Subjects -> BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (Total: 3841 journals)
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INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND AID (103 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 97 of 97 Journals sorted alphabetically
Africa Development     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
African Evaluation Journal     Open Access  
African Journal of Economic and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
African Journal of Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Afrique contemporaine : La revue de l'Afrique et du développement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Humanities and Development Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Asia Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Asian Education and Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Foreign Policy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Canadian Journal of Development Studies / Revue canadienne d'études du développement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Capacity.org     Free   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos de Trabajo Hegoa     Open Access  
Desarrollo y Sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Desenvolvimento em Questão     Open Access  
Developing Country Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Development Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Development Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Development Studies Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
DRd - Desenvolvimento Regional em debate     Open Access  
Economia & Região     Open Access  
Economic History of Developing Regions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Economic Journal of Development Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Economic Journal of Emerging Markets     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Economics and Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Economics Development Analysis Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Economics of Development     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Economies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Emerging Economy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Environmental Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Finance & Development     Free   (Followers: 10)
Forum for Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Ghana Journal of Development Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Iberoamerican Journal of Development Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Growth and Development Review     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Journal of Human Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Innovation and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Insight on Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Affairs and Global Strategy     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
International Development Policy : Revue internationale de politique de développement     Open Access  
International Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Agricultural Management and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Developing Societies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Development Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Peace and Development Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Regional Development     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International NGO Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
IZA Journal of Labor & Development     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Accounting and Finance in Emerging Economies     Open Access  
Journal of African Studies and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Asian Development     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Business and Social Review in Emerging Economies     Open Access  
Journal of Contemporary Integrative Ideas     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Developing Economies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Development and Administrative Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Development Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Economic Development Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Economic Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Environmental Economics and Policy     Partially Free   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Illicit Economies and Development     Open Access  
Journal of International Business Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Journal of Management for Global Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Social and Economic Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Sustainable Development Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Sustainable Finance & Investment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the Indian Ocean Region     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Jurnal Ekonomi dan Studi Pembangunan     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Markets, Globalization & Development Review : The Official Journal of the International Society of Markets and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
MediaTrend     Open Access  
Membership Management Report The     Hybrid Journal  
New African Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Organizations and Markets in Emerging Economies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
QA : Rivista dell’Associazione Rossi-Doria     Full-text available via subscription  
Regional Formation and Development Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Review of Development and Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Review of Economics and Development Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Internacional de Cooperación y Desarrollo     Open Access  
Revista Perspectivas do Desenvolvimento     Open Access  
Rozwój Regionalny i Polityka Regionalna     Open Access  
Scholedge International Journal of Management & Development     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Social Development Issues     Full-text available via subscription  
Special Events Galore     Hybrid Journal  
St Antony's International Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Stability : International Journal of Security and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Studies in Comparative International Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Successful Fundraising     Hybrid Journal  
Technological and Economic Development of Economy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Tropicultura     Open Access  
Volunteer Management Report     Full-text available via subscription  
World Development Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
International Journal of Development Issues
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.139
Number of Followers: 10  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1446-8956 - ISSN (Online) 1758-8553
Published by Emerald Homepage  [362 journals]
  • Adoption and use of electronic voting system as an option towards credible
           elections in Nigeria

