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Showing 1 - 97 of 97 Journals sorted alphabetically
Africa Development     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
African Evaluation Journal     Open Access  
African Journal of Economic and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
African Journal of Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Afrique contemporaine : La revue de l'Afrique et du développement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Humanities and Development Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Asia Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Asian Education and Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Foreign Policy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Canadian Journal of Development Studies / Revue canadienne d'études du développement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Capacity.org     Free   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos de Trabajo Hegoa     Open Access  
Desarrollo y Sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Desenvolvimento em Questão     Open Access  
Developing Country Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Development Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
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Development Studies Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
DRd - Desenvolvimento Regional em debate     Open Access  
Economia & Região     Open Access  
Economic History of Developing Regions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Economic Journal of Development Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Economic Journal of Emerging Markets     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Economics and Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Economics Development Analysis Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Economics of Development     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Economies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Emerging Economy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Environmental Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Finance & Development     Free   (Followers: 10)
Forum for Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Ghana Journal of Development Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Iberoamerican Journal of Development Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Growth and Development Review     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Journal of Human Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Innovation and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Insight on Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Affairs and Global Strategy     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
International Development Policy : Revue internationale de politique de développement     Open Access  
International Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Agricultural Management and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Developing Societies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Development Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Peace and Development Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Regional Development     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International NGO Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
IZA Journal of Labor & Development     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Accounting and Finance in Emerging Economies     Open Access  
Journal of African Studies and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Asian Development     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Business and Social Review in Emerging Economies     Open Access  
Journal of Contemporary Integrative Ideas     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Developing Economies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Development and Administrative Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Development Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Economic Development Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Economic Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Environmental Economics and Policy     Partially Free   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Illicit Economies and Development     Open Access  
Journal of International Business Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Journal of Management for Global Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Social and Economic Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Sustainable Development Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Sustainable Finance & Investment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the Indian Ocean Region     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Jurnal Ekonomi dan Studi Pembangunan     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Markets, Globalization & Development Review : The Official Journal of the International Society of Markets and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
MediaTrend     Open Access  
Membership Management Report The     Hybrid Journal  
New African Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Organizations and Markets in Emerging Economies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
QA : Rivista dell’Associazione Rossi-Doria     Full-text available via subscription  
Regional Formation and Development Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Review of Development and Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Review of Economics and Development Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Internacional de Cooperación y Desarrollo     Open Access  
Revista Perspectivas do Desenvolvimento     Open Access  
Rozwój Regionalny i Polityka Regionalna     Open Access  
Scholedge International Journal of Management & Development     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Social Development Issues     Full-text available via subscription  
Special Events Galore     Hybrid Journal  
St Antony's International Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Stability : International Journal of Security and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Studies in Comparative International Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Successful Fundraising     Hybrid Journal  
Technological and Economic Development of Economy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Tropicultura     Open Access  
Volunteer Management Report     Full-text available via subscription  
World Development Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.756
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 14  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 4 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 2042-6747 - ISSN (Online) 2042-6755
Published by Emerald Homepage  [362 journals]
  • Humanitarian logistics and supply chain standards. Literature review and
           view from practice

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Claudia Paciarotti, Wojciech D. Piotrowicz, George Fenton
      Abstract: The paper is focused on standards in humanitarian logistics and supply chain. Standards, implemented between organisations, allow improving the interoperability of humanitarian operations. The paper aims (1) to review a state-of-the-art approach to the topic by the academic community, (2) to evaluate the current use of standards among humanitarian organisations and (3) to investigate the perceived need for further and specific standards. To achieve the aims, the literature was reviewed; then a survey on 227 professionals from the humanitarian logistics sector was conducted. Based on 227 responses, it is possible to conclude that most surveyed professionals recognise the need for and the importance of standardisation in humanitarian logistics, especially in areas such as procurement, distribution, medical logistics and logistics planning, which were perceived as critical areas that require standardisation. Practitioners and scholars were targeted via social media, through mailing lists and via communication from the practitioner organisation – the Humanitarian Logistics Association (HLA). While it provided good access to different groups of respondents, the response rate is not possible to calculate. The findings confirm the high importance of standardisation, indicating areas and functions that should be standardised first. Standardisation may improve cooperation between different humanitarian actors, allowing better service provision for beneficiaries. Thus there are also potential negative impacts, i.e. impact on localisation, which should be overcome. Results do not have a direct social impact; however, they stimulate research and work among practitioners on standardisation, which in turn could improve cooperation between humanitarian actors, thereby enabling a better humanitarian response in emergencies. The majority of papers on standardisation use a qualitative approach. This paper applies a survey among a large network of humanitarian practitioners, capturing their view on the topic and perception of the need for standardisation. The work is descriptive; however, it could be used as a base for further studies related to humanitarian standards.
      Citation: Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management
      PubDate: 2021-06-15
      DOI: 10.1108/JHLSCM-11-2020-0101
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Managing regional logistics in times of crisis: a COVID-19 case study

