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INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND AID (103 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 97 of 97 Journals sorted alphabetically
Africa Development     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
African Evaluation Journal     Open Access  
African Journal of Economic and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
African Journal of Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Afrique contemporaine : La revue de l'Afrique et du développement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Humanities and Development Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Asia Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Asian Education and Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Foreign Policy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Canadian Journal of Development Studies / Revue canadienne d'études du développement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Capacity.org     Free   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos de Trabajo Hegoa     Open Access  
Desarrollo y Sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Desenvolvimento em Questão     Open Access  
Developing Country Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Development Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Development Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Development Studies Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
DRd - Desenvolvimento Regional em debate     Open Access  
Economia & Região     Open Access  
Economic History of Developing Regions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Economic Journal of Development Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Economic Journal of Emerging Markets     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Economics and Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Economics Development Analysis Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Economics of Development     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Economies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Emerging Economy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Environmental Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Finance & Development     Free   (Followers: 10)
Forum for Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Ghana Journal of Development Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Iberoamerican Journal of Development Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Growth and Development Review     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Journal of Human Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Innovation and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Insight on Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Affairs and Global Strategy     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
International Development Policy : Revue internationale de politique de développement     Open Access  
International Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Agricultural Management and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Developing Societies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Development Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Peace and Development Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Regional Development     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International NGO Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
IZA Journal of Labor & Development     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Accounting and Finance in Emerging Economies     Open Access  
Journal of African Studies and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Asian Development     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Business and Social Review in Emerging Economies     Open Access  
Journal of Contemporary Integrative Ideas     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Developing Economies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Development and Administrative Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Development Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Economic Development Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Economic Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Environmental Economics and Policy     Partially Free   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Illicit Economies and Development     Open Access  
Journal of International Business Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Journal of Management for Global Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Social and Economic Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Sustainable Development Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Sustainable Finance & Investment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the Indian Ocean Region     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Jurnal Ekonomi dan Studi Pembangunan     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Markets, Globalization & Development Review : The Official Journal of the International Society of Markets and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
MediaTrend     Open Access  
Membership Management Report The     Hybrid Journal  
New African Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Organizations and Markets in Emerging Economies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
QA : Rivista dell’Associazione Rossi-Doria     Full-text available via subscription  
Regional Formation and Development Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Review of Development and Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Review of Economics and Development Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Internacional de Cooperación y Desarrollo     Open Access  
Revista Perspectivas do Desenvolvimento     Open Access  
Rozwój Regionalny i Polityka Regionalna     Open Access  
Scholedge International Journal of Management & Development     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Social Development Issues     Full-text available via subscription  
Special Events Galore     Hybrid Journal  
St Antony's International Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Stability : International Journal of Security and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Studies in Comparative International Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Successful Fundraising     Hybrid Journal  
Technological and Economic Development of Economy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Tropicultura     Open Access  
Volunteer Management Report     Full-text available via subscription  
World Development Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.108
Number of Followers: 0  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 1 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 2044-0839 - ISSN (Online) 2044-0847
Published by Emerald Homepage  [362 journals]
  • Market-oriented extension and farming efficiency in small-scale maize
           farmers: evidence from Northern Vietnam

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      Authors: Nguyen To-The, Tuan Nguyen-Anh
      Abstract: Northern Vietnam is a mountainous area where most farmers' livelihoods depend on maize production. Beside training in farming techniques, since 2013 extension courses on market access have been gradually delivered to maize farmers to help them save production costs and increase earnings. By applying robust regression and Tobit models to estimate technical efficiency (TE), the difference-in-difference (DID) technique is used in this study to determine the change in the TE of 1,035 farmers in the period 2013–2015 in Northern Vietnam. The DID estimator indicated the initial success of extension courses by showing a faster increase in the TE of the receivers compared to that of non-receivers. However, co-operation in production and marketing by maize farmers and access to micro-credit resulted in an insignificant impact on the TE of maize farmers in 2015. These low impact results highlighted the inefficiency of the extension and micro-credit programmes and that raised the concern of policymakers. The distance to local market signifies the determination of farmers on their crops affected by how close their location to their input/output marketplaces. The Land Policy of the government should take into careful consideration measures to exploit all potential production and to mitigate poverty as well as foster the development of the region. The expansion of extension courses on access to market has been recognised as an effective method to increase farmer's efficiency.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2021-03-09
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-05-2020-0101
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • How can mixed integer linear programming assist dairy manufacturers by
           integrating supply decisions and production planning'

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      Authors: Juliana Emidio, Rafael Lima, Camila Leal, Grasiele Madrona
      Abstract: The dairy industry needs to make important decisions regarding its supply chain. In a context with many available suppliers, deciding which of them will be part of the supply chain and deciding when to buy raw milk is key to the supply chain performance. This study aims to propose a mathematical model to support milk supply decisions. In addition to determining which producers should be chosen as suppliers, the model decides on a milk pickup schedule over a planning horizon. The model addresses production decisions, inventory, setup and the use of by-products generated in the raw milk processing. The model was formulated using mixed integer linear programming, tested with randomly generated instances of various sizes and solved using the Gurobi Solver. Instances were generated using parameters obtained from a company that manufactures dairy products to test the model in a more realistic scenario. The results show that the proposed model can be solved with real-world sized instances in short computational times and yielding high quality results. Hence, companies can adopt this model to reduce transportation, production and inventory costs by supporting decision making throughout their supply chains. The novelty of the proposed model stems from the ability to integrate milk pickup and production planning of dairy products, thus being more comprehensive than the models currently available in the literature. Additionally, the model also considers by-products, which can be used as inputs for other products.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2021-02-24
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-09-2020-0199
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Competitive advantage and processor demand for local and imported food
           ingredients: analysis from an urban dairy market in West Africa

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      Authors: Ryan Vroegindewey, Robert B. Richardson, Kimberly Chung, Veronique Theriault, David L. Ortega
      Abstract: In Mali, dairy processors mostly use imported powdered milk rather than local fresh milk, constraining the development of a domestic milk sector. We investigate factors motivating a firm's choice of milk input, to identify measures that can encourage demand for fresh milk. We utilize case study data from nine firms that use fresh and powdered milk to varying degrees, and which are representative of dairy processing in Bamako. To model firm motivations, we assess how each input contributes to or detracts from firm competitive advantage, through its influence on cost and differentiation. Firms using fresh milk pay a higher input price, incur higher transaction costs and face additional challenges in production and distribution. Firms distinguish themselves from competitors through four potential sources of differentiation: novel product types, quality enhancements, quality-signaling and unique packaging. However, fresh milk firms are less likely to exploit each source of differentiation. Competitive advantage is a useful framework for understanding firm behavior in developing markets and can be applied in other contexts to strengthen external validity. The extant economics literature on African dairy development has been surprisingly silent on the threat of import competition. This research is one of the first to investigate this issue in the under-studied middle segment of food value chains.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2021-02-18
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-06-2020-0133
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Measuring productivity of dairy industry companies: an approach with data
           envelopment analysis

