Subjects -> BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (Total: 3841 journals)
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INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND AID (103 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 97 of 97 Journals sorted alphabetically
Africa Development     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
African Evaluation Journal     Open Access  
African Journal of Economic and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
African Journal of Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Afrique contemporaine : La revue de l'Afrique et du développement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Humanities and Development Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Asia Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Asian Education and Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Foreign Policy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Canadian Journal of Development Studies / Revue canadienne d'études du développement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Capacity.org     Free   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos de Trabajo Hegoa     Open Access  
Desarrollo y Sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Desenvolvimento em Questão     Open Access  
Developing Country Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Development Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Development Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Development Studies Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
DRd - Desenvolvimento Regional em debate     Open Access  
Economia & Região     Open Access  
Economic History of Developing Regions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Economic Journal of Development Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Economic Journal of Emerging Markets     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Economics and Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Economics Development Analysis Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Economics of Development     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Economies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Emerging Economy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Environmental Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Finance & Development     Free   (Followers: 10)
Forum for Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Ghana Journal of Development Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Iberoamerican Journal of Development Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Growth and Development Review     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Journal of Human Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Innovation and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Insight on Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Affairs and Global Strategy     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
International Development Policy : Revue internationale de politique de développement     Open Access  
International Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Agricultural Management and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Developing Societies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Development Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Peace and Development Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Regional Development     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International NGO Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
IZA Journal of Labor & Development     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Accounting and Finance in Emerging Economies     Open Access  
Journal of African Studies and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Asian Development     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Business and Social Review in Emerging Economies     Open Access  
Journal of Contemporary Integrative Ideas     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Developing Economies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Development and Administrative Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Development Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Economic Development Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Economic Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Environmental Economics and Policy     Partially Free   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Illicit Economies and Development     Open Access  
Journal of International Business Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Journal of Management for Global Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Social and Economic Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Sustainable Development Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Sustainable Finance & Investment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the Indian Ocean Region     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Jurnal Ekonomi dan Studi Pembangunan     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Markets, Globalization & Development Review : The Official Journal of the International Society of Markets and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
MediaTrend     Open Access  
Membership Management Report The     Hybrid Journal  
New African Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Organizations and Markets in Emerging Economies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
QA : Rivista dell’Associazione Rossi-Doria     Full-text available via subscription  
Regional Formation and Development Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Review of Development and Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Review of Economics and Development Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Internacional de Cooperación y Desarrollo     Open Access  
Revista Perspectivas do Desenvolvimento     Open Access  
Rozwój Regionalny i Polityka Regionalna     Open Access  
Scholedge International Journal of Management & Development     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Social Development Issues     Full-text available via subscription  
Special Events Galore     Hybrid Journal  
St Antony's International Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Stability : International Journal of Security and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Studies in Comparative International Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Successful Fundraising     Hybrid Journal  
Technological and Economic Development of Economy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Tropicultura     Open Access  
Volunteer Management Report     Full-text available via subscription  
World Development Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.087
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1931-1465 - ISSN (Online) 1932-1473
Published by Now Publishers Inc Homepage  [29 journals]
  • How Are Future Energy Technology Costs Estimated' Can We Do
           Better'

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      Abstract: Making informed estimates of future energy technology costs is central to understanding the cost of the low-carbon transition. A number of methods have been used to make such estimates: extrapolating empirically derived learning rates; use of expert elicitations; and engineering assessments which analyse future developments for technology components’ cost and performance parameters. In addition, there is a rich literature on different energy technology innovation systems analysis frameworks, which identify and analyse the many processes that drive technologies’ development, including those that make them increasingly cost-competitive and commercially ready. However, there is a surprising lack of linkage between the fields of technology cost projections and technology innovation systems analysis. There is a clear opportunity to better relate these two fields, such that the detailed processes included in technology innovation systems frameworks can be fully considered when estimating future energy technology costs.Here we demonstrate how this can be done. We identify that learning curve, expert elicitation and engineering assessment methods already either implicitly or explicitly incorporate some elements of technology innovation systems frameworks, most commonly those relating to R&D and deployment-related drivers. Yet they could more explicitly encompass a broader range of innovation processes. For example, future cost developments could be considered in light of the extent to which there is a well-functioning energy technological innovation system (TIS), including support for the direction of technology research, industry experimentation and development, market formation including by demand-pull policies and technology legitimation. We suggest that failure to fully encompass such processes may have contributed to overestimates of nuclear cost reductions and under-estimates of offshore wind cost reductions in the last decade.Suggested CitationAjay Gambhir, Richard Green, Michael Grubb, Philip Heptonstall, Charlie Wilson and Robert Gross (2021), "How Are Future Energy Technology Costs Estimated' Can We Do Better'", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 15: No. . http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000128
      PubDate: Fri, 31 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Emphasizing Distributional Impacts in Teaching Solutions to Market
           Failures

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      Abstract: This paper argues for incorporating distributional impacts into research and classroom discussions that focus on potential solutions to market failures. Many economists were taught to focus on the efficiency associated with such solutions and to assume that other means would be used to achieve the appropriate distribution of wealth within an economy. The paper briefly enumerates both theoretical and practical reasons why emphasizing distributional impacts is important. The paper offers a number of methods that can be used to identify distributional impacts in applied research such as Kaldor–Hick Tableaus, Lorenz Curves, Gini Coefficients, and weighted benefit–cost analysis and provides sample assignments that can be used in a wide range of classes.Suggested CitationSarah L. Stafford (2021), "Emphasizing Distributional Impacts in Teaching Solutions to Market Failures", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 15: No. 3, pp 175-202. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000141
      PubDate: Mon, 27 Sep 2021 00:00:00 +020
       
  • What Should We Be Teaching Students about the Economics of Climate Change:
           Is There a Consensus'