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      Authors: Christopher M. Durugbo, Soud M. Almahamid, Lulwa H. Budalamah, Odeh R. Al-Jayyousi, Batoul BendiMerad
      Abstract: Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a pandemic with unique regional logistics management (RLM) challenges to respond to the chaos created by the crisis and to restore normality for operations and supply chains in home nations. The purpose of this article is to explore RLM in times of crisis from the perspective of public authorities responsible for combating the COVID-19 pandemic. The article also discusses the significance of crisis-driven RLM for humanitarian logistics and supply chain (HLSC) management. Grounded on an inductive case study logic and guided by a constructivist perspective, this research involves semi-structured interviews with 15 managers and strategists responsible for the RLM of COVID-19 to capture lessons learnt so far from mitigating the transmission and spread of COVID-19. Underpinning the research is a conceptual RLM model premised on coordination, communication, and containment mechanisms (the 3Cs of crisis-driven logistics), as crisis response. The study finds that the triggering of regional logistics in times of crisis for the COVID-19 case involves taskforce teams with centralisation for crisis readiness, information infrastructure with digitalisation for crisis protocols, and capacity calculations with orchestration for crisis scenarios. The study also finds that navigating the challenges for the 3Cs of crisis-driven logistics entails forward-thinking leadership for culture-based commitments, first-hand clarity for compliance-based campaigns, and far-reaching solidarity for compassion-based contributions. This article addresses the gap in knowledge on RLM and potential priorities that underpin crisis-driven RLM strategies for HLSCs. The research is original in its argument for regional perspectives on logistics strategies that contribute to the “viability” and “integrity” of HLSCs. The research also uniquely focuses on RLM in times of crisis and proposes a conceptual RLM model of strategies for enhancing HLSCs.
      Citation: Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management
      PubDate: 2021-06-07
      DOI: 10.1108/JHLSCM-01-2021-0001
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • A multi-objective optimization model for logistic planning in the crisis
           response phase

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      Authors: Mohammad Mahdi Ershadi, Hossein Shams Shemirani
      Abstract: Proper planning for the response phase of humanitarian relief can significantly prevent many financial and human losses. To this aim, a multi-objective optimization model is proposed in this paper that considers different types of injured people, different vehicles with determining capacities and multi-period logistic planning. This model can be updated based on new information about resources and newly identified injured people. The main objective function of the proposed model in this paper is minimizing the unsatisfied prioritized injured people in the network. Besides, the total transportation activities of different types of vehicles are considered as another objective function. Therefore, these objectives are optimized hierarchically in the proposed model using the Lexicographic method. This method finds the best value for the first objective function. Then, it tries to optimize transportation activities as the second objective function while maintaining the optimality of the first objective function. The performances of the proposed model were analyzed in different cases and its robust approach for different problems was shown within the framework of a case study. Besides, the sensitivity analysis of results shows the logical behavior of the proposed model against various factors. The proposed methodology can be applied to find the best response plan for all crises. In this paper, we have tried to use a multi-objective optimization model to guide and correct response programs to deal with the occurred crisis. This is important because it can help emergency managers to improve their plans.
      Citation: Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management
      PubDate: 2021-06-03
      DOI: 10.1108/JHLSCM-11-2020-0108
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • A preliminary study for selecting the appropriate AI-based forecasting
           model for hospital assets demand under disasters

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      Authors: Sara Jebbor, Chiheb Raddouane, Abdellatif El Afia
      Abstract: Hospitals recently search for more accurate forecasting systems, given the unpredictable demand and the increasing occurrence of disruptive incidents (mass casualty incidents, pandemics and natural disasters). Besides, the incorporation of automatic inventory and replenishment systems – that hospitals are undertaking – requires developed and accurate forecasting systems. Researchers propose different artificial intelligence (AI)-based forecasting models to predict hospital assets consumption (AC) for everyday activity case and prove that AI-based models generally outperform many forecasting models in this framework. The purpose of this paper is to identify the appropriate AI-based forecasting model(s) for predicting hospital AC under disruptive incidents to improve hospitals' response to disasters/pandemics situations. The authors select the appropriate AI-based forecasting models according to the deduced criteria from hospitals' framework analysis under disruptive incidents. Artificial neural network (ANN), recurrent neural network (RNN), adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) and learning-FIS (FIS with learning algorithms) are generally compliant with the criteria among many AI-based forecasting methods. Therefore, the authors evaluate their accuracy to predict a university hospital AC under a burn mass casualty incident. The ANFIS model is the most compliant with the extracted criteria (autonomous learning capability, fast response, real-time control and interpretability) and provides the best accuracy (the average accuracy is 98.46%) comparing to the other models. This work contributes to developing accurate forecasting systems for hospitals under disruptive incidents to improve their response to disasters/pandemics situations.
      Citation: Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management
      PubDate: 2021-05-27
      DOI: 10.1108/JHLSCM-12-2020-0123
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Exploring the barriers that influence intention to donate and role of the
           charity shop within the multi-tier supply chain

