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Showing 801 - 354 of 354 Journals sorted alphabetically
Veredas do Direito : Direito Ambiental e Desenvolvimento Sustentável     Open Access  
Veritas et Justitia     Open Access  
Verstek     Open Access  
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Via Inveniendi Et Iudicandi     Open Access  
Vianna Sapiens     Open Access  
Victoria University of Wellington Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Villanova Environmental Law Journal     Open Access  
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Violence Against Women     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
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Vox Juris     Open Access  
Waikato Law Review: Taumauri     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Washington and Lee Journal of Energy, Climate, and the Environment     Open Access  
Washington and Lee Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Washington Law Review     Free   (Followers: 2)
Washington University Global Studies Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Washington University Journal of Law & Policy     Open Access  
Washington University Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Wayne Law Review     Free  
Western Journal of Legal Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Western New England Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
William & Mary Environmental Law and Policy Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
William & Mary Journal of Women and the Law     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
William and Mary Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Windsor Yearbook of Access to Justice / Recueil annuel de Windsor d'accès à la justice     Open Access  
Wirtschaftsrechtliche Blätter     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Wroclaw Review of Law, Administration & Economics     Open Access  
Yale Journal of Law & the Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Yale Journal of Law and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Yale Journal on Regulation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Yale Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 62)
Yearbook of European Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Yearbook of International Disaster Law Online     Full-text available via subscription  
Yuridika     Open Access  
Zuzenbidea ikasten : Irakaskuntzarako aldizkaria     Open Access  
交大法學評論     Open Access  

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Western New England Law Review
Number of Followers: 2  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 0190-6593
Published by Western New England College Homepage  [1 journal]
  • FAMILY LAW—THE REVICTIMIZATION OF SURVIVORS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND
           THEIR CHILDREN: THE HEARTBREAKING UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCE OF SEPARATING
           CHILDREN FROM THEIR ABUSED PARENT

    • Authors: Jeanne M. Kaiser et al.
      Abstract: Massachusetts law governing child custody recognizes the damaging effect that witnessing domestic violence can have on a child. Accordingly, the law requires courts to give special attention to the effects of domestic violence on a child when determining custody. An unintended consequence of this scrutiny is that parents who have been the victims of domestic violence can lose custody, or even their parental rights, for failing to protect children from witnessing their abuse. This result can be prevented by requiring courts to apply the same level of attention to the effects of domestic violence when removing a child from an abused parent as they do when placing a child with an abusive parent.
      PubDate: Sat, 08 Jan 2022 17:15:36 PST
       
  • INSURANCE LAW—COLLATERAL SOURCE REDUCTIONS IN CONNECTICUT: HOW INSURANCE
           “WRITEOFFS” NOW LEADS TO WINDFALL JUDGMENTS – AN ANALYSIS OF THE
           MARCIANO DECISION AND ITS IMPACT

    • Authors: Frank J. Garofalo III
      Abstract: The purpose of the tort compensation system is to make an injured party whole; no less, but no more. With that concept in mind, Connecticut first codified its “collateral source” reduction rules in 1985, which were designed to prevent an injured party from obtaining a “double recovery” of economic damages already paid to the injured party, or paid on the injured party’s behalf through an outside source, such as insurance.1 In Marciano v. Jimenez, however, the Connecticut Supreme Court interpreted section 52-225a to declare that when “any” right of reimbursement or subrogation exists to any portion of the claimed economic damages, there should be no collateral source reduction.2 As a result of this precedent, trial courts now routinely deny collateral source reductions in an overbroad manner. As of today, in any case involving the presence of a lien placed on the lawsuit for medical expenses paid, such as in cases with plaintiffs covered by Medicare or Medicaid, the Marciano decision has been interpreted to require the denial of any collateral source reduction. This includes the portions of the bill that were contractually written off by the provider and were never incurred by plaintiff. Judicial interpretation of section 52-225a in this manner, however, is inapposite with the legislative intent behind the statute’s enaction. A plaintiff’s recovery of financial damages for medical expenses that were never incurred or owed is the type of windfall benefit section 52225a was designed to avoid. In light of such harsh results, the Marciano decision needs to be rectified upon reconsideration of the decision by the Connecticut Supreme Court or through legislative action.
      PubDate: Sat, 08 Jan 2022 17:15:32 PST
       
