses in various state universities in northern India. Several visits and revisits were also undertaken to various universities to approach the respondentsResults: Results confirmed consistency, typography, graphics, grid, and layout as factors responsible for predicting usability of e-learning. Surprisingly, color and compositional guidelines emerged insignificant.Implications: The study has implications for teaching and learning activities that promote effective learning. The findings are beneficial for course-design faculty who develop modules by considering visual design elements that can facilitate interaction with and understanding of content by students learning in an online modality.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Jul 2022 19:52:10 PDT
       
  • Global Issues Spanning Higher Education

    • Authors: Gary J. Burkholder et al.
      Abstract: We are pleased to publish the first regular issue (Volume 12, Issue 1) of Higher Learning Research Communications (HLRC) for 2022. While the pandemic waxes and wanes, students in many parts of the world are returning or have returned to face-to-face instruction. It will take some time to fully understand the impact of the pandemic on higher education and what lasting changes will result from it. The Special Issue, Education Technologies and COVID-19: Experiences and Lessons learned, for which we are continuing to review manuscripts, should provide some insight into this question.This letter also contains article summaries.
      PubDate: Tue, 28 Jun 2022 19:57:40 PDT
       
  • Student Engagement and Learning Approaches during COVID-19: The Role of
           Study Resources, Burnout Risk, and Student Leader–Member Exchange as
           Psychological Conditions

    • Authors: Melissa Reynell van der Ross et al.
      Abstract: Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to explore the interplay of psychological conditions that influenced personal engagement among university students. As a theoretical lens through which to investigate this, the study used the job demands-resources model, the study demands-resources model, and the leader–member exchange theory. This study further aimed to explore outcomes that supported students in becoming lifelong learners (i.e., deep-learning approach).Method: Participants were undergraduate students registered at a South African university. We used a purposive, non-probability sampling strategy and employed a cross-sectional survey research design. This study used Mplus version 8.6 for the statistical analyses.Results: Results showed that the psychological conditions of meaningfulness (study resources), availability (burnout risk), and safety (student–leader–member exchange) influenced student engagement. In addition, the results showed that study demands were positively associated with student engagement, although this association can be regarded as small. Furthermore, study resources and student engagement were associated with a deep approach to learning.Conclusions: Findings from the present study demonstrated that Kahn’s theory carried implications beyond the workplace and held true in a student learning environment. Further, an exploration of the psychological conditions that led to engagement showed that the job demands-resources model and the study demands-resources model could be used to operationalise study resources as psychological meaningfulness and burnout risk as availability. Similarly, in the context of exploring the student-lecturer relationship, student leader–member exchange could be operationalised as psychological safety.Implication for Practice: Leaders in higher education are encouraged to focus not only on ensuring that students receive adequate support in terms of structures and physical resources during periods of uncertainty, such as the global COVID-19 pandemic, but to adopt a holistic approach that includes considering all the psychological conditions that encourage and promote students’ engagement.Method: Participants were undergraduate students registered at a South African university. A purposive, non-probability sampling strategy was used and a cross-sectional survey research design was employed. This study used Mplus version 8.6 for the statistical analyses.Results: Results showed that the psychological conditions of meaningfulness (study resources), availability (burnout risk), and safety (student–leader–member exchange) as conceptualised in Kahn’s (1990) grounded theory influenced student engagement. In addition, the results showed that study demands were positively associated with student engagement, although this association can be regarded as small. Furthermore, study resources and student engagement were associated with a deep approach to learning.Conclusions: Findings from the present study demonstrated that Kahn’s theory carried implications beyond the workplace and held true in a student learning environment. Further, an exploration of the psychological conditions that led to engagement showed that the job demands-resources model and the study demands-resources model could be used to operationalise study resources as psychological meaningfulness and burnout risk as availability. Similarly, in the context of exploring the student-lecturer relationship, student leader–member exchange could be operationalised as psychological safety.Implication for practice: Leaders in higher education are encouraged to focus not only on ensuring that students receive adequate support in terms of structures and physical resources during periods of uncertainty, such as the global COVID-19 pandemic, but to adopt a holistic approach that includes considering all the psychological conditions that encourage and promote students’ engagement.Keywords: Burnout risk, deep and surface approaches to learning, student engagement, study demands-resources, student leader–member exchange. Date Submitted: 25 February 2022
      PubDate: Fri, 24 Jun 2022 10:17:44 PDT
       
  • Faculty Making the Emergency Online Transition During the COVID-19
           Pandemic: Effects of Prior Online Teaching Experience and Strategies Used
           to Learn to Teach Online (Special Edition 2022)