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      Authors: Hailan Guo, Xiaoling Xu
      Abstract: Humanitarian relief organisations such as charities count on donations to provide assistance to people in need when disasters occur. In the UK, about 11,200 charity shops collect second-hand goods from donors to raise funds for their parent charity to support target beneficiaries. As their numbers increase, charity shops are finding it difficult to secure good quality stock. Furthermore, they may need to plan ahead to secure sufficient stock when the economy experiences a downturn. This paper identifies the charity shop's role and its donation flow in the multi-tier supply chain and empirically assesses the barriers that influence intention to donate with a mixed-methods approach. In order to explore the charity shop's role within the multi-tier supply chain, this study begins with a literature review and then develops a conceptual model. In order to empirically evaluate the barriers that influence intention to donate, the authors conducted semi-structured interviews with 14 charity shop managers and collected 222 usable questionnaires from donors. The interpretive structural modelling (ISM) approach was applied to examine the interrelationship among barriers and rank their priority. This paper identifies ten significant barriers that influence intention to donate: lack of good quality items for donation; lack of information on how charity shops make use of donations; lack of familiarity with the donation process; lack of information of what items can be accepted by charity shops; lack of awareness of the impact that donations make; the difficulty of being available at the scheduled times for charity shops' free pick-up services; the difficulty of donating during shops' opening hours; the difficulty of finding parking to access charity shops; and living too far away from charity shops. In particular, the questionnaires' results indicate that lack of good quality items is the most significant barrier. This is also reflected in the ISM model, and thus needs more attention. The results are very useful for charity shops themselves to understand current barriers to securing good quality stock and to develop potential stock-securing interventions based on these barriers' priority. Although charity shops have been investigated by several researchers, their supply chain remains insufficiently explored. This paper fills this gap by identifying the charity shop's role and its donation flow in the supply chain and by empirically assessing the supply-side barriers with a mixed-methods approach.
      Citation: Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management
      PubDate: 2021-04-29
      DOI: 10.1108/JHLSCM-07-2020-0055
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • A disaster relief commodity supply chain network considering emergency
           relief volunteers: a case study

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      Authors: Omid Kebriyaii, Marzieh Hamzehei, Mohammad Khalilzadeh
      Abstract: The number of natural and man-made disasters is remarkable and threatened human lives at the time of occurrence and also after that. Therefore, an efficient response following a disaster can eliminate or mitigate the adverse effects. This paper aims to help address those challenges related to humanitarian logistics by considering disaster network design under uncertainty and the management of emergency relief volunteers simultaneously. In this paper, a robust fuzzy stochastic programming model is proposed for designing a relief commodity supply chain network in a disaster by considering emergency relief volunteers. To demonstrate the practicality of the proposed model, a case study is presented for the 22 districts of Tehran and solved by an exact method. The results indicate that there are many parameters affecting the design of a relief commodity supply chain network in a disaster, and also many parameters should be controlled so that, the catastrophe is largely prevented and the lives of many people can be saved by sending the relief commodity on time. This model helps decision-makers and authorities to explore optimal location and allocation decisions without using complex optimization algorithms. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, employee workforce management models have not received adequate attention despite their role in relief and recovery efforts. Hence, the proposed model focuses on the problem of managing employees and designing a disaster logistics network simultaneously. The robust fuzzy stochastic programming method is applied for the first time for controlling the uncertainties in the design of humanitarian relief supply chains.
      Citation: Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management
      PubDate: 2021-04-09
      DOI: 10.1108/JHLSCM-08-2020-0073
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Managing funerary systems in the pandemic: lessons learned and an
           application of a scenario simulation in São Paulo City, Brazil

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      Authors: Irineu de Brito Jr, Manoel Henrique Capistrano Cunha, Luiz Antonio Tozi, Luiz Augusto Franzese, Márcia Lorena da Silva Frazão, Adriano Bressane
      Abstract: This study, a practice forum article, aims to presents the lessons learned and the development of a discrete event simulation model to support the funerary system management of São Paulo City, Brazil, during the COVID-19 pandemic. A discrete event simulation model was developed by the authors as soon as the pandemic affected the city of São Paulo, Brazil. Based on the model, several scenarios with varying minimum, median and peak demands (i.e. the number of deaths) were tested and evaluated. The lessons learned from the scenario analysis and implementation of the decision-making of the city government of São Paulo are discussed in this article. The lessons learned about the coordination, inventory management and other operational characteristics in funerary logistics during the pandemic are shared with a model, which quantifies the demand for vehicles, coffins, graves and teams in the cemeteries in different simulated scenarios. The São Paulo State Civil Defense used this information during the pandemic to prepare the funerary system of the municipality. The study presents methods to mitigate the sanitary, environmental and psychosocial problems related to the funerary system. Studies on funerary systems are scarce. This study presents the results that supported the dimensioning of the funerary system during the pandemic and operational lessons about the logistics to support decision-making in future events.
      Citation: Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management
      PubDate: 2021-03-31
      DOI: 10.1108/JHLSCM-09-2020-0078
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • HIV supply chains in low- and middle-income countries: overview and
           research opportunities