  • LEGAL EDUCATION—OPEN YOUR CASEBOOKS PLEASE: IDENTIFYING OPEN ACCESS
           ALTERNATIVES TO LANGDELL’S LEGACY

    • Authors: Emma M. Wood et al.
      Abstract: Nonprofits, academic institutions, and educators have collaborated, at all academic levels, to create quality Open Educational Resources (OER) since that term was defined by UNESCO in 2002. These opensource educational materials are in the public domain and published under an open license, meaning that they can be freely copied, used, adapted, and re-shared with the public. They include not only textbooks but supplemental educational materials in various media formats. Their value is such that even federal and state legislatures are taking note and passing laws to incentivize the creation and use of OER in both secondary and higher education. Despite the momentum in academics toward the adoption of open textbooks and supplemental materials, legal academia has been slower to embrace open casebooks. By design, OER offers a great deal of flexibility for educators and the promise of cost savings for academic institutions and students. This paper examines the modern history of casebooks and the OER movement, as well as the various OER platforms ideally suited to create open content for law courses. The authors posit that a greater understanding of OER will give law professors and students a wider range of choice and ownership in course materials.
      PubDate: Sat, 08 Jan 2022 17:15:27 PST
       
  • TORT LAW—THE SUDDEN MEDICAL EMERGENCY DEFENSE IN CONNECTICUT: INSURERS
           BENEFIT WHILE THE INNOCENT INSURED IS LEFT TO SUFFER

    • Authors: Caitrin Ellen Kiley
      Abstract: Every individual in the United States who purchases and registers a vehicle is involved with the automobile insurance industry. Like many other types of insurance, there is much longstanding debate regarding the difficulty associated with receiving the benefits one has paid for. This debate is particularly complicated in Connecticut. Unlike many other jurisdictions that have a no-fault automobile insurance system, Connecticut relies on a tort-based liability system for determining compensation for an injured party.In Connecticut, when a driver or passenger is injured in a car accident as a result of the actions of another driver, damages are recovered by proving legal liability. Connecticut courts currently allow a defendant and their insurer to escape liability if the defendant driver caused the accident due to a “medical emergency.” When a defendant proves that they suffered a “medical emergency,” the plaintiff is also barred from recovering underinsured or uninsured motorist coverage under their own insurance policy. The injured person is left with the financial burden, despite the fact that both parties were covered by insurance.This Note argues that Connecticut should, either through legislation or regulation, disallow automobile insurance companies from taking advantage of the Sudden Medical Emergency Defense as a way to deny providing coverage after an automobile accident. This would allow a plaintiff who was injured due to the incapacitation caused by a sudden medical emergency of another driver to recover from the other driver’s insurance company, up to their policy limits, and from their own insurance company if uninsured or underinsured motorist coverage applies.
      PubDate: Sat, 08 Jan 2022 17:15:23 PST
       
  • CONTRACT LAW—BREWING A SOLUTION: AN ARGUMENT FOR FAIRNESS IN
           MASSACHUSETTS BEER FRANCHISE LAWS

    • Authors: Frederickie A. Rizos
      Abstract: For over a decade, Massachusetts craft brewers have been fighting to change the Massachusetts Beer Franchise Law as it directly impacts their success. The Law makes it extremely difficult for a brewer to escape a contract with a distributor. Once a brewer and a distributor establish a relationship for at least six months, a brewer must show good cause to terminate the agreement, which can be extremely time-consuming, cumbersome, and costly. There is no written or oral agreement requirement, and the statutory provision can take effect without the knowledge of either party. Thus, an up-and-coming brewery without knowledge of the statute may think it is just testing out the waters with a distribution company and can end up stuck working with that company indefinitely. The problems arise when a brewer is unhappy with a distributor and cannot do anything about it.The Massachusetts Beer Franchise Law is meant to protect small distributors from large breweries. The legislation did not take into account the negative effects that could arise if the industry dynamic were to change. Now, it is the small brewers that need protection from large distributors. This Note discusses the negative impacts of static statutory solutions and proposes new, dynamic statutory provisions to resolve the ongoing conflict created by the Massachusetts Beer Franchise Law. Additionally, this Note considers non-legislative protections such as contractual provisions a brewer might consider when entering into a distribution agreement.
      PubDate: Sat, 08 Jan 2022 17:15:19 PST
       
