Subjects -> EDUCATION (Total: 2309 journals)
    - ADULT EDUCATION (24 journals)
    - COLLEGE AND ALUMNI (10 journals)
    - E-LEARNING (38 journals)
    - EDUCATION (1959 journals)
    - HIGHER EDUCATION (140 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS (4 journals)
    - ONLINE EDUCATION (42 journals)
    - SCHOOL ORGANIZATION (14 journals)
    - SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATION (40 journals)
    - TEACHING METHODS AND CURRICULUM (38 journals)

HIGHER EDUCATION (140 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 142 of 142 Journals sorted alphabetically
+E Revista de Extensión Universitaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Academic Leadership Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 38)
Academic Leadership Journal in Student Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
African Journal of Teacher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
AISHE-J: The All Ireland Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Ámbito Investigativo     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Engineering Education     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Arab Journal For Quality Assurance in Higher Education     Open Access  
Arquivos do Museu Dinâmico Interdisciplinar     Open Access  
Asian Association of Open Universities Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
AUDEM : The International Journal of Higher Education and Democracy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Aula Universitaria     Open Access  
Bangladesh Journal of Medical Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Campus Virtuales     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Canadian Medical Education Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Perspectives on Academic Integrity     Open Access  
Chronicle of Higher Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
College Student Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Critical Studies in Teaching and Learning (CriSTaL)     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Educate~     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Educational Research in Medical Sciences Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
EDUMECENTRO     Open Access  
ENGEVISTA     Open Access  
Enhancing Learning in the Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Ethiopian Journal of Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
European Journal of Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Excellence in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 45)
Extensión en red     Open Access  
Formación Universitaria     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Higher Education Evaluation and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Higher Education for the Future     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Higher Education of Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Higher Education Pedagogies     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Higher Education Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 68)
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Higher Learning Research Communications     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Högre utbildning     Open Access  
Informing Faculty (IF)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ingeniería Mecánica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Innovation in Teaching and Learning in Information and Computer Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Integración y Conocimiento     Open Access  
International Journal for Educational Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for Students as Partners     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of African Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Doctoral Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Educational Technology in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 36)
International Journal of Engineering Pedagogy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 63)
International Journal of Higher Education and Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Kinesiology in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of STEM Education     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of the First Year in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Research in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Interpreter and Translator Trainer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
ISAA Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J3eA     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Jesuit Higher Education : A Journal     Open Access  
Journal for Education in the Built Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal for the Study of Postsecondary and Tertiary Education     Open Access  
Journal of Academic Writing     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Advanced Academics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Journal of Biomedical Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Collective Bargaining in the Academy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of College Counseling     Partially Free   (Followers: 4)
Journal of College Teaching & Learning     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Community Engagement and Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Critical Scholarship on Higher Education and Student Affairs     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Nursing Education and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Perspectives in Applied Academic Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Praxis in Higher Education : JPHE     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Problem Based Learning in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Science and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Service-Learning in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Student Affairs in Africa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Student Engagement : Education Matters     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Student Financial Aid     Open Access  
Journal of Teacher Education for Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Teaching and Learning for Graduate Employability     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Technology and Science Education     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of the European Honors Council     Open Access  
Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 47)
Journal of Veterinary Medical Education     Partially Free   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Women and Gender in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Kentucky Journal of Excellence in College Teaching and Learning     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Kentucky Journal of Higher Education Policy and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Land Forces Academy Review     Open Access  
Maine Policy Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Makerere Journal of Higher Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Marketing Education Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Marketing of Scientific and Research Organizations     Open Access  
Medical Teacher     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Merrill Series on The Research Mission of Public Universities     Open Access  
National Teaching & Learning Forum The     Hybrid Journal  
Nauka i Szkolnictwo Wyższe     Open Access  
New Directions for Student Leadership     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Nordic Journal of Information Literacy in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Nursing Education Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
OUSL Journal     Open Access  
Papers in Postsecondary Learning and Teaching     Open Access  
Pedagogia Social. Revista Interuniversitaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pédagogie Médicale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Perspectiva Educacional     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Planet     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Policy Reviews in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Practical Assessment, Research, and Evaluation     Open Access  
PRISM : A Journal of Regional Engagement     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Prompt : A Journal of Academic Writing Assignments     Open Access  
Recherche & formation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Recruiting & Retaining Adult Learners     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Research Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Research Integrity and Peer Review     Open Access  
Revista d'Innovació Docent Universitària     Open Access  
Revista de Ensino em Artes, Moda e Design     Open Access  
Revista de la Universidad de La Salle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Revista Digital de Investigación en Docencia Universitaria     Open Access  
Revista Electronica Interuniversitaria de Formacion del Profesorado     Open Access  
Revista Gestão Universitária na América Latina - GUAL     Open Access  
Revista Interuniversitaria de Formacion de Profesorado     Open Access  
RT. A Journal on Research Policy and Evaluation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
RU&SC. Revista de Universidad y Sociedad del Conocimiento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Strategic Enrollment Management Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Student Engagement in Higher Education Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Student Journal of Professional Practice and Academic Research     Open Access  
Student Success : A journal exploring the experiences of students in tertiary education     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Summer Academe : A Journal of Higher Education     Open Access  
Tartu Ülikooli ajaloo küsimusi     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Teaching and Learning Inquiry     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
The Qualitative Report     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transformation in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Trayectorias Universitarias     Open Access  
Triple Helix     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Uniped     Open Access  
Universidad en Diálogo : Revista de Extensión     Open Access  
Universidades     Open Access  
Widening Participation and Lifelong Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Women in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Университетское управление: практика и анализ     Open Access  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.426
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 47  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 2 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 2042-3896 - ISSN (Online) 2042-390X
Published by Emerald Homepage  [362 journals]
  • Curse or blessing' Students’ experience from ChatGPT with an application
           of Colaizzi’s phenomenological descriptive method of enquiry
           and content analysis

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      Authors: Md. Rabiul Awal, Asaduzzaman
      Abstract: This qualitative work aims to explore the university students’ attitude toward advantages, drawbacks and prospects of ChatGPT. This paper applies well accepted Colaizzi’s phenomenological descriptive method of enquiry and content analysis method to reveal the ChatGPT user experience of students in the higher education level. The study’s findings indicate that ChatGPT enhances the quality of learning and facilitates faster learning among university students. However, despite numerous positive outcomes, it is noted that ChatGPT may diminish students' creativity by swiftly addressing their critical queries. Over time, students may experience a decline in patience and critical thinking skills as they excessively rely on ChatGPT, potentially leading to ethical misconduct. This paper primarily explores the advantages and drawbacks of using ChatGPT in the university context of Bangladesh. The present study creates a platform for future research in this domain with comprehensive study design. The study results alert the policy makers to improve upcoming version of ChatGPT with convenient user experience and academicians as this paper unleash several positive as well as negative consequences of using this AI-enabled chatbot.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2024-04-05
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-09-2023-0249
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • A qualitative study of transformative learning during internships

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      Authors: Jiunwen Wang, Ivy Chia, Jerry Yap
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to document the process of transformative learning during students’ internships. A qualitative study was conducted with 13 interviewed students to gain deeper insights into their learning experiences during their internships. Their weekly reflections from their 6 month’s internship experience were also coded for common themes. The study found numerous trigger events ranging from task-related challenges to interpersonal challenges to environmental challenges led to mindset shifts in students during their internships. The mindset shifts are enabled by students engaging in the trigger events through asking questions, seeking information and reflecting. Other enablers of these mindset shifts are workplace psychological safety, social support and individual learning orientation. The conclusion drawn is that trigger events and enabling resources such as external support are central to healthy mindset shifts and learning. This paper provides important guidance for supporting transformative learning during student internships. This paper provides important guidance for supporting transformative learning during student internships.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2024-04-02
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-08-2023-0216
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Job satisfaction among university graduates in Chile

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      Authors: Oscar Espinoza, Luis González, Catalina Miranda, Luis Sandoval, Bruno Corradi, Noel McGinn, Yahira Larrondo
      Abstract: The job satisfaction of university graduates can serve as an indicator of success in their professional development. At the same time, it can be a measure of higher education systems’ effectiveness. The purpose is to assess the relationship of university graduates’ socio-demographic characteristics, aspects of their degree program, experiences in the labor market and current working conditions and their job satisfaction. The data were collected from a survey conducted at 11 Chilean universities with 534 graduates. An ordinal logistic regression model was fit to calculate job satisfaction probabilities for different graduate profiles. The results show that sex, field of study, gross salary and horizontal match are related to graduates’ job satisfaction. Men and graduates in education and humanities are more likely to report being satisfied with their current job. Those graduates receiving higher salaries and those who are horizontally well-matched report higher levels of job satisfaction. This study contributes to expanding knowledge about the job satisfaction of university graduates. Specifically, based on the results obtained, it introduces the idea of aspiration fulfillment as a possible determinant of job satisfaction in different fields of study. This can serve as a starting point for research that delves into differentiated expectations for graduates from different disciplines.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2024-03-26
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-10-2023-0286
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Exploring the impact of serious leisure on well-being and self-perceived
           employability: the mediating role of career adaptability amongst Chinese
           undergraduates

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      Authors: Yin Ma, P.M. Nimmi, Maria Mouratidou, William E. Donald
      Abstract: This study aims to explore the impact of engaging in serious leisure (SL) on the well-being (WB) and self-perceived employability (PE) of university students while also considering the role of career adaptability (CA) as a mediator. A total of 905 domestic undergraduate students from China completed an online survey. The findings reveal that participation in SL positively influences WB and PE. Additionally, the results indicate that CA mediates the SL-WB relationship but not the SL-PE relationship. The theoretical contribution of this research comes from advancing our understanding of sustainable career theory through empirical testing of SL, PE, and CA on WB outcomes within a higher education setting. The practical implications of this study involve providing universities with strategies to support domestic Chinese undergraduate students in enhancing their WB and PE through active engagement in SL pursuits and the development of CA. Moreover, our findings serve as a foundation for future research investigating whether insights gained from domestic Chinese undergraduate students can provide solutions on a global scale to address the persistent challenges of improving student WB and PE.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2024-03-22
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-12-2023-0346
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • I will get my job: moderated and mediation model of students' perceived
           employability in post-pandemic era

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      Authors: Abdul Hafaz Ngah, Nurul Izni Kamarulzaman, Saifullizam Puteh, Nurul Ain Chua Abdullah, Nur Asma Ariffin, Long Fei
      Abstract: The current study investigates the factors influencing graduates’ perceived employability by utilizing the stimulus-organism-response theory, in the post pandemic era. A quantitative approach was employed to examine the hypotheses of the research framework through partial least squares structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) on the SmartPLS software. The result indicates that course structure has a positive effect on students’ grit and community of inquiry (CoI). Also, students’ grit and CoI have a positive relationship with students’ performance, while students’ performance has a positive relationship with perceived employability. Moreover, students’ grit, CoI and students’ performance sequentially mediated course structure and perceived employability, whereas readiness and self-directed learning strengthen the relationship between students’ performance and perceived employability. The findings will benefit university management, government and potential employers on how confident the student is in the chances of a future career after graduating from a higher institution.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2024-03-18
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-11-2023-0326
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Examining knowledge and skills acquisition from youth leadership programs
           in Brunei: is self-esteem the missing link in training transfer'