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      Authors: Funmilola Olubunmi Omotayo, Olasubomi Adetutu Adekunle
      Abstract: This study aims to investigate the adoption and use of electronic voting (e-voting) system as an option to credible elections in Nigeria, as well as the factors that could influence the readiness of Oyo state citizens in Nigeria to use the system. The study adopts the survey research design, while the Technology Readiness Acceptance Model provides the theoretical framework. A two-stage sampling procedure (random and convenience) was used to select 500 Nigerian citizens, who are of voting age, while data were collected with a structured questionnaire. Findings reveal that the citizens are ready to use the e-voting system if adopted by the Nigerian Government. Optimism and innovativeness are positively correlated, and perceived discomfort and perceived insecurity are negatively correlated, with readiness to use e-voting system by Oyo state citizens. The Technology Acceptance Model constructs (perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use), as well as computer self-efficacy also have positive correlations with readiness to use of e-voting. The population of the study was limited to only citizens in one state of the federation; hence, the results cannot be generalised to all citizens in Nigeria. The study contributes to existing knowledge on adoption and use of technology and confirms that optimism and innovativeness are motivators and discomfort and insecurity are inhibitors of intention to use and actual usage of technology. Hence, these constructs should be taken into account and promoted when Nigeria is planning to adopt the e-voting system. This paper could assist the Nigerian Government on the factors to consider when implementing the e-voting system. This paper is one of the first pieces of empirical research that attempted to investigate the factors that could promote acceptance and use of the e-voting system in Nigeria.
      Citation: International Journal of Development Issues
      PubDate: 2021-02-11
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDI-03-2020-0035
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Fuzzy set approach to measuring urban poverty: a case of Lagos State slums

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      Authors: Oluwaseyi Omowunmi Popogbe, Simeon Oludiran Akinleye, Mautin David Oke
      Abstract: This paper aims to measure multi-dimensional poverty in Lagos State slums. This study is relevant because slums are becoming a present-day reality for urban cities and it is now paramount to understand the dynamics of deprivations suffered under various dimensions in the slums. A multi-stage sampling technique is used to sample 400 respondents from five slums (Makoko, Iwaya, Ilaje, IjoraBadia and Amukoko) in Lagos State and information have gotten using a structured questionnaire. The fuzzy set approach to measuring multi-dimensional poverty index (MPI) is used in estimating the MPI for the slums. The findings from the study show that although all the slums have varying MPI; however, the average MPI for the slums is 0.49. Further findings show that majority of the households are largely deprived in the education dimension, proceeded by the living standards dimension and finally, health dimension. The current study focused on a few selected slums in Lagos State and findings show that it may be erroneous to absolutely adopt policy implications derived for other major slums in cities around the world. This study advances the frontier of slum studies in Nigeria by following an analytical path in understanding the degree of poverty in the slums.
      Citation: International Journal of Development Issues
      PubDate: 2021-02-11
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDI-06-2020-0139
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Is employee-client matching good for firms targeting the bottom of the
           pyramid' A study of microfinance institutions

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      Authors: Naome Otiti, Kjetil Andersson, Roy Mersland
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to determine whether there exists employee-client matching at the bottom of the pyramid (BOP) and the most favourable employee-client categorization in terms of employee productivity when serving the BOP market. This is important in a bid to determine how to effectively operate at the BOP given the market’s unique characteristics. This study uses two methods depending on the research question. First, a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) is used to determine the different employee-client categories based on socio-economic status. Second, fixed effects analyses are performed based on these categories to determine the most suitable employee-client category. The results show the existence of employee-client matching based on similar socio-economic status. However, multivariate testing reveals that the mismatch category, where employees are of higher socioeconomic status than the clients, generates more favourable employee productivity. Moreover, this result may be contingent on the geographical location of the firm. The findings are important for human resource management particularly the employment strategy of BOP firms. It suggests the need to consider employee profiles and client profiles when deciding which new markets to target. The paper uses a global database of microfinance institutions as a case of BOP firms to investigate employee-client matching at the bottom of the pyramid.
      Citation: International Journal of Development Issues
      PubDate: 2021-02-08
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDI-04-2020-0069
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Moonlighting to survive in a pandemic: multiple motives and gender
           differences in Ghana