  • CIVIL RIGHTS LAW—INCLUSION OF EMOTIONAL SUPPORT ANIMALS AS SERVICE
           ANIMALS UNDER THE ADA: CREATING THE RIGHT TO USE DOGS TO ASSIST PEOPLE
           LIVING WITH MENTAL HEALTH ISSUES

    • Authors: Amanda M. Foster
      Abstract: The use of emotional support animals to alleviate or mitigate symptoms associated with mental health issues has been a topic of debate since its inception. On one hand, there is the community of people who have expressed a need to use support animals to help them to participate in society, including while traveling by airplane. On the other hand, the Department of Transportation has had to assess whether allowing support animals on airplanes would pose a direct threat to the safety or health of others.In most contexts, support animals are not treated as service animals, so therein lies substantial confusion. Broadening the Americans with Disabilities Act’s definition of service animal to include emotional support animals will have both positive and negative consequences. By expanding and clarifying the language, our society will benefit by breaking the stigma of mental illness. Nonetheless, there are risks that come with this positive change that will be worth it in the end. These disability regulations need to be updated in a way to provide clarity for all Americans. By carefully crafting the definition of an emotional support animal around the robust fraud mechanisms outlined in this article, people with mental health disabilities can have the ADA’s promises fulfilled and be fully integrated into society while still protecting the interests of businesses and others.
      PubDate: Sat, 08 Jan 2022 17:15:14 PST
       
  • FOREWORD

    • Authors: Jennifer Taub
      Abstract: This Foreword highlights the central points of the Articles in Volume 43, Issue 1 of Western New England Law Review. The Article topics include emotional support animals, distribution rights for small beer brewers, fairness in accident insurance coverage, alternative legal education materials, and custody challenges for parents with abusive partners. Each share the identification of a perceived problem with the legal status quo and presents proposed solutions.
      PubDate: Sat, 08 Jan 2022 17:15:09 PST
       
  • THE LONG ROAD TO POWER FOR WOMEN IN POLITICS

    • Authors: Timothy Vercellotti
      Abstract: A century after women won the right to vote they remain significantly under-represented in federal and state elected office in the United States. Why do women, who comprise more than half of the population in the United States, still fall far short of that proportion in Congress and in state governorships' Political science research suggests there are multiple explanations, ranging from women’s views on whether they are prepared to run to institutional and social constraints. The situation may be changing, however, given the record-setting number of women who ran for federal and state offices in the 2018 election cycle. Women continue to make advances in American politics, even if the rate of progress is slower than many would prefer.
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Oct 2020 18:57:35 PDT
       
  • FROM SUFFRAGE TO SUBSTANTIVE HUMAN RIGHTS: THE CONTINUING JOURNEY FOR
           RACIALLY MARGINALIZED WOMEN

    • Authors: Bandana Purkayastha
      Abstract: This Article highlights racially marginalized women’s struggles to substantively access rights. Suffrage was meant to acquire political rights for women, and through that mechanism, move towards greater equality between women and men in the public and private spheres. Yet, racial minority women, working class and immigrant women, among others, continued to encounter a series of political, civil, economic, cultural, and social boundaries that deprived them of access to rights. From the struggles of working-class immigrant women for economic rights, to equal pay, and better work conditions, to the struggles of Japanese American women who were interned because they were assumed to be “the enemy” of the state, the history of the twentieth century is replete with contradictions of what was achieved in the quest for rights and what was suppressed. This Article touches on some key moments in history to illustrate the struggles of racially marginalized women to build lives of human dignity—lives that are secure from bodily harm, and from severe economic, social, and political inequalities. The quest for rights—human rights that might help secure the conditions that enable people to build secure, dignified lives—remains an unfinished journey.
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Oct 2020 18:57:28 PDT
       