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      Authors: Adilah Hisa, Nurul Amirah Ishak, Md Zahidul Islam
      Abstract: This study aims to examine the impact of knowledge and skills acquisition from youth leadership programs on the extent of training transfer. Additionally, it explores the role of self-esteem as a potential intervening mechanism in linking the acquired knowledge and skills to the transfer of training. Using a non-probability purposive sampling, data were gathered from participants of youth leadership programs in Brunei. The study hypotheses were validated using multiple linear regression analysis and Hayes PROCESS macro. The findings revealed that knowledge and skills acquisition positively affect the extent of training transfer among youth leadership program participants. Moreover, self-esteem is found to be a crucial mediator in the relationship between knowledge and skills acquired from youth leadership programs and the extent of training transfer. The study suggests that to optimize the transfer of training in the youth leadership programs, relevant stakeholders – training providers, and practitioners – must prioritize not only the knowledge and skills acquisition but also the cultivation of participants’ self-esteem. To achieve this, a primary focus should be placed on the criticality of designing such programs to address these factors. Policymakers, particularly in Brunei, can enhance the leadership pipeline among the youth population and expedite progress toward achieving the national vision by aligning leadership development initiatives with the broader national development agenda. Collectively, this study enhances understanding of training transfer in youth leadership development, an often-overlooked area in the literature.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2024-03-14
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-07-2023-0207
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Vicarious learning and graduates' adaptive career behaviours: the case of
           graduates on clinical internships

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      Authors: Christian Ehiobuche
      Abstract: The effect of vicarious learning during clinical or medical internships on graduates' adaptive career behaviours has attracted scant attention from healthcare researchers, particularly, in the developing world context. Drawing upon the social cognitive career theory model of career self-management (SCCT-CSM), the current study examines how vicarious learning influences the clinical graduates' adaptive career behaviours (i.e. career exploration and decision-making) via career exploration and decision-making self-efficacy (CEDSE) and career intention. Data were collected from 293 nursing graduates undertaking clinical internships in 25 hospitals across Nigeria who willingly participated in this study as they were also assured of confidentiality at two-waves. The proposed hypotheses were tested using a path analysis. The findings showed that vicarious learning during clinical internship had a direct effect on career exploration, decision-making and career decision self-efficacy among graduate trainees. Also, the findings revealed that the effects of vicarious learning on the graduates' career exploration and career decision-making were significantly mediated by career decision self-efficacy and career intentions. The findings of this study have important practical implications for higher education institutions and industries that send and receive clinical graduates for clinical internships to gain more skills. More emphasis should be on encouraging learners to learn vicariously in addition to other forms of learning experiences available during clinical internships. The study explains that the graduates' higher engagement in clinical career exploration and decision-making was based on a higher level of vicarious learning during internships. The results suggest that higher education institutions and healthcare service providers can derive greater benefits from more emphasis on promoting vicarious learning during clinical internships.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2024-03-13
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-03-2023-0070
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Sustainability and accounting education in the Greek context

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      Authors: Michail Nerantzidis
      Abstract: Sustainable development (SD) is becoming an important area of research in accounting education. This paper examines if postgraduate accounting students in the Greek context present different awareness of SD issues and if this is related to their Master’s orientation. Moreover, it compares the results with other similar studies. An online questionnaire was designed based on Ebaid (2022) and Aleixo et al. (2021), and distributed to two different Master’s orientation programs. Then, descriptive statistics and contingency table analysis were performed to illustrate the main differences regarding the students’ responses. The results indicate that the examined postgraduate students recognize the importance of SD for their future careers and require more knowledge about this issue. Moreover, it is presented that most of the postgraduate students adhere to the core sustainability principles (i.e. recycle, reuse and reduce), while only the students of environmental, social and governance (ESG) Master are significantly and actively engaged in social and environmental activities. Collectively, the results show that postgraduate students in Greece are more familiar with the term SD compared to participants in other similar studies in different contexts. Planners and decision-makers in higher education institutions could benefit from the findings to reconsider accounting education by introducing new courses and/or Master’s programs to promote knowledge and action for SD. This is the first study, as far as we know, that examines the issue of sustainability and accounting education on postgraduate students.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2024-03-07
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-09-2023-0244
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Police misconduct and social media: perceptions of aspiring future police
           officers

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      Authors: James Turner, Colin Rogers, Ian Pepper
      Abstract: The research aimed to explore the perceptions of aspiring future police officers studying at a university in relation to the actions to be taken with regards to typical posts on social media by a fictitious off and on-duty police officer. This in turn would inform future police workforce requirements. Policing students who expressed their aspirations as future police officers were recruited. A total of 99 students studying the College of Policing licensed Professional Policing Degree at the University of South Wales, took part in Hydra Immersive Simulations to ascertain their perception of social media posts by a fictitious serving police officer. The students were asked to rate the appropriateness of the social media posts as groups, and as individuals. The findings suggest that, whilst the majority of students identified misconduct issues in the social media posts, the response to how the fictitious police officer should be dealt with varied. In addition, it would appear that there may be a need for those involved in policing education to reinforce, in an ongoing basis, knowledge of the College of Policing Code of Ethics, misconduct rules, regulations and increase awareness of unacceptable social media posts. The research was conducted with professional policing degree (PPD) students from one university. It is important to reinforce The College of Policing Code of Ethics, expected professional standards and an understanding of what constitutes unacceptable social media posts throughout the education of aspiring police officers. As this has the potential, if recruited, to impact on the service. Limited research has been conducted in relation to the College of Policing licensed higher education programme, the PPD, equipping aspiring police officers to successfully join the service and influence the cultural change.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2024-02-27
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-08-2023-0214
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Conceptualising degree apprentice identity to enhance work-integrated
           learning

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      Authors: Rebecca Jane Quew-Jones
      Abstract: The study explores Degree Apprenticeship Identity (DAI) conceptualisation to enrich understanding to enhance work-integrated learning (WIL). Lived experiences of degree apprentices (DAs) are examined, and a model of DAI developed to support teaching and learning interventions on this relatively new and significant programme. It draws pragmatically upon qualitative data from semi-structured interviews with Chartered Manager Degree Apprenticeship from diverse backgrounds in a higher education institutes (HEI). Data were explored abductively, using thematic analysis to investigate common patterns that influence identity; investigating personal experiences, socio-economic and cultural background, educational context and social interactions. Influential themes surfaced, including pride in work, supporting others, sharing experiences and belonging, facilitating DAI model formation. The model illustrates that DAI is composed of existing personal, necessary professional and power of learning transformation through social identity by interventions that encourage peer engagement, group reflection and group-actualisation. As this is a small-scale exploratory study, it is not intended to be representative of wider populations, which results in generalisability of findings. Data were collected from a well-established closed cohort programme led by the researcher, previously programme director. Interviews generated a broad range of anecdotal evidence, surfacing valuable insights relating to DAI formation. To enhance WIL, tutors can foster social interventions that encourage peer dialogue, heighten DAs sense of self as capable learners and increase confidence growth. The research provides a DAI Model, a fresh approach to understanding ways to enhance WIL for DAs through a stronger focus on group identity through social interventions. This preliminary model presents an opportunity for further research; other apprenticeships, larger and/or open cohorts.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2024-02-26
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-10-2023-0301
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Case-based activities for risk management education

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      Authors: Anand Prakash, Sudhir Ambekar
      Abstract: This study aims to describe the fundamentals of teaching risk management in a classroom setting, with an emphasis on the learning interface between higher education and the workplace environment for business management students. The study reviews literature that uses spreadsheets to visualize and model risk and uncertainty. Using six distinct case-based activities (CBAs), the study illustrates the practical applications of software like Palisade @RISK in risk management education. It helps to close the gap between theory and practice. The software assists in estimating the likelihood of a risk event and the impact or repercussions it will have if it occurs. This technique of risk analysis makes it possible to identify the risks that need the most active control. @RISK can be used to create models that produce results to demonstrate every potential scenario outcome. When faced with a choice or analysis that involves uncertainty, @RISK can be utilized to enhance the perspective of what the future might contain. The insights from this study can be used to develop critical thinking, independent thinking, problem-solving and other important skills in learners. Further, educators can apply Bloom’s taxonomy and the problem-solving taxonomy to help students make informed decisions in risky situations.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2024-02-23
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-07-2023-0177
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • The role of community colleges in preparing students with special and
           common skills for the workforce: a longitudinal case study

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      Authors: Thomas Gauthier
      Abstract: American Community colleges are vital to the country's economic mobility and are leaders in developing and facilitating career, technical, and workforce education. This study explored employer perspectives on employees' common and specialized skills across industries in the United States. Employers were profiled for one year using a case study and content analysis method. They submitted performance records for at least three employees who graduated from community college career, technical, or workforce programs. Data revealed that overall, employees were successful at work, but employers focused on employability skills across disciplines (common skills); specialized skills employers focused on were associated with business operations and processes and seemed to be something other than industry-specific technical knowledge. This article and the research it refers to constitute original work that has not been reproduced or published. The value of this article is premised on new longitudinal data, which could be used to improve and progress institutional CTE and WD programs.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2024-02-22
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-02-2023-0054
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Mapping the research landscape of vocational education
           and entrepreneurship: insights and future directions

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      Authors: Vijay Amrit Raj, Sahil Singh Jasrotia, Siddharth Shankar Rai
      Abstract: Vocational education and entrepreneurship are constantly increasing in research fields. However, what is the current state of vocational education and entrepreneurial research' Where will the area go next' These questions are still unanswered; thus, this study tries to map the research landscape of the study area to get insights and provide directions for future research. This research collected extant literature on vocational education and entrepreneurship using Scopus scientific database. Bibliometric analysis has been performed to extract insights from 175 documents published in the study area. Content analysis on the extant literature has also been committed to getting contextual information and developing an integrated research framework for future researchers. The bibliometric analysis revealed that training, career choice, curriculum, self-employment, student psychology, better job opportunity, learning environment and innovation are the most discussed in the vocational education and entrepreneurship literature. Developed nation’s strong presence, indicated by the number of publications in the field. This study significantly contributes to entrepreneurship by disclosing advances in the literature and some of the most active research fronts in this sector, delivering insights that have yet to be wholly appreciated or appraised. The study also developed an integrated framework that could benefit various vocations, education and entrepreneurship stakeholders.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2024-02-22
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-05-2023-0129
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Getting on board with certified public accountant evolution: re-evaluating
           a financial statement analysis project in light of a changing profession

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      Authors: Marie Elaine Gioiosa, Cathryn M. Meegan, Jill M. D'Aquila
      Abstract: Given the implementation of a new Certified Public Accountant (CPA) licensure exam and the CPA Evolution Model Curriculum, accounting educators must integrate more advanced skills in their coursework. We illustrate how a commonly-used project in accounting classes, which teaches technical accounting content, can address skills and competencies identified by the Pathways Commission and the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) and, as a result, enhance skills all business school graduates need in the workplace. We incorporate a financial statement analysis research project under a group work format in three levels of financial accounting classes. Using both quantitative and qualitative analysis, we evaluate changes in student perceptions of skills and competencies important for business graduates. We find students perceive improvement in critical thinking, problem-solving, the ability to work with other people, their understanding of the course material, and data analysis abilities after completion of the project. We also find statistically significant increases pre-to post-project in student perceptions of their knowledge, confidence, competence, and enthusiasm with respect to accounting material. We provide an example of how educators can align a commonly-used project with the CPA Evolution Model Curriculum, yet still meet the needs of non-accounting majors and prepare all students for future business careers. Group work has been studied and similar financial statement analysis projects have been implemented in the classroom for years. We contribute by not only extending and updating this research, but also by re-evaluating a project to determine whether it meets the shifting needs of a rapidly changing profession. By doing so, we answer recent researchers’ call for research in higher education that addresses employability and workplace skills.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2024-02-22
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-07-2023-0184
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Social capital and career adaptability: the mediating role
           of psychological capital