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      Abstract: Research on the economics of climate change has advanced drastically in the last 20 years, but how has treatment of climate change evolved in the classroom' Many economics, environmental studies, and public policy departments now offer climate economics and climate policy courses, but it is unclear what topics are covered, what resources are used, and with what knowledge students are expected to walk away. In this paper, we assess what topics are (or should be) taught in climate economics courses, how those topics have shifted over time, and what learning goals are articulated for students. Our assessment is based on a review of common teaching materials, an informal collection of syllabi, and the results from a survey of environmental and resource economists. Overall, there is a reasonable degree of consensus on the key topics for inclusion across survey respondents, although some topics may complement or crowd out those in standard courses in environmental and resource economics. Despite relatively broad consensus on topics, we find that climate economics courses can diverge greatly in practice, perhaps because there is no central teaching resource used across courses. We conclude constructively by proposing a set of learning goals that instructors can draw from and build upon, which we hope will aid in developing shared expectations for what students will learn in a climate economics course.Suggested CitationLynne Y. Lewis and Casey J. Wichman (2021), "What Should We Be Teaching Students about the Economics of Climate Change: Is There a Consensus'", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 15: No. 3, pp 203-233. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000142
      PubDate: Mon, 27 Sep 2021 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Teaching Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: A Review of the
           Economic Education Literature

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      Abstract: Environmental and natural resource economics (ENRE) is a rapidly growing economics field, creating challenges for instructors seeking to bring these advances into the classroom. This paper creates an easy-to-use guide to the large volume of journal articles on teaching ENRE. We include cross-referenced tables for quick review, detailed summaries for more in-depth understanding, and categorize each of the articles according to topic and pedagogy. We identify an impressive set of resources that instructors can use to engage students. The most common ENRE topic in these 54 articles is incentive-based approaches for addressing externalities, and more specifically, marketable pollution permits. The least developed topics were those focused on conservation, sustainability, and climate change.Suggested CitationJimena González-Ramírez, Jill Caviglia-Harris and John C. Whitehead (2021), "Teaching Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: A Review of the Economic Education Literature", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 15: No. 3, pp 235-369. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000143
      PubDate: Mon, 27 Sep 2021 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Climate–Society Feedback Effects: Be Wary of Unidentified
           Connections

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      Abstract: Feedbacks within the climate–economy system are complex. The research analyzing the relationship between human activities and the climate is considerable, with particular focus on intra-system feedback effects: environmental tipping points, and climate-triggered social tipping points, like migration, to a lesser extent (Kopp et al., 2016; van Ginkel et al., 2018). Due to their cross-disciplinary nature (Guerrero et al., 2018), two-way interactions between the environment and society, whereby movement in either system can trigger inter-system feedbacks (Lade et al., 2013; Yletyinen et al., 2019) as humans respond to a changing environment thereby further changing the environment, have only recently received attention by a growing inter-disciplinary research community. With the aim of improving climate policy and its tools, such as the social cost of carbon, we describe these social–ecological system (SES) feedbacks and place them in the existing taxonomy for tipping points applied by mainstream climate–economy models. Drawing lessons from SES research and related interdisciplinary literature, we discuss the value of and method by which to modify social-cost integrated assessment models (SC-IAMs), like Nordhaus' Dynamic Integrated Climate Economy. As it is critical that climate policy include these risks to the stability of the climate–economy system, we conclude with a research agenda for the identification, quantification, and integration of climate–society feedbacks into SC-IAMs.Suggested CitationPeter H. Howard and Michael A. Livermore (2021), "Climate–Society Feedback Effects: Be Wary of Unidentified Connections", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 15: No. 1-2, pp 33-93. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000129
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Jul 2021 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Green Bonds: The Evolution of a Sustainable Financial Instrument on the
           Cutting Edge

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      Abstract: This paper analyses the most recent literature available on the green bond, a financial instrument that raises funds for environmentally friendly projects. The aim of this research is to build a comprehensive review based on green bond roles, functions, features, typologies, general uses and effects. Ultimately, we try to address its potential contribution to the objectives of environmental policy. Our research reveals several roles that the instrument is taking. The regulation, the ecosystem and the best practices being developed around it may further boost the advance of sustainable activities in the market. Since 2013, when the issuances started to grow considerably, green bond market behaviour has been relatively similar to that of the conventional bond market. There have, however, been cases in which it attracted greater attention from investors and others in which it appeared to perform better than regular bond instruments. The green bond is also increasingly being considered as a strong potential support mechanism for the post-pandemic crisis recovery. Last, the paper highlights opportunities for future research on the subject.Suggested CitationAntonio Malorgio, Emanuele Teti and Maurizio Dallocchio (2021), "Green Bonds: The Evolution of a Sustainable Financial Instrument on the Cutting Edge", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 15: No. 1-2, pp 95-135. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000134
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Jul 2021 00:00:00 +020
       
  • The Promotion of Innovation in Regulated Network Industries

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      Abstract: The capital intensive network industries such as electricity and gas delivery infrastructures exhibit natural monopoly characteristics because of their high economy of scale relative to the size of the market. Due to the absence of direct competition in these regulated industries, infrastructure providers hardly undertake the appropriate level of innovation activities to optimise the operation and continuity of their services; a review is provided to show how different countries support innovation in the network industries. As innovation activities are costly and risky undertakings, a relevant query is how to incentivise innovation through economic regulations. This paper models three generic schemes of innovation promotion: individual incentive contracts, competitive innovation fund and cooperative innovation program. We show how each of these schemes affects the firms' incentives for innovation activities. The results confirm the effectiveness of all three schemes. However, implementing an individual incentive contract is information-intensive, while competitive or cooperative schemes do not require an informed regulator. A comparison is provided between the schemes.Suggested CitationSeyed Reza Mirnezami (2021), "The Promotion of Innovation in Regulated Network Industries", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 15: No. 1-2, pp 137-174. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000139
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Jul 2021 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Policies as Information Carriers: How Environmental Policies May Change
           Beliefs and Consequent Behavior

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      Abstract: This paper discusses how policy interventions not only alter the legal and financial frameworks in which an individual is operating, but can also lead to changes in relevant beliefs. We argue that such belief changes in how an individual perceives herself, relevant others, the regulator and/or the activity in question can lead to behavioral changes that were neither intended nor expected when the policy was designed.In the environmental economics literature, these secondary impacts of conventional policy interventions have not been systematically reviewed. Hence, we intend to raise awareness of these effects. In this paper, we review relevant research from behavioral economics and psychology, and identify and discuss the domains for which beliefs can change. Lastly, we discuss design options with which an undesired change in beliefs can be avoided when a new policy is put into practice.Suggested CitationAnn-Kathrin Koessler and Stefanie Engel (2021), "Policies as Information Carriers: How Environmental Policies May Change Beliefs and Consequent Behavior", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 15: No. 1-2, pp 1-31. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000123
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Jul 2021 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Labour Market Consequences of a Transition to a Circular Economy: A Review
           Paper