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      Authors: Bertha Viviana Ruales Guzmán, Gloria Isabel Rodríguez Lozano, Oscar Fernando Castellanos Domínguez
      Abstract: This research had two main objectives: To measure the productivity of companies in the Colombian dairy industry and to identify efficient decision-making units (DMUs) that can be used as work sample in future case studies. In the measurement of productivity, financial variables were considered for a sample of 19 DMUs. Efficient companies were identified through the data envelopment analysis (DEAs) methodology with the VRS model oriented to inputs and outputs. The input variables analyzed were “current asset,” “property, plant and equipment,” “non-current liability” and “equity,” while the output variables were “revenue” and “profit.” Findings revealed that seven DMUs are efficient in the input and output orientation and that companies of different sizes and with or without quality certifications are efficient in the sample analyzed. Additionally, the benchmark efficient DMUs were identified for each of the non-efficient DMUs. The implications for the research include the contribution to the theory, on the one hand, with the analysis of the current state of the literature on the use of DEA in the food sector, and on the other, with the use of DEA to measure the productivity of Colombian dairy industry companies and with the identification of a sample of efficient units that can be analyzed in future case studies. This article is novel and pioneering because it measures for the first time the productivity of DMUs of the Colombian dairy industry, in addition to including the current state of the literature on the application of the DEA methodology in the food sector. These findings contribute to the consolidation of the theory and also provide inputs for researchers, practitioners, managers, and policy makers.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2021-02-18
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-05-2020-0100
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Branding of green tea leaf: a disruptive innovation for building market
           competitiveness of small tea growers in North East India

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      Authors: S. John Mano Raj
      Abstract: This study aims to explore the opportunities and methods for branding fresh tea leaves, currently sold as commodities in the B2B market, as an innovative method by engaging with a smallholder group. The purpose is to enhance the market competitiveness of the significant number of small tea growers in developing economies. An exploratory study was conducted comprising a qualitative survey of a farmers' group formed by the smallholding of tea gardens and the sourcing factories in the state of Assam, India. Relevant case studies on the branding of agricultural commodities were also analyzed. Smallholding farmers, through collective efforts and with adequate extension and marketing support, can comply with the standards expected from their buyer. Perishable farm produce sold in the B2B market can be differentiated by exploiting attributes beyond the physical product. Market linkages established through innovative practices can enhance the market competitiveness of smallholdings. Successful branding of tea leaves can encourage similar practice in other agricultural crops as well. This will improve the quality of produce, increase the earnings of smallholdings and at the same time enhance customer value and satisfaction. This paper is the first of its kind to investigate the opportunities for branding tea leaves produced by smallholdings and sold in the B2B market. The findings will be useful to researchers, smallholdings, policymakers, and consumers at large.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2021-02-12
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-09-2019-0145
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Factors impacting the quality of fresh produce in transportation and their
           mitigation strategies: empirical evidence from a developing economy

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      Authors: Saurav Negi, Shantanu Trivedi
      Abstract: This study explores the factors that impact the quality of fresh produce in the transportation phase of the supply chain and the mitigation framework for improving the quality to curb the losses. This study aimed for an exploratory analysis using both quantitative and qualitative research methods. Using a questionnaire with responses from 172 transporters from the Uttar Pradesh region, India, primary data were gathered through a survey. Factors were identified using factor analysis and mitigation strategies were suggested for the factors through semi-structured interviews with six experts in transportation, agribusiness and food supply chain. Four factors that impact the quality were identified based on the factor analysis, namely operational issues, poor preservation, lack of ease of in-transit and poor infrastructure. The operational issue was found to be the main factor influencing the quality of fresh produce. The study also proposed the mitigation framework for the factors based on the interview results. The present study is confined to the fresh produce supply chain transportation process, particularly fruits with an emphasis on the Uttar Pradesh region, India. There is a lack of literature on implying mitigation strategies for factors affecting fresh produce quality in the transport process in India. Thus, this study attempts to fulfill this gap and has added to the food supply chain literature that could help scholars and practitioners in improving the food supply chain in developing economies.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2021-02-12
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-07-2020-0154
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Dynamics of agricultural growth and diversification in Eastern India

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      Authors: Ghanshyam Pandey, Seema Kumari
      Abstract: In low-income economies agriculture plays an important role in promoting economic growth and reducing poverty. Agricultural growth achieved through diversification toward the higher value crops enhance income and mitigate risk. The present study focuses on one of the eastern Indian states namely “Jharkhand”; where agriculture is the mainstay for the 80% of its rural population. The state per-capita income is below the national average; however, it has registered an impressive growth, especially in the agriculture sector in the last one decade. In this study, the authors attempt to identify the components in sources of agricultural growth; the authors also estimate the determinants of overall agricultural growth. The study is based on the secondary data from 2000–2001 to 2015–2016. This paper first decomposes the agricultural growth into area, price, yields (technological improvement) and diversification effects through the method of growth accounting approach. Secondly, the study employs the new classical growth model through the ordinary least square (OLS) to examine the determinants of overall agricultural growth. The author's findings indicate that there has been a shift in cropping patterns from the cultivation of cereals to non-cereals in the state during the study period. Among the major crops, the area under pulses cultivation has increased by 19% from 2000–t2002 to 2014–2016. The increase in area under cultivation and the diversification in favor of higher-value crops have been the major reasons for the accelerating overall agricultural growth in the state along with improvements in technology. The study reveals that increased use of fertilizer per hectare, capital formation and road density are the main determinants of high agricultural growth in the state. The study is based on secondary data and based on one state. A primary study to complement this could have been better. The limited data available for some of important variables related to mechanizations are also a limitation of the present study. Several studies have analyzed the diversification and agricultural growth in India. With our best knowledge this kind of study has not been done so far for the state of Jharkhand in eastern India.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2021-02-10
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-06-2020-0131
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Shortage of pulses in India: understanding how markets incentivize supply
           response

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Mathew Abraham, Prabhu Pingali
      Abstract: This paper aims to understand the significant farm and market-level factors that incentivize the adoption and marketing of pulses influencing its supply response to changing demand. The authors first use a modified Nerlovian supply response model using secondary data to identify the major price and non-price factors influencing the supply of pigeon pea, black and green gram in the major pulses growing states in India. Second, using primary qualitative data the authors map the pulses value chain from farm to retail to identify the how proportional and fixed transaction costs (FCTs) influence market participation of pulses growers and limit the transmission of price and quality information. The supply response model shows some positive influence of price on area allocation for pigeon pea and black gram and some negative effects of yield and price increase of competing crops on pigeon pea acreage. However, for the most part, the area of Kharif pulses is inelastic to prices in the long run. Irrigation, rainfall and yields in the lag year are shown to have a significant influence on area allocation for pulses. The market study reveals that low yields, low landholding size and geographical disadvantages of high agro-climatic risk and poor connectivity hinder market access of pulses farmers relative to other crops. Market power in favor of buyers and poor price and quality information is a disadvantage to sellers, influencing their ability to participate in markets. A quantitative study would be required to identify the magnitude of farm and market-level transaction costs. This study helps to understand the supply response of pulses and gives suggestions to direct policy to rectify this.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2021-02-09
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-11-2017-0128
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Participation in farmers' organization and production efficiency:
           empirical evidence from smallholder farmers in Bangladesh