  • WOMEN, POLITICS, AND GENDER INEQUALITY

    • Authors: Joya Misra
      Abstract: Women’s representation in United States politics has increased but remains substantially lower than in many other countries. This Article first examines the structural impediments to higher levels of women’s representation, including how gender stereotypes may limit women’s electoral success. Then, the focus shifts to how women’s representation may and may not result in different kinds of policy priorities. Finally, the Article takes a more intersectional approach to consider how variations among women impact political priorities and approaches.
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Oct 2020 18:57:21 PDT
       
  • “NOT AS A FAVOR, NOT AS A PRIVILEGE, BUT AS A RIGHT”: WOMAN
           SUFFRAGISTS, RACE, RIGHTS, AND THE NINETEENTH AMENDMENT

    • Authors: Joan Marie Johnson
      Abstract: This brief history of the woman suffrage movement shows how various suffragists believed the right to vote for women was a human right that all American citizens should possess, while other suffragists viewed their struggle as one for respect and protection from abusive men. These differences are particularly salient in the fraught role of black woman suffragists, who, while dedicated to the cause, were frequently unwelcome in the white-dominated state and national movements.
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Oct 2020 18:57:15 PDT
       
  • EXCERPT FROM “MASSACHUSETTS IN THE WOMAN SUFFRAGE MOVEMENT:
           REVOLUTIONARY REFORMERS”

    • Authors: Barbara Berenson
      Abstract: In November 2019, the Author spoke at the Western New England Law Review held its symposium, On Account of Sex: Women’s Suffrage and the Role of Gender in Politics Today. This Article contains excerpts from Chapters 7 and 8 of her book, Massachusetts in the Woman Suffrage Movement: Revolutionary Reformers, in which she explores the many changes in the suffrage campaign as the Gilded Age gave way to the Progressive Era at the start of the twentieth century.
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Oct 2020 18:57:10 PDT
       
  • “NASTY” WOMAN AND “VERY HAPPY YOUNG GIRL”: THE POLITICAL CULTURE
           OF WOMEN IN DONALD TRUMP’S AMERICA

    • Authors: John Baick
      Abstract: Discussions of gender and politics in the present day must include a consideration of the charged atmosphere of our political culture. Americans were embroiled in culture wars for much of the twentieth century—conflicts that included the right of women to vote, the civil rights of African Americans and other minority groups, and the meaning of sexuality. New debates have been added in the last few years—many of which center on gender, sexuality, and race. The culture wars have reached a fevered peak with the election and administration of Donald Trump. Yet Trump himself does not represent a new front in the culture wars, but what might be a climactic battle between the forces of the past and the future of the American nation.The title of this piece is drawn from presidential pronouncements on the meaning of women in public life—the first a tried-and-true insult reserved mostly for offending women, and the second a sarcastic critique that Trump directed towards the teenage global warming activist Greta Thunberg. This Article will focus on the front lines that these two insults represent in our culture wars. What does it mean to be a woman and a citizen and a political actor, and in a larger sense, what it means to be an American in Trump’s America.
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Oct 2020 18:57:03 PDT
       
  • FOREWORD

    • Authors: Sudha Setty
      Abstract: In November 2019, the Western New England Law Review held its symposium, On Account of Sex: Women’s Suffrage and the Role of Gender in Politics Today. The symposium articles ask us to look at history to see what factors enabled path-breaking activists to secure the right to vote in a time of immense national turmoil. They also ask us to weigh how history should assess the strategic decisions that ultimately gained political rights for some women, but deliberately excluded Black women and other activists.These historical accounts help us consider how the right to vote is faring, particularly after a series of cases in which the U.S. Supreme Court has enabled a profound movement toward disenfranchisement through invalidating key sections of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, allowing requirements for state-issued voter identification that serve to prevent voting, enabling extraordinary gerrymandering, allowing for the purging of voters from the registration rolls, and making it harder for people to vote absentee even during a pandemic. They also take up issues regarding gender, race, class, status in gaining rights and political representation; how the environment surrounding voting rights has experienced and continues to experience great challenges; and how, although we can see radical threats to those rights in a profound and obvious manner in today’s politics, those threats are simply current versions of a long-standing issue in United States politics and in politics around the world.
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Oct 2020 18:56:56 PDT
       