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      Authors: Abdolrahim Gheyassi, Amir Alambeigi
      Abstract: This study’s main objective is to determine the extent to which social capital and psychological capital can explain differences in career adaptability among higher education students. The study employed a quantitative approach, utilizing a survey research design. Data were gathered using an online questionnaire completed by 384 fourth-year undergraduate agricultural students in Iran. The inverse square root and multistage sampling methods were used to determine the sample size. The partial least squares-structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) method examined the associations between latent variables. The results suggest that social and psychological capital significantly influence the career adaptability of agricultural students, highlighting their significance in enhancing career adaptability. Moreover, psychological capital positively mediates the relationship between social capital and career adaptability. Agricultural higher education institutions must focus on developing students' social and psychological capital to cultivate career adaptability in agricultural students. Agricultural higher education institutions, for example, should help students develop soft skills. This study offers novel insights into the significance of individual resources, such as social and psychological capital, in enhancing the career adaptability of students. In addition, the key contribution of this study is the researchers' empirical evidence that multiple career resources are interconnected (social capital, career adaptability, and psychological capital).
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2024-02-20
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-02-2023-0021
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • A tailored innovative model of “research internship”
           aimed at strengthening research competencies in STEM undergraduates

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      Authors: Nitha Siby, Mohammad Ammar, Jolly Bhadra, Elmogiera Fadlallh Elsaye Elawad, Noora Jabor Al-Thani, Zubair Ahmad
      Abstract: Research internships are integral components of undergraduate programs that nurture students' skill sets. However, the current trend of these internships adopting a direct apprenticeship model, often termed “cookbook” laboratory sessions, falls short of cultivating 21st-century skills. Therefore, this study proposes an innovative Outcomes-directed Research Internship Model (ODRIM) designed to enhance research competencies. This study introduces a pioneering research internship model by integrating the course-based undergraduate research experience (CURE) framework with principles rooted in outcomes-based education (OBE). To evaluate its effectiveness and compare it with traditional research internship models (TRIMs), a two-group pretest-posttest design was utilized. Statistical analysis was performed on data collected from 66 participants to assess their research competencies. The results revealed a significant positive difference in utilizing the tailored innovative ODRIM track (pre-mean = 17.525, post-mean = 19.875; p = 0.009) compared to the TRIM track (pre-mean = 19.769, post-mean = 19.615; p = 1.000) in enhancing overall student research competency. Specifically, this innovative internship model notably enhanced students’ abilities in conducting research, showcasing technical skills, collaborating within teams, and disseminating research outcomes, encompassing the composition of research articles and reports. This tailored approach to the “Research Internship” encourages a harmonious blend of hands-on, inquiry-based learning and clear, measurable learning goals. It not only cultivates an immersive and thorough research experience to improve students’ research competencies, but also guarantees a concentrated alignment with predetermined research learning objectives.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2024-02-20
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-07-2023-0180
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Shifting work competencies in an emerging economy: a comparison of
           accounting students’ perceptions of demand and supply

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      Authors: Nicholas Chandler
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to ascertain which competences are seen by employers as important for accounting students in an emerging economy, to triangulate this list with the experiences of working students and compare with those work competencies acquired during the period of study. This study employs a novel mixed-method approach, with interviews of employers (n = 11) to identify key work competencies, and then with a quantitative study of working students (n = 184) to examine the work competency gap, using paired T-tests and mean weight discrepancy scores. The study was undertaken between September and December 2022. The paper provides empirical insights into key work competencies in an emerging economy. There is a focus on technical skills at the university, whilst soft skills are preferred by employers. New key work competencies were uncovered relating to intuition, innovation and communicating in a foreign language. The key personal characteristics required for the job relate to change and uncertainty. A qualitative assessment of key work competencies of employers and the use of mean weighted discrepancy scores is recommended in further studies in this field. Practical approaches for educators, government and employers are offered to address the increasing demand for soft skills and other work competencies specific to an emerging economy. The study is set in an emerging economy, which is underdeveloped in this field. The findings inform key stakeholders with a vested interest in reducing the work competency gap.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2024-02-20
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-08-2023-0213
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • The first national subject benchmark statement for UK higher education in
           policing: the importance of effective partnership and collaboration

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      Authors: Ian Pepper, Carol Cox, Ruth Fee, Shane Horgan, Rod Jarman, Matthew Jones, Nicoletta Policek, Colin Rogers, Clive Tattum
      Abstract: The Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) for Higher Education in the UK focuses on maintaining, enhancing and standardising the quality of higher education. Of significant impact are the development of subject benchmark statements (SBS) by the QAA, which describe the type and content of study along with the academic standards expected of graduates in specific disciplines. Prior to 2022, the QAA did not have a SBS to which higher education policing programmes could be directly aligned. Over 12-months, a SBS advisory group with representatives from higher education across England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, The College of Policing, QAA, Police Federation of England and Wales and policing, worked in partnership to harness their collective professional experience and knowledge to create the first UK SBS for policing. Post publication of the SBS, permission was sought and granted from both the College of Policing and QAA for members of the advisory group to reflect in an article on their experiences of collaborating and working in partnership to achieve the SBS. There is great importance of creating a shared vision and mutual trust, developed through open facilitated discussions, with representatives championing their cause and developing a collaborative and partnership approach to completing the SBS. A collaborative and partnership approach is essential in developing and recognising the academic discipline of policing. This necessarily requires the joint development of initiatives, one of which is the coming together of higher education institutions, PSRBs and practitioner groups to collaborate and design QAA benchmark statements. The SBS advisory group has further driven forward the emergence of policing as a recognised academic discipline to benefit multiple stakeholders. The SBS for policing is the first across the UK. The authors experiences can be used to assist others in their developments of similar subject specific benchmarking or academic quality standards.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2024-02-19
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-02-2023-0042
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Enabling student employability through volunteering: insights from police
           volunteers studying professional policing degrees in Wales

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      Authors: Ian Pepper, Colin Rogers, James Turner, Nick Louis, Bronwen Williams
      Abstract: This paper aims to explore perceptions and provides insights, from students who volunteer in policing whilst also studying the college of policing licenced professional policing degree (PPD) in Wales. It examines issues that act as enablers and blockers to volunteering in this public service, which also provides opportunities to develop their employability towards the careers to which they aspire. The paper provides insights from students and makes recommendations of interest to multiple stakeholders locally, regionally, nationally and internationally regarding attracting and recruiting volunteers. Focus groups were conducted with students at three separate universities in the South and West of Wales. These undergraduate students were volunteers in different police forces and agreed to take part in connection with their experiences. The results were analysed using NVivo to establish commonalities. The paper provides empirical insights concerning the issues surrounding the way those undergoing the process for recruitment as volunteers within policing are either hindered (blocked) or assisted (enabled). It identifies specific problematic areas as well as areas which have been of assistance. Policy makers, educators and recruiters should be aware of such blockers and enablers when considering adopting volunteering as an opportunity to enhance student employability. It also has resonance for other forms of volunteering in alternate public services. This research is limited to those volunteers who are undertaking the licenced PPD at three separate universities in Wales. Although the research adds to the broader evidence-base with regards to volunteering and its use to enhance employability. The paper includes practical implications for multiple stakeholders including university programme educators, administrators and decision makers in policing with regards to volunteering, employability, programme structures and process management. The research is based upon the experiences and perceptions of those individuals who are actually engaged in volunteering.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2024-02-19
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-09-2023-0253
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Work readiness and trending avenues for future studies: a systematic
           literature review and bibliometric analysis

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      Authors: Buddhini Amarathunga, Ali Khatibi, Zunirah Mohd Talib
      Abstract: This study aims to undertake a theoretical and technical exploration of the literature on Work Readiness (WR) through the implementation of a systematic literature review and bibliometric analysis. The present study addresses seven distinct research questions: (1) an examination of the descriptive features characterizing the literature on WR, (2) an analysis of trends in annual scientific publications related to WR, (3) the identification of the most pertinent and high-impact sources contributing to WR, (4) the delineation of the globally cited articles exerting the most influence on WR, (5) the determination of the most relevant countries associated with WR, (6) an evaluation of the outcomes derived from Bradford’s Law of Scattering and Lotka’s Law of scientific productivity in the context of WR, and (7) the identification of the prevailing research avenues that hold significance for future studies on WR. The present study employed Systematic Literature Review (SLR) and bibliometric analysis mapping techniques to analyze 521 articles extracted from the Scopus database. The analysis utilized Biblioshiny software and VOSviewer software as the primary tools. The findings reveal that WR constitutes a steadily expanding subject discipline, showcasing a notable 9.12% annual growth in scientific production spanning from 1975 to 2023. Australia, the USA, and Canada emerged as the most productive countries within the field of WR, as evidenced by their cumulative scientific production. The thematic map of keyword analysis suggests several burgeoning pathways for future researchers in the WR domain, including workplace learning, functional capacity evaluation, graduate WR, digital literacy, blended learning, resilience, and curriculum. This study contributes to the WR discourse by providing a comprehensive literature review. The findings of this study hold significance for graduates, universities, employers, the higher education industry, and the broader community.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2024-02-19
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-10-2023-0280
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Able or disabled: why should neurodiverse students experience improved
           access to public universities' An exploratory study

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      Authors: Mohamed Mousa, Rami Ayoubi, Vesa Puhakka
      Abstract: This paper aims to answer the question: To what extent should neurodiverse students experience improved access to public universities in Egypt and why' A systematic qualitative research method was used with data collected through semi-structured interviews with 44 educators in four universities in Egypt. A thematic approach was implemented to analyze the collected data. The addressed educators believe that greater representation of neurodiverse students in their schools should be a priority for the following four reasons: first, neurodiverse students represent a promising new market segment schools could benefit from; second, recruiting more neurodiverse students represents a chance for schools and faculties to prove the social role they can undertake; third, schools can benefit from the unique skills many neurodiverse students have, particularly in mathematical and computational skills; and fourth, the greater the representation of neurodiverse students, the more research projects and funding opportunities educators can obtain. This paper contributes by filling a gap in diversity management, higher education and human resources management in which empirical studies on the representation of neurodiverse individuals in public universities have been limited so far.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2024-02-08
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-06-2023-0163
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Exploring research trends of metaverse in education:
           a bibliometric analysis