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      Authors: Sofie Stulens, Kim De Boeck, Nico Vandaele
      Abstract: Despite HIV being reported as one of the major global health issues, availability and accessibility of HIV services and supplies remain limited, especially in low- and middle-income countries. The effective and efficient operation of HIV supply chains is critical to tackle this problem. The purpose of this paper is to give an introduction to HIV supply chains in low- and middle-income countries and identify research opportunities for the operations research/operations management (OR/OM) community. First, the authors review a combination of the scientific and grey literature, including both qualitative and quantitative papers, to give an overview of HIV supply chain operations in low- and middle-income countries and the challenges that are faced by organizing such supply chains. The authors then classify and discuss the relevant OR/OM literature based on seven classification criteria: decision level, methodology, type of HIV service modeled, challenges, performance measures, real-life applicability and countries covered. Because research on HIV supply chains in low- and middle-income countries is limited in the OR/OM field, this part also includes papers focusing on HIV supply chain modeling in high-income countries. The authors conclude this study by identifying several tendencies and gaps and by proposing future research directions for OR/OM research. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this paper is the first literature review addressing this specific topic from an OR/OM perspective.
      Citation: Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management
      PubDate: 2021-03-04
      DOI: 10.1108/JHLSCM-08-2020-0072
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The four spheres of value co-creation in humanitarian professional
           services

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      Authors: Francesco Pillitteri, Erica Mazzola, Manfredi Bruccoleri
      Abstract: The study focuses on the value co-creation processes in humanitarian professional services provision, analysing the key enabling factors of beneficiaries' participation, involved in long-term integration programmes (L-TIPs). Through an in-depth case study, the research looks at the practices of value co-creation in humanitarian professional services, considering both the perspectives of the professional service provider and beneficiary. In professional services beneficiary's participation affects the success of the L-TIPs outcomes. Participation's enablers can be classified into four different spheres, each belonging to different elements of professional service: the beneficiary, the professionals, the service design and the external environment. This paper contributes to the literature on humanitarian operations & supply chain management. By focussing on an understudied phase of the disaster life-cycle management, it contributes to the theory of value co-creation by exploring new issues and drivers of beneficiary's participation. This research has interesting implications for policymakers and humanitarian practitioners. First, guidelines for professionals' behaviours and interventions should be designed as well as new practices and strategies should be adopted. Second, governments should avoid concentrating L-TIPs in few big humanitarian centres. The study focuses on an understudied stage of humanitarian operations, namely the L-TIPs, and uses this setting to build on the theory of value co-creation in professional services by identifying its enabling factors, clustered into four spheres, namely beneficiary, professional, service design and environmental.
      Citation: Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management
      PubDate: 2021-02-25
      DOI: 10.1108/JHLSCM-06-2020-0049
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Siting refugee camps in mainland Greece using geographic information
           systems-based multi-criteria decision-making

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      Authors: Sotirios N. Denekos, Nikitas-Spiros Koutsoukis, Efstathios T. Fakiolas, Ioannis Konstantopoulos, Nikolaos P. Rachaniotis
      Abstract: Refugee camps are not easily welcomed by local communities. The purpose of this paper is to outline a structured approach to support the decision-making process for siting refugee camps in mainland Greece using multiple criteria, including local opposition. A suitability analysis generates a list of potential sites and a multiple criteria evaluation is applied. The motivation is the development of a methodology that can support choices and policies regarding the refugee camps siting problem, incorporating the need to address local opposition. The proposed methodology combines geographic information systems (GIS) with multiple criteria decision-making (MCDM) techniques. These are used to develop a location classification and ranking model based on related criteria and subcriteria, attributes and weights. The region of Peloponnese in Greece is selected as a case study to validate the approach. The lack of predefined candidate sites for refugee camps necessitates, initially, tackling a site search problem to generate a pool of potential sites through a suitability analysis. Subsequently, using the GIS the pool yields a subset of potential sites, satisfying all the criteria to setup a refugee camp. Through the current analysis the suitability of the single existing refugee camp site in Peloponnese can be evaluated. Finally, a “with and without” analysis, excluding the social criterion, depicts the changes in the candidate sites pool and their scores. There is a lack of relevant literature taking into account the local opposition or sociopolitical implications as decision criteria. The selection of the appropriate criteria is a complex process that involves the cooperation of many experts. The main criteria, subcriteria and their attributes were determined according to existing literature and authors' informed judgment. The proposed methodology can help decision-makers to setup a decision-making system and process for identifying refugee camps' sites using multiple criteria, including local opposition.
      Citation: Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management
      PubDate: 2021-02-24
      DOI: 10.1108/JHLSCM-02-2020-0009
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • An entropy-based approach for disaster risk assessment and humanitarian
           logistics operations planning in Colombia