    • Authors: Edward Hebert et al.
      Abstract: Objectives: During the COVID-19 pandemic, university faculty experienced an emergency pivot to online instruction in the Spring 2020 semester. Many had no prior online teaching experience and were given little time to adapt. This study examines pre-pandemic online teaching experience and training strategies used to learn how to teach online during the emergency remote teaching semester, perceptions of change in online teaching ability and the pandemic’s impact on teaching effectiveness, and interest in future online teaching opportunities.Method: Full-time faculty (n = 455) from four public regional universities in the southern United States completed a survey at the start of the Fall 2020 semester.Results: Over 35% had no prior online teaching experience, while 43% had taught several online courses. During the pandemic, in an effort to learn or improve online teaching skills, 13.4% sought peer mentoring, 31.9% completed a training program, and 34.9% both sought mentoring and completed training. Perceived online teaching skills, impact of the pandemic on teaching effectiveness, and interest in future online teaching were significantly related to prior online teaching experience and training sought.Conclusions: Faculty with less online experience perceived a greater negative effect of the pandemic on teaching performance and had less interest in future online teaching. Both mentoring and training enhanced perceived teaching skills, lowered the negative impact of the pandemic on teaching effectiveness, and promoted a positive attitude about future online teaching.Implications for Theory or Practice: The results provide support for the importance of faculty development programs in shaping attitudes and perceived effectiveness in online teaching and add to existent research on university faculty during the pandemic. Evidence from studies such as this provides universities with data that may be used to re-evaluate induction and training to improve instructional delivery in future instances when emergency remote teaching is required.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2022 20:12:50 PDT
       
  • Reasons Faculty Teach, or Do Not Teach, Service-Learning Courses in a
           Pandemic: The Role of Faculty Investment and Clues for the Future of
           Service-Learning

    • Authors: Melissa C. Garvin et al.
      Abstract: Objectives: Current issues impact the number and type of service-learning courses (SLCs) offered across universities. Our research aims to address the barriers and offer solutions to implementing SLCs.Methods: Instructors (n = 117) in the California State University system, the largest in the United States, who taught SLCs in fall 2019 and spring 2020 were contacted to understand why they chose to continue, or discontinue, teaching SLCs in Fall 2020.Results: The majority of participants continued to teach an SLC. Those who had more experience teaching SLCs were more likely to continue. Additionally, female participants trended toward being more likely to consider the use of service-learning as a high-impact practice as more important in their decision to continue teaching an SLC compared to male participants. Additional results and further implications are addressed.Conclusions: While there are significant barriers to teaching SLCs in a remote environment, there are viable solutions.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 May 2022 16:57:53 PDT
       
  • Relationships Among Higher Education EFL Student Perceptions Toward Fully
           Online Language Learning and Computer Self-efficacy, Age, Gender, and
           Proficiency Level in Emergency Remote Teaching Settings

    • Authors: Marco Cancino et al.
      Abstract: Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore Chilean higher education English as a foreign language (EFL) students’ perceptions toward components of their fully online learning experience and their computer self-efficacy during the CoVID-19 pandemic and assess how these variables are influenced by age, gender, and language proficiency.Method: Participants of the study were 236 undergraduate students (110 males and 126 females) who took a fully online EFL course in a professional institute in Chile. Likert-scale questionnaires were used to gather data on perceptions toward fully online language learning components (online participation, collaborative group work, instructional materials, and learning strategies and styles) and computer self-efficacy (CSE).Findings: Participants held overall positive views toward fully online language learning components but had negative views toward online participation. Findings revealed significant relationships between computer self-efficacy and perceptions toward fully online language learning components. The perceptions that learners held toward fully online courses seem to be unaffected by gender and proficiency level, although gender did impact CSE.Implications for Theory and Practice: Feeling disconnected from peers and the learning experience in general can lead to negative attitudes toward online learning as well as feelings of isolation. Learners may feel unmotivated, frustrated, and discouraged to continue participating in the course. Teachers can nurture a sense of community in the classroom by facilitating dialogue, providing timely feedback, moderating student discussions, and building social networks around learners. It is also important to promote healthy levels of computer self-efficacy that can positively influence perceptions toward group work and learning strategies.Conclusion: Emergency remote teaching can have a negative impact on online participation. As more educational institutions provide their students with online options for attending classes, teachers should focus on increasing peer collaboration and interaction.
      PubDate: Mon, 16 May 2022 21:07:54 PDT
       
  • Quality Assurance, Meet Quality Appreciation: Using Appreciative Inquiry
           to Define Faculty Quality Standards