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      Authors: Subir Bairagi, Khondoker Abdul Mottaleb
      Abstract: Farmer organizations (FOs) can elevate many of the production- and marketing-related challenges by ensuring access to technology, farming information and loan for inputs and mechanization. This study assesses the major factors that affect the participation in FOs by the smallholder rice farmers in Bangladesh and evaluates the impacts of the participation on rice yield and production efficiency. The present study used primary data collected from 1,000 smallholder rice farmers in northwest Bangladesh, consisting of 250 farmers those participated in an organization. This study utilized a sample selection stochastic production frontier (SPF) method, a combination of the conventional SPF and the Heckman's sample selection model, to control for biases stemming from observed and unobserved attributes. This study demonstrates that participation in an organization is significantly affected by smallholder rice farmers' education, occupation, family size, household income, land ownership and the location where they reside. At the same time, the participation status affects the productivity of smallholder farmers. Findings indicate that farmers who participated in an organization had higher rice yield (11% more) and were technically more efficient (1.4 percentage points higher) compared to farmers who did not participate. Since this study was carried out with representative sampled farmers from northwest Bangladesh, the findings may not represent all farmers' perceptions of FOs in the country. Even though more than 200,000 FOs are currently in operation, knowledge regarding the effectiveness of Bangladesh's FOs is limited. Notably, this study used a relatively new method, sample selection SPF model, to investigate the impact of FOs on the production efficiency of smallholder rice farmers in northwest Bangladesh. Therefore, this study contributes to the literature in elucidating the factors affecting participation in FOs and its impact on rice yield and efficiency. Since FOs have been somewhat ineffective in their role as service providers in Bangladesh, this study’s results will guide policymakers to intervene more successfully regarding the changes needed.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2021-02-04
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-09-2020-0203
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Does agro-processing adoption affect farm income and farm
           diversification' Empirical evidence from Taiwan

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      Authors: Lin Lin, Hung-Hao Chang
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to identify the factors associated with the adoption of agro-processing methods and to estimate their impact on farm income and farm diversification. Using a large-scale sample of 12,122 special crop farm households drawn from the 2015 Agricultural Census Survey in Taiwan, the semiparametric multivalued treatment effect model was estimated. The authors found that agro-processing farm households obtain higher farm incomes than non-agro-processing farm households. Among the agro-processing methods, self-processing generates higher farm income than outsourced-processing. Moreover, farm households that adopt either agro-processing method are more likely to diversify into agritourism and other agribusinesses than non-agro-processing farms. The authors could only access data on farm income and not on agro-processing costs. Future studies may address the impact of agro-processing on farm profitability if relevant data are available. Very few studies have examined the relationship between agro-processing, farm income and farm diversification. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is one of the first papers to examine the impact of different agro-processing practices on farm income and farm diversification.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2021-02-04
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-07-2020-0157
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Adoption impact of maize seed technology on farm profitability: evidence
           from Ghana

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      Authors: Amos Mensah, Maxwell Asiamah, Camillus Abawiera Wongnaa, Faizal Adams, Seth Etuah, Eli Gaveh, Patrick Appiah
      Abstract: The paper aims to examine impact of adopted maize seed technology on farm profitability. It assesses both the revenue and cost implication of the adopted technology on farmers' welfare. The study aims to expand the domain of farm investment assessment analysis by including a broader range of production outcome indicators than is normally found in the adoption impact on farm profitability literature. The paper opted for an empirical study using field survey data. A structured questionnaire was used to interview 400 maize farmers across four regions of Ghana. The survey was complemented with focus group discussions in each region with participants representing male and female farmers cultivating maize on a commercial basis. The data captured detail household level (i.e. demographic and socioeconomic characteristics) as well as farm-level information on maize production (i.e. input use and farm output). The paper provides empirical insights about maize farmers' perception on the adopted maize seed technology and the factors influencing adoption. It also shed light on the fact that maize farmers do not base their adoption decisions solely on farm output and revenue indicators alone, but mainly on the return on their investment and the cost associated with the maize seed technology adopted. Because of data limitation, the influence of some important actors (market power) could not be directly captured in the analysis; this may lead to over simplification of a very complex situation in the maize sector. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to future investigate the influence of such important phenomenon on farm profitability. Improving maize productivity and farm profitability across the sectors is important in order to improve farmer income. This study, therefore, highlights the effect of adopted seed technology and its impact on farm profitability. This paper fulfils an identified need to study how investment cost in maize seed technology affect farm profitability.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2021-02-02
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-06-2020-0120
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Vertical coordination in the Chinese grape market

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      Authors: Linda Bitsch, Shuo Li, Jon H. Hanf
      Abstract: Regarding the global development of the wine industry, China has gained a notable share in terms of wine consumption, and its domestic wine production has increased steadily since 2000. The wine production process requires close coordination between growers and processors to avoid disruption and instability in the supply chain of the wine grapes. However, vertical coordination in the Chinese wine regions has received little attention. Based on the existing theoretical background on vertical coordination, this study aims to detect the evolution processes of vertical coordination in the Chinese grape market. Exploratory qualitative research fits with the aim of this study. From December 2018 to January 2019, interviews with grape growers and wine processors of various Chinese wine-producing areas took place. After transcribing all recorded files into text, a qualitative data analysis following the approach of Mayring (2015) was used to analyse and interpret the data. The models of vertical coordination in the grape supply in China vary between the producer's requirements on grape quality/quantity and the arrangements of grape supply chains, which are diverse depending on regional strategies of the local government. However, in this research, the authors did not get into details on the organization of the contractual coordination, and due to the limited access to grape growers, the relationship between farmers and processors cannot be analysed in detail. With a better understanding of the coordination relationship and enhanced contract enforcement, the vineyard management and grape supply chain management can be better performed, inducing a steady industrial development. Regarding the global development of the wine industry, China has gained a notable share in terms of wine consumption, and its domestic wine production has increased steadily since 2000. However, vertical coordination in the Chinese wine regions has received little attention. The study provides a first insight into the grape market structures, as very little is known.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2021-02-01
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-07-2020-0145
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Exploration of COVID-19 impact on the dimensions of food safety and
           security: a perspective of societal issues with relief measures