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      Authors: Rafael Renteria, Mario Chong, Irineu de Brito Junior, Ana Luna, Renato Quiliche
      Abstract: This paper aims to design a vulnerability assessment model considering the multidimensional and systematic approach to disaster risk and vulnerability. This model serves to both risk mitigation and disaster preparedness phases of humanitarian logistics. A survey of 27,218 households in Pueblo Rico and Dosquebradas was conducted to obtain information about disaster risk for landslides, floods and collapses. We adopted a cross entropy-based approach for the measure of disaster vulnerability (Kullback–Leibler divergence), and a maximum-entropy estimation for the reconstruction of risk a priori categorization (logistic regression). The capabilities approach of Sen supported theoretically our multidimensional assessment of disaster vulnerability. Disaster vulnerability is shaped by economic, such as physical attributes of households, and health indicators, which are in specific morbidity indicators that seem to affect vulnerability outputs. Vulnerability is heterogeneous between communities/districts according to formal comparisons of Kullback–Leibler divergence. Nor social dimension, neither chronic illness indicators seem to shape vulnerability, at least for Pueblo Rico and Dosquebradas. The results need a qualitative or case study validation at the community/district level. We discuss how risk mitigation policies and disaster preparedness strategies can be driven by empirical results. For example, the type of stock to preposition can vary according to the disaster or the kind of alternative policies that can be formulated on the basis of the strong relationship between morbidity and disaster risk. Entropy-based metrics are not widely used in humanitarian logistics literature, as well as empirical data-driven techniques.
      Citation: Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management
      PubDate: 2021-02-18
      DOI: 10.1108/JHLSCM-03-2020-0018
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Understanding material and supplier networks in the construction of
           disaster-relief shelters: the feasibility of using social network analysis
           as a decision-making tool

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Alex Copping , Noorullah Kuchai , Laura Hattam , Natalia Paszkiewicz , Dima Albadra , Paul Shepherd , Esra Sahin Burat , David Coley
      Abstract: Understanding the supply network of construction materials used to construct shelters in refugee camps, or during the reconstruction of communities, is important as it can reveal the intricate links between different stakeholders and the volumes and speeds of material flows to the end-user. Using social network analysis (SNA) enables another dimension to be analysed – the role of commonalities. This is likely to be particularly important when attempting to replace vernacular materials with higher-performing alternatives or when encouraging the use of non-vernacular methods. This paper aims to analyse the supply networks of four different disaster-relief situations. Data were collected from interviews with 272 displaced (or formally displaced) families in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Nepal and Turkey, often in difficult conditions. The results show that the form of the supply networks was highly influenced by the nature/cause of the initial displacement, the geographical location, the local availability of materials and the degree of support/advice given by aid agencies and or governments. In addition, it was found that SNA could be used to indicate which strategies might work in a particular context and which might not, thereby potentially speeding up the delivery of novel solutions. This study represents the first attempt in theorising and empirically investigating supply networks using SNA in a post-disaster reconstruction context. It is suggested that future studies might map the up-stream supply chain to include manufacturers and higher-order, out of country, suppliers. This would provide a complete picture of the origins of all materials and components in the supply network. This is original research, and it aims to produce new knowledge.
      Citation: Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management
      PubDate: 2021-09-28
      DOI: 10.1108/JHLSCM-01-2020-0007
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Relocation of public healthcare network of a large city in the event of a
           major earthquake: a combined methodological analysis

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      Authors: Alexander Garrido , Fabián Pongutá , Oscar Yecid Buitrago
      Abstract: The aim of this research is to improve the responsiveness of the healthcare network of a large city to a major earthquake, by applying a combined methodology to reduce human suffering and death. Scenario analysis, a non-linear programming (NLP) model, and the analytical network process are sequentially applied to find the “best location pattern”. When considering the occurrence of major earthquakes in cities with high population density, as a rule of thumb, the location of healthcare facilities should prioritize areas characteristically overcrowded and/or that were built based on poor standards of seismic resistance. The proposed research design does not include a cost criterion in the set of decision variables involved. Furthermore, the results derived from the NLP-model are restricted by the input simulation data. The performance of the “best location pattern” is compared with the current location of healthcare facilities in terms of their distances to the affected zones. Metropolis areas worldwide with similar conditions to the city under consideration could be benefited from applying the general methodology for relocation of healthcare facilities described in this research. This research implements a diverse combination of methodologies to examine the problem of relocating of healthcare facilities in a large city in the wake of an assumed earthquake. In addition, to the best of authors' knowledge, this is the first study of its kind that proposes improvements in the responsiveness of the healthcare facilities' network in the city in question.
      Citation: Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management
      PubDate: 2021-09-17
      DOI: 10.1108/JHLSCM-04-2021-0040
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • An M/M/C/K queueing system in an inventory routing problem considering
           congestion and response time for post-disaster humanitarian relief: a case
           study

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      Authors: Mahdieh Masoumi , Amir Aghsami , Mohammad Alipour-Vaezi , Fariborz Jolai , Behdad Esmailifar
      Abstract: Due to the randomness and unpredictability of many disasters, it is essential to be prepared to face difficult conditions after a disaster to reduce human casualties and meet the needs of the people. After the disaster, one of the most essential measures is to deliver relief supplies to those affected by the disaster. Therefore, this paper aims to assign demand points to the warehouses as well as routing their related relief vehicles after a disaster considering convergence in the border warehouses. This research proposes a multi-objective, multi-commodity and multi-period queueing-inventory-routing problem in which a queuing system has been applied to reduce the congestion in the borders of the affected zones. To show the validity of the proposed model, a small-size problem has been solved using exact methods. Moreover, to deal with the complexity of the problem, a metaheuristic algorithm has been utilized to solve the large dimensions of the problem. Finally, various sensitivity analyses have been performed to determine the effects of different parameters on the optimal response. According to the results, the proposed model can optimize the objective functions simultaneously, in which decision-makers can determine their priority according to the condition by using the sensitivity analysis results. The focus of the research is on delivering relief items to the affected people on time and at the lowest cost, in addition to preventing long queues at the entrances to the affected areas.
      Citation: Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management
      PubDate: 2021-08-31
      DOI: 10.1108/JHLSCM-12-2020-0119
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Exploring critical success factors (CSFs) of humanitarian supply chain
           management (HSCM) in flood disaster management (FDM)