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      Authors: M.P. Akhil, Remya Lathabhavan, Aparna Merin Mathew
      Abstract: By a thorough bibliometric examination of the area through time, this paper analyses the research landscape of metaverse in education. It is an effort that is focused on the metaverse research trends, academic production and conceptual focus of scientific publications. The Web of Science (WoS) database was explored for information containing research articles and associated publications that met the requirements. For a thorough analysis of the trend, thematic focus and scientific output in the subject of metaverse in education, a bibliometric technique was used to analyse the data. The bibliometrix package of R software, specifically the biblioshiny interface of R-studio, was used to conduct the analysis. The analysis of the metaverse in education spanning from 1995 to the beginning of 2023 reveals a dynamic and evolving landscape. Notably, the field has experienced robust annual growth, with a peak of publications in 2022. Citation analysis highlights seminal works, with Dionisio et al. (2013) leading discussions on the transition of virtual worlds into intricate digital cultures. Thematic mapping identifies dominant themes such as “system,” “augmented reality” and “information technology,” indicating a strong technological focus. Surprisingly, China emerges as a leading contributor with significant citation impact, emphasising the global nature of metaverse research. The thematic map suggests ongoing developments in performance and future aspects, emphasising the essential role of emerging technologies like artificial intelligence and virtual reality. Overall, the findings depict a vibrant and multidimensional metaverse in education, poised for continued exploration and innovation. The study is among the pioneers that provide a comprehensive bibliometric analysis in the area of metaverse in education which will guide the novice researchers to identify the unexplored areas.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2024-01-19
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-06-2023-0156
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Students' industrial work experience scheme (SIWES): exploring higher
           institution student’s participation and sense of belonging

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      Authors: Musa Abba Umar, Penuel Medan, Zainab Aliyu Atiku
      Abstract: The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which students' industrial work experience scheme (SIWES) students in higher education institutions experienced a high level of engagement in workplace activities and a strong sense of affiliation with their workplace environment. The additional purpose encompassed the identification of factors that both facilitated and hindered their engagement and self-efficacy. The data for this study were collected via a cross-sectional survey of 243 students who were undertaking the SIWES as a mandatory component of their graduation requirements. The survey was conducted at selected tertiary institutions in Nigeria. The qualitative replies yielded valuable insights on the factors that motivated and supported participation, with self-efficacy emerging as a significant facilitator as well as a potential barrier. There is a positive association between more interactions, a professional atmosphere and self-efficacy. The study may not comprehensively include all contextual variables that might potentially impact students' perception of belongingness and self-efficacy during the SIWES program, including the distinct industry or workplace setting. This exploratory study analyzes SIWES students' cultural and personal affiliation. The study suggests these changes improve student performance. Engagement and belonging techniques for students, supervisors, coworkers and professionals are classified by the study. The study found that supervisors and coworkers help students at work. It underlines academics' responsibility in creating SIWES curricula that increase student confidence and active learning. According to this study, students should receive self-confidence therapy before SIWES. Self-confidence and student success and well-being need additional investigation, the report says. This study takes a unique approach by examining belongingness and self-efficacy in the SIWES course. It examines the interdependence of these notions and the curriculum's various challenges and opportunities. By addressing these important issues, study adds to existing knowledge and lays the groundwork for future research.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2024-01-12
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-10-2023-0294
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • The business students' intention to establish a start-up company: the role
           of higher education-related factors

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      Authors: Winda Widyanty, Dian Primanita Oktasari, Sik Sumaedi, Sih Damayanti
      Abstract: This study aims to develop and test a conceptual model of business students' intention to establish a start-up business that involves attitude, perceived behavioral control (PBC), entrepreneurial competence, financial access, lecture service quality, curriculum program, extracurricular activity and institutional support simultaneously. An online survey was performed. The respondents were 196 business students in a private university in Indonesia. The data were analyzed using partial least square structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM). Business students' intention to establish a start-up business was positively and significantly influenced by attitude and PBC. PBC was positively and significantly influenced by entrepreneurial competence and financial access. Attitude and entrepreneurial competence were positively and significantly influenced by curriculum program and extracurricular activity, but not influenced by lecture service quality and institutional support. Financial access was positively and significantly influenced by extracurricular activity and institutional support. This research was conducted in a private university in Indonesia. Therefore, to test the stability of the research findings and the proposed conceptual model, it is necessary to conduct research in different contexts. Research on the intention to establish a start-up business that simultaneously considers attitude, PBC, entrepreneurial competence, financial access, lecture service quality, curriculum program, extracurricular activity and institutional support is still scarce in the literature. This study addressed the gap.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2024-01-08
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-06-2023-0144
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Simulation-based education to facilitate clinical readiness in nursing and
           midwifery programmes in sub-Saharan Africa: a meta-synthesis

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      Authors: Gertrude Mwalabu, Annie Msosa, Ingrid Tjoflåt, Kristin Hjorthaug Urstad, Bodil Bø, Christina Furskog Risa, Masauko Msiska, Patrick Mapulanga
      Abstract: The purpose of this study was to explore the clinical readiness of simulation-based education (SBE) in preparing nursing and midwifery students for clinical practice in sub-Saharan Africa. This study has synthesised the findings from existing research studies and provides an overview of the current state of SBE in nursing and midwifery programs in the region. A qualitative meta-synthesis of previous studies was conducted using the following steps: developing a review question, developing and a search strategy, extracting and meta-synthesis of the themes from the literature and meta-synthesis of themes. Five databases were searched for from existing English literature (PubMed, Cumulative Index for Nursing and Allied Health Professional Literature [CINAHL], PsycINFO, EMBASE and ScienceDirect Medline, CINAHL and Science Direct), including grey literature on the subject. Eight qualitative studies conducted in sub-Saharan Africa between 2014 and 2022 were included. Hawker et al.'s framework was used to assess quality. The following themes emerged from the literature. Theme 1: Improved skills and competencies through realism and repetition. Theme 2: Improved skills and competencies through realism and repetition. Theme 3: Improved learning through debriefing and reflection. Theme 4: Constraints of simulation as a pedagogical teaching strategy. The qualitative meta-synthesis intended to cover articles from 2012 to 2022. Between 2012 and 2013, the authors could not identify purely qualitative studies from sub-Saharan Africa. The studies identified were either mixed methods or purely quantitative. This constitutes a study limitation. Findings emphasise educator training in SBE. Comprehensive multidisciplinary training, complemented by expertise and planned debriefing sessions, serves as a catalyst for fostering reflective learning. Well-equipped simulation infrastructure is essential in preparing students for their professional competencies for optimal patient outcomes. Additional research is imperative to improve the implementation of SBE in sub-Saharan Africa. The originality and value of SBE in nursing and midwifery programs in sub-Saharan Africa lie in its contextual relevance, adaptation to resource constraints, innovative teaching methodologies, provision of a safe learning environment, promotion of interprofessional collaboration and potential for research and evidence generation. These factors contribute to advancing nursing and midwifery education and improving healthcare outcomes in the region. This study fills this gap in the literature.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2024-01-05
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-06-2023-0136
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • The factors affecting work readiness during the transition from university
           student to physiotherapist in Australia

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      Authors: Vidya Lawton, Verity Pacey, Taryn M. Jones, Catherine M. Dean
      Abstract: Work readiness is an important aspect of the transition from higher education to professional practice. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of work readiness of individuals transitioning into physiotherapy practice in Australia and identify any association with personal, education and work factors. Purpose-built surveys were distributed to final-year students and graduates of physiotherapy programmes nationally. Work readiness was measured using the recently validated Work Readiness Scale for Allied Health Professionals 32 (WRS-AH32), which captures the following four domains: Practical Wisdom, Interpersonal Capabilities, Personal Attributes and Organisational Acumen. The surveys also included personal, education and work data. Work readiness was expressed as percentages for total work readiness and within each domain. Independent t-tests were used to examine the influence of personal, education and work factors on work readiness. 176 participant responses were analysed (84 students and 92 graduates). Total work readiness was 80% [standard deviation (SD)8], with Practical Wisdom the highest scoring domain (91%, SD8) and Personal Attributes the lowest scoring domain (65%, SD14). Considering overall work readiness, individuals reporting some psychological symptoms scored lower than asymptomatic individuals [mean difference 7% (95% confidence interval (CI) 4 to 9)] and final-year students scored less than graduates [mean difference 3% (95%CI 0 to 5)]. All stakeholders, including individuals, universities and employers, need to consider further strategies to develop aspects of work readiness, particularly within the domain of Personal Attributes and those with psychological symptoms. This study demonstrates that physiotherapy students and graduates perceive themselves to be well prepared to transition to the workforce.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2024-01-05
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-10-2023-0287
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Delivering the Chartered Manager Degree Apprenticeship: what are the
           challenges and implications for good practice'

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      Authors: Clare Horackova, Sarah Bloomfield, Carla Roberta Pereira, Fidèle Mutwarasibo
      Abstract: The Chartered Manager Degree Apprenticeship (CMDA) was approved for delivery in the UK in 2015 (IfATE, 2023). The CMDA offers future managers the opportunity to gain a recognised degree as well as the practical skills to thrive in today's competitive job market. A number of studies have been written on the development phase of the CMDA in various institutions, but to date no systematic review exists to provide an overview of commonalities and insights gained across these studies. This review aims to fill this gap. A systematic literature review (SLR) was used to identify studies written on the CMDA since its introduction. In total, 12 papers met the authors' selection criteria, and thematic coding was used to analyse and present the findings. Findings were grouped into five themes: (1) curriculum design; (2) programme delivery and support for apprentices; (3) portfolio of evidence and End Point Assessment (EPA); (4) working with employers and (5) recruitment and onboarding. This review is the first synthesis to date of literature written on the CMDA. The authors' analysis has allowed them to formulate recommendations for future practice that will be of use to providers in the next phase of the CMDA's development.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2024-01-04
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-09-2023-0262
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Identifying supply chain manager leadership skills and competencies gaps
           in Malaysia

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      Authors: Siti Norida Wahab, Albert Tan, Olivier Roche
      Abstract: In recent years, technology diffusion, globalization and the Internet revolution have accelerated the growth of online transactions and altered corporate operations systems. The emergence of computer technology and the Internet have changed the way businesses work. The purpose of this study is to find and identify any common patterns in the logistics and supply chain industries for job requirements using job posting content in Malaysia. This study provides an exploratory assessment of the employability skill set required using online job posting advertisements. Online job posting advertising, also known as e-recruiting, is one field that has been significantly influenced by information technology. In addition, the current Covid-19 outbreak has created a new need for a long-term contactless talent acquisition process in the organization's operating systems. Based on this study's findings, the top ten skills required by employers for logistics and supply chain positions are (1) supply chain analytics, (2) technological aptitude, (3) teamwork skills, (4) customer focus, (5) leadership skills, (6) interpersonal skills, (7) people skills, (8) creativity and resilience, (9) demand and supply forecasting ability, and (10) project management skills. Overall, the findings provide a road map for practitioners and academics interested in developing supply chain managers' necessary skills and competencies to manage current and future supply networks. It also allows companies to adjust their supply chain management hiring, training and retention methods. Although the study was done in Malaysia, the supply chain skills and competencies stated in this study, as well as their categorization, can be applied in other developing countries.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2024-01-02
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-07-2023-0179
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Organisational digital capability: a cross-country review of guidance