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      Authors: Janpriy Sharma, Mohit Tyagi, Arvind Bhardwaj
      Abstract: Outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic has created the catastrophic situation, it has crippled all the economic activities and seized off the operations of food supply chain (FSC). Disrupted FSC escalated the societal concerns related to food safety and security. The purpose of this study is to consolidate various issues, exploring the perspectives associated with the agricultural practices, food industries and society concerns related with the FSC performance system dynamics amid of COVID-19 pandemic. To structure this work, a detailed research literature insight focussing on the key findings associated with the past disease outbreaks like influenza, avian flu, Ebola, bird flu, SARS, foot and mouth disease and ongoing phase of COVID-19, encompassing the perspective related with various agricultural and concerned supply chain practices is clustered. Furthermore, issues having relevancy with the notion of this work, sourced from platforms of print and electronic media have been incorporated to ground the reality associated with the impacts, for better visualisation of the perspectives. This study outlays the key findings which are relevant with the past pandemic outbreaks from the core of the research literature. It details the impact of the current COVID-19 scenario on the various FSC operations, focussing on dimensions allied with the industry, economic and society concerns. For the same, to mitigate the effects, relief measures focussing on the short- and long-term perspectives have been incorporated. Steps ramped up by the Government of India (GOI) to safeguard masses from the threat of food security, accelerate pace of the FSC operations and upscale operating capacities of the industries and agriculture practices have incorporated. Presented work is persuaded amid of the COVID-19 lockdown restrictions hence it outlays the theoretical perspectives only. But, these perspectives portray the ongoing scenario's impacts, extending its implication to the people coming from the industry and academia background. This study can felicitate the government bodies to make them familiar with the various impacts which indented the FSCs, food industries and added woes to the society concerns. India is the second largest populated nation of the world, and outspread of the COVID-19 has capsized the FSCs and raised the various instances, making population vulnerable to the threats of food insecurity. This study encompasses effect of the FSC disruption by incorporating its effect on the food industries practices, societal issues and extending possible relief measures to restructure the FSC dynamics. As of now, study focussing on the Indian FSC concerns, detailing of impacts due to pandemic outbreak, relief measures to sail out of the hard times are not available.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2021-01-26
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-09-2020-0194
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Assessing the economic viability of commercial moringa production for
           Kenyan small-scale farmers

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      Authors: Carrie Waterman, Austin Peterson, Celina Schelle, Steven A. Vosti, Stepha McMullin
      Abstract: Moringa (Moringa oleifera) is a highly nutritious, fast-growing crop that has emerged in Western markets as a “superfood” and as a “smart crop” for income generation potential among small-scale farmers. As such, moringa has been widely promoted by agricultural development practitioners in low-income countries and by emerging businesses aimed at achieving nutritional and social impact. However, the intrinsic nutritional and agronomic strengths of moringa are not enough to warrant its widespread promotion without first evaluating its economic potential to farmers. A Land Use System (LUS) analysis modeling tool was employed to test the economic performance of two sets of moringa production practices in Kenya. Data were collected during in-depth interviews and field visits with farmers in Meru that supply a local market, and in Shimba Hills that supply an organic export market. Results suggest that current production practices over an 12-years assessment period generate a Net Present Value (NPV) of US$8,049 [ha-1] in Meru and a negative NPV of US$697 [ha-1] in Shimba Hills; with average daily returns to family labor of these two production systems of roughly 1.6 times and 0.13 times the prevailing local wage rate, respectively. These differences were attributed to a higher farmgate prices and greater yields in Meru. The analysis tool was then used to predict the effects of changes in farming practices, e.g. if farmers in Meru switched to intensive bed cultivation NPV is estimated to increase by ∼650%. This study demonstrates the importance of examining the economic performance of agricultural production systems intended to increase the benefits to small-scale farmers. Our study is the first to assess moringa's economic performance within two production systems in Kenya – a local farmers' cooperative in Meru, and a group of farmers contracted by an export company.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2021-01-07
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-08-2020-0183
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Drivers for continued use of a direct marketing channel: evidence from
           Thai farmers

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      Authors: Haruhiko Iba, Apichaya Lilavanichakul
      Abstract: This study aims to identify the key drivers influencing the success of farmers who employ direct marketing at wholesale markets. The diversification of the distribution system in Thailand has created many challenges for farmers, with diversified farm businesses struggling to survive and to ensure profitability across channels. Direct marketing channels at wholesale markets provide farmers the opportunity to develop a new farm business division. The study consists of qualitative and quantitative approaches. First, in-depth interviews with farmers were conducted, and selected case studies were employed to develop a research framework and design the questionnaire. Second, the questionnaire survey was conducted. Using factor analysis and logistic regression, farmers' data were studied to define the factors of success in direct marketing. Three key drivers were examined and verified. The findings indicate that the development of direct marketing channels requires farmers to efficiently allocate family labour, possess negotiation skills and manage a farmer network. Particularly, the presence of negotiation skills coupled with digital technology can enable farmers to expand the market and build their network. Two marketing channels have been explored. However, more choices in marketing channels utilizing digital resources should be addressed in future research. This is the first empirical study to define the drivers leading Thai farmers to continue employing a direct marketing channel.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2020-12-31
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-09-2020-0196
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Corporate social responsibility in agribusiness: evidence in Latin America

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      Authors: Morelle Maykon Monteiro Mello, Wesley Ricardo de Souza Freitas, Adriano Alves Teixeira, Jorge Henrique Caldeira-Oliveira, Luis Gustavo Freitas-Silva
      Abstract: Agribusiness has stood out in the economy sector as a form of countryside-city interaction due to its productive chain characterized by modernization coming from cities, especially in the industrial area. Thus, the present study analyzed corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the context of agribusiness, based on a survey of articles published in the Scopus database. The main objective of the research is to analyze whether the agribusiness sector has incorporated CSR into its internal policy. For this, the methodology used was researching through a systematic literature review, in which 14,720 documents on CSR were found. When restricting the search for CSR in agribusiness, 44 articles were found, and it was noticed that three were based on analysis in Latin America, which were the object of the study. From this, it was realized that the literature on the subject is scarce, but of fundamental importance for its adoption in the sector, as it brings economic and environmental benefits not only to companies but also to society as a whole. Although CSR is not yet the total solution to socioeconomic and environmental problems, it can be used as a strategy for raising companies’ awareness, based on the development of an organizational environmental culture, which brings competitive advantages over competitors who adopt them. The topic of CSR is a recent discussion in the academic field, which is why it has few studies. Thus initially, we sought to analyze it in the scenario in Latin America, as presented in the present work. However, as a future stage of research in the area of CSR, this topic will be analyzed as an academic master’s degree in the context of the BRIC countries.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2020-12-30
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-04-2020-0071
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Consumers' preferences and willingness to pay for domestic chicken cut
           parts in Ghana: evidence from the Kumasi metropolis

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      Authors: James Osei Mensah, Seth Etuah, Emmanuel Fiifi Musah, Frederick Botchwey, Loretta Oppong Adjei, Kofi Owusu
      Abstract: This study aims to analyse consumers' preferences for domestic chicken cut parts and the premium they are willing to pay for the various parts using data from a contingent valuation survey of individual chicken meat consumers in the Kumasi Metropolitan Area of Ghana. The willingness to pay premiums are obtained using the double-bounded dichotomous choice approach. Determinants of the consumers' willingness to pay amounts are identified through a multivariate Tobit regression analysis. The study finds that the wing is the most preferred chicken part by the consumers followed by the thighs. All consumers who express interest in a particular domestic chicken cut part are willing to pay a premium. Age, sex, years of formal education, household size and income level of the consumers as well as convenience, product availability and perceived wholesomeness of the product are identified as the key factors that influence the willingness to pay amounts. The findings and recommendations of this study could serve as a guide to domestic poultry meat producers and investors in Ghana and other developing countries on how to process or package the meat for the market or consumers. This could further contribute to policy formulation regarding the development of the domestic poultry meat industry. The uniqueness of this study is seen in the contributions it makes to the literature on consumer preferences and willingness to pay for chicken cut parts from a developing country perspective where the market for these products is virtually non-existent.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2020-12-24
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-05-2020-0105
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Wavelet-based analysis of guar futures in India: did we kill the golden
           goose'