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      Authors: Isaac Sakyi Damoah
      Abstract: This study explores the critical success factors (CSFs) in humanitarian supply chain management (HSCM) by focussing on flood disaster management (FDM) in Ghana. An in-depth semi-structured interview and questionnaire surveys in a sequential data collection approach were used to collect data from definitive stakeholders of humanitarian organisations. The data was analysed using exploratory factor analysis (EFA), confirmatory factors analysis (CFA) and structural equation modelling (SEM) techniques. Seventy-four factors were identified as success factors of HSCM of flood disaster management. However, 41 of these factors were statistically significant and considered as critical. In descending order, these factors relate to management practices, education and training, stakeholder involvement and cooperation, infrastructure, innovation and technology, materials and resources, administrative practices, socio-cultural and economic. Whilst some factors are internal to the humanitarian organisations, others are external factors that are beyond the control of humanitarian organisations. Even though this study offers empirical results that could guide policymakers in their decision-making about humanitarian operations, care needs to be taken since the data is within one country and within a specific disaster context – hence, policymakers need to consider the local contextual dynamics. Future studies could look at different disasters context to make a comparative analysis of various types of disaster operations. Institutions such as World Health Organization, Red Cross organisations and UN seeking to curbs global-warming-related disasters and the reduction of the effects of flood disaster can use findings as a guide during the formulation of HSCM policies and strategies. Unlike previous studies of humanitarian operations that focussed extensively on theoretical expositions, simulations, conceptual frameworks and models, this present study offers empirical evidence of humanitarian operations in the context of SCM. Further, by highlighting on the HSCM CSFs, this study contributes to disaster reduction and their effects on humanity in the context of FDM. This research could be used as guide by governments and FDM organisations to make informed decisions on SCM areas to focus the most during FDM.
      Citation: Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management
      PubDate: 2021-08-25
      DOI: 10.1108/JHLSCM-01-2021-0003
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The evolution of humanitarian logistics as a discipline through a crystal
           ball

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Nezih Altay , Gyöngyi Kovács , Karen Spens
      Abstract: Humanitarian logistics has for a long time been argued to be a new discipline. Now that even the Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management (JHLSCM) has existed over a decade, it is time to take a closer look at its evolution. This article provides some understanding for the developments of humanitarian logistics over the past decade, reveals current trends and discovers what lies behind the curtains in the humanitarian logistics and supply chain management discipline. This article brings in developments and discussions in humanitarian logistics practice into the research domain. The article conveys the concerns of humanitarian logistics practitioners to research. These include the backlash from the COVID-19 pandemic as a prime current concern, and also other longer-term issues and developments. The themes identified in the article can be used to inform a research agenda in humanitarian logistics and supply chain management. The article revisits a framework of global events and their cascading impacts to include non-linearities and multiple disruptions from evolutionary disasters such as the COVID-19 pandemic. The article argues for more collaborative and co-designed research to increase the relevance and impact of humanitarian logistics. Wider societal views are brought into the area of humanitarian logistics. The article highlights the gaps that remain in humanitarian logistics and supply chain management research.
      Citation: Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management
      PubDate: 2021-08-23
      DOI: 10.1108/JHLSCM-06-2021-0056
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • A methodology for managing public spaces to increase access to essential
           

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      Authors: Andrés Regal Ludowieg , Claudio Ortega , Andrés Bronfman , Michelle Rodriguez Serra , Mario Chong
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to present a spatial decision support system (SDSS) to be used by the local authorities of a city in the planning and response phase of a disaster. The SDSS focuses on the management of public spaces as a resource to increase a vulnerable population’s accessibility to essential goods and services. Using a web-based platform, the SDSS would support data-driven decisions, especially for cases such as the COVID-19 pandemic which requires special care in quarantine situations (which imply walking access instead of by other means of transport). This paper proposes a methodology to create a web-SDSS to manage public spaces in the planning and response phase of a disaster to increase the access to essential goods and services. Using a regular polygon grid, a city is partitioned into spatial units that aggregate spatial data from open and proprietary sources. The polygon grid is then used to compute accessibility, vulnerability and population density indicators using spatial analysis. Finally, a facility location problem is formulated and solved to provide decision-makers with an adaptive selection of public spaces given their indicators of choice. The design and implementation of the methodology resulted in a granular representation of the city of Lima, Peru, in terms of population density, accessibility and vulnerability. Using these indicators, the SDSS was deployed as a web application that allowed decision-makers to explore different solutions to a facility location model within their districts, as well as visualizing the indicators computed for the hexagons that covered the district’s area. By performing tests with different local authorities, improvements were suggested to support a more general set of decisions and the key indicators to use in the SDSS were determined. This paper, following the literature gap, is the first of its kind that presents an SDSS focused on increasing access to essential goods and services using public spaces and has had a successful response from local authorities with different backgrounds regarding the integration into their decision-making process.
      Citation: Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management
      PubDate: 2021-08-17
      DOI: 10.1108/JHLSCM-02-2021-0012
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Coordination at the 10-year mark of the JHLSCM–from global response
           to local preparedness