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      Authors: Tony Wall, Nga Ngo, Chúc Nguyễn Hữu, Phạm Ngọc Lan, Sarah Knight
      Abstract: Digital transformation continues to rapidly progress in higher education globally, spanning all aspects of higher education operations, values and culture. Despite expanding literature, guidance remains focussed on emergency application during pandemic lockdowns and/or on single organisational case studies. Digital transformation frameworks that move beyond these foci are heavily criticised for being commercially contextualised (outside of higher education) and are often too narrowly conceptualised. The purpose of this paper is to review the most common framework currently used in the UK, which takes a strategic and organisational perspective on digital transformation. This is a technical review article that summarises key guidance for organisational digital capability and then reflects on its application in the UK (a developed economy and higher education system) and in Vietnam (one of the fastest-growing economies with a developing higher education committed to digital transformation) as an initial attempt to explore its applicability beyond the UK context. Vietnam has been chosen as a reference context, given its significant current digital transformation policy reform at the national level and as a collaboration partner with the UK in its digital transformation. The guidance highlights six core areas to consider for digital capability: information and communication technology (ICT) infrastructure, content and information, research and innovation, communication, learning, teaching and assessment and organisational digital culture. Although the framework is normative, findings suggest it is sufficiently open-ended to enable its users to determine practical steps to drive digital transformation. However, complementary tools are suggested to deal with the rapidly developing digital transformation policy context of Vietnam. This is the first time a review has been conducted from the perspective of different countries, with a view to supporting leaders, managers and policymakers in the UK, Vietnam and other Association of South Eastern Nations (ASEAN) networks in their own digital transformation transitions.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2023-12-26
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-06-2023-0157
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Irish apprenticeships in financial services: negotiating gender and
           navigating social justice

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      Authors: Corina Sheerin, Jonathan Brittain
      Abstract: Set within the context of International Financial Services (IFS), this research aims to considers the demographic profile of IFS apprenticeship candidates in relation to gender equality and social mobility in Ireland. This study also offers valuable insights as to the gendered nature of these “new” apprenticeships and examine whether these programmes provide opportunities for social mobility. Implementing a quantitative approach, underpinned by a positivist stance, this study analyses Irish national apprenticeship data relating to IFS programmes (n = 1118). Non-parametric tests were applied in the analysis of the gender dimension, while to analyse social mobility, the socio-economic status and spatial profile of candidates were compiled and analysed using the Pobal HP Deprivation Index (SA). The findings revealed more women are undertaking non-traditional apprenticeship programmes as compared with traditional craft apprenticeships. Within the IFS context, while female participation was seen to be growing, gender divergence was observed in terms of programme level, with a greater number of men, as compared with women, engaging in higher-level degree apprenticeship programmes. The findings also show that IFS apprentices are primarily from socio-economic areas that are above average. This trend indicates a distinctive candidate who is more aligned with the sectoral profile of IFS than that of traditional apprenticeship programmes. Such findings reveal that the “widening participation” aim of IFS apprenticeships is not yet fully realised with issues of gender inequality and social mobility persistent within the wider IFS sector. This study provides an important dimension to both academic and practitioner literature concerning apprenticeships. To date, there has been a proliferation of publications concerning the beneficial impact of skills and vocational-led apprenticeships. However, limited attention has been directed to non-traditional apprenticeships and even less still within the setting of IFS. This research initiates the process of addressing that gap within an Irish context. This study also adds to the existing apprenticeship discourse regarding issues of gender and social mobility by examining the gendered nature of IFS apprenticeships and well as assessing whether these apprenticeships aid social mobility.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2023-12-22
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-07-2023-0183
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Training of third-party employees and its outcomes: a systematic
           literature review

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      Authors: Mahima Anand, Sushmita Biswal Waraich
      Abstract: Training has been an important tool for enhancing the skills and productivity of employees. Having productive employees helps organizations sustain themselves. Today, the authors organisations have an increasing number of employees on third-party payroll performing core as well as noncore business functions. However, due to the lack of ownership and moral obligation of employers, these employees are often not provided training, resulting in skills obsolesce and less productivity. The present study is a systematic literature review (SLR) on client organizations’ roles in training third-party employees (TPEs) and its related outcomes. The present study is a SLR on client organizations' roles in training TPEs and their related outcomes. Using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) approach, this study presents a review of 217 research papers on training of TPEs and its related outcomes. The study identifies the outcomes of providing training to TPEs and presents the findings and suggestions made by researchers. The study concludes that TPEs are an important investment for the client organization. Training them would benefit the client organization, TPEs and the economy as a whole. The paper also suggests some avenues for future research. This paper tries to answer an important question: What could drive productive behavior among TPEs' Based on the literature reviewed, the answer is that TPEs could be offered training opportunities with a view to enhancing their employability. This could induce, among them, a sense of being valued and supported while contributing to organizational performance and creating a feeling of reciprocal obligation. This is an important contribution to literature. Low investment in these employees affects their employability, i.e. be it in the same organization for another term or another organization and thus the need for training and development, for sustained productivity among TPEs, in organizations. Training and development, for them, would result in enhanced employability within as well as outside the organization. These employees could also be a good source for regular positions within the organization, if required, benefiting both the organization and the employee. Additionally, the economy would also benefit from a pool of skilled workforce. Therefore, it is suggested that governments initiate some policy framework regarding mandatory training of TPEs to increase their competencies, resulting in increased organizational productivity, especially for TPEs at lower and middle levels of management. The paper is an original contribution by the researcher. An attempt has been made to highlight the training needs of TPEs and their related outcomes.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2023-12-18
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-07-2023-0192
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Social entrepreneurship and complex thinking: an exploratory, educational
           innovation proposal for acquiring and scaling competencies

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      Authors: José Carlos Vázquez-Parra, Marco Cruz-Sandoval, Carlos Sotelo, David Sotelo, Martina Carlos-Arroyo, Jorge Welti-Chanes
      Abstract: This article aims to present the results of an exploratory pilot study that demonstrates the validity of a self-created implementation methodology to develop the students' level of perceived achievement of the social entrepreneurship competency and explain how this is equally valid in developing the perceived achievement of the complex thinking competency. Based on a multivariate descriptive statistical analysis, this article offers the results of an educational intervention carried out on a sample group of students from a Mexican university before and after a training program in social entrepreneurship. The favorable results showed that the proposed methodology is valid for scaling social entrepreneurship and complex thinking competencies and their subcompetencies. These results are not only academically valuable, as they highlight the need to delve into the relationship between these two competencies, but they also allow us to appreciate the ample opportunities for practical implementation of entrepreneurship programs by universities and other institutions to work directly with social entrepreneurs and seek alternatives to develop skills through devising, proposing and developing social entrepreneurship projects.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2023-12-18
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-06-2023-0165
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The challenge of skill development through “experiencing” integrated
           marketing communications

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Christina O'Connor, Gillian Moran
      Abstract: Integrated marketing communications (IMC) is possibly “the richest and most accessible service-learning experience” in the marketing curriculum (Petkus, 2000, p. 68). Yet, despite this recognition, scholars and practitioners continue to lament the pronounced theory-practice gap between how IMC is taught and the practice of it in industry (Schultz and Patti, 2009; Kerr and Kelly, 2017). This research embeds IMC practice within a classroom setting and subsequently explores student marketers' perceptions of their skill development through experiential client-based learning. An in-depth qualitative study demonstrates the value of integrating experiential learning within an IMC course, captured through students' reflective practice. Evidence suggests that experiential, client-based projects are suitable for fostering key practice-based skills in the classroom through students “experiencing” IMC at work. However, this is not always easy. In fact, building key skills such as leadership, motivation, communications, organisation and teamwork presents various challenges for students, whilst students appear unaware of other pertinent skills (e.g. persuasion, critical thinking) gained through exposure to “real-world” IMC tasks. Instructors adopting experiential learning in the marketing classroom have an opportunity to actively design tasks to embed key workplace skills to bridge the theory-practice gap. Client-based projects offer fertile ground for students to experience marketing in action whilst ultimately bolstering their confidence in their workplace skills. This research contributes to the marketing education literature and acknowledges the importance of embedding key workplace skills into the contemporary marketing curriculum. An overview of challenges and solutions for instructors seeking to adopt experiential learning via client-based projects in the IMC classroom is presented within this research.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2023-11-27
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-06-2023-0167
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • How entrepreneurial environment and education influence university
           students' entrepreneurial intentions: the mediating role
           of entrepreneurial motivation

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      Authors: Jyoti Chahal, Muhammad Haroon Shoukat, Rami Ayoubi
      Abstract: Underpinned by social cognitive and ecological systems theories, this research explored higher education students' entrepreneurial intentions (EI). It begins by exploring how various factors, including entrepreneurship education (EE), entrepreneurial motivation (EM) and entrepreneurial environment (EENV), contribute to the evolution of EI of students. Second, it examines the role of EM as an underlying mechanism between EE-EI and EENV-EI. Finally, this research explores how EENV moderates the EM and EI relationship. The data were gathered from 366 college students pursuing higher education around India using a convenience sample technique. Partial least square structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) was applied to SmartPLSv.3.3.9 software to analyze the data. A direct relationship was found between EE, EENV and EM with EI. Moreover, this research found a partial mediation of EM between EENV-EI and EE-EI paths. Also, the results show that EENV strengthens the link between EM and EI links. This study offers valuable insights that can guide government agencies and higher education institutions (HEIs) in reshaping the landscape of entrepreneurial education at the university level. This transformation encompasses the integration of work-based learning experiences as a conduit for equipping students with tangible skills and exposing them to the realities of entrepreneurship in the real world. This research considerably contributes to the current literature on entrepreneurship at HEIs by merging social cognitive and ecological systems theories. This research is a pioneering input to examine the underlying mechanism of entrepreneurial motivation between EENV, EE and EI.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2023-11-14
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-10-2022-0206
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Graduate employability skills of business students: the moderating role of
           reflective practices

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      Authors: Esther Asiedu, Ebenezer Malcalm, Afia Nyarko Boakye, Cornelius Kwarkoh Kwarkoh Amoah
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to examine the moderating effect of the reflective practice of business students on how it helps to develop their employability skills through various university strategies. The study employed a simple random sample to select undergraduate level 400 students from the Universities under study (the University of Ghana, University of Professional Studies Ghana, Lancaster University Ghana and Webster University Ghana). Only final-year students with an informed judgement on the reflective practice and various institutional practices to acquire graduate employability skills were participated. The independent variables of the study are institutional strategies (curriculum design, extra curriculum, work-integrated learning, career development centre, university collaboration with the industry, student engagement, internship job placement), the moderator is the reflective practice and the dependent variable of the study is graduate employability. The study found that the moderation role of reflective practice had a significant effect on institutional strategies (extracurriculum, career development centre, university collaboration with the industry, student engagement and internship job placement) and graduate employability. The study was limited to only undergraduate business students from four universities ignoring other disciplines and postgraduate students. The practical implication is that reflective practice must be an integral tool for various universities if they want students to use their strategies to sharpen their employability skills. The social implications of the study emphasise the reflective practice of graduate students in universities. This implies that firms and other institutions must consider reflective practice for the maximum output of their employees. The concept of employability is a bit complex as it concerns many stakeholders of the educational process; the students, academic staff, employers, policymakers and higher education; the private sector; and the government. Although examining students' employability development skills is of great importance, students' reflective practice tends to be overlooked in most studies. Therefore, the focus of this study examines how the reflective practice of graduate students promotes employability through the various university strategies, which had not been considered.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2023-11-06
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-12-2022-0264
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Benefits of a short course on mental health well-being and resilience for
           healthcare workers in South Africa during the COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Maneo Maiketso, Jacqueline Wolvaardt, Margot Uys, Marolien Grobler
      Abstract: The study explored whether an asynchronous short online course in mental health well-being and resilience for healthcare workers (HCWs) showed improved self-reported results among participants during the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. A descriptive cross-sectional study evaluated the course outcomes using the 10-item Connor and Davison's Resilience Scale, the World Health Organization's WHO-five well-being index and self-developed questions. Data were collected via online questionnaires before and after course completion. A total of 1 301 HCWs participated. The highest proportion of participants was from South Africa (SA) (93.7%) and females (78.7%). Analysed mean pre- and post-training scores showed increased scores in all five domains: knowledge, confidence in course outcomes, behaviour, resilience and well-being. Confidence in the course outcomes was the only common significant construct for both well-being and resilience. Mindfulness activities (β = 0.12, 95%CI [0.032, 0.213], p = 0.008) and self-care behaviours (β = 0.14, 95%CI [0.035, 0.241], p = 0.009) were significant predictors of participants' well-being. Coping mechanisms for stress (β = 0.12, 95%CI [0.036, 0.21], p = 0.006) and connecting with a social support network (β = 0.085, 95%CI [0.0007, 0.17], p = 0.048) were significant predictors of participants' resilience. Those working in the private sector, those working in clinical settings and those who were female showed significant associations with well-being and resilience. The results are self-reported data which may be susceptible to social desirability and acquiescent effects. There are no guarantees that positive effects observed during this study are sustained over time. The study sample was selective in that it excluded those who did not consent for the use of their data and those who did not complete the course. The research is noteworthy as literature shows that female HCWs tend to have worse mental health outcomes than males in the same field. Online learning can enable HCWs to conveniently access mental health education, accommodate their work commitments and explore topics that are potentially stigmatising.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2023-10-31
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-11-2022-0247
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Co-designing doctoral programs to enhance postgraduate students'
           employability: insights from industry stakeholders