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      Authors: Richard K. Asravor
      Abstract: Moonlighting is on the ascendancy among the urban populace of Ghana, especially, during the coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) period. This paper aims to investigate the motives and determinants of moonlighting in Urban Ghana. This study used data from a semi-structured questionnaire administered during the COVID-19 period in Ghana. Data on the motivation for moonlighting was analysed using descriptive statistics whilst the logit regression model was used to analyse the determinants for moonlighting. The findings show that men moonlight more than women in Ghana. Despite this, there are no substantive differences in the motives and determining factors influencing men and women moonlighting in Ghana. The findings indicate that moonlighting is used by both sexes to deal with the financial difficulties faced because of lower earnings from their primary occupation due to the COVID-pandemic. Aside from financial difficulty which was viewed as the most important reason for moonlighting by both sexes, men view being secure in their primary job as the 2nd most important motivational factor contrary to women who view lowering the risk of primary job loss as the 2nd most important motivational factor. The impacts of the COVID-19, the log of primary income and marriage are push factors to moonlight whilst having household members who are working and higher levels of education are pulled factors to moonlight in Ghana in the COVID-19 period. With the current harsh economic conditions that COVID-19 has placed on families in urban areas and the urgent need for multiple jobs as a risk coping mechanism, little empirical work has been done on the role moonlighting plays as a catalyst or otherwise. This paper fills this gap by examining how gender difference affects moonlighting in Ghana in this COVID-19 period.
      Citation: International Journal of Development Issues
      PubDate: 2021-01-07
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDI-08-2020-0180
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Foreign vs domestic remittances and household welfare: evidence from
           Mexico

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      Authors: Ernesto Aguayo-Téllez, Adelaido García-Andrés, Jose N. Martinez
      Abstract: This paper aims to analyse the differential impact of foreign and domestic remittances on household expenditure shares. This study uses micro-data from a very large and detailed income-expenditure survey in Mexico and runs consumption-share Engel equations to estimate income (expenditure) elasticities for different consumption goods groups. Trying to account for the standard problems of endogeneity, this paper considers only nuclear households with migrant fathers and compare households that receive remittances from abroad, from within Mexico and those not receiving remittances. This study finds that international remittances have a larger impact on the expenditure shares of women’s clothes, insurances and durable goods, while domestic remittances have a larger impact on the share of income dedicated to food, health and education. Based on the results, differences in consumption shares between families receiving foreign and domestic remittances might depend not only on the relative size of the income transfer but also on the nature of the transfer and the sender’s capacity to monitor in person the use of those remittances. The results indicate that households that receive remittances from abroad present higher shares of consumption of some goods the literature commonly associates with the mothers’ preferences.
      Citation: International Journal of Development Issues
      PubDate: 2020-12-28
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDI-05-2020-0108
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Spatial econometric analysis of digital financial inclusion in China

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      Authors: Xiao-Ling Song, Ya-Ge Jing, Kade'erya Akeba'erjiang
      Abstract: This study aims to empirically analyze the factors influencing digital financial inclusion in China. Using panel data from 31 provinces in China for the years 2011-2018, the study constructed spatial econometric models for regression analysis at the national and regional levels. Economic development, government intervention, internet penetration and the development of the credit level significantly affected the development of digital financial inclusion in China. However, the specific influence of the various factors varied by province. Provinces with less-developed economies generally had weaker economic foundations and underdeveloped digital financial services, making it more difficult to fully achieve digital financial inclusion. Relevant government policies should strengthen digital infrastructure and improve the organizational systems and services of digital finance to support the balanced development of digital financial services in China. China’s e-commerce development has been at the global forefront for decades, which suggests digital financial inclusion is also well-placed for strong development in China. However, quantitative research on the digital financial inclusion index has remained insufficient in China and worldwide, with most research ignoring the status of different development levels in a different region. To address this gap in the literature, this study empirically researched the status, regional differences and causes associated with these differences that impact digital financial inclusion in China.
      Citation: International Journal of Development Issues
      PubDate: 2020-12-09
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDI-05-2020-0086
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • The triple crisis of debt, demand and decarbonisation: a preliminary
           analysis of the impact of COVID-19 on commodity-dependent developing
           economies