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      Authors: Arunava Bandyopadhyay, Souvik Bhowmik, Prabina Rajib
      Abstract: Guar Gum (GG) is used in Shale oil exploration. Excessive price increase in the Guar futures market had a spillover impact on Guar spot prices and affected Guar export from India as Shale oil producers started exploring alternate sources. In this paper, the role of excessive speculation in the futures market, and its adverse impact on the guar-based agri-business ecosystem have been empirically explored. Volatility spillover dynamics between WTI crude oil and Guar futures have been explored using bivariate-Granger Causality, BEKK–GARCH models with Wavelet multi-resolution analysis. The wavelet-based models capture the multi-scale features of mean and volatility spillover to identify the effect of heterogenous investment behavior in the time and frequency domain. The results provide evidence that excessive speculation in futures markets increases spot market volatility. The results also suggest that the excess presence of short-term investors can destabilize the futures market. The purpose of the commodity futures market is to support price discovery and risk management. However, speculative practices can destabilize these purposes leading to the failure of the business ecosystem. The novelty of this paper is twofold. First, it explores the economic linkages between the spot and futures market and tests whether the presence of heterogeneous traders affects the economic linkages. Second, it models the impact of short-term speculative investment on the destabilization of the spot market.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2020-12-11
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-09-2020-0200
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Innovation and firm growth in agricultural inputs industry: empirical
           evidence from India

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      Authors: Manogna R L
      Abstract: Innovation strategy and its outcomes may be different for agricultural input firms in developing countries than those operating in developed countries; hence, a study of developing economy should be an important addition to the literature which has earlier focussed mainly on developed countries. Indian firms which were previously catering to domestic demand are now the exporters of major agricultural machinery such as tractors and pesticides. Rapid growth in demand for the agricultural inputs and improvement in technology implementations have led us to study the performance and transformation of these input industries. An empirical analysis was performed on the listed agricultural input firms during 2001–2019 to investigate the relationship between the R&D efforts and growth of firms in the seed, pesticide, fertiliser and agricultural machinery industries using the system-generalised methods of moments (GMM) technique on the panel of 1,320 firm-year observations. The findings reveal that investments in innovations have a positive and lagged effect on the growth of firms in the Indian agricultural inputs industry. A further analysis reveals that younger firms grow faster when they invest in R&D. More specifically, the author finds evidence in the case of the agricultural inputs industry that import of raw materials negatively affects the firms' growth (FG) and export intensity (EI) positively affects the growth in the case of R&D firms. Investments in R&D are also seen to enable firms to reap benefits from externalities present in the industry. This study suggests that the government should encourage the industries to invest optimally in R&D projects by providing favourable fiscal treatments and R&D subsidies which are observed to have positive effects in various developed countries. There are very few studies that have explored the impact of R&D expenditure on the firm performance in agricultural inputs industry, especially in an emerging economy context like India.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2020-11-11
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-07-2020-0156
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Analyzing repurchase behavior and benchmarking brands: implications for
           salespersons in a personal selling context

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      Authors: Pradeep Kumar Mohanty, Archana Patro
      Abstract: This work reports on a study to measure tractor owners' (mostly farmers') repurchase behavior (RPB). While earlier studies have focused on the technical aspects of the tractors, none as yet have considered farmer intention and behavior for predicting purchase decision. A conceptual model was built considering all possible antecedents of farmers' RPB based on in-depth interviews and discussions with marketing managers. Interviews with customers were used to understand these antecedents or interactions with salespersons, either directly or indirectly during conversations or visits to stores. The authors have attempted to develop a scale on farmers' consumption experience from the perspective of farmers. The model was validated using Smart-PLS, and the best tractor brand was identified using data envelopment analysis (DEA). At the village level, snowball sampling was adopted to identify potential tractor owners who had repurchased the same brand or a higher model as respondents. Findings reveal that all the paths were found to be significant. Farmers' consumption experience (FE) seems to be the biggest predictor of RPB, followed by image, satisfaction and trust. The newly introduced construct FE has a significant effect on farmers' RPB. DEA results further indicate that most tractor companies function with 100% efficiency. The study was carried out in India; it can be extended to other countries. Also, the sample was collected from one state in India and is cross-sectional in nature, so it cannot be generalized. First, the authors developed a conceptual model considering all possible antecedents of RPB. No studies had yet developed a scale on FE. Second, the authors created a benchmark for the various preferred tractor brands from the farmers' perspective using DEA.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2020-10-22
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-05-2020-0103
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Productivity growth in India's bakery manufacturing industry

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      Authors: Shiv Kumar, Abdulla, ChhatraPal Singh
      Abstract: The main aim of this paper is to examine the total factor productivity (TFP) and its components namely, technological change, technical efficiency change, scale change and allocative change in bakery industry in India. The study is based on panel data on 35 Indian states for the period 2009–2010 and 2012–2013. Stochastic frontier function is employed to estimate the productivity growth. The results show that TFP is driven by technological progress, followed by technical efficiency and scale efficiency. Allocative efficiency, however, has a negative effect on TFP. The bakery industry needs to define its innovation strategies, as these strategies lead to different outcomes that can be achieved only through the management of resources dedicated to the generation and implementation of innovations. Using frontier production function takes the stochastic context into account for the dynamic behaviour of TFP and its components. Most of the past studies have assessed the TFP at the aggregate level using three-digit National Industrial Classification (NIC) or four-digit NIC code. An analysis at higher levels aggregation masks the variation in TFP and its components available at the firm level. This study uses five-digit NIC data to measure the firm specific TFP of bakery industry. Further, it looks at the contribution of technical progress (TP), technical efficiency, scale efficiency and allocative efficiency.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2020-10-09
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-12-2019-0204
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Consumer segmentation and preference for indigenous chicken products

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      Authors: Richard Kwasi Bannor, Steffen Abele, John K.M. Kuwornu, Helena Oppong-Kyeremeh, Ernest Darkwah Yeboah
      Abstract: This study examined consumer preference and willingness to pay a premium price for indigenous chicken products in Ghana. Data were obtained from 240 consumers in Ghana through the administration of a structured questionnaire. Probit regression was used to examine the factors influencing consumer preference for indigenous chicken products in Ghana. Ordered probit regression was employed to examine the factors influencing the percentage premium price a consumer is willing to pay for indigenous chicken products whereas the cluster analysis was used to segment the consumers. Different sets of factors were identified to have influenced the decision to purchase indigenous chicken products and the willingness to pay for a premium price. In total, four market segments were identified in this study: shopper consumer segment, the conventional or ethnocentric consumer segment, the privilege consumer segment and the pleasure-seeker consumer segment. The important factors to learn from this study are the following: examining the critical success factors for the promotion of indigenous chicken products in Ghana is an excellent opportunity for future research. Second, the choice of locally-produced exotic breeds/strains of chicken meat has not been examined in this study. Therefore, a comparative study of consumer preference of the locally-produced exotic breeds/strains of chicken in Ghana is another great opportunity for further research. Regardless of the seemly opportunities in regional marketing, Ghana has not leveraged on this to promote a regional marketing brand for its local products – like indigenous chicken products – over imported chicken products. Besides, regionalism studies on agricultural products have received less attention in Ghana; therefore, this study contributes to a better understanding of consumer choice of indigenous chicken products, potentially, and the marketing of regional food products in Ghana.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2020-09-10
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-08-2020-0162
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Climate resilience and varietal choice: a path analytic model for rice in
           Bangladesh

