Subjects -> BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (Total: 3570 journals)
    - ACCOUNTING (132 journals)
    - BANKING AND FINANCE (306 journals)
    - BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (1248 journals)
    - CONSUMER EDUCATION AND PROTECTION (20 journals)
    - COOPERATIVES (4 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SCIENCES: GENERAL (212 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SYSTEMS, THEORIES AND HISTORY (235 journals)
    - FASHION AND CONSUMER TRENDS (20 journals)
    - HUMAN RESOURCES (103 journals)
    - INSURANCE (26 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE (145 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND AID (103 journals)
    - INVESTMENTS (22 journals)
    - LABOR AND INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS (61 journals)
    - MACROECONOMICS (17 journals)
    - MANAGEMENT (595 journals)
    - MARKETING AND PURCHASING (116 journals)
    - MICROECONOMICS (23 journals)
    - PRODUCTION OF GOODS AND SERVICES (143 journals)
    - PUBLIC FINANCE, TAXATION (37 journals)
    - TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL DIRECTORIES (2 journals)

PUBLIC FINANCE, TAXATION (37 journals)

Showing 1 - 35 of 35 Journals sorted alphabetically
American Economic Journal : Economic Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 164)
Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Annual Review of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Antitrust Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Australian Journal of Public Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 214)
BMC Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 126)
Canadian Public Policy / Analyse de Politiques     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Corporate Governance International Journal of Business in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Current Issues in Auditing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Economics of Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Financial Internet Quarterly     Open Access  
Governance : An International Journal of Policy, Administration and Institutions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
HOLISTICA ? Journal of Business and Public Administration     Open Access  
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Corporate Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Disclosure and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Organization Theory and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Accounting and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Applied Sciences in Accounting, Finance, and Tax     Open Access  
Journal of Business Thought     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Management and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Monetary Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 95)
Journal of Public Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Public Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 76)
Journal of Public Economics Plus     Open Access  
Journal of Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Jurnal Akuntansi dan Perpajakan     Open Access  
Public Integrity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Public Money & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Public Understanding of Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.262
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 7  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2045-2101 - ISSN (Online) 2045-211X
Published by Emerald Homepage  [360 journals]
  • In search of a fertile entrepreneurial landscape: how to keep it on the
           level

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Victor V. Claar
      Abstract: Recent analysis suggests entrepreneurship is in decline. If so, some argue that the appropriate policy response is to devote even further government intervention to nurture both fledgling ventures as well as entirely new undertakings, lamenting the fact that much current economic policy caters to already-successful firms – thereby creating a decision-making environment that stacks the deck against would-be entrepreneurs. While it is indeed true that entrepreneurial ventures lead to value creation over time, this paper argues that the answer to any slowdown in entrepreneurship is not to add even more policy Band-Aids to an already broken system of carve-outs, exemptions, subsidies and tax breaks. Instead the solution to bad policy is to unwind bad policy that favors Goliaths over Davids, thereby creating a level playing field for all. Any attempt to use government initiatives to spur entrepreneurship will, over the longer term, only serve to distort the economic outcomes society would have observed as the product of a system of rule-of-law, clearly defined and enforced property rights and freely functioning markets that permit entrepreneurs, investors, consumers and savers to make the most sensible choices available to them. This essay cites fundamental pieces of existing entrepreneurial research to make its argument. Rather than adding even more policy initiatives to address any slowdown in entrepreneurship, policymakers should aspire to create the most fertile environment possible to foster entrepreneurial activity. Adding more policies on top of existing ones presumes to know which policies are better than others. Even when perceived as neutral, policy incentives cannot improve upon the outcomes of the unseen price system. This paper reminds readers that entrepreneurship is vital to economic flourishing, while reminding readers that even policy actions presumed to be beneficial likely bear unintended consequences because they bring their own disruptions to the decision-making environment.
      Citation: Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy
      PubDate: 2022-03-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JEPP-02-2022-0028
      Issue No: Vol. 11 , No. 1 (2022)
       
  • The need for new public policies to increase entrepreneurship and spur
           economic growth