    • Authors: Ann M. Morgan et al.
      Abstract: Objectives: This study outlines the journey of an online university to evaluate faculty performance standards, key performance indicators, and systems for quality assurance using an appreciative inquiry summit model. The study reveals the power of quality appreciation as an approach that elicits a shared vision for quality definitions and standards and serves as a historical marker in the higher education shift from data-driven faculty performance approaches to strengths-based, inclusive methods.Method: The retrospective business case outlines one university’s 2018 Appreciative Inquiry Summit, 5D (define, discover, dream, design, destiny/deliver) approach, resulting deliverables, lessons learned, and conclusions.Results: The summit and subsequent quality appreciation processes laid a foundation for inclusive leadership and inclusive teaching and learning. Quality appreciation was observed to be a third component to quality enhancement that had heretofore included quality control and quality assurance mechanisms. Quality appreciation, based on appreciative inquiry (AI) approaches, is a method for uncovering the positive core of an organization that results in ideal quality standards, definitions, and desires for ongoing quality creation.Conclusions: This case provides a view of one university’s building upon data-driven methods for faculty performance evaluation. The use of appreciative inquiry to advance a quality appreciation agenda and human-centered approaches served as a stepping-stone toward a vision for inclusive, strengths-based quality enhancement.Implication for Theory and/or Practice: Quality control mechanisms and systems for quality assurance are supported by quality appreciation. In this case, faculty quality appreciation is the integration of AI practices with ongoing evaluation and identification of faculty and classroom quality standards. Quality Appreciation leads to strengthened definitions of quality that are values-driven and founded in the heart and soul of the university’s teaching and learning.
      PubDate: Tue, 03 May 2022 20:37:24 PDT
       
  • The Third Mission of Universities on the African Continent:
           Conceptualisation and Operationalisation

    • Authors: Lazarus Nabaho et al.
      Abstract: Objective: The purpose of the study was to explore the conceptualization of the third mission in African higher education and the activities that universities are required to engage in and/or are engaging in to fulfil the third role.Method: The interpretive lens underpinned the study. Data were collected from the documents of the African Union Commission (AUC), in which the third mission is both implicit and explicit. We used content analysis as a data analysis technique.Results: The AUC conceptualizes the third mission as a role of universities, as a social role, as forging partnerships, and as being mutually beneficial to society and the university. Universities in Africa are implementing and/or required to implement 11 third mission activities aimed at bridging the gap between them and society. Almost all third mission activities are anchored to the classical missions of teaching and research associated with higher education institutions.Conclusions: We concluded that: (a) the third mission is built on the classical missions of universities; (b) the distinction between the classical missions and the third mission is that the first mission (teaching) involves the dissemination of knowledge through academic education while the second mission (research) hinges on the generation of academic knowledge, but the third mission involves both in a non-academic context; and (c) the third mission is a multidimensional concept.Implication for Theory and Practice: The study adds to the limited literature on the third mission of universities from a supranational perspective. Second, it extends the conceptual framework of Molas-Gallart and colleagues for understanding the third mission that is based on the experience of advanced higher education systems by supplementing it with four themes from Africa. Finally, it provides information the AUC may use to revise the instrument for evaluating the performance of universities on the third mission.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Apr 2022 21:08:03 PDT
       
  • Moderating Role of Attention Control in the Relationship Between Academic
           Distraction and Performance

    • Authors: V. Deepa et al.
      Abstract: Objectives: The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of social media engagement, which includes frequency of using social media platforms (FSMP) and social media involvement, on the academic distraction and academic performance of the student. The study further tests the moderating role of attention control on the relationship between academic distraction and academic performance.Method: Data were collected from 272 students studying in universities in India. Students answered questions on the frequency of visiting social media platforms and social media involvement, components of academic distraction, and attention control. AMOS software was used to test the structural model.Results: FSMP does not contribute to academic distraction; however, consistent social media involvement does predict academic distraction. Unlike previous studies, academic distraction does not influence the academic performance of students born in the digital era, who have accessed social media throughout their childhood. Attention control moderates the relationship between academic distraction and academic performance.Conclusions: The study challenges past research that claims social media engagement has a negative effect on student academic performance. Social media involvement, such as texting, commenting, and sharing updates, causes academic distraction but may not affect student academic performance. A novel finding is that the strength and direction of the relationship between academic distraction on academic performance vary with attention control.Implication for Theory and/or Practice: The study can be useful for educators and policy makers to build strategies for developing digital citizenship behaviours among students and thereby leverage social media for improved academic achievements of students. In particular, the potential moderating role of attention control in the interaction between academic distraction and academic performance has implications for educators and researchers.
      PubDate: Sun, 06 Mar 2022 18:17:58 PST
       