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Marianne Jahre , Leif-Magnus Jensen
      Abstract: At the inception of the Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management (JHLSCM), logistics coordination was identified as important, both in practice and research, but few studies on the topic had been published. Ten years later, many, if not most, papers in the journal mention the topic. So the picture has changed, but to what extent' This paper discusses how coordination research has followed humanitarian logistics practice and vice versa. The point of departure in the present article is the most salient topic from the study’s original papers (Jahre et al., 2009; Jahre and Jensen, 2010). The authors discuss how these topics have developed in research and practice. A recent literature review (Grange et al., 2020) enables us to pick relevant papers from JHLSCM and supplement them with more recent ones. The authors complement this approach with updated data on the cluster system, particularly the logistics cluster, to add insights from the empirical domain. In practice, the cluster concept has developed from coordination within clusters in response to the inclusion of inter-cluster coordination in preparedness, and more recently a focus on localized preparedness. However, JHLSCM research does not appear to have kept pace, with a few notable exceptions. The majority of its papers still focus on response. To the extent that preparedness is covered, it is primarily done so at the global level. The authors use a framework to discuss humanitarian logistics coordination research and identify important gaps. Based on developments in practice, the study’s key contribution is a revised model with suggestions for further research.
      Citation: Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management
      PubDate: 2021-08-17
      DOI: 10.1108/JHLSCM-06-2021-0051
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The infrastructures of war and peace

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      Authors: Tore Listou
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to identify the need for and develop a framework for research on the effects UN peace operation infrastructure has on a host nation. Mission infrastructure serves primarily to sustain a mission. As the mission terminates, infrastructure is often transferred to the host nation. The mission infrastructures could have both positive and negative implications for the host nation and for local communities. Exploratory approach to develop a foundation for a research agenda in an area with little existing research. Identify theoretical contributions related to infrastructures, combine with primary data from one peace operation, secondary data from five other peace operations and from the UN repositories. This study proposes a research agenda. As such our findings relate to the identification and classification of different infrastructures and their interdependencies. This framework would contribute to new ways of exploring and analysing both the effectiveness of peace operations and the impact a mission has on the development in the host nation. This study proposes a framework for research. As such, it will have implications primarily for researchers. Understanding the interdependencies between mission infrastructures and the material and social infrastructures of a host nation would help understanding what value mission infrastructure brings to a host nation and the local communities. Analysing the logistics in peace support operations as networks of infrastructures bring new perspectives into humanitarian logistics.
      Citation: Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management
      PubDate: 2021-08-03
      DOI: 10.1108/JHLSCM-06-2021-0054
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Humanitarian aid logistics: a Cardiff University research perspective on
           cases, structures and prospects

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      Authors: Anthony Beresford , Stephen Pettit
      Abstract: This paper provides a contextualised review of research in the area of humanitarian and emergency relief logistics, providing insights with particular emphasis on lessons learned. The paper tracks the evolution of research against the development of partner networks and key global events; information was collated and assimilated from cross-cutting themes such as disaster preparedness, emergency response structures and the transferability of commercial-world concepts and principles (such as sustainability) into volatile and fragile environments. It concludes by suggesting possible future challenges which could steer humanitarian response on the ground and will influence the path of academic research going forward. The paper provides a general review of work undertaken in the area of Humanitarian Logistics. Use is made of vignettes of case studies in order to provide focus to the discussion and to highlight key issues that emerged from the research reviewed. The findings show that there are several new areas of research which will need to be addressed in the humanitarian logistics arena. The discussion demonstrates that research into crisis response is arguably even more important today than it has been previously. Research therefore likely needs to be expanded considerably over the next decade and beyond. This paper contextualises and synthesises past research into humanitarian logistics responses, highlights key themes and suggests areas for further research.
      Citation: Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management
      PubDate: 2021-07-30
      DOI: 10.1108/JHLSCM-06-2021-0052
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • A purchasing portfolio model for humanitarian supply chain resilience:
           perspectives from a development aid context