  • FAMILY LAW—STATES SHOULD CREATE A HEIGHTENED STANDARD OF REVIEW FOR
           CONTRACTS THAT DETERMINE THE DISPOSITION OF FROZEN EMBRYOS IN CONTESTED
           DIVORCE CASES

    • Authors: Stacie L. Provencher
      Abstract: While in vitro fertilization (“IVF”) presents an opportunity to become parents for a couple facing infertility or experiencing medical issues that may ultimately result in infertility, it also presents the possibility for a legal dispute should the couple separate in the future. The contracts that the parties enter into with the fertility clinic, and with each other, at the beginning of the IVF process are long, complicated documents that are often not well explained nor well understood. Because the parties do not necessarily understand the rights that they are each giving up under these contracts or contemplate how forfeiting these rights may affect each in the future, there can be legal disputes if a couple separates. Since many states have not addressed embryo disputes at the time of divorce through legislation, this issue has to be decided by state appellate courts when the issue arises. In 2018–2019, three state appellate courts were tasked with determining the correct way to handle the disposition of embryos as a matter of first impression.This Note examines the way courts have decided to handle the disposition of embryos1 in contested divorces. There are three approaches taken across the country: the contract approach, the balancing of interests approach, and the contemporaneous mutual consent approach. This Note considers whether contracts with fertility clinics should be examined by courts more critically than contracts are reviewed generally. This Note argues that states deciding this issue as a matter of first impression should move away from blanket enforcement of contracts. This objective can be accomplished by employing a heightened standard of contract review before enforcing agreements, and instead using the balancing of interests approach in the event the clinic contracts fail to meet this heightened standard in a way that protects the interests of the parties.
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Oct 2020 15:32:14 PDT
       
  • LABOR & EMPLOYMENT LAW—THE CASE OF CAMARGO AND THE CONUNDRUM OF DEFINING
           WORKER STATUS UNDER MASSACHUSETTS WORKPLACE LAWS

    • Authors: Victoria Arend Carbone
      Abstract: A worker’s status as an “employee” or “independent contractor” determines the amount of protection she will receive under a vast array of workplace laws. However, the definitions of “employee” and “independent contractor” are increasingly misapplied in today’s labor market. The resulting worker misclassification is a widely recognized problem that prevents workers from knowing and asserting their rights. Incongruous statutory standards for defining worker status exacerbate worker misclassification. In Ives Camargo’s Case, the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court contended with such incongruities in a decision that determined the correct standard for defining who is an “employee” and “independent contractor” under Massachusetts workers’ compensation law. The Court’s holding affirmed the Commonwealth’s current definitional system for worker status in which, paradoxically, “the same worker can be an employee for one purpose but an independent contractor for another.” This Note argues that the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court missed an opportunity in Camargo to clarify the incongruous standards used to define worker status in Massachusetts. In the wake of Camargo, this Note calls for a uniform definition of “independent contractor” across the Commonwealth’s workplace laws.
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Oct 2020 15:32:09 PDT
       
  • CONSTITUTIONAL LAW—PUERTO RICO AND THE AMBIGUITY WITHIN THE FEDERAL
           COURTS

    • Authors: Claribel Morales
      Abstract: The island of Puerto Rico has a rich culture and a storied history. This history is also plagued by legal and political ambiguity, which is still visible in recent Federal and Supreme Court jurisprudence. The purpose of this Article is to conceptualize the complicated legal and political relationship between Puerto Rico and the United States—from Puerto Rico’s colonial inception to the Insular Cases, which defined Puerto Rico’s status as a territory to its current political stalemate. Further, these decisions created a familiar Plessy v. Ferguson-type legal doctrine in the form of second-class citizenship for the inhabitants of Puerto Rico.First, this Article briefly discusses the history of Puerto Rico, from its colonial incarnation of Spanish rule to the signing of the Jones-Shafroth Act, which established United States citizenship for the people of Puerto Rico. Next, this Article details the inconsistency that the federal courts have shown to Puerto Rico. In Puerto Rico v. Sánchez-Valle, Justice Breyer’s dissenting opinion demonstrates how the majority oversimplified Puerto Rico’s judicial autonomy. To exemplify further this inconsistency, Puerto Rico went from having the ability to construct its own Constitution in 1952 to the 2016 Supreme Court decision in Puerto Rico v. Franklin California Tax-Free Trust, which denied Puerto Rico the ability to control its own debt management during its fiscal crisis.
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Oct 2020 15:32:03 PDT
       