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      Abstract: Circular economy policies aim at reducing resource intensity and use throughout the economy, while also seizing economic opportunities. Employment benefits are also often emphasised. However, the employment effect of circular economy policies is still unclear and difficult to quantify, as the literature on this topic is still relatively new. This paper is the first of its kind to review the state-of-the art literature on the labour market implications of a transition to a circular economy. The review focuses in particular on ex-ante economic modelling studies and compares their employment and resource efficiency outcomes. The reviewed studies suggest that a transition to a circular economy can generate a positive net effect on employment, though the labour implications can differ widely across different sectors and regions and some may experience significant losses. Furthermore, the way in which revenues from materials taxes are recycled can substantially influence the employment outcome.Suggested CitationFrithjof Laubinger, Elisa Lanzi and Jean Chateau (2020), "Labour Market Consequences of a Transition to a Circular Economy: A Review Paper", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 14: No. 4, pp 381-416. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000120
      PubDate: Tue, 15 Dec 2020 00:00:00 +010
       
  • The Causal Relationship between Primary Energy Consumption and Economic
           Growth in Israel: A Multivariate Approach

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      Abstract: The empirical relationship among energy and economic growth has been abundantly studied in the literature. In this paper, we provide a state-of-the-art review of the topic, and highlight the main methodological issues that previous studies have attempted to address so far. Since Israel is experiencing profound energy changes, we take this case as an illustration and investigate the causal link between primary energy consumption and economic growth. Capital and labour are included in the model with multivariate framework. A cointegrating relationship is found among the variables. Causality tests' results display both short-run and long-run relationship between economic growth and primary energy consumption. Besides, a unidirectional causality running from economic growth to primary energy consumption is supported. Since the primary energy consumed in Israel is overwhelmingly oil, natural gas and coal, we support the economic growth-led-primary energy consumption hypothesis. In line with previous studies, our findings suggest that promoting low-carbon energy sources through fossil conservation policies may not significantly hinder economic growth.Suggested CitationCosimo Magazzino and Nicolas Schneider (2020), "The Causal Relationship between Primary Energy Consumption and Economic Growth in Israel: A Multivariate Approach", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 14: No. 4, pp 417-491. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000121
      PubDate: Tue, 15 Dec 2020 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Defining Build-Back-Better after Disasters with an Example: Sri Lanka's
           Recovery after the 2004 Tsunami

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      Abstract: The long-term economic recoveries catastrophic disasters are poorly understood. In contrast, the policy literature is full of aspirational plans to "build-back-better" (BBB) — a recovery that leads to improvements above and beyond the pre-disaster status quo. Yet, BBB remains ill-defined. It is clearly multi-dimensional, but here we focus on assessment of building back a better economy. The central objective of our paper is to propose a more concrete definition of BBB and test it against Sri Lanka's recovery after the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. To do so, we propose four criteria against which one should evaluate BBB policies, and then we specifically evaluate these for the recovery as it was experienced in Sri Lanka. These criteria are safety, speed, fairness (inclusiveness), and socio-economic potential.Suggested CitationIlan Noy, Diana De Alwis, Benno Ferrarini and Donghyun Park (2020), "Defining Build-Back-Better after Disasters with an Example: Sri Lanka's Recovery after the 2004 Tsunami", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 14: No. 4, pp 349-380. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000122
      PubDate: Tue, 15 Dec 2020 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Sectoral Decomposition of CO2 World Emissions: A Joint Quantile Regression
           Approach

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      Abstract: Different economic sectors interact with each other and contribute in increasing CO2 emissions in different ways and with different intensities. A modeling framework describing CO2 cross-sectoral dependencies could be fruitful to authorities providing guidance to policies on emissions regulations and environment preservation. After surveying the existing literature that investigates on the relationship between urbanization and CO2 emissions, we focus on the role of quantile regression in environmental modeling to provide a more complete view of the the nexus between socio-demographic factors and CO2 emissions coming from different sources of economic activities, that can be missed by other regression methods. In particular, using a new joint quantile regression approach, in this paper we consider a sectoral disaggregation of total CO2 emissions of 154 world countries and hypothesize a heterogeneous effect of population, urbanization, industrialization and economic growth in different sectors and at different quantile levels of the multivariate CO2 distribution.Suggested CitationLuca Merlo, Lea Petrella and Valentina Raponi (2020), "Sectoral Decomposition of CO2 World Emissions: A Joint Quantile Regression Approach", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 14: No. 2-3, pp 197-239. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000116
      PubDate: Tue, 20 Oct 2020 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Optimal Diversity in Auctions for Renewable Energy Sources under
           Technological Uncertainty

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      Abstract: A cost-effective low-carbon transition requires designing a state support mechanism that delivers an optimal diversity of renewable energy sources (RES) in the energy mix. Lowest price auctions that do not discriminate between technologies deliver optimal RES diversity, providing that there are no spill-over effects associated with the deployment of each technology. This precondition fails to apply, however, if RES technologies are able to benefit from learning-by-doing and if learning rates are uncertain. In the first part of this study we review the literature on the optimal diversity of technologies when technological progress is uncertain and on the uncertainty of learning rates. Then we use an analytical model to demonstrate that, under the uncertainty of learning potential, the socially-optimal diversity of RES is larger than the outcome of the lowest price auction. We also show that the social benefits from diversification disappear if there is no potential for learning-by-doing. Thus, countries that potentially could benefit from large learning rate effects — such as countries at the technological frontier — should increase RES diversification by introducing technology-specific auctions, while more peripheral countries should limit diversification by using technology-neutral auctions. We also show that the diversity of RES in the social optimum is greater than that predicted by energy models assuming fixed learning rates.Suggested CitationJakub Sawulski and Jan Witajewski-Baltvilks (2020), "Optimal Diversity in Auctions for Renewable Energy Sources under Technological Uncertainty", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 14: No. 2-3, pp 299-347. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000118
      PubDate: Tue, 20 Oct 2020 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Behavioural Economics, Benefit-Cost Analysis, and the WTP versus WTA
           Choice