  • Audio - Article Summaries Volume 11, Issue 2 (Spanish)

    • Authors: Erwin Krauskopf et al.
      Abstract: As an added service to those visiting the journal, the HLRC provides in English and Spanish a brief audio summary of the articles published in the issue. This is the Spanish version.
      PubDate: Sun, 06 Mar 2022 18:17:48 PST
       
  • Perceptions of Employability Skills of Undergraduate Business Students in
           a Developing Country: An Exploratory Study

    • Authors: Wise Mainga et al.
      Abstract: Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the relative importance of different employability skills for business graduates seeking initial employment.Method: Semi-structured survey questionnaires were administered to human resources representatives from industry, business lecturers, and graduating business students to determine gaps in perceptions between the three stakeholder groups.Results: There was some alignment and moderate discrepancies in perceptions of the relative importance of different employability skills between the three stakeholder groups. There were statistically significant differences in perceived importance of communication, teamwork, and interpersonal skills between graduating students and employers. There is evidence that employers were satisfied with the level of academic skills possessed by business students at the time of graduation. However, there was significant difference in perception between employers and graduating students on the extent to which perseverance and initiative and risk-taking were fully developed among business graduates.Conclusions: By increasing their self-awareness and critical reflection on their learning experiences, graduating students can take proactive steps to enhance their positional advantage in the labour market. The various stakeholders, including academics, can lead a social dialogue towards a deliberate approach to developing graduate employability.Implications: Acquiring in-demand soft skills is one side of the employability coin; the other is developing dynamic psychological-social capital, such as self-awareness, self-directness, proactivity, adaptability, and resilience, that is underpinned by lifelong learning. Both are needed to navigate multiple job transitions and career challenges throughout one’s career span.
      PubDate: Sat, 26 Feb 2022 12:07:37 PST
       
  • Seeking Equity, Agility, and Sustainability in the Provision of Emergency
           Remote Teaching During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Center for Teaching and
           Learning Takes an Expanded Role

    • Authors: Henry Trotter et al.
      Abstract: Objectives: The purpose of the study was to illuminate and assess the experiences and feelings of the staff of a center for teaching and learning at one South African university during the early months (April–June 2020) of the COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns when it switched from face-to-face teaching to emergency remote teaching (ERT). It explores the practical, operational, ethical, cultural, and emotional questions that the staff of this center dealt with as they supported the university in ERT provision.Method: This paper draws on in-depth interviews with 23 staff members of the Centre for Innovation in Learning and Teaching (CILT) who revealed not only the logistical, technical, and administrative challenges faced during the ERT rollout period but the efforts they made to ensure that their efforts promoted equity (for students), agility (for the university), and psychological sustainability (for themselves).Findings: Using cultural historical activity theory as a lens to assess CILT staff activities, findings indicate that a number of contradictions and tensions emerged during this period—concerning exacerbated inequities, pedagogical compromises, cultural anxieties, and psychological pressures—that could not be fully resolved but only managed.Implications for Research: CILT staff are interested not only in providing logistical, technical, and practical support to a university but also in dealing effectively with the ethical, cultural, and emotional concerns that arise in times of crisis and transition, such as the current one. Understanding what happened during COVID-19 may offer insights into how other centers for teaching and learning can adjust to what will likely remain an unstable future in higher education.Conclusion: The pandemic ruptured the previously organic change and growth that characterized CILT development, transforming it as the staff responded to this South African university’s need to provide support to academics and students engaging with ERT.
      PubDate: Sat, 29 Jan 2022 12:22:05 PST
       
  • Audio - Article Summaries Volume 11, Issue 2 (English)

    • Authors: Gary J. Burkholder et al.
      Abstract: As an added service to those visiting the journal, the HLRC provides in English and Spanish a brief audio summary of the articles published in the issue. This is the English version.
      PubDate: Wed, 19 Jan 2022 20:47:02 PST
       
  • Replication or Reinvention: Educators’ Narratives on Teaching in Higher
           Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic

    • Authors: Viola Manokore et al.
      Abstract: Objectives: The purpose of the study was to examine narratives about the effect of the sudden transition from face-to-face teaching to emergency remote teaching necessitated by the COVID-19 pandemic on post-secondary educators.Method: We conducted interviews with 11 post-secondary educators from five post-secondary institutes in one province in Canada. Educators were asked to reflect on their experiences during the transition from in-person to remote teaching and learning.Results: Our thematic analysis revealed that educators’ experiences were influenced by three main factors: (a) student engagement, interactions, and persistence in learning; (b) competence in the application of teacher technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK); and (c) overall well being of faculty and students.Conclusions: Participants had unique experiences, and institutions varied in the ways they supported students and staff. Those educators who had expertise, experience, or professional support in technology and teaching seemed to have an easier transition.Implication for Theory and Practice: Higher education institutes should support educators in enhancing their technological pedagogical knowledge and in facilitating learning in various delivery modalities.
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Jan 2022 21:27:33 PST
       