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      Authors: D.V.P. Prasada
      Abstract: Rice is the primary staple crop in South Asia and is cultivated mainly on lowland ecosystems usually fed by the monsoon. With increasing climatic volatility, exclusively rain-fed rice paddies have experienced a triple threat in droughts, floods and salinity. This study investigates the linkages of these abiotic stresses on yield and subsequent farmer decisions on varietal choice. A path analytic model is conceptualized where the relationship between yield (conditional on abiotic stresses) and the varietal choice decision is mediated by adaptation motive (latent construct) and market exposure (observed construct). The path model is validated using 2,523 observations from Bangladesh farmers to obtain parameter estimates for direct effects and mediated effects indicated above. Findings reveal that drought and flood impacts, in contrast to salinity impacts, are influential to both yield and varietal choice. The adaptation motive, however, is clear only in the case of salinity. Time preference of farmers and previous exposure to climate shocks predict adaptation motive substantively. The study reveals that market exposure is also a significant mediator of varietal choice in addition to the mediating effect of adaptation. The study adopts a path analytic model which is able to capture direct, indirect and mediated effects between exogenous factors and varietal choice decision. While the models provide conclusive statistical evidence to the above hypotheses, within-area variations of behavior may not be captured adequately by the method. Analyzing the complexity of varietal decision-making choice using a path analytical model is a novel contribution to the literature. The application itself is unique to the context applied. The findings complement the literature on varietal adoption in the context of climate resilient paddy systems.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2020-08-25
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-09-2019-0135
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Agricultural commercialization and food security: an ex-ante approach

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      Authors: Olufemi D. Bolarinwa, James F. Oehmke, Charles B. Moss
      Abstract: The lack of theoretical and pragmatic way of measuring agricultural commercialization has been responsible for the inconsistent results for the impact of agricultural commercialization on household welfare. This study makes use of an input-based market participation approach that utilizes household preplanting production decision to stratify farming households according to production orientation. The study estimates a system of input and consumer demand equations. It augments traditional input and consumer demand equations with an additional variable based on an endogenous switch, which measures the probability of being a commercial farming household. Empirical evidence suggests that market orientation is an important determinant of the level of traded input and hence, market participation. Predicted probabilities obtained from the endogenous switch are used to stratify households into subsistence and commercial agricultural households. Results of the relative effect of commercial agriculture on the level of household food security support the claim that production orientation does affect the relationship between the relative share of food expenditure to the household total expenditures and the logarithm of household expenditure for this part of sub-Saharan Africa. As in the case of all generalized method of moments studies, the results depend on the robustness of the instruments. However, search for better instruments may run afoul of Leamer's ad hoc specification search with nonexperimental data. This paper is original in its formulation of an endogenous switch between subsistence and commercial agriculture. This switch is estimated as a latent variable following a logit form.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2020-08-24
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-01-2020-0014
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Profitability and choice of marketing outlets: evidence from Ghana's
           tomato production

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      Authors: Faizal Adams, Camillus Abawiera Wongnaa, Edwin Coleman
      Abstract: The study analyzed the profitability of tomato farmers and determinants of farmers' choice of marketing outlets (wholesaler or retailer) in Ghana. A two-stage sampling technique was used to collect data from 100 tomato farmers in Ghana. Analytical tools which include descriptive statistics, gross margin analysis (GM), profitability ratios and binary logit model were employed. Profitability analysis indicates that farmers who supply to wholesalers have gross margin of Gh¢7.86 (US$1.67) per 25 kg crate, while farmers who supply to retailers recorded a major loss of Gh¢5.36 (US$1.14) per 25 kg crate. The result suggests that farmers selling to wholesalers are better off than farmers supplying to retailers. The binary logit regression analysis reveals a positive relationship between farmers' choice of marketing outlet (wholesaling) and age of respondents, quantity of tomato sold and cost of labor for production. A negative relationship also existed between farmers' choice of marketing outlet and weighted average selling price and household size. The results call for policy efforts to provide an enabling environment for more extension education and establishment of farmer associations to make marketing information for price development among farmers available. The choice of marketing outlet greatly influences profitability of tomato production. This study examines the performance of the various tomato marketing outlets in Ghana.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2020-08-24
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-06-2019-0090
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Do international remittances accelerate out-farm labor migration in
           developing countries' A dynamic panel time-series analysis

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      Authors: Ayuba Seidu, Gulcan Onel, Charles B. Moss
      Abstract: A major policy issue facing leaders in the developing world is whether international migration, through remittances, contributes to the development process in migrant-sending communities or impedes the efficient allocation of labor and human capital at the origin countries. This study examines the impact of remittance inflows on out-farm migration of farm labor toward the nonfarm sector. Specifically, this study shows how international migrant remittances may alter the predictions of out-farm migration models by Harris–Todaro. The authors use unbalanced panel time-series data on 77 developing countries between 1991 and 2010 within a dynamic panel time-series framework to estimate the impact of remittances on the out-farm migration rate. The authors find two competing effects of remittances on out-farm migration of labor in developing countries. First, remittances decelerate the out-farm migration rates by supplementing farm income and consumption expenditures. Second, remittances provide a source of investment in nonfarm activities that increase the rate of migration out of agriculture over time. Combining these effects, on average, our elasticity estimates indicate that a 10% increase in remittances reduces the migration out of agriculture, on average, by 0.5% in developing countries over time. The authors findings align with the “developmentalist” or “optimistic” views of international migration. International migration, through remittances, help make the inevitable transition out of the farm sector smoother for developing countries. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to extend the empirical literature on macro-level determinants of out-farm migration within the Harris–Todaro framework to explicitly account for the impacts of remittances inflows into developing countries that the new economics of labor migration (NELM) theory hypothesizes.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2020-08-13
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-05-2020-0097
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Farmer cooperatives, gender and side-selling behavior in Burundi's coffee
           sector

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      Authors: Andrew Gerard, Maria Claudia Lopez, Daniel C. Clay, David L. Ortega
      Abstract: This study aims to improve our understanding of side selling in farmer cooperatives. Cooperative member side selling, in which farmers divert produce from cooperatives to competitors, threatens coffee cooperatives. This is a problem in Burundi, where many households earn income from coffee and cooperatives serve a collective action function. Using data from a survey of Burundian coffee farmers, we assess the determinants of two types of cooperative member side-selling behavior: selling to both cooperative and non-cooperative buyers and selling solely to non-cooperative buyers. Farmers who sell to both cooperative and non-cooperative buyers are more likely to be male household heads, be more invested in coffee and have larger farms than non-side sellers, among other characteristics. Farmers who only sell to non-cooperative buyers are poorer and less invested in coffee than non-side sellers. Additional research is needed to better understand why side-selling behavior differs between groups and to better understand how household head gender influences side selling. In addition, this study lacks qualitative data supporting quantitative findings. Future research should include qualitative methods to better understand motivations for side-selling behavior. The study provides important information on what influences cooperative member side selling and focuses on specific types of side-selling behavior that have been largely overlooked. The study focuses on the role of household head gender in side selling, which is important, given the centrality of women to African agriculture.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2020-07-30
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-05-2020-0081
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • COVID-19 lockdown: implication for food security