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      Abstract: Many of the findings from behavioural economics research offer useful opportunities to better understand and anticipate people's choices among alternatives and to improve policy design accordingly. Their use has, however, varied among fields — being widely employed in some and mainly ignored in others. Major issues and likely understatements resulting from current practice are illustrated in the recent assessment of the monetary value of damages resulting from the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill.Suggested CitationJack L. Knetsch (2020), "Behavioural Economics, Benefit-Cost Analysis, and the WTP versus WTA Choice", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 14: No. 2-3, pp 153-196. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000119
      PubDate: Tue, 20 Oct 2020 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Five Decades of Modeling Oil Price Shocks: A Critical Review

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      Abstract: After five decades of modeling oil price shocks, their causes and repercussions remain a question of considerable interest, both in the academic literature and the policy domain. This paper critically reviews the leading explanations of the underlying causes of oil price shocks since the 1970s. Specifically, it is intended to provide insights into the theoretical, methodological, and empirical milestones together with unresolved issues from both a historical and exploratory viewpoint. The paper also provides and discusses pathways to overcome some of the unresolved issues to aid future model formulations and policy prescriptions.Suggested CitationMikidadu Mohammed (2020), "Five Decades of Modeling Oil Price Shocks: A Critical Review", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 14: No. 2-3, pp 241-297. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000117
      PubDate: Tue, 20 Oct 2020 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Assessing the Benefits of Air-Quality Improvements in General Equilibrium:
           A Review

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      Abstract: The vast majority of existing attempts to measure the benefits and costs of air-quality regulations assume no interaction between the behavioral responses that determine the market-based costs of these policies and the targeted environmental benefits themselves. Nevertheless, general equilibrium theory suggests a number of channels through which important interdependencies might arise, including health impacts on labor supply and the demand for medical care, complementarities between air quality and demand for leisure activities, and interactions between multiple services derived from a common, impacted ecosystem. We develop a unified theoretical framework to assess the nascent literature focused on incorporating air-quality impacts into general equilibrium models. Our primary focus is on quantitative studies employing computable general equilibrium (CGE) models. We conclude by identifying priorities for future research in this field.Suggested CitationJared C. Carbone and Yuzhou Shen (2020), "Assessing the Benefits of Air-Quality Improvements in General Equilibrium: A Review", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 14: No. 1, pp 1-36. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000113
      PubDate: Tue, 07 Apr 2020 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Liability for Natural Resource Damages from Oil Spills: A Survey

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      Abstract: This paper provides an overview of the role of oil spill liability in policy at the state, national, and international levels. The primary focus is on damages to publicly owned natural resources from oil spills and associated legislation, policy, and economics.Both US and International Law have evolved over time to provide strict liability for an ever more inclusive set of oil spill damages, including what is termed "pure environmental" damages. This represents arguably the most expansive implementation of the "Polluter Pays Principle", which makes those who pollute financially responsible for the damages. Under both US and International Law, the primary form of compensation is a set of cost-effective actions to restore environmental damages, which has been termed resource-based compensation, as opposed providing to monetary compensation to injured parties.The framework under US law for liability for publicly owned natural resource damages requires quantification of causal linkages from a spill event, to injury to natural resources, to damages to the public, to natural recovery to baseline conditions, and accelerated recovery under alternative sets of restoration programs. In principle, this is a logical framework to ensure that the public is compensated for spill-related environmental damages. However, carrying out such a program may strain the state-of-the-science at each stage, given the many limitations of our scientific understanding of complex environmental systems.Thus, assessing liability for oil spill damages is a highly challenging endeavor and enormous uncertainties exist at nearly every stage in the process. Furthermore, litigation for oil spill damages is often a high stakes game, where the parties that are principally involved in assessing damages also receive benefits from, or pay the costs of, the damage awards. Thus, the process of assessing damages cannot be viewed as an objective analysis by impartial third parties. Furthermore, this damage assessment process is costly and time consuming, and neither assessment costs nor litigation costs contribute to compensating victims or restoring environmental damages.This raises the question of whether we as a society should rethink the framework for compensation for natural resource damages in future oil spill legislation. Standardized alternatives to traditional tort law exist which may reduce the time and financial costs of litigation and may thereby expedite restoration actions. Furthermore, standardized approaches may not necessarily reduce the accuracy of damage assessments, given the great scientific uncertainties and the financial interests of the parties involved in the damage assessment process.Suggested CitationJames J. Opaluch (2020), "Liability for Natural Resource Damages from Oil Spills: A Survey", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 14: No. 1, pp 37-111. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000114
      PubDate: Tue, 07 Apr 2020 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Directly Valuing Animal Welfare in (Environmental) Economics

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      Abstract: Research in economics is anthropocentric. It only cares about the welfare of humans and usually does not concern itself with animals. When it does, animals are treated as resources, biodiversity, or food. That is, animals only have instrumental value for humans. Yet, unlike water, trees, or vegetables, and like humans, most animals have a brain and a nervous system. They can feel pain and pleasure and many argue that their welfare should matter. Some economic studies value animal welfare, but only indirectly through humans' altruistic valuation. This overall position of economics is inconsistent with the utilitarian tradition and can be qualified as speciesist. We suggest that economics should directly value the welfare of sentient animals, at least sometimes. We briefly discuss some possible implications and challenges for (environmental) economics.Suggested CitationAlexis Carlier and Nicolas Treich (2020), "Directly Valuing Animal Welfare in (Environmental) Economics", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 14: No. 1, pp 113-152. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000115
      PubDate: Tue, 07 Apr 2020 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Natural Resources and Environment Preservation: Strategic Substitutability
           vs. Complementarity in Global and Local Public Good Provision