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      Authors: Keston K. Perry
      Abstract: This paper aims to offer a preliminary overview and analysis of the impact of the COVID-19 crisis on commodity-dependent developing economies (CDDEs). Using debt, decarbonisation and demand as empirical and analytical prisms to understand impacts and dynamics, the paper offers “rent space” as a theoretical tool to appreciate the changing possibilities for using resource rents for capital accumulation and expand development frontiers. It maps out the certain common features among this group of developing countries facing an increasingly adverse and uncertain situation. It offers a political economic perspective on the global dynamics and internal political situation that constrain these countries’ ability to manage the effects of this external shock that date to the 2008 crisis, and to therefore shore up an effective recovery in the coming years. The paper draws together secondary literature and evidence from a number of sources including the World Bank, United Nations and International Monetary Fund on the empirical situation in these countries in view of COVID-19. The paper uses a thematic approach to understand how the current crisis has exposed these embedded and worsening vulnerabilities in this group of countries. Results demonstrate the wide-ranging effects of COVID-19 as an existential crisis of demand in short and medium term, the explosion of debt due to actually occurring financialisation and the looming medium and long-term consequences of decarbonisation that may oblige countries to abandon exploitation of fossil fuel resources. In the final analysis, COVID-19 has revealed a number of lingering effects of the commodity boom and global financial crisis. The increased indebtedness that resulted not only underscores the long-term unviability of commodity-based development as a strategy but also reveals new unprecedented weaknesses and challenges. Given the current configuration of global and domestic political economy dynamics, the paper shows that the “rent space” in fossil fuel exporters is particularly constrained and shrinking, compared to mineral exporters, but all showing a trend towards concentration in commodity production overall and worsening prospects for green recovery or industrial pathway.
      Citation: International Journal of Development Issues
      PubDate: 2020-12-07
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDI-07-2020-0166
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Effects of zakat on the economic growth in selected Islamic countries:
           empirical evidence

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      Authors: Khoutem Ben Jedidia, Khouloud Guerbouj
      Abstract: This study aims to examine the impact of zakat on the economic growth for a sample of Muslim countries. As a matter of fact, Zakat is a religious tax on wealth paid annually to specified recipients. As it leads to income redistribution and increases the aggregate demand, zakat can be a growth factor in the Islamic framework. This paper is based on a dynamic panel data model for the purpose of investigating the role of zakat in the economic growth for a sample of eight Muslim countries during the period ranging from 2004 to 2017. The general method of moments is applied. The findings provide evidence that zakat stimulates the country’s growth. Indeed, as zakat funds are directed to increase consumption, investment or government expenditure, they spur on the economic growth. Moreover, the authors come to the conclusion that more trade openness allows an increase in the real gross domestic product (GDP) per capita. However, the broad money to GDP and population growth rate seem insignificantly associated with the economic growth for the sample considered. The findings have substantial implications for the economic policy in Muslim countries. Authorities may further rely on zakat to boost the economic growth. First, it is essential to improve the muzakki’s knowledge on zakat to increase their intention, and so their ability and willingness to pay zakat. Second, the government intervention in both zakat collect and distribution becomes mandatory. Therefore, the contribution of zakat to the economic growth will be higher. This requires better-quality services of zakat institutions. A few studies have empirically looked into the impact of zakat on the economic growth, especially for panel data. Hence, the present study tries to enrich the literature on this topic. It creates significant evidence regarding the relevance of zakat in Muslim countries. The findings provide empirical support that zakat is an additional growth factor in the Islamic framework.
      Citation: International Journal of Development Issues
      PubDate: 2020-11-11
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDI-05-2020-0100
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • The nexus between economic institutions and unemployment: evidence from
           sub-Saharan Africa