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      Authors: Henry Egbezien Inegbedion
      Abstract: The purpose of the paper is to sought to know the implication of COVID-19 lockdown for food security in Nigeria The study examined implication of COVID-19 lockdown for food security. The cross sectional survey research design was employed. Information was elicited from respondents through the social medium (Facebook). The question response format of the instrument was of the five-point Likert scale type. Research data were analysed using one sample t-test and least squares (regression). The results show that COVID-19 lockdown can significantly constrain farm labour, transportation and security, while food security can be threatened by insufficient labour, transportation, farmers' morale and farm coordination A major limitation was the restriction to only online data collection method owing to the researcher's inability to administer the instrument physically as a result of the lockdown. This had an implication on randomisation. Long stay of people at home and away from farm activities will threaten food security on the long run and thus, precipitate social vices due to the attendant hunger and deprivation In empirical examination of the impact of COVID-19 pandemic lockdown on food security, thereby providing statistical evidence that will be useful in the sensitisation of stakeholders on the need to thread on the part of caution to avoid the possible consequences of restricting farmers' operations through the COVID-19 lockdown.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2020-07-28
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-06-2020-0130
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Striving for sustainable value chain establishment: a multiple feasibility
           analysis approach

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      Authors: Marie Ingrid Herman, Minh Thi Thai
      Abstract: Over the last decade, value chain for development has shown its bias towards global value chain approaches. This article proposes a holistic framework to carry out feasibility analysis for the establishment of a value chain. A qualitative research approach was used to collect and analyse data from a wide range of stakeholders potentially involved in establishment of a global cut-foliage value chain based on wild harvesting of ornamental ferns in New Caledonia. Multiple feasibility analyses revealed issues that need to be addressed, priorities for different stakeholders and possible ways forward in the establishment of a value chain. The framework supports businesses, entrepreneurs, investors, donors and governments in proceeding with value chain establishment with significant consideration of social, economic and environmental drivers for sustainability. Relevant concepts in several fields are integrated into a single framework that can guide feasibility analysis of value chain establishment.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2020-07-24
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-01-2020-0002
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Impact of climate change on food security in Saudi Arabia: a roadmap to
           agriculture-water sustainability

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      Authors: Mohammad Imdadul Haque, Md Riyazuddin Khan
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to provide a detailed analysis of the trends in temperature and rainfall over the period 1967–2016 (50 years) for the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and estimate the effect of these climatic changes on major crop production. To set up an empirical association between crop yields and climatic variables, the study uses a fixed effect regression framework. This approach makes it possible to capture the effects of time-invariant indicators and farmers' independent adaptation strategies in reaction to year-to-year variations in precipitation and temperature. The study observes a significant increase in average temperature by 1.9 degrees Celsius in the last 50 years and the greatest increase is noted in the summer. However, there is no significant change in rainfall. The results indicate that a one-degree Celsius increase in temperature reduces crop yields by 7–25%. The results also indicate that rainfall has a positive effect on all the crops. But, rainfall could not offset much of the adverse effects of temperature. Future research can focus on the analysis of the climate change impact assessment for different regions in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and develop a place-based policy. The recent initiative to phase out crop production makes the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia entirely rely on imports. This may have little or no impact presently. However, in the future, it is possible that any global shocks on agriculture due to climate change or geopolitical instability will make the situation worse off. It will threaten both food and nutrition security in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Therefore, it is important to study these in the present context to prepare a road map for future food, water and nutrition security.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2020-07-23
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-06-2020-0127
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Determinants of adoption of modern rice varieties in rural Vietnam: a
           double-hurdle approach

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      Authors: Pham Tien Thanh, Pham Bao Duong
      Abstract: This article aims to examine the determinants of farmers' decisions on the adoption of modern rice varieties in two stages, including whether to adopt and, if so, how much to adopt. The Double-Hurdle and Tobit models are applied to determine whether farmers make their two-stage decisions separately or simultaneously. The findings reveal that farmers make their decisions on the probability of adoption and the intensity of adoption separately. Ethnicity, agricultural labor, land, rice production asset and non-farm self-employment are determinants of the farmers' decision on the adoption of modern rice varieties in both stages. Previous adoption, gender and an irrigation program only have a significant effect on the farmers' probability of adoption, while the market only significantly explains the farmers' decision on the intensity of adoption. Due to the unavailability of data, this article does not include the attributes of the rice varieties or farmers' perception about the varieties in the model. The uniqueness of this research is that it attempts to examine the determinants of farmers' two-stage decisions on whether to adopt and how much to adopt the modern rice varieties by application of the Double-Hurdle method.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2020-07-21
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-01-2020-0008
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Assessing the market power of millers and wholesalers in the Bangladesh
           rice sector

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      Authors: Mohammad Chhiddikur Rahman, Valerien Pede, Jean Balie, Isabelita M. Pabuayon, Jose M. Yorobe, Samarendu Mohanty
      Abstract: Because of the increasing differential between farm and retail prices, the study proposes to investigate the extent of market power in the rice value chain of Bangladesh using advanced econometric techniques. Using a Stochastic Frontier Estimation approach on cross-sectional data, the study examines the price spread along the rice value chain to determine whether millers and wholesalers exercise market power. Empirical results reveal that, on average, rice millers and wholesalers charge 33 and 29% above the marginal cost, respectively. This study confirms the non-competitive behavior of the rice market with wholesalers and millers wielding substantial market power A limitation of the study is that it does not include the retailers who also play a major role in the Bangladesh rice value chain. This is left for future study. This study combines primary and secondary data collected on the Bangladesh rice sector to examine the market power of two major players along the value chain, millers and wholesalers, using an advanced econometrics approach.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2020-07-21
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-04-2018-0053
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Post-merger branding strategies and market power in the Brazilian brewing
           industry