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      Abstract: Environment is a public good whose preservation requires some type of intervention. Use of natural resources for economic activities should be regulated by the local communities; however, this can have in turn external effects on other communities. Environment then takes the double nature of local and global public good, requiring intervention of different levels of governments, whose interplay may raise further conflicts. The aim of this paper is twofold. First, we survey the literature on conflicts arising from the alternative uses of land and natural resources and discuss the effects and policy implications of the interplay between different governments. Second, we focus on the role of strategic interactions in the environmental governance and the implied policy trade-offs and present a formal policy game with potential conflicts between central and local authorities. The model aims to describe the circumstances according to which the lack of coordination between local and central authorities leads to under- or over-provision of natural resources and environment preservation.Suggested CitationNicola Acocella and Giovanni Di Bartolomeo (2019), "Natural Resources and Environment Preservation: Strategic Substitutability vs. Complementarity in Global and Local Public Good Provision", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 13: No. 3-4, pp 203-227. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000109
      PubDate: Wed, 18 Sep 2019 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Two Kinds of Nudging and the Power of Cues: Shifting Salience of
           Alternatives and Shifting Salience of Goals

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      Abstract: Nudging has become a major form of intervention in the domains of sustainable behaviour, health behaviour, financial behaviour, and many others. But how does nudging work' Research so far has paid more attention to the effects of nudging than to the underlying mechanisms. The most prominent mechanisms associated in the literature with nudging are human biases and automatic decision-making. However, we argue that the heart of nudging mechanism is a shift in salience. Attention to this mechanism leads to an important distinction between two kinds of nudging: first, there is goal nudging, in which the salience of overarching goals is affected, leading to changes in activated preferences and attention to specific classes of alternatives. Second, there is behavioural nudging, in which the salience of a concrete alternative is being affected. In most cases, the two kinds of nudging work hand in glove, but without paying attention to their separate and joint effects, nudging interventions can be ineffective or even counterproductive.Suggested CitationSiegwart Lindenberg and Esther K. Papies (2019), "Two Kinds of Nudging and the Power of Cues: Shifting Salience of Alternatives and Shifting Salience of Goals", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 13: No. 3-4, pp 229-263. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000110
      PubDate: Wed, 18 Sep 2019 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Environmental Policy and Innovation: A Decade of Research

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      Abstract: Innovation is an important part of environmental policy, and encouraging innovation is often an explicit goal of policymakers. A large literature in environmental economics examines the links between environmental policy and innovation. Popp et al. (2010) provides an extensive review of the literature on environmental innovation. This paper updates that review, highlighting research published during the past decade, with a focus on empirical research examining links between environmental policy and environmentally friendly innovation. I highlight major trends in the literature, including an increased number of cross-country studies and a focus on the effect of different policy instruments on innovation. I include a discussion of the justifications and evidence for technology-specific policy incentives and present evidence on the effectiveness of government R&D spending. My review concludes with a discussion of three promising areas for new research on environmental innovation.Suggested CitationDavid Popp (2019), "Environmental Policy and Innovation: A Decade of Research", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 13: No. 3-4, pp 265-337. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000111
      PubDate: Wed, 18 Sep 2019 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Optimal Taxation, Environment Quality, Socially Responsible Firms and
           Investors

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      Abstract: We characterize the optimal pollution-, capital- and labour-tax structure in a continuous-time model in the presence of pollution (resulting from production), both in the first- and second-best, allowing investors to be driven by social responsibility objectives. The social responsibility objective takes the form of warm-glow, as in Andreoni (1990) and Dam (2011), inducing firms to reduce pollution through increased abatement activity. Among the results, the second-best pollution tax displays an additivity property and the Chamley–Judd zero capital-income tax can be violated under warm-glow preferences. We also show that first- and second-best pollution taxes are positive, under warm-glow preferences, and, under mild assumptions, the latter yield lower first-best pollution taxes and lower pollution intensity.Suggested CitationThomas I. Renström, Luca Spataro and Laura Marsiliani (2019), "Optimal Taxation, Environment Quality, Socially Responsible Firms and Investors", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 13: No. 3-4, pp 339-373. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000112
      PubDate: Wed, 18 Sep 2019 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Do Environmental and Economic Performance Go Together' A Review of
           Micro-level Empirical Evidence from the Past Decade or So

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      Abstract: This article reviews the empirical literature combining economic and environmental performance data at the micro-level, i.e. firm or facility level. The literature has generally found a positive and statistically significant correlation between economic performance, as measured by profitability indicators or stock market returns, and environmental performance, as measured by emissions of pollutants or adoption of international environmental standards. The main reason for this finding seems to be that firms that reduce their material and energy costs experience both better economic performance and lower emissions. Only a small and recent literature analyses the joint causal impact of environmental regulations on environmental and economic performance. Interestingly, this literature shows that environmental regulations tend to improve environmental performance while not weakening economic performance. However, the evidence so far is limited to a handful of environmental regulations that are not extremely stringent, so the result cannot be easily generalized. More research is needed to assess the joint effects of environmental regulations on environmental and economic performance, to explore the heterogeneity of these effects across sectors, countries and types of policies, and to understand which policy designs allow improving environmental quality while not coming at a cost in terms of economic performance of regulated businesses.Suggested CitationAntoine Dechezleprêtre, Tomasz Koźluk, Tobias Kruse, Daniel Nachtigall and Alain de Serres (2019), "Do Environmental and Economic Performance Go Together' A Review of Micro-level Empirical Evidence from the Past Decade or So", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 13: No. 1-2, pp 1-118. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000106
      PubDate: Fri, 26 Apr 2019 00:00:00 +020
       