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      Authors: Raquel María Pérez-García, Amaya Erro-Garcés, Maria Elena Aramendia-Muneta, Antonio López Peláez
      Abstract: Doctoral programs play a crucial role in promoting innovation and technology transfer in universities. To design these programs effectively and with a co-design perspective, it is essential to consider all stakeholders involved in the process, including teachers, students and employers. The main objective of this study is to enhance postgraduate programs to improve students' employability. This empirical study was conducted over a three-year period and employed semi-structured interviews as its primary research methodology. In the first phase, 21 in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with managers from various sectors. The second phase involved 20 interviews, and the final phase of the study included 18 interviews with the same managers from previous phases. The study's main results revealed that the international networks, language proficiency and analytical skills of doctoral students were highly valued by employers. The main findings come from companies with doctoral students. Therefore, the skills were identified during the learning experience of the PhD graduates in the companies. The study's results can guide improvements in postgraduate program curricula and design to enhance students' employability. This research presents a novel approach to its findings. On the one hand, the study's conclusions may provide valuable insights for business agents, encouraging them to hire PhD students. On the other hand, it aims to drive necessary changes that promote more PhD students' focus on non-academic careers, creating significant value for research and innovation in the private sector.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2023-10-30
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-04-2023-0097
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Higher education student engagement with online learning: the role of
           perceived value and academic entitlement

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      Authors: Hussein-Elhakim Al Issa, Mohammed Mispah Said Omar, Ayşem Çelebi
      Abstract: The purpose of the study is to investigate the impact of perceived value and academic entitlement on the online engagement of university students. The mediating effect of technostress inhibitor and teacher behavior between perceived value, entitlement and student engagement was also examined. The study used a quantitative research methodology, with data collected through a survey of 304 undergraduate students from a public university in Bahrain. The findings showed that perceived value and academic entitlement were significant predictors of online student engagement. At the same time, only technostress inhibitor was found to mediate those associations. An unexpected result was entitlement's positive and significant impact on student engagement. University decision-makers are strongly advised to enhance perceived value and support mechanisms for engagement, address technology-related concerns and improve teacher capacity and students' online learning experience. The study makes a distinct contribution by investigating how perceived value, academic entitlement, technostress inhibitors and teacher behavior influence student engagement in the online higher education context.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2023-10-27
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-07-2023-0174
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • EdTech applications and their adoption in Indian education sector–a
           bibliometric analysis and systematic literature review

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      Authors: Vaibhav Aaradhi, Debarun Chakraborty
      Abstract: This research intends to analyse the trend in educational technology (EdTech) over the last 20 years using systematic scientific mapping and bibliometric analysis and how it relates to the Indian context. Considering the anticipated growth in this field over the previous three years post-pandemic, an existing literature analysis is required. This study aims to map the existing intellectual structure in EdTech applications to extend the knowledge base further in this field. This study also intends to research how the Indian education sector compares in terms of the research output for the EdTech sector, considering the increased government focus on online learning as per the education policy in 2020. The study's findings will pave the way for sustainable research that will be extended in the future. Bibliometric analysis is conducted on the manuscripts extracted from Web of Science databases for the last 20 years (from 2003 to 2023). This study uses a descriptive research approach for bibliometric analysis as, by nature, this is an exploratory investigation, and no physical or existing experiment can be performed on the quantification, characteristic or productivity of EdTech applications. VoS Viewer and R software are extensively considered for a detailed bibliometric analysis. E-learning, blended learning and distance education emerged as the most frequently used keywords. The results reveal that technology adoption, higher education, technology and modelling are the most researched topics in this field. This research is limited to the last 20 years' database obtained from the Web of Science database and limited to educational, management and operation databases only. The paper intends to analyse the global scenario of EdTech research and ensures that the paper will effectively connect with researchers, educators, policymakers and practitioners from different parts of the world. The results derived from the bibliometric analysis, cluster analysis and identification of key authors, journals and countries can contribute towards the improved contribution in this area. The paper discusses the research in EdTech over the last two decades and effectively tries to bridge the gap in global research. Integrating systematic scientific mapping and bibliometric analysis is an innovative way to assess the growth and impact of EdTech. Considering the post-pandemic scenario and the government's emphasis on online learning, these are consistent with current developments.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2023-10-23
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-09-2022-0192
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Individual stories of agency: an exploratory study into the pandemic
           impact on students' employability skills

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Huong Lan Nguyen
      Abstract: This paper aims to investigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on university students' employability skills and give insights into preparation for future crises that may happen. Employing an interpretative phenomenological approach with the frame of social cognitive theory, the current study examined the changes in environmental, behavioral and personal elements of human functioning for employability skills being affected by the conditions during the pandemic. Findings based on ten in-depth semi-structured interviews with students at universities in Vietnam highlighted that the global pandemic performed as both challenge and an opportunity for employability skills development, yet the extent to which the students can benefit from the new studying conditions attributed to each individual's initiatives in taking advantages of resources and acting against difficulties. Whether the pandemic became a hindrance or a motivation for students' employability skills to develop and whether students effectively utilized an agency to overcome challenges and improved their skills after the pandemic have not yet been investigated. This study added to the body of literature regarding self-regulated learners by demonstrating agency in the learning process as well as how to manage careers and improve employability skills by making use of resources in disconnected settings.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2023-10-23
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-05-2023-0111
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • A profile of core workplace skills in developing countries: utilizing
           PIAAC datasets

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      Authors: Xiao Xu
      Abstract: Utilizing datasets of Ecuador, Hungary, Kazakhstan, Mexico and Peru from the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies survey from 2017 to 2018, this study aimed to develop and validate a profile indicating core workplace skills in developing countries. DeVellis' guide of scale development navigated the development of the profile. Multiple techniques including item analysis, exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis and multigroup confirmatory factor analysis were used on a sample of 7,166 participants to validate the profile of core workplace skills in developing countries. A resultant five-dimensional profile with 18 items was developed: oral communication skills, reading skills, math skills, information and communication technology skills and learning skills. The estimates of composite reliability showed the profile was reliable. The validity estimates of the profile were obtained from several sources including content, convergent, discriminative and construct validity. The measurement invariance was also held for the profile. Based on the researcher's knowledge, the study is the first attempt to develop a profile to indicate core workplace skills in developing countries. The profile theoretically framed the core workplace skills in developing countries and provides a new measure for identifying, evaluating and thus improving core workplace skills in developing countries for different stakeholders in the era of Education 4.0.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2023-10-11
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-09-2022-0184
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The evolution of the service-learning methodology as a university social
           responsibility strategy that generates shared value: a Latin American
           experience

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      Authors: Julianna Paola Ramirez Lozano, Leslie Bridshaw Araya, Renato Peñaflor Guerra
      Abstract: The study analyzed how the service-learning (SL) methodology can become a university social responsibility (USR) strategy that generates shared value for the university and its stakeholders. This qualitative and exploratory–descriptive research had a nonexperimental field and cross-sectional design that used field techniques such as focus groups and in-depth interviews with the participants of the USR program “MIPyME vs COVID-19” in two Latin American countries. This study revealed the perceptions of students who participated in the USR program on how a virtual service-learning (vSL) strategy related to the use of technology generates a positive impact on the development of shared learning between students and micro-entrepreneurs from a global and Latin American perspective, as well as for the internationalization of their study plans. The field study was conducted in only two Latin American countries; however, the USR program has been implemented in eight universities from eight Latin American countries with very similar social, political and health contexts. It is one of the first studies on SL used in a strategic and articulated way in universities with a USR approach. It analyzed traditional evaluations of this methodology, incorporating others such as virtuality (produced by the effects of the COVID-19), which led the authors to generate methodological innovations based on new ways of connecting, linking and generating shared learning and value for all.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2023-10-11
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-10-2022-0214
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Can people with disabilities obtain income by using skills learned from
           vocational trainings' Evidence from mainland China

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      Authors: Wei Li, Tianran Ni, Yi Zhang, Daan Wang, Salvador Parrado
      Abstract: This study aims to examine the effects of vocational training programs for people with disabilities on their income. It conducted a multinomial regression analysis of 10,469 survey responses from 31 provincial administrative areas in mainland China. It finds the following antecedents all influence the trainees’ self-reported income, including their perception of the quality of the program, the training subject, the degree of consistency between their current job and this subject, their employment sector, their motivation and access to training resources and the geographical location of the program. The findings are not representative of people with disabilities across mainland China because the respondents were not randomly sampled. The findings suggest that to increase the income of people with disabilities, the training can be designed according to the needs of employers by teaching subjects relevant to the needs of the labor market, reaching out to motivated trainees and enhancing the quality of training. Training institutions, employers and governments are recommended to work together to integrate class-based learning with workplace-based learning and practices. More training resources can be devoted to the self-employed people with disabilities or those who operate in the informal sector and are in less-developed areas. The improvement of employment opportunities and income of people with disabilities supports the safeguarding of their social economic rights and the building of an inclusive society. Few studies have empirically explored and explained the effects of vocational training programs on people with disabilities’ income. This article fills this gap by assessing the performance of China's vocational training programs funded by the Federation of Disabled Persons at all levels.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2023-10-10
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-02-2023-0027
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Serial multiple mediation of career adaptability and self-perceived
           employability in the relationship between career competencies and job
           search self-efficacy