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      Authors: Abdullahi Abdulhakeem Kilishi, Hammed Adesola Adebowale, Sodiq Abiodun Oladipupo
      Abstract: This paper aims to investigate the nexus between economic institutions (EI) and unemployment in sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries. Specifically, the paper examines the impact of aggregate EI and ten different components of institutions on total, male and female unemployment in SSA. The paper used unbalanced panel data of 37 SSA countries covering the period between 1995 and 2018. A dynamic heterogenous panel data model is specified for the study. Two alternative estimation techniques of dynamic fixed effect and pool mean group methods were used to estimate the models. The choice of appropriate method is based on Hausman specification test. The findings reveal that aggregate EI and institutions related to the monetary system, trade flows, government spending and fiscal process significantly lead to less unemployment in the long-run. However, there is no evidence of a significant relationship between EI and unemployment in the short-run. These findings are consistent for total, male and female unemployment, respectively. To reduce unemployment significantly in the long run, policymakers in SSA need to build more market-friendly institutions that will incentivize private investment, allow free movement of labour and goods, as well as guarantee a stable macroeconomic environment and efficient fiscal system. Most of the existing studies focused on the influence of labour market institutions on unemployment ignoring the effects of other forms of institutions. While available studies on the link between institutions and unemployment used either OECD or other developed countries sample, with scanty evidence from Africa. However, the effects of EI could vary across regions. Thus, generalizing the findings from developed countries for SSA countries and other developing countries may be misleading. Hence, this paper contributes to the existing literature by examining the nexus between different types of EI and unemployment using the SSA sample.
      Citation: International Journal of Development Issues
      PubDate: 2020-11-02
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDI-03-2020-0048
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Women leading change: re-shaping gender in Ghanaian mines

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      Authors: Rufai Haruna Kilu, Adesuwa Omorede, Maria Uden, Mohammed-Aminu Sanda
      Abstract: There is growing attention towards inclusive mining to make an economic case for gender equality and diversity in the industry. Available literature lacks sufficient empirical evidence on the subject matter in Ghana. Therefore, this paper aims to understudy women miners in Ghana and document their role in recent change regimes in mine works gender profiles. An observed change that is stimulating a shift in background dispositions leads to increasing number of women taking up mine jobs. In working towards achieving the aim of the study, both qualitative design and a multiple case study approaches are deployed. Four multinational Ghanaian mines and a mining and technology university were used to understudy the women miners and their role towards a change in mine work gender perspectives. The results showed a regime of “ore-solidarity movement” (women in mining – Ghana). A kind of solidarity identified conventionally as a social movement in active resource and self-mobilization, engaged in a symbolic contestation for change of the status quo (dominant masculinity cultures) in furtherance of gender equity and inclusion in milieu of mine works reforms in Ghana. The study is of high scientific, political and public interest to better understand women’s movements in the mining industries in Ghana and to frame them theoretically. It offers solid empirical evidence on roles women miners play to ensure gender shape-shifting and liberalizing the mining space for women’s participation. This move towards inclusive mining implies poverty eradication among women, work towards achieving sustainable mining, competitiveness and assurance for gender-driven social innovative mining.
      Citation: International Journal of Development Issues
      PubDate: 2020-11-02
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDI-09-2019-0167
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Entitlement programmes for garnering votes' The impact of local
           elections on targeted social protection in decentralised Indonesia

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      Authors: Dharendra Wardhana
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to find the relationship between local direct elections and the change in social spending, controlling for GDP per capita, revenues and wide-range socio-welfare indicators at the regional level. This research uses a model of time-series cross-sectional panel data set for 33 provinces in Indonesia from 2001 to 2012. The main finding of this research is that the political budget cycle does exist in Indonesia. Incumbents responded to the direct elections more sensitively rather than to other variables in the model. The most important variables that are significant in the model are not only direct election but also inter-governmental grants. Interestingly, the local economy (as measured by GDP per capita) does not clearly exhibit a meaningful impact. Although the importance of decentralisation in Indonesia is actually at the regency level, obtaining the data is really challenging. Therefore the exercise on this paper is currently limited only for the provincial level. This finding conveys the message that there is large room for improvement in inter-governmental transfer formulation, more importantly to the regions where they still entail significant budget support from central government. In addition, transfers during specific periods such as elections need to be modified to avoid the misappropriation of local budget and to mitigate the adverse impact of PBC. The formulation of inter-governmental transfers is pivotal in reducing over-dependence to the central government funding and to ensure the effectiveness of budget devolved at the local level. To the author’s understanding, the paper is the first to discuss the presence of the political budget cycle on social protection programs in Indonesia. The expected contribution of the current work is twofold: Firstly, the author used a recent data set hosted by the World Bank (INDO-DAPOER). Secondly, the findings are relevant to the discussion within the sphere of development studies and political science.
      Citation: International Journal of Development Issues
      PubDate: 2020-10-23
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDI-04-2020-0070
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Actions beyond regulatory compliances: perceived climate strategy
           proactivity in Indian companies