  • A Review of Eco-labels and their Economic Impact

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      Abstract: In many countries, various eco-labels have emerged for informing consumers about the environmental impact of the offered products. Using recent advances in the empirical and theoretical literature, this review questions the efficiency of eco-labeling. We combine a literature review with discussions of empirical examples. We underline the limitations of eco-labels for signaling credible information to consumers. In particular, both the complexity and the proliferation of eco-labels are likely to hamper their efficiency in guiding consumers. From a regulatory perspective, several studies show that eco-labels are useful, but they cannot be considered a panacea for improving environmental quality. Indeed, it is often socially optimal to combine eco-labels with other regulatory tools such as standards banning polluting products and tax/subsidy mechanisms depending on the environmental quality. The conclusion suggests research priorities for tackling unanswered questions.Suggested CitationMaïmouna Yokessa and Stéphan Marette (2019), "A Review of Eco-labels and their Economic Impact", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 13: No. 1-2, pp 119-163. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000107
      PubDate: Fri, 26 Apr 2019 00:00:00 +020
       
  • The Economics of REDD through an Incidence of Burdens and Benefits Lens

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      Abstract: Forests in lower-income countries provide a global public good, carbon sequestration. REDD, "reduced emissions from deforestation and forest degradation" is a performance-based payment designed to align private incentives at the country level with the socially optimal level of forest loss. This review article focuses on the distributional implications of REDD, specifically on whom the burdens and benefits fall. First, REDD implementation has proven more difficult and costly than originally anticipated. The literature highlights many costs of REDD over and above the opportunity cost, including readiness, enforcement and monitoring, which initially were underestimated or ignored. Second, ensuring additionality, minimising leakage, and spatial targeting of carbon rich locations, are difficult and costly, and shown in the literature to sometimes be at odds with pro-poor efforts. Third, benefit sharing has emerged in the literature as a central element of REDD implementation. Rural households may use nearby forests yet have no rights, and REDD may bring no benefits whilst imposing costs on these communities. Where REDD is implemented at the community level, incentives may not be aligned at the level of the individual, reducing REDD's impact and increasing conflict. Finally, funding sources are closely linked to the incidence of benefits and burdens. Our review suggests that, over a decade on from the Paris Agreement, REDD continues to be controversial, with equity-efficiency trade-offs often difficult to avoid. However, the literature provides considerable theoretical and empirical evidence as to how and where REDD can have a positive impact on both carbon sequestration and livelihoods.Suggested CitationElizabeth J. Z. Robinson, Scott Somerville and Heidi J. Albers (2019), "The Economics of REDD through an Incidence of Burdens and Benefits Lens", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 13: No. 1-2, pp 165-202. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000108
      PubDate: Fri, 26 Apr 2019 00:00:00 +020
       
  • The Long-Term Consequences of Disasters: What Do We Know, and What We
           Still Don't

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      Abstract: What are the long-term economic consequences of disasters' This question is debated among scholars, but any answer for it is very important for policymakers as well. Several factors should be taken into consideration when assessing likely post-disaster long-term outcomes, including the type and severity of the event, the underlying composition of the economy, and the total area impacted. Additionally, the way that researchers choose to define long-term impact, and what is being measured, also matters. Regardless, there is no clear consensus concerning the long-term economic consequences of these events. A common way to identify this impact is to compare the economy post-disaster to the level it was at prior to the event. This approach can be useful when estimating the impact in the short term; however, when analyzing the long-term impact this approach is less convincing. Economies are constantly changing, and over long periods of time these changes will accumulate. Therefore, one of the biggest challenges these inquiries face is the need to estimate what the level of economic activity would have been had the disaster not occurred. The methodologies in which researchers go about doing this can have a significant impact on their conclusions, as we show with several examples. We also describe studies that use data collected at regional or city/township level; these have found a much more nuanced set of results.Suggested CitationIlan Noy and William duPont IV (2018), "The Long-Term Consequences of Disasters: What Do We Know, and What We Still Don't", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 12: No. 4, pp 325-354. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000104
      PubDate: Thu, 06 Dec 2018 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Why Are Firms Environmentally Responsible' A Review and Assessment of
           the Main Mechanisms

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      Abstract: This review explores the mechanisms through which environmental responsibility influences firm performance. We identify several mechanisms related to stakeholders — customers, employees, investors, government, non-governmental organization, and executives. We try to identify trends both in the importance of different mechanisms in our knowledge about them.We find that recent literature put increasing emphasis on the role of employees as driver of corporate environmental responsibility. The literature also argues that socially responsible investments are becoming more and more mainstream. Finally, we argue that interaction between stakeholders is an important driver of environmental responsibility, with the interaction of NGOs and consumers as an important example.Suggested CitationKjell Arne Brekke and Sanja Pekovic (2018), "Why Are Firms Environmentally Responsible' A Review and Assessment of the Main Mechanisms", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 12: No. 4, pp 355-398. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000105
      PubDate: Thu, 06 Dec 2018 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Climate Policies, Distributional Effects and Transfers Between Rich and
           Poor Countries

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      Abstract: This paper studies the role of equity preferences and distribution in climate policies by presenting mechanisms and results from dynamic North-South models. If policy makers express preferences regarding the distributive outcome of policies, they may adopt climate policies that influence the distribution in their preferred direction. A better distribution of outcomes may result even in the absence of such preferences if there exist strategic reasons for transfers from the rich to the poor countries. We also present results concerning when such transfers do and do not work according to policy makers’ intentions. A transfer that proceeds from the poor to the rich countries is climate migration. This may have distributional consequences and possibly increase the incentives of the rich countries to implement climate policies that mitigate negative distributional effects, even if their main concern is with their own outcomes.Suggested CitationSnorre Kverndokk (2018), "Climate Policies, Distributional Effects and Transfers Between Rich and Poor Countries", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 12: No. 2-3, pp 129-176. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000100
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Nov 2018 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Benefit Transfer of Environmental and Resource Values: Progress, Prospects
           and Challenges

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      Abstract: This article summarizes the current state and future prospects for benefit transfer of environmental and resource values. Benefit transfer is the use of pre-existing empirical estimates from primary studies at one or more sites or contexts where research has been conducted to predict welfare estimates such as willingness to pay at other, typically unstudied sites or contexts. We orient the discussion around theory, methods and practice, focusing on progress, challenges and frontiers in the literature since the review of Johnston and Rosenberger (2010, Journal of Economic Surveys). The article begins with a brief history of benefit transfer and a summary of areas in which there is methodological consensus. It then presents questions regarding the approaches most likely to promote valid and reliable transfers, and recent research to address these questions. We conclude with an examination of the gap between research and practice, and a discussion of future prospects and research needs.Suggested CitationRobert J. Johnston, John Rolfe and Ewa Zawojska (2018), "Benefit Transfer of Environmental and Resource Values: Progress, Prospects and Challenges", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 12: No. 2-3, pp 177-266. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000102
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Nov 2018 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Guidance for Deliberative Monetary Valuation Studies