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      Authors: Malú N.P.S. Cerqueira, Danilo R.D. Aguiar, Adelson Martins Figueiredo
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to investigate firm strategies and the exertion of market power in the brewing sector in Brazil following a merger between the two largest brewers (Brahma and Antarctica) that created Ambev and given that the existing literature is inconclusive on this subject In this study the authors apply cointegration analysis to price series of beer brands. The authors use the reduced form vector error correction (VEC) model to measure the price responses of beer brands in terms of direction, magnitude and speed. The authors use monthly retail prices for the primary brands of beer in the city of São Paulo, Brazil's largest consumer market. Specifically, the authors use two sets of retail prices, one from bars (the main point of beer sales, with roughly 50% of market share) and another from supermarkets. The series range from 1994 to 2014, depending on the brand. This study indicates that Ambev's two major brands (Skol and Brahma) behave as market leaders, while its third brand (Antarctica) has been used to challenge the low-price competitor (Nova Schin). The authors also found evidence that the pricing policies of Brahma and Antarctica have changed toward cooperation following the creation of Ambev. The main limitation of this article is that the authors only had access to retailer data. As the merger involved brewers, the authors would ideally use manufacturer beer prices in their econometric analysis. However, the consistency of our results suggests that retailers have been passively transmitting brand strategies launched at a manufacturer level. As the dominant firm created following the merger of the two largest brewers appears to use one of its brand to restrict entry of competitors and the premium brands to enjoy high profits, consumers tend to be harmed by high beer prices and lack of options. Furthermore, small and medium-size companies cannot grow due to entry barriers created by the dominant firm. This paper is the first to apply cointegration analysis to examine the effect of mergers on pricing strategies. The robustness of this study suggests that this approach could be used for antitrust agencies to monitor post-merger strategies.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2020-07-14
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-09-2019-0160
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Small growers’ direct participation in the market and its impact on
           farm income

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      Authors: Ujjwal Kanti Paul, Gurudas Das, Malabika Das, Tanuj Mathur
      Abstract: The existing literature on linking growers directly with the market mostly overlooks the case of smallholders. They grow commercial–perishable crops and have to rely on the efficacy of the marketing system. The present paper intends to fill this void. The paper studies the performance of two local markets among 216 pineapple producers and 50 traders using the structure–conduct–performance framework. Following which the authors attempt to unravel the determinants of growers' direct participation in the market and the impact of such involvement on the farm income using the Heckman two-stage treatment effect model. The study analysis shows that the likelihood of growers’ direct participation in markets, found oligopolistic, increases with education, price information and family labor unit, while decreases with the growers' age, distance from market and the footfall of intermediaries at the farm gate. The second stage of the model has established a positive impact of participation on farm income. The small sample size could restrict generalization. The authors used only operating efficiency as an indicator of the performance of the marketing system due to the unavailability of district-level time series data on pineapple pricing. This study shows that local food markets are oligopolistic. Growers fetch very less share in consumers' price and become vulnerable to food insecurity. The study highlights the determinants of growers' direct participation in the local market and the impact of such involvement on farm income.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2020-07-07
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-05-2019-0067
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Transaction costs and participation in avocado export marketing in
           Murang’a County, Kenya

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      Authors: Kelvin Njuguna Karing'u, Hezron Nyarindo Isaboke, Samuel Njiri Ndirangu
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of transactional costs on smallholder avocado farmers’ participation in the export market and the extent of participation in Murang’a County, Kenya. Data was collected from 384 avocado farmers in Murang’a County, following stratified sampling. The Heckman two-stage model was used for analysis. Results showed that the cost of information search was an important variable that impedes smallholders’ participation in export marketing while harvesting costs inhibits the extent of participation in export marketing. This study used data at the farm level. Therefore, insights on transaction costs among other marketing agents in the export market value chain would be an issue for future studies. Following the debate on transaction costs and market participation among farmers in Sub-Sahara Africa, this paper models transactional costs and export market participation among avocado smallholders and measures the extent of participation with the inclusion of harvesting costs, negotiation costs, monitoring costs and information search costs that are not common in previous studies, thus contributing to the development of literature.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2020-07-07
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-12-2019-0206
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Adoption and impact of modern varieties of paddy in India: evidence from a
           nationally representative field survey

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      Authors: Anjani Kumar, Gaurav Tripathi, P. K. Joshi
      Abstract: New varieties of paddy are constantly being developed in India in order to sustain yield gains in the face of biotic and abiotic stresses. In this study, the authors attempt to identify the drivers for adoption of new varieties of paddy in India; the authors also estimate the impact on yield of the adoption of new paddy varieties. Survey data consisted of the reported information from approximately 20,000 paddy farmers in India. The study employs Cragg's double-hurdle model to study the probability and intensity of adoption of new varieties; we use regression discontinuity design to estimate the change in yield due to adoption of new varieties. The authors’ findings indicate that the adoption of new varieties of paddy in India varies significantly within and between regions; further, the adoption of new varieties is affected by a number of socioeconomic and demographic factors; the authors also find that the adoption of new varieties increases yield significantly. These are observational data and not based on the experiments. The authors relied on farmers' memory to recall the information. The authors suggest the formulation of strategic policies that can cater to the needs of regions and states that are lagging behind in the adoption of new paddy varieties.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2020-07-03
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-11-2019-0198
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Drivers of youth in cocoa value chain activities in Ghana

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      Authors: Franklin Nantui Mabe, Gideon Danso-Abbeam, Shaibu Baanni Azumah, Nathaniel Amoh Boateng, Kwadwo B. Mensah, Ethel Boateng
      Abstract: Cocoa is regarded as a brown-golden crop, but its value chain activities are dominated by the elderly. Hence, focussing attention on the young generation of farmers is the surest way to reverse this trend and secure the future of the cocoa industry. This paper, therefore explores factors influencing youth participation in cocoa value chain activities in Ghana. Primary data were collected using a multistage sampling technique. The authors used a semi-structured questionnaire in collecting data via interviews. Through the theory of utility maximization, a multivariate probit (MVP) model was estimated to identify factors influencing youth participation in cocoa value chain activities in Ghana. The author found that some of the value chain activities are complementary, while others are substitutes. Participation in cocoa value chain activities is influenced by access to land, participation in training programmes in cocoa production, membership of Next Generation Cocoa Youth Programme (MASO), access to agricultural credit and other demographic characteristics. Relevant information and youth-targeted projects enhance their participation in value chain activities. This paper is one of the few studies that empirically analyses drivers of youth participation in cocoa value chain activities in Africa.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2020-06-18
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-10-2019-0177
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Fiji's participation in the global coconut value chain: opportunities and
           challenges

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      Authors: Jessie Lin
      Abstract: This paper explores the institutional challenges and opportunities in Fiji's integration into the global value chain. Fiji is naturally endowed with coconut palms across its many islands. However, the coconut sector remains rudimentary with little value-addition. Coconut products of high-value are now being produced and exported throughout the world. While many coconut producing countries have benefitted from this coconut demand surge, Fiji has been unable to benefit from the international market. This study utilizes a mixed-methods approach to analyze the challenges and opportunities. First, an analysis is done on a macro-level at the link between institutional quality and Fiji's export of coconut products. Then, primary data is collected with semi-structured interviews with key stakeholder groups in regions of Fiji. The goal is to gain an understanding of the perceived challenges and opportunities from each actor. The empirical results show that institutional quality matters for Fiji's coconut exports. Increased scores in the government effectiveness and voice and accountability indicators enhance coconut exports from Fiji, suggesting that domestic institutions play an important role. Interviews with key actors reveal that communications among each stakeholder group are fragmented. The main institutional actors and the producers have different perceptions of the industry's challenges, thus resulting in different ideas on how to address the issues. This study is limited by the data availability of coconut production and trade volume of more specific products. Furthermore, due to the transportation and weather constraints during our visit to Fiji, certain parts of the island were not accessible. This paper uses a mixed-methods approach to assess a specific case study.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2020-05-18
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-12-2019-0208
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies

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