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      Authors: Merve Gerçek
      Abstract: This study aims to explore the relationships between career competencies and job search self-efficacy via the serial multiple mediation effect of career adaptability and self-perceived employability within multiple theoretical frameworks. This study adopts a cross-sectional design to collect data at a specific point in time and employs self-report questionnaires to collect data from participants. In total, 302 students from the “management and organization department” in a vocational school of a public university completed the survey forms. To test the hypothesized model, a serial multiple mediation analysis was performed using structural equation modeling (SEM) via SPSS (Statistical Package for Social Sciences) AMOS (Analysis of Moment Structures). The results indicated that career competencies, career adaptability, job search self-efficacy and self-perceived employability all had significant and positive relationships. Additionally, the relationship between career competencies and job search self-efficacy was serially mediated by career adaptability and self-perceived employability as anticipated. Considering the growing importance of the subject of how universities might better prepare their graduates for the job market, the study's findings have important policy implications. University students should also be provided with career management resources, specifically adaptation resources, to help them navigate their individual characteristics and transfer more successfully into the existing job market. This is the cause of the need for constant planning, adaptation, assessment and evaluation of career competencies in current labor markets. The study contributes to international career development and vocational education research by filling a gap in the literature by demonstrating that job search self-efficacy, which is a predictor of job search behavior, can be promoted by career competencies, career adaptability and self-perceived employability. These findings are particularly significant because they highlight the importance of career-related knowledge, skills and abilities in engaging university students seeking employment in a developing country with a highly competitive labor market.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2023-10-10
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-02-2023-0036
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Promoting sustainable learning among accounting students: evidence from
           field experimental design

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      Authors: Noor Ul Hadi, Assim Ibrhaim Abdel-Razzaq
      Abstract: Several studies have attempted to explain the integration of sustainable development in business school curricula. However, little is known about who (male students vs female students), at which age (under 21, 21–25 and 26–30) and at which stage of their undergraduate education (freshman, junior or senior) can attain and retain an adequate understanding of sustainability in accounting education. For this reason, the present study aims to investigate the students' interest in sustainability in accounting with respect to their demographic factors. The study used a quantitative research design where data were collected at a single point in time. Further, an independent sample t-test, one-way ANOVA and factorial design were performed on 132 responses conveniently collected from accounting students in the College of Business Administration (COBA) at Prince Mohammad Bin Fahd University (PMU) in Al Khobar, Saudi Arabia. The study found no differences between the attitudes of male and female students toward sustainability in accounting education. Similarly, no statistical differences were found in the three age categories identified in this study. However, significant results were found throughout the different academic classifications (seniority): freshman students, junior students and senior students. Further, differences in the mean scores for freshman and junior accounting students were different between the male and female students, indicating that both male and female senior students' attitudes toward sustainability in accounting education were higher than those of male and female freshman and junior accounting students. The study concluded that students achieve an adequate understanding of sustainability in accounting education related to the relativism category of the Perry model of intellectual development. Literature on attitude of students toward sustainability in education, specifically accounting education, is questionable and needs further exploration. This is due to the fact that only a small number of accounting students have been exposed to sustainable accounting education. Similarly, a recent study found a significant deficiency in sustainable accounting education in four Saudi Arabian universities, with only 4.5% of respondents knowing the comprehensive definition of sustainable development and 88% respondents having very low to low familiarity with the term sustainability.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2023-10-09
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-03-2023-0058
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Collaborative governance for aviation approved training organisation: an
           adapted model for multi-stakeholder collaboration

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      Authors: Oke Hendra, Benny Kurnianto, Ika Endrawijaya
      Abstract: This study aimed to develop an adapted collaborative governance model for aviation human resource development in Indonesia's approved training organisations (ATO), considering the expected changes in the industry due to advanced technologies. The model, based on Ansell and Gash's approach, emphasizes multi-stakeholder collaboration to ensure workforce development aligns with industry and regulatory standards and accommodates technological advancements. Qualitative methods, such as in-depth interviews and focus group discussions, were employed to collect and analyse data. The results indicated that collaborative governance is a valuable tool for cultivating competent human resources and facilitating industry improvement in the face of rapid technological change. The proposed model contributes significantly to the field by promoting inclusive and effective human resource development through the Centre for Aviation Human Resource Development (CAHRD), thereby preparing the Indonesian aviation industry for the impact of advanced technologies. Furthermore, this study contributes to the enhancement of Ansell and Gash's collaborative governance theoretical framework by effectively addressing its empirical gaps concerning vocational education and training challenges within Indonesia's air transportation sector.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2023-10-05
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-06-2023-0164
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Digital wellbeing – a review of the JISC guidance from
           the UK and Vietnam

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      Authors: Scott Foster, Trang Ly Thien, Anna Jayne Foster, Thi Hanh Tien Ho, Sarah Knight
      Abstract: The aim of this paper is to contribute to the discussion of wellbeing within the university education system by outlining the key issues and benefits and recognising future research on digital well-being for students. The JISC Digital wellbeing paper highlights the many positive and negative impacts associated with digital wellbeing. This paper explores how some of these features have been considered within institutions within the UK and Vietnam and highlights the emerging research in one Vietnamese institution in relation to student wellbeing, where digital wellbeing was identified as a key concern. This is a technical review article which summarises key guidance for organisational digital wellbeing and then reflects on the application in the UK (a developed economy) and in Vietnam (one of the fastest growing economies). This is the first time a review has been conducted from the perspective of different countries. There are two aspects to digital wellbeing, individual and the social or organisational perspectives. The JISC Digital wellbeing paper highlights the many positive and negative impacts associated with digital wellbeing. This paper explores how some of these features have been considered within institutions within the UK and Vietnam and highlights the emerging research in one Vietnamese institution in relation to student wellbeing, where digital wellbeing was identified as a key concern. The context of digital wellbeing within higher education is then discussed drawing similarities between the UK and Vietnamese student experiences whilst acknowledging the limitations of current research within the field. Many institutions have seen a rise in the number of wellbeing challenges, and there are few examples of specific initiatives aimed at addressing digital wellbeing challenges for their stakeholders. Existing research on students' wellbeing is predominately focused on undergraduate students and does not differentiate between undergraduate and postgraduate students, nor between masters, doctoral and professional level students and does not explore the impact of digital wellbeing discretely; this is an area which would benefit from future research.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2023-09-26
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-04-2023-0099
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Adaptive learning through technology: a technical review and
           implementation

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      Authors: Clay Gransden, Matthew Hindmarsh, Ngoc Chi Lê, Thi-Huyen Nguyen
      Abstract: There is an increase globally of students using technology to support their learning. The purpose of this paper is to outline the technical aspects of adaptive learning and contribute to the development of pedagogy that incorporates this method in teaching and learning. This is a technical review article that summarises key guidance on the application of adaptive learning and then reflects on its application in a UK and Vietnamese context. Initial analysis demonstrates that learning can occur asynchronously because of students engaging with adaptive learning. Issues and recommendations were derived from the reflections and practice of both UK and Vietnamese practitioners. Recommendations focussed on the more practical elements of constructing and maintaining adaptive learning. Questions were then constructed to make the decision of whether to implement adaptive learning into teaching and learning practices. This academic commentary reflects on the implementation of asynchronous learning adaptive technologies in both the UK and Vietnam, specifically exploring the use of a “mastery path” and “computerised adaptive testing” to enhance student understanding.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2023-09-25
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-05-2023-0121
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Comparison of requirements of graduates entering employment in Vysočina
           Region and region Upper Austria

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      Authors: Kateřina Berková, Dagmar Frendlovská, Martina Kuncová, Robert Füreder, Margarethe Überwimmer
      Abstract: Currently, owing to the influence of rapid globalisation, the issue of international and cross-cultural implementation of cross-cultural relationships is being widely discussed. This is also related to the readiness of graduates for international cooperation. The objective of this qualitative study is to identify and compare the requirements of company representatives from the Czech Republic – the Vysocina Region and Austria (Region Upper Austria) regarding the readiness of graduates to entering the workforce and the intercultural differences between the relevant regions. A total of 20 Czech and Austrian companies from the relevant regions participated in the research. The results were obtained through in-depth guided interviews and a comparative method. The qualitative study has theoretical implications in the context of new findings in the field of research. It contributes to the knowledge relating to the preparation of graduates for entering the workforce, and in the context of intercultural development, it extends this knowledge with the identified weaknesses of the mentioned preparation at the level of Czech or Austrian education. The most effective and probable approach to enhance the development of cross-cultural competences in particular appears to be the integration of new techniques and content of education in the form of new subjects in cooperation with academics and practitioners from the particular country. Collaboration with these experts can build students' knowledge and skills from an intercultural environment to the highest degree possible.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2023-09-14
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-02-2023-0034
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • An interpretive phenomenological analysis of nursing student perceptions
           of summative assessment feedback using LEGO® Serious Play®

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      Authors: Benjamin Ajibade, Catherine Hayes
      Abstract: The aim of the study is to explore perceptions of the impact of assessment feedback by international undergraduate nursing students. Research to date indicates that summative assessment feedback may impact significantly on student achievement but if it is undertaken sub optimally or does not provide students with the opportunity to engage with the process and reflexively respond, it can also be exceptionally damaging to the learning experience. A scoping exercise of overall student feedback experience was initially collated via the adoption of an Interpretive Phenomenological Approach (IPA). Participants were recruited via purposive sampling and the LEGO® Serious Play® method was used to collect data. Analysis with Quirkos software was used to examine the salience as well as commonality of findings as an integral part of a recognised five-step thematic analytical approach. Feedback was perceived, by students, as significantly impacting factor in relation to their overall progression, attainment and retention rates. Themes generated from the findings evidenced student perceptions that summative feedback is a positive driver and source of motivation for academic success and progression. It was perceived that levels of attainment were related to the clarity, quality and individualised nature of feedback that students received and that this was perceived to be evident in their final grades. These were accompanied by perceptions that feedback clarity also determined the potential of breaking down perceived student barriers to learning, their perceived capacity for effective assignment planning and preparation and the likelihood of them having any positive collective or individual interpersonal relationships with their tutors. Summarised, students perceived that feedback ought to lead to student empowerment in managing their studies and as such it ought to be clear, straightforward and non-ambiguous. The methodological design of the study means that generalisability from its findings was never intended or possible. However, there may be the potential transferability of findings to similar institutions and contexts of nurse education with students who have similar demographic profiling. The study was also a means of providing an insight into the lived experience of students which could be used in the prospective adaptation of feedback mechanisms for staff at a local level within Higher Education. The study reveals the perceived impact of gamification as a mechanism of summative assessment as conveyed by a designated group of students. Whilst specific recommendations for change can only be made within the context specificity of the research, there may be aspects of the findings which are potentially transferable to other similar contexts of Higher Education delivery whose pedagogical approaches mirror those in operation at the institution where the research was undertaken. It became apparent that the standardisation of feedback approaches offered many opportunities to improve existing systems. The issue of monitoring workloads is also of significance in terms of the level and degree of summative assessment and feedback that academic staff can undertake. The study revealed the perceived magnitude of assessment feedback on progression, attainment and retention rates, alongside the perceived need for a universal feedback template and the opportunity to provide audio-video feedback. This study adds to existing knowledge in the field of pedagogic practice about both the execution of LEGO® Serious Play® as a research methodology and why the perceptions of feedback as articulated and illuminated by a group of contemporary nursing students ought to matter in the context of Higher Education.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2023-09-07
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-09-2022-0188
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Disparities in work-integrated learning experiences for students who
           present as women: an international study of biases, barriers, and
           challenges