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      Abstract: There is growing demand for more pluralistic valuation approaches, for which Deliberative Monetary Valuation (DMV) is suitable. Guidance is needed for valid and reliable DMV application, as exists for conventional willingness to pay studies using stated preference methods. The purpose of this paper is to develop a set of minimal requirements for study design and reporting aimed at DMV practitioners, based on the existing DMV literature as well as related social science literatures. The core contribution of our paper is the practical recommendations for DMV study design focusing on the deliberation process and elicitation format, analysis of the deliberation and willingness to pay results, and validity. We summarise reporting requirements for reliability, before offering conclusions and suggestions for promising future research directions.Suggested CitationMarije Schaafsma, Bartosz Bartkowski and Nele Lienhoop (2018), "Guidance for Deliberative Monetary Valuation Studies", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 12: No. 2-3, pp 267-323. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000103
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Nov 2018 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Identifying the Causes of Low Participation Rates in Conservation Tenders

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      Abstract: Conservation tenders are being used as a policy mechanism to deliver environmental benefits through changes in land, water and biodiversity management. While these mechanisms can potentially be more efficient than other agri-environmental and payment for ecosystem service schemes, a key limitation in practice is that participation rates from eligible landholders are often low, limiting both efficiency and effectiveness. In this paper we document and review potential causes of low participation in two categories: those that treat participation as an adoption issue focused on searching for the landholder, farm or practice characteristics that limit participation; and those that treat it as an auction design issue, looking for the different auction, contract or transaction cost elements that limit landholder interest in participation. We then model how landholders make choices to engage and bid in a tender, making three important contributions to the literature on this topic. First, we document the low participation rates in conservation tenders, mostly across developed countries, an issue that has received little attention to date. Second, we explain that a decision to participate in a conservation tender involves three simultaneous decisions about whether to change a management practice, whether to be involved in a public or private program with contractual obligations, and how to set a price or bid. Third, we explain that there are a number of factors that affect each stage of the decision process with some, such as landholder attitudes and risk considerations, relevant to all three. Our findings suggest that decisions to participate in a conservation tender are more complex than simple adoption decisions, involving optimisation challenges over a number of potentially offsetting factors.Suggested CitationJohn Rolfe, Steve Schilizzi, Peter Boxall, Uwe Latacz-Lohmann, Sayed Iftekhar, Megan Star and Patrick O'Connor (2018), "Identifying the Causes of Low Participation Rates in Conservation Tenders", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 12: No. 1, pp 1-45. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000098
      PubDate: Tue, 06 Nov 2018 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Cities and Nature

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      Abstract: The world is continuing to urbanize. As a result, most of the interactions between humans and nature take place in cities. These interactions are varied and complex. But, contrary to past conception, urbanites do not decimate nature in cities and it continues to thrive. The rich urban biodiversity includes both endemic and cultured species. People oriented evaluations of the importance urban nature differ from evaluations focused on the ecological system. Most of the urban-economic literature has focused on estimates of the positive externalities of the proximity to nature, albeit in relations to very limited aspects of such effects. The quantification of eco-services has been only partly successful. Recently there is a growing realization that there exist associated negative externalities as well. For example, in many cities the penetration of large mammals, made possible by the morphology of built areas, is generating behavior patterns, such as at least partial changes in the spatial incidence of the demand for housing.The paper surveys literature concerning various aspects of urban nature and its relationship to urban morphology. It raises several issues that have not been addressed sufficiently by urban nature scholarship. The commonly accepted view of ecosystem services is that the provisioning, regulating and cultural services stem from the biodiversity of the ecosystem. But, while the cultural services of ecosystems within cities may be high, they do not necessarily stem from the values of biodiversity. So is the relationship between provisioning/regulating services and biodiversity. And so the question remains open, whether future cities can sustain human welfare while retaining biodiversity patterns and function. Finally, we ask which type of species do we wish to conserve' What is the contribution of conservation biology to the issue and to what extent conservation biology and urban economy are compatible'Suggested CitationDani Broitman, Danny Czamanski and Dan Malkinson (2018), "Cities and Nature", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 12: No. 1, pp 47-83. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000099
      PubDate: Tue, 06 Nov 2018 00:00:00 +010
       
  • The Impact of Electricity on Economic Development: A Macroeconomic
           Perspective

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      Abstract: This paper provides a review of the macro-level evidence on the importance of electricity for economic development. We find that electricity access and use are strongly correlated with economic development, as theory suggests. Despite a large empirical literature, however, there are few methodologically strong studies that establish causal effects of either electricity use or electricity infrastructure on economic growth. The micro-level literature provides more convincing evidence of causal effects, although these appear not to be uniform in all locations. We present a number of country case studies that are suggestive of electrification playing an important role in broad-based development progress. The paper also identifies potential avenues for future research. High-quality macro-level evidence on the economic effects of electricity access and reliability would help policy-makers and aid agencies make decisions regarding investment priorities.Suggested CitationPaul J. Burke, David I. Stern and Stephan B. Bruns (2018), "The Impact of Electricity on Economic Development: A Macroeconomic Perspective", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 12: No. 1, pp 85-127. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000101
      PubDate: Tue, 06 Nov 2018 00:00:00 +010
       