  • JURISPRUDENCE—MERELY JUDGMENT: A FALLIBILIST ACCOUNT OF THE RULE OF
           LAW

    • Authors: Bruce K. Miller
      Abstract: How should judges decide the cases presented to them' In our system the answer is, “according to law,” as opposed to the judges’ preferred outcomes. But for at least a century, skeptics have cast doubt on whether adjudication under law is possible. Judge Richard Posner, now retired from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit, has, for example, argued that the indeterminacy of legal argument and the influence of judges’ predispositions show that it is not. Judge Posner thus recommends that judges give up on the rule of law in contested cases and instead candidly base their decisions on what they take to be in the best interests of society.Is there a convincing response to Judge Posner’s critique' H.L.A. Hart famously sought to defend the rule of law as a law of rules, grounded in judges’ acceptance of a “Rule of Recognition,” as the ultimate basis for their decisions. But Hart’s reliance on agreement among judges, coupled with his acknowledgement of an “open texture” where the Rule of Recognition breaks down, renders his explanation unhelpful to a judge confronted with seriously competing arguments.
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Oct 2020 15:31:56 PDT
       
  • CRIMINAL LAW—DOES A CONFESSION MATTER' A DEFENDANT’S CONFESSION AS
           IRRELEVANT TO PROVE HIS GUILT

    • Authors: Doron Menashe et al.
      Abstract: This Article presents a revolution in the rules of confessions and their admissibility. It proposes to diverge from the dichotomous test of admissibility currently applied in the rules of evidence, concerning rejecting invalid evidence, in order to recognize the possibility of applying the blue pencil doctrine in the same manner. According to our suggestion, courts should partially recognize the admissibility of late confessions, despite the fact that the source of the late confession is an invalid confession previously given. Recently, Israel’s Supreme Court has determined that a late confession given after an invalid confession is considered admissible. In other words, the court has decided to apply a relative nullification of improper practices by law-enforcement authorities and therefore, apply, in a new manner, the blue pencil doctrine, a doctrine that is usually used in contract law.This Article is dedicated to the theoretical and practical justifications to accept late confessions, emphasizing the rules of evidence as they exist in statute, as well as the question of incentivization of improper behavior by law enforcement authorities. The Article addresses the question of whether it is appropriate to acknowledge the American jurisprudence principle, known as the “fruit of the poisonous tree” doctrine. As this Article describes, our proposed solution would be to maintain the reliability of a late confession, in contrast to the American doctrine of fruit of the poisonous tree. Thus, this Article would present an alternative legal principle, which may prove more fitting for this matter, in light of the principles of the rules of evidence in the Israeli legal system.
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Oct 2020 15:31:51 PDT
       
  • HEALTH LAW—A HARD PILL TO SWALLOW: AN EXAMINATION OF THE U.S. DRUG
           DEVELOPMENT PROCESS AND STATE AND FEDERAL GOVERNMENT MEASURES TO EXPAND
           PATIENT ACCESS TO INVESTIGATIONAL DRUGS

    • Authors: Alissa Bang
      Abstract: The drug development process—regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)—is complex, lengthy, and costly. For years, reformers have sought more liberal access to potential drug treatments that have not yet reached the final stages of the process. “Right to Try” laws and the FDA’s expanded access program are among some of the government measures designed to allow terminally ill patients to obtain investigational drugs before they receive FDA approval. This Article explores the strengths and shortcomings of some of the measures undertaken by state and federal governments, while highlighting the policy struggle between providing individuals early access to potentially life-saving drugs and maintaining the necessary government oversight to ensure consumer safety.
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Oct 2020 15:31:45 PDT
       
 
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