  • Institutional Responses to COVID-19

    • Authors: Gary J. Burkholder et al.
      Abstract: We are pleased to publish the second regular issue of Higher Learning Research Communications (HLRC) for 2021, which follows the publication of the first issue in June and the Special Issue, Implications of COVID-19 on Higher Education. The pandemic continues to impact higher education; in many parts of the world. While in some areas, higher education institutions have reopened, others are continuing to operate at least partially remote as they deal with the risk for COVID infections. The manuscripts in the current issue and those published in the previous issues this year indicate that the implications of the pandemic on higher education continue to be far-reaching. Higher education likely will shift to more of a hybrid learning model, as several of the authors suggest, to remain flexible in meeting the needs of students and faculty while being ready to quickly shift modalities when required.
      PubDate: Sat, 18 Dec 2021 18:47:59 PST
       
  • Systematic Collective e-Cheating in a Saudi Arabian Higher Education
           Context: A Case Study

    • Authors: Amel M. Shoaib et al.
      Abstract: Objectives: The primary purpose was to investigate organized group cheating in a Middle Eastern institution during the shift to e-learning brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic in 2019.Method: The study explores the personal experiences of ten Saudi Arabian English as a Foreign Language program graduates in a higher education institution through in-depth interviews via qualitative interpretative phenomenological analysis. The study was guided by Ajzen’s theory of planned behavior.Results: A novel type of misconduct coined systematic collective e-cheating was identified and discussed. In addition, insights on the causes and types of e-cheating in a Middle Eastern context were provided.Conclusions: Academic misconduct was directly influenced by a rapid transition to e-learning, societal culture, and subjective norms, all of which jointly contributed to shifts in ethical perceptions leading to increased reports of cheating.Objectives: The primary purpose was to investigate organized group cheating in a Middle Eastern institution during the shift to e-learning brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic in 2019.Method: The study explores the personal experiences of ten Saudi Arabian English as a Foreign Language program graduates in a higher education institution through in-depth interviews via qualitative interpretative phenomenological analysis. The study was guided by Ajzen’s theory of planned behavior.Results: A novel type of misconduct coined systematic collective e-cheating was identified and discussed. In addition, insights on the causes and types of e-cheating in a Middle Eastern context were provided.Conclusions: Academic misconduct was directly influenced by a rapid transition to e-learning, societal culture, and subjective norms, all of which jointly contributed to shifts in ethical perceptions leading to increased reports of cheating.Implication for Theory and/or Practice: Education professionals need to be aware of underlying issues related to unethical behavior and encourage students to understand and address negative ideologies regarding ethics on a societal level. Efforts must also be made to raise instructor awareness of academic misconduct in e-learning through comprehensive professional development programs. Furthermore, with the increased use of technology in education, if the social, cultural, and perceptional factors are not addressed, educational systems will be impacted, affecting the credibility and value of academic degrees should cheating become the norm.
      PubDate: Sun, 12 Dec 2021 16:17:32 PST
       
  • Remote Teaching in Nepalese Higher Education During COVID-19:
           Teachers' Perspectives

    • Authors: Suman Laudari et al.
      Abstract: Objectives: The purpose of the study was to examine the factors that supported or inhibited teacher participation in remote teaching. Teaching and learning in Nepal was predominantly face-to-face prior to the pandemic, and the previous studies showed that the use of educational technology in higher education was limited.Method: This exploratory case study draws on data derived from focus group discussions with teachers in higher education. Thematic analysis was employed to explore the impacts of different factors in sudden transition to remote teaching.Findings: Findings show that personal factors such as teachers’ sense of duty and their attitude towards technology use facilitated their practice despite technological (internet connection), organizational (directives on exams or online classes) and environmental (inconsistent power supply) issues.Implication for Theory and/or Practice: Continued uptake of technology by teachers and colleges and universities should be practiced to move education towards a blended approach to teaching and learning. Educational authorities should provide more explicit guidelines on teaching and learning and administration of assessments across multiple situations, including pandemics and other emergencies requiring higher education to pivot.Conclusion: COVID-19 has sped up technology uptake and integration in higher education in Nepal. It increased awareness of technology and encouraged teachers to enhance their skills to integrate technology into learning.
      PubDate: Mon, 06 Dec 2021 20:02:58 PST
       
 
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