  • The Economics of Resilience

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      Abstract: This paper provides an interpretive overview on the economics of resilience with special reference to social–ecological systems. We address the basic sciences of regime shifts and resilience in different settings linked to empirical cases and review the economic models related to these aspects. In particular we discuss models to assess market outcomes when thresholds exist and are known and particular characteristics of such systems when they are optimally managed. We also examine multiple aspects of uncertainty including unknown but learnable thresholds and systems where either the threshold or the stock dynamics are uncertain because they change in a stochastic way. Moreover, we discuss resilience in relation to measurement and valuation using approaches that focus on the role of biodiversity for resilience, the insurance value of resilience and the value of resilience as a stock that influences social welfare. Finally, we discuss issues related to practical resilience management and identify knowledge gaps that future research efforts could address.Suggested CitationChuan-Zhong Li, Anne-Sophie Crépin and Carl Folke (2018), "The Economics of Resilience", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 11: No. 4, pp 309-353. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000096
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Aug 2018 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Spatial Heterogeneity in Stated Preference Valuation: Status, Challenges
           and Road Ahead

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      Abstract: This paper reviews the progress made over the past few years in evaluating and controlling for spatial heterogeneity in stated preference valuation, focussing on applications to environmental valuation. Spatial heterogeneity can strongly impact value estimates, so failure to account for it can compromise their validity and reliability. Incorporating spatial factors into valuation studies not only helps to control for some potential biases, but also produces more precise evaluation of amenities that have mixed use and non-use values. For these reasons and considering the ever-growing need for non-market valuation studies, spatial heterogeneity deserves more attention in the stated preference valuation literature.In this review we discuss the current state-of-knowledge and identify some of the main issues that have been raised in the literature in relation to spatial heterogeneity in stated preference valuation, including distance-decay, substitution, embedding effects and scale factors. We present several techniques that have been used so far, mostly originating from spatial econometrics and spatial statistics, to control for spatial heterogeneity. Some of the ongoing challenges that require further attention are also highlighted. We conclude by suggesting potential directions for future research in light of recent progress made in related disciplines and the evolution of modern technologies.Suggested CitationJeremy De Valck and John Rolfe (2018), "Spatial Heterogeneity in Stated Preference Valuation: Status, Challenges and Road Ahead", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 11: No. 4, pp 355-422. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000097
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Aug 2018 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Network Representations of Pollution-Generating Technologies

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      Abstract: We update developments on modeling technology including unintended outputs and show how these can, at least to a large extent, be incorporated in a network model framework. Recently there have been efforts to specify more detailed models which include multiple functions to separately capture intended and unintended products. Yet another recent strand of the recent literature has also explicitly tried to include a material balance condition in the model. We see this general evolution as beginning with what might be called a black box technology, with inputs entering the box, and good and bad outputs exiting the box. The more sophisticated models can be thought of as filling in the black box with the more detailed processes involved with production, prevention and abatement, with production accompanied by undesirable byproducts subject to legal regulations and laws of nature. This can be modeled as a network within the black box.Suggested CitationMoriah Bostian, Rolf Färe, Shawna Grosskopf and Tommy Lundgren (2018), "Network Representations of Pollution-Generating Technologies", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 11: No. 3, pp 193-231. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000093
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Aug 2018 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Optimal Taxation, Redistribution, and Environmental Externalities

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      Abstract: This paper surveys research on optimal redistributive taxation in economies with environmental externalities. A key question is whether externality correction only motivates an adjustment of the tax policy rule for the externality-generating activity, or whether the marginal value of the externality directly enters the policy rules for other tax instruments as well. In a static benchmark model with an atmospheric consumption externality, where the government uses a mix of a nonlinear income tax and linear commodity taxes, one can show that Sandmo's (1975) additivity property applies. This means that externality correction leads to an additional term (measuring the marginal value of the externality) in the commodity tax formula for the externality-generating good, while the policy rules for commodity taxation of clean goods and marginal income taxation take the same form as in the absence of any externality. We also extend this benchmark model to capture a number of scenarios (such as non-atmospheric externalities, border trade in the externality-generating good, and competition between governments in a multi-country framework), where the additivity property no longer applies. We end by examining an intertemporal model of optimal taxation with a stock-externality, allowing us to integrate the study of optimal redistributive taxation with literature on environmental economics and policy based on dynamic models.Suggested CitationThomas Aronsson and Tomas Sjögren (2018), "Optimal Taxation, Redistribution, and Environmental Externalities", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 11: No. 3, pp 233-308. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000095
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Aug 2018 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Economics of Habitat Fragmentation: A Review and Critique of the
           Literature

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      Abstract: Understanding the signficance of habitat fragmentation for ecological function has been a focus in the natural sciences for decades. More recently, the field of economics has begun to assess the drivers and impact of habitat fragmentation, as well as potential policy and market-based mechanisms to address fragmentation. We present a review of the existing economics literature that addresses habitat pattern/fragmentation and we define themes, issues, and next steps for this literature. First, this paper reviews economic modeling and empirical approaches to identifying drivers and patterns of fragmentation. The next section summarizes the literature on analysis of optimal land use patterns and the tradeoffs of managing for ecological and economic objectives. The last literature section contains description of policy and mechanisms for addressing habitat fragmentation in the context of single and multiple landowners who do not manage land for habitat benefits explicitly. We conclude with a discussion of unanswered questions and next steps for research and data analysis on habitat fragmentation.Suggested CitationH. J. Albers, K. D. Lee and K. R. E. Sims (2018), "Economics of Habitat Fragmentation: A Review and Critique of the Literature", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 11: No. 2, pp 97-144. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000092
      PubDate: Wed, 23 May 2018 00:00:00 +020
       
  • Voluntary Pollution Control under Threat of Regulation

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      Abstract: This paper reviews the literature relating to the use of regulatory threats to induce voluntary pollution abatement. Some scholars have argued that voluntary approaches are most likely to be effective when accompanied by a strong regulatory threat (e.g., Bizer, 1999; Coglianese and Nash, 2016; Khanna and Damon, 1999). However, the use of threats raises a number of issues that do not arise in other contexts where voluntary abatement occurs in response to market-based or government-provided financial incentives. This provides the rationale for this review focused specifically on voluntary approaches with regulatory threats, which discusses both the advantages and disadvantages of using a threat-based approach and the implications of doing so, drawing on both the theoretical and empirical literature.Suggested CitationKathleen Segerson (2018), "Voluntary Pollution Control under Threat of Regulation", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 11: No. 2, pp 145-192. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000094
      PubDate: Wed, 23 May 2018 00:00:00 +020
       
 
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