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      Authors: Nikhil Kant
      Abstract: This paper aims to assess the perceptions of stakeholders as regards the practices of Indian companies vis-à-vis climate change seeking underpinnings from stakeholder theory and collecting data using a structured questionnaire. This paper used a descriptive analytical research design based on the data collected from a diverse sample of stakeholders of Indian companies through a cross-sectional, self-administered online survey questionnaire. The study attaching significance to the stakeholders’ perception as a useful tool underscores that Indian companies have started to engage in preventive measures to minimize the externalities of climate crisis taking cognizance of the stakeholders’ interests amidst their increased awareness, also underlining that their perceptions substantially determine climate strategy proactivity (CSP) in their quest of competitive advantage beyond regulatory compliances. The study finds that incessant growth in the stakeholder awareness has not left companies to remain reluctant from analyzing effects and adopting suitable strategies in India also which, as a fast growing developing country, has witnessed immense growth in the post-liberalization era. This study would help decision-makers in businesses, policymakers, practitioners and standard-setters by providing further insights on the relevance of stakeholders’ perspectives in CSP in the developing countries. Stakeholders’ perceptions though representing varied categories hint that the actions beyond regulatory compliances need to be in focus in future studies. The paper elaborates the significance of CSP in developing countries to eliminate the impact of inadequacies that previous studies undertook primarily in developed countries have failed in contextualizing these issues of developing countries.
      Citation: International Journal of Development Issues
      PubDate: 2020-10-23
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDI-07-2020-0152
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Cognitive abilities and income: preliminary evidence from a developing
           country

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      Authors: Raufhon Salahodjaev, Ziyodakhon Malikova
      Abstract: Related literature finds that human capital proxied by cognitive abilities is an important antecedent of numerous specific life outcomes. The purpose of this study is to extend existing evidence by investigating the link between cognitive skills and income in Tajikistan. Tajikistan is a landlocked low-income country situated in Central Asia. Its population is 9.1 million people and gross domestic product per capita of US$822. According to the World Bank, Tajikistan has made significant progress in decreasing poverty levels from 83% in 2000 to 29.5% in 2017. The data for this study comes from the 2013 Jobs, Skills and Migration Survey conducted by the World Bank and the German Society for International Cooperation. The main explanatory variable of the study is the cognitive abilities index of the respondents. The survey used item response theory (IRT) approach to estimate the ability of respondents. IRT is a method or a set of statistical frameworks, used to explore assessment item data, such as cognitive abilities assessment data. The wage function was estimated using the ordinary least squares method because the results are easier to interpret (Jencks, 1979; Bowles et al., 2001; Groves, 2006). The baseline results are reported in Table 2. The results in Column 1 demonstrated the link between cognitive abilities and income without control variables (unconditional model). As expected, cognitive abilities are positively and significantly related to income (a1 = 0.0715, p < 0.01). The results from the unconditional model suggest that one standard deviation increase in cognitive abilities is associated with a nearly 17% increase in income. However, the study has a number of limitations. First, the dependent variable measures the overall income of the respondent, which includes the profit from other businesses. The survey does not provide data on monthly wages of respondents. Second, the sample may not perfectly represent the overall population of Tajikistan. To partially resolve this issue, this paper re-estimated out results for various sub-samples. Another important limitation of this study is the lack of respondent’s family background, which is an important correlate of human capital and income. The results in the study offer preliminary evidence on the link between cognitive abilities and income in Tajikistan. However, the results of the study also suggest that both measures of human capital are positively related to income. Therefore, policymakers in Tajikistan should invest greater resources to health care, education and training programs as cognitive skills can be built in particular in the early stages of the life cycle. Indeed, Tajikistan has a significant potential for economic growth model driven by human capital. According to the World Bank, the adult literacy rate in Tajikistan is 100%, which is significantly above of what is observed in other developing countries. This may imply that the human potential in this country is considerable, and further investment in soft and hard skills would have a positive impact on economic growth. This paper offers new evidence on the link between cognitive abilities and income, using data from Tajikistan. First, this paper finds that cognitive abilities are positively and significantly correlated with income. Second, this paper finds that this link remains robust even when this paper control for a large set of personal and job-related characteristics. The results from the unconditional model suggest that one standard deviation increase in cognitive abilities is associated with nearly a 17% increase in income.
      Citation: International Journal of Development Issues
      PubDate: 2020-10-21
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDI-06-2020-0123
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Corruption, public debt and economic growth – evidence from
           developing countries