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Robert P. Singh
      Abstract: The purpose of this viewpoint paper is to bring attention to the declining rate of entrepreneurship, its effect on the broader economy, the need for public policy solutions and to offer several such solutions. Government intervention is needed to address the stagnation trends discussed throughout the paper. It is up to academic scholars, researchers and think tanks to make government leaders aware of the trends and possible solutions. A literature review was performed and the need to increase entrepreneurship through public policies was discussed. The current ten-year economic expansion is suffering from secular stagnation as a result of diminishing new venture creation and slower adoption of technological innovations. Economic policies are heavily tilted toward large, established firms even as new entrepreneurial ventures have greater impact on job creation. The importance of using public policies to spur economic growth through greater opportunity-based entrepreneurship is discussed. Unique tax policy changes are suggested as well as a proposed national business plan competition. This paper makes a contribution to the entrepreneurship and public policy literature by discussing how the declining rate of entrepreneurship and slower adoption of new technology are related to the relatively tepid pace of economic expansion seen over the last decade in the US. The proposed policies focus on increasing new ventures based on opportunity-based entrepreneurship, and it is hoped that this will help in the development of other policies and spur new lines of research and knowledge that lead to increased economic growth.
      Citation: Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy
      PubDate: 2022-02-18
      DOI: 10.1108/JEPP-08-2019-0067
      Issue No: Vol. 11 , No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Private healthcare entrepreneurship in a free-access public health system:
           what was the impact of COVID-19 public policies in Greece'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nikolaos Apostolopoulos , Panagiotis Liargovas , Pantelis Sklias , Ilias Makris , Sotiris Apostolopoulos
      Abstract: This paper aims to examine whether private healthcare entrepreneurship can flourish and overcome obstacles in cases of a free-access public health system and periods of strict public policies, such as the COVID-19 pandemic. Moreover, the paper aims to illuminate the wider social role of private healthcare entrepreneurship during the COVID-19 pandemic. This paper adopts a qualitative methodological strategy through 12 in-depth semi-structured interviews with the owners of diagnostic centres located in small Greek towns. Private healthcare entrepreneurship flourished and played a significantly positive social role in the context of a degraded public health sector, which lacked investments for more than ten years and was further depleted by its recent focus on COVID-19 incidents. This paper reveals that although public policies that aimed to deal with COVID-19 produced serious consequences, business activity adapted to the new circumstances. Future research can combine the findings of this paper with the views of stakeholders, policymakers and social actors. This paper's value lies in its efforts to expand our current knowledge regarding the impact of COVID-19 public policies on entrepreneurship.
      Citation: Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy
      PubDate: 2022-02-17
      DOI: 10.1108/JEPP-03-2021-0029
      Issue No: Vol. 11 , No. 1 (2022)
       
  • The impact of the institutional environment on entrepreneurial activity:
           an analysis of developing and developed countries

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lucas Pereira de Mello , Gustavo Hermínio Salati Marcondes de Moraes , Bruno Brandão Fischer
      Abstract: Entrepreneurship can be understood as a systemic phenomenon, thus relying on sets of influential factors associated with socioeconomic contexts. Institutional conditions play a pivotal role in this regard, affecting the allocation of entrepreneurial efforts. The goal of this research is to verify to what extent do the pillars of Countries' Institutional Profiles – regulatory, cognitive and normative – affect both the prevalence and quality of entrepreneurship, assessing the differences between developing and developed countries both in total entrepreneurial activity and in the following qualitative frames: innovation rate, high job creation expectations and motivational index. The authors’ assessment uses data from the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) with a longitudinal approach for 112 countries over the period 2003–2019. Dynamic panel data regressions are applied. By comparing developing and developed countries, findings highlight that institutional effects are heterogeneous among developing and developed countries, with informal institutions being more relevant for developing countries than formal ones. Also, using a broad range of institutional indicators, the authors’ assessment indicated that the association between institutional conditions and productive entrepreneurship seems to be far more intricate than argued by theoretical literature. The authors’ findings indicate the need for developing countries to address formal institutional voids in order to generate more effective conditions for productive entrepreneurship to emerge. Following prior literature, this can have systemic impacts on trajectories for economic growth and development. The originality of this research consists in using a longitudinal and integrative approach to compare institutional effects on different types of entrepreneurship, as well as comparing these effects in countries at different stages of development.
      Citation: Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy
      PubDate: 2022-02-09
      DOI: 10.1108/JEPP-09-2021-0113
      Issue No: Vol. 11 , No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Give me your rested, your wealthy, your educated few' A critical
           discussion of the current literature on immigrant self-employment