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      Authors: Narath Bhusiri , Ruth Banomyong , Puthipong Julagasigorn , Paitoon Varadejsatitwong , Nirpa Dhami
      Abstract: The impact of supply disruptions from unplanned events can cause goods shortage, limited responsiveness and high opportunity cost thus compromising development aid programmes' achievement targets. These situations force humanitarian aid agencies to develop new strategies for effectively managing their supplies. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the foundation of humanitarian supply chain resilience through the development of an adapted Kraljic portfolio model. Action research was used to adapt and validate the Kraljic portfolio model to the development aid context. The research team worked with a humanitarian aid agency in developing criterions and used Analytical Hierarchical Process (AHP) in weighting those key criterions. The adapted portfolio model was able to evaluate purchases done by the aid agency by incorporating different perspectives related to the strategic importance of purchase and supply vulnerability. In particular, development aid programmes require large supplies annually. Better classification offers improved visualisation of purchases, leading to a more precise adoption of mitigation strategies and policies to minimise supply disruption risks. Adapting the Kraljic portfolio model is a stepping-stone to building humanitarian supply chain resilience. The proposed humanitarian supply chain resilience framework is based on the foundation that current humanitarian supply chain needs to be re-engineered. In order to re-engineer, the supply base strategy must first be revisited. Many aid agencies do not have a holistic view on their purchases and commonly apply a transactional classification of purchases that only considers the consumption values. Purchasing strategies mostly focus on cost minimisation, whereas risk mitigations have been disregarded. The proposed portfolio model overcomes these drawbacks. Societal impact may be limited but development aid agencies will be able to offer more reliable aid delivery as part of their mandate. The proposed portfolio model is among the first tool to guide humanitarian aid agencies to develop procurement strategies to alleviate supply disruptions and increase development aid programmes resilience.
      Citation: Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management
      PubDate: 2021-07-29
      DOI: 10.1108/JHLSCM-06-2021-0053
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Security, sustainability and supply chain collaboration in the
           humanitarian space

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      Authors: Paul D. Larson
      Abstract: To extend humanitarian supply chain relationships beyond logistics concerns of delivery, quality and cost. As humanitarian actors continue to face increasing numbers of natural disasters, armed conflicts and attacks on aid workers, security (risk) and sustainability are issues of growing importance. Aiming to inspire discussion, the paper concludes with a research agenda. This is a conceptual paper inspired by relevant statistics, news reports and academic literature. Worldwide natural disasters and armed conflicts are on the rise. So are deliberate attacks on aid workers. Thus, humanitarian supply chain design must include considerations of security and sustainability. Agencies have several options for integrating matters of security and sustainability with the delivery of aid, from being reactive to creating internal solutions to forming proactive relationships with security and sustainability experts. There are numerous opportunities for research in the areas of security, sustainability and supply chain relationships. Through advocacy and supply chain relationships, humanitarian agencies can enhance security for aid workers and civilians affected by conflict and disasters. Looking to the future, they can also make a positive difference on issues of sustainability. There is an opportunity to enlarge the “humanitarian space” – and increase security for aid workers and civilians, especially in areas of armed conflict. In the long term, aid agencies can also help eliminate social problems such as gender inequality. This appears to be among the first papers to discuss matters of security and sustainability in the context of humanitarian supply chain collaboration.
      Citation: Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management
      PubDate: 2021-07-27
      DOI: 10.1108/JHLSCM-06-2021-0059
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • System dynamics for humanitarian operations revisited

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      Authors: Maria Besiou , Luk N. Van Wassenhove
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to show that the current complexity of humanitarian operations has only increased the usefulness of system dynamics (SD) in helping decision-makers better understand the challenges they face. A critical analysis to evaluate how SD methodology has been applied to humanitarian operations. Today's humanitarian operations are characterized by huge complexity given the increased number of stakeholders, feedback loops, uncertainty, scarce resources and multiple objectives. The authors argue that SD's tools (causal-loop diagram, data layer, simulation model) have the capacity to appropriately capture this complexity, thereby enhancing intuition and understanding. Researchers and practitioners hesitate to use system dynamics when data is missing. The authors suggest alternatives to deal with this common situation.
      Citation: Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management
      PubDate: 2021-07-21
      DOI: 10.1108/JHLSCM-06-2021-0048
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Emergency supplies purchase patterns during COVID-19 outbreak in the
           developing economy: frequency and stockpiling drivers’ assessment

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      Authors: Alexander Rossolov , Olexiy Kuzkin , Halyna Rossolova
      Abstract: The purpose of the paper is to assess the roots of stockpiling behaviors and to give a quantitative assessment of shopping frequency changes for emergency supplies during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. In addition, the authors aim to determine the sources that influenced emergency supply purchases during the COVID-19 outbreak. The study used a polling or survey process implementation to collect the data on shopping patterns and to determine the drivers of stockpiling behaviors for the assessment. The polling was conducted using a snowball technique, and descriptive and regression analyses were used to define the roots of the stockpiling behaviors and the shopping frequency changes. It was determined that 88.0% of end-consumers increased their shopping volumes for emergency supplies. An almost twofold increase in the average duration of usage for stockpiled goods (from 11 to 21 days) was also determined. Also revealed was a reduction in shopping frequency from an average of seven (pre-COVID-19 period) to five (first wave of COVID-19 pandemic) days. Such disproportional increases in purchase volumes along with a slight reduction in shopping frequency indicate the strong stockpile patterns that occurred during the pandemic. The research is based on data from Ukraine, where the number of COVID-19 cases was low. Despite the comparatively low spread of COVID-19 in large cities in Ukraine in relation to other cities globally, people still revealed panic and stockpiling behaviors. The study's quantitative assessment of shopping behaviors reveals the social and economic determinants of the shopping frequency.
      Citation: Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management
      PubDate: 2021-07-09
      DOI: 10.1108/JHLSCM-02-2021-0016
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management

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