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      Authors: Carole Ibrahim
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine the effect of corruption on public debt and economic growth in 20 developing countries over the period 1996-2018. This study makes use of the autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) model to detect the long-term relationships, on the one hand, between corruption and public debt and, on the other hand, between corruption and economic growth. The empirical results reveal that corruption increases the debt-to-GDP ratio and that the interactions between corruption and public revenues and between corruption and public spending have a positive influence on public debt in the long run. The estimations also show that high corruption hampers long-term economic growth and increases the negative effect of public debt on economic growth in developing countries. While corruption is a prevalent phenomenon in most developing countries, the literature still lacks empirical examination of its economic effects. This study fills this gap with the aim of highlighting that high corruption hinders development in developing nations. This study also examines the impact of the interactions between corruption and components of the fiscal balance on public debt. Moreover, while the existing empirical literature uses regression techniques, this paper uses a panel ARDL approach to detect the long-term effects of corruption.
      Citation: International Journal of Development Issues
      PubDate: 2020-08-03
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDI-12-2019-0208
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Public health spending and health outcome in Nigeria: the role of
           governance

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      Authors: Uche Abamba Osakede
      Abstract: This paper aims to analyze the relationship between public health spending and health outcome using time series data in Nigeria over the period 1980 to 2017, taking into account the role of governance by assessing how the quality of governance directly affects health status and indirectly as a mediator for the effectiveness of public health spending. Using the Hausman statistical tests to check for the existence of endogeneity, the proper method for estimating the model for this study is the two-stage least square regression model. The two-stage least squares regression model addresses the problem of endogeneity using instrumental variables. The mediating role of governance on the effectiveness of public health spending on health was considered by an interaction of governance indicators with public health spending. The results showed that public health spending had no significant effect on health outcome except when interacted with governance quality. The interaction of government health spending with governance effectiveness as well as that for control of corruption improved health by inducing a fall in maternal deaths, whereas government health expenditure interacted with rule of law raised maternal mortality. Public health spending interacted with regulatory quality improved life expectancy while that for political stability with public health spending induced a fall in life expectancy, poor maternal and infant health. Political stability and the control of corruption had direct influence on maternal health. Given the predominance of public health spending in promoting access to health care and population health status for developing economies, the effectiveness of such spending should be top priority in policy makers’ agenda. This again is important because for developing economies, government revenue is generated from a small tax base due to their highly informal nature. To improve health status from public intervention in the health sector, there is indeed need for improvement in the overall state of governance in Nigeria. This paper is one of the few country case studies which uses time series data to examine the role of governance on the efficacy of public health spending with extension of findings to maternal health and covering more measures of governance quality. The results fundamentally illuminate the importance of governance in fostering development in health and consequently enhancing economic development and growth.
      Citation: International Journal of Development Issues
      PubDate: 2020-06-14
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDI-10-2019-0169
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • International Journal of Development Issues

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