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Joshua K. Bedi , Shaomeng Jia
      Abstract: The finding that immigrants are more likely to self-employ than natives has been consistently shown by different researchers. At the same time, many call for the prioritization of high-skilled immigration as they believe low-skilled entrepreneurs are not particularly innovative or high-growth-oriented. The purpose of this study is to critically review and synthesize the current literature on immigrant self-employment, paying particular attention to low-skilled immigrant entrepreneurship and the popular policy recommendation that high-skilled immigrants should be prioritized. The authors survey the existing literature on immigrant self-employment and discuss recurring data issues, how those issues have or have not been addressed, as well as how these data issues impact the validity of policy recommendations that favor high-skilled immigrants and disfavor low-skilled immigrants. In particular, the authors examine how length of stay in the host country and host country institutions impact immigrant self-employment, especially low-skilled immigrant self-employment. The authors also point out unintended consequences of low-skilled immigration. The authors find data issues significantly impact the potential justifications behind calls to favor high-skilled immigrants. In particular, many researchers underestimate the positive impacts of low-skilled immigrant self-employment by not accounting for institutions and length of stay in the host country. The authors conclude with policy recommendations that prioritize high-skilled immigration should be re-examined in light of recurring omitted variable biases within previous studies and evidence of a number of positive unintended consequences associated with low-skilled migration. The authors review current literature and discuss how important confounding variables, like the number of years an immigrant entrepreneur has lived in a host country and the institutions of a host country, make common policy recommendations suggesting prioritization of high-skilled immigration problematic. The authors also discuss potential solutions to these data issues, ways these issues have been solved already, and possible ways forward. Finally, after considering the literature, the authors offer our own set of policy recommendations.
      Citation: Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy
      PubDate: 2022-02-01
      DOI: 10.1108/JEPP-08-2021-0105
      Issue No: Vol. 11 , No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Entrepreneurship in superdiverse societies and the end of
           one-size-fits-all policy prescriptions

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: David Emanuel Andersson , Dieter Bögenhold , Marek Hudik
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to explore the entrepreneurial and policy consequences of the structural changes associated with postindustrialization. The approach uses Schumpeterian and institutional theories to predict the consequences of postindustrialization on four types of innovative markets: global mass markets; global niche markets; local mass markets and local niche markets. The paper makes two key predictions. First, global mass markets will account for most cost-cutting process innovations. Second, niche markets, whether global or local, will provide the bulk of product innovations. Opportunities for product innovations in niche markets multiply both as the result of a more complex economy and as the result of heterogeneous preferences of consumers with divergent learning trajectories. The key implication of the theoretical pattern prediction of this paper is that there are increasing opportunities for entrepreneurs to introduce novelties that cater to niche demands, and this includes new lifestyle communities. The increasing diversity of values and preferences implies that one-size-fit-all policies are becoming increasingly inimical to the entrepreneurial discovery of higher-valued resource uses. This paper takes a standard prediction of entrepreneurial theories – that innovations become more common with an increase in economy-wide product complexity – and extends this to increasing complexity on the consumption side. With increases in opportunities for learning, consumers diverge and develop disparate lifestyles. The resultant super-diversity, which multiplies consumption niches to a much greater extent than what ethnicity-based diversity indices would imply, makes it more difficult to achieve consensus about the desirability of public policies.
      Citation: Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy
      PubDate: 2021-10-28
      DOI: 10.1108/JEPP-05-2021-0062
      Issue No: Vol. 11 , No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 35.170.82.159
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-