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      Authors: Tracey Bowen, Maureen T.B. Drysdale, Sarah Callaghan, Sally Smith, Kristina Johansson, Colin Smith, Barbara Walsh, Tessa Berg
      Abstract: This study identifies gendered disparities among women students participating in work-integrated learning and explores the effects of the disparities on their perceptions on perceived opportunities, competencies, sense of belonging, and professional identity. A series of semi-structured focus groups were run with 59 participants at six higher education institutions in four countries (Australia, Canada, Sweden, United Kingdom). All focus groups were designed with the same questions and formatting. Thematic analysis of the transcripts revealed two overarching themes, namely perceptions of self and interactions with others in work placements. Theme categories included awareness of self-presentation, sense of autonomy, perceived Allies, emotional labour, barriers to opportunity, sense of belonging, intersections of identity, and validation value. This study fills an important gap in the international literature about gendered experiences in WIL and highlights inequalities that women experience while on work placements.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2023-09-05
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-05-2023-0115
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Ghana's textile and apparel sector: a strategic assessment of skills needs
           and development through the STED framework

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      Authors: Hod Anyigba, Alexander Preko, William Kwesi Senayah
      Abstract: This study is to examine and develop sector skills strategies and action plans for the textile and apparel (T&A) sector. The paper used a participatory action qualitative method anchored on the Skills for Trade and Economic Diversification (STED) framework, utilising the workshop-based approach with 24 key stakeholders of the sector. Content analysis was used with the help of Nvivo software. The findings revealed that there are skills shortages, skills gaps, skills mismatches and skills diversification programmes available through higher education and work-based learning. Further, there are labour supply challenges such as national skills policy and strategy, government and stakeholder coordination, funding, relevance of curriculum and qualifications, access to practicals and the absence of a clear national vision for the sector. This study possesses an inherent limitation in terms of generalising the findings derived from qualitative research. This research is among the first of its kind to assess skills needs and gaps through the lens of STED framework, which has been overlooked in previous literature. Importantly, this study provides vocational insights into skill needs in the sector.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2023-08-25
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-12-2022-0290
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Student engagement through teamwork skills: the mediating role of
           psychological well-being

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      Authors: Sheela Bhargava, Renu Sharma
      Abstract: The study aims to examine the mediating effect of psychological well-being (PWB) on the relationship between teamwork skills and student engagement (SE) in higher education institutional setups. The study used a triangulation mixed-methods approach. Data were collected from final-year students pursuing post-graduation and graduation in private colleges in India. In the main study, quantitative data was gathered from 276 students through a survey. The relationship among the variables-teamwork skills, SE and PWB was empirically validated through path analysis; mediation was also conducted. In the auxiliary study, qualitative data was gathered through focus group sessions and was analyzed using thematic analysis. Results depicted that teamwork skills positively predict students' engagement with their academic program. Additionally, PWB partially mediates the relationship between teamwork skills and SE. The study was conducted to expand understanding of aspects related to promoting students' engagement in HEIs in Delhi and Haryana through being attentive toward teamwork skills development and through taking care of students' PWB.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2023-08-21
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-06-2022-0126
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Drivers of strengthening university–industry collaboration: implications
           for favorable outcomes

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      Authors: Md Aktar Kamal, Souman Guha, Noor Nahar Begum, Md Abu Taher
      Abstract: The purpose of the study was to examine the factors that are important for strengthening university–industry collaboration (UIC). This study also investigates the outcome of UIC in the light of creativity, skill, knowledge, and research work. A survey method has been used to collect data for the study. This study applied a purposive judgmental sampling technique where particular types of respondents like university faculty members and the top officials of the organizations were selected who are knowledgeable and can provide the desired information. The current study used the structural equation modeling method to analyze the data. In the first stage, this research assessed the demographic factors of the respondent. Then this study conducts confirmatory factors analysis and convergent and discriminant validity and reliability test. Finally, the hypotheses are tested by using nonparametric. This study finds that knowledge transfer mechanism, governmental factors, organizational design factors, technology transfer and the collaborative network has a significant impact on strengthening UIC, which ultimately facilitates creativity, knowledge creation, skills development and supply of graduate according to the requirement of the industry, good research work. The current study identified some important determinant that has a substantial influence on strengthening UIC. According to the study organizational design, government, technology, collaborative network and mechanism for knowledge transfer play very crucial roles in strengthening collaboration that ultimately increases the creativity, skills, knowledge and research capability of graduates.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2023-08-21
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-10-2019-0151
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Health professions’ perspective on emergency remote education

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      Authors: Cleide Gisele Ribeiro, Plinio dos Santos Ramos, Raimundo Nonato Bechara, Juliano Machado de Oliveira, Erika Bicalho de Almeida, Soraida Sozzi Miguel, Djalma Rabelo Ricardo, Rodrigo Guerra de Oliveira
      Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic has created a significant disruption in the educational systems worldwide. Some institutions opted for emergency remote education due to the need to cancel in-person activities. The aims of this paper were to evaluate the use of asynchronous methodology in health sciences education, determine whether asynchronous methodology was sacrificing overall student satisfaction, and investigate whether satisfaction improved as the program develops. Initially, there was phase 1 that corresponded to four weeks of activities. Each professor produced a video lesson, and after each video lesson, a weekly educational activity was made available. Next, phase 2 was implemented using the same methodology, however lasting six weeks. Three questionnaires were developed, and a Likert scale was administered to verify the students’ level of satisfaction. Data were analyzed using frequency distributions, mean values, standard deviation and confidence interval. The normality of the sum data (total of the questionnaires) was tested using the Kolmogorov–Smirnov test. Although the students pointed out that the asynchronous methodology facilitated access to the content and considered this methodology satisfactory, they expressed a reduced level of satisfaction regarding emergency remote education in general when data from the first weeks were compared to those of the previous weeks. It is clear that students became increasingly discouraged and tired over time, which motivated the institution to shift into a combination of synchronous and asynchronous methodology to improve student learning. Teaching in the field of health care encompasses difficult competencies that sometimes are impossible to be learned remotely, so there is a need to examine and evaluate properly the remote education in this area. With careful planning, educational institutions can evaluate their experiences during the pandemic, allowing those involved to highlight strengths and identify weaknesses to better prepare for future needs to improve remote education.
      Citation: Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning
      PubDate: 2023-08-16
      DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-01-2023-0019
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
 
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  Subjects -> EDUCATION (Total: 2309 journals)
    - ADULT EDUCATION (24 journals)
    - COLLEGE AND ALUMNI (10 journals)
    - E-LEARNING (38 journals)
    - EDUCATION (1959 journals)
    - HIGHER EDUCATION (140 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS (4 journals)
    - ONLINE EDUCATION (42 journals)
    - SCHOOL ORGANIZATION (14 journals)
    - SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATION (40 journals)
    - TEACHING METHODS AND CURRICULUM (38 journals)

HIGHER EDUCATION (140 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 142 of 142 Journals sorted alphabetically
+E Revista de Extensión Universitaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Academic Leadership Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 38)
Academic Leadership Journal in Student Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
African Journal of Teacher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
AISHE-J: The All Ireland Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Ámbito Investigativo     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Engineering Education     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Arab Journal For Quality Assurance in Higher Education     Open Access  
Arquivos do Museu Dinâmico Interdisciplinar     Open Access  
Asian Association of Open Universities Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
AUDEM : The International Journal of Higher Education and Democracy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Aula Universitaria     Open Access  
Bangladesh Journal of Medical Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Campus Virtuales     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Canadian Medical Education Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Perspectives on Academic Integrity     Open Access  
Chronicle of Higher Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
College Student Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Critical Studies in Teaching and Learning (CriSTaL)     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Educate~     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Educational Research in Medical Sciences Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
EDUMECENTRO     Open Access  
ENGEVISTA     Open Access  
Enhancing Learning in the Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Ethiopian Journal of Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
European Journal of Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Excellence in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 45)
Extensión en red     Open Access  
Formación Universitaria     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Higher Education Evaluation and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Higher Education for the Future     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Higher Education of Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Higher Education Pedagogies     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Higher Education Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 68)
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Higher Learning Research Communications     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Högre utbildning     Open Access  
Informing Faculty (IF)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ingeniería Mecánica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Innovation in Teaching and Learning in Information and Computer Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Integración y Conocimiento     Open Access  
International Journal for Educational Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for Students as Partners     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of African Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Doctoral Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Educational Technology in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 36)
International Journal of Engineering Pedagogy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 63)
International Journal of Higher Education and Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Kinesiology in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of STEM Education     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of the First Year in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Research in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Interpreter and Translator Trainer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
ISAA Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J3eA     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Jesuit Higher Education : A Journal     Open Access  
Journal for Education in the Built Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal for the Study of Postsecondary and Tertiary Education     Open Access  
Journal of Academic Writing     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Advanced Academics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Journal of Biomedical Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Collective Bargaining in the Academy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of College Counseling     Partially Free   (Followers: 4)
Journal of College Teaching & Learning     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Community Engagement and Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Critical Scholarship on Higher Education and Student Affairs     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Nursing Education and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Perspectives in Applied Academic Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Praxis in Higher Education : JPHE     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Problem Based Learning in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Science and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Service-Learning in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Student Affairs in Africa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Student Engagement : Education Matters     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Student Financial Aid     Open Access  
Journal of Teacher Education for Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Teaching and Learning for Graduate Employability     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Technology and Science Education     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of the European Honors Council     Open Access  
Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 47)
Journal of Veterinary Medical Education     Partially Free   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Women and Gender in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Kentucky Journal of Excellence in College Teaching and Learning     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Kentucky Journal of Higher Education Policy and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Land Forces Academy Review     Open Access  
Maine Policy Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Makerere Journal of Higher Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Marketing Education Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Marketing of Scientific and Research Organizations     Open Access  
Medical Teacher     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Merrill Series on The Research Mission of Public Universities     Open Access  
National Teaching & Learning Forum The     Hybrid Journal  
Nauka i Szkolnictwo Wyższe     Open Access  
New Directions for Student Leadership     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Nordic Journal of Information Literacy in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Nursing Education Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
OUSL Journal     Open Access  
Papers in Postsecondary Learning and Teaching     Open Access  
Pedagogia Social. Revista Interuniversitaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pédagogie Médicale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Perspectiva Educacional     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Planet     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Policy Reviews in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Practical Assessment, Research, and Evaluation     Open Access  
PRISM : A Journal of Regional Engagement     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Prompt : A Journal of Academic Writing Assignments     Open Access  
Recherche & formation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Recruiting & Retaining Adult Learners     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Research Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Research Integrity and Peer Review     Open Access  
Revista d'Innovació Docent Universitària     Open Access  
Revista de Ensino em Artes, Moda e Design     Open Access  
Revista de la Universidad de La Salle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Revista Digital de Investigación en Docencia Universitaria     Open Access  
Revista Electronica Interuniversitaria de Formacion del Profesorado     Open Access  
Revista Gestão Universitária na América Latina - GUAL     Open Access  
Revista Interuniversitaria de Formacion de Profesorado     Open Access  
RT. A Journal on Research Policy and Evaluation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
RU&SC. Revista de Universidad y Sociedad del Conocimiento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Strategic Enrollment Management Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Student Engagement in Higher Education Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Student Journal of Professional Practice and Academic Research     Open Access  
Student Success : A journal exploring the experiences of students in tertiary education     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Summer Academe : A Journal of Higher Education     Open Access  
Tartu Ülikooli ajaloo küsimusi     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Teaching and Learning Inquiry     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
The Qualitative Report     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transformation in Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Trayectorias Universitarias     Open Access  
Triple Helix     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Uniped     Open Access  
Universidad en Diálogo : Revista de Extensión     Open Access  
Universidades     Open Access  
Widening Participation and Lifelong Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Women in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Университетское управление: практика и анализ     Open Access  

           

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