Subjects -> LAW (Total: 1397 journals)
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LAW (843 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 801 - 354 of 354 Journals sorted alphabetically
Uyuşmazlık Mahkemesi Dergisi     Open Access  
Valparaiso University Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Vanderbilt Law Review     Free   (Followers: 5)
Varia Justicia     Open Access  
Veredas do Direito : Direito Ambiental e Desenvolvimento Sustentável     Open Access  
Veritas et Justitia     Open Access  
Verstek     Open Access  
Vertentes do Direito     Open Access  
Via Inveniendi Et Iudicandi     Open Access  
Vianna Sapiens     Open Access  
Victoria University of Wellington Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Villanova Environmental Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Villanova Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Violence Against Women     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
VirtuaJus - Revista de Direito     Open Access  
Vniversitas     Open Access  
Vox Juris     Open Access  
Waikato Law Review: Taumauri     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Washington and Lee Journal of Energy, Climate, and the Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Washington and Lee Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Washington Law Review     Free   (Followers: 2)
Washington University Global Studies Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Washington University Journal of Law & Policy     Open Access  
Washington University Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Wayne Law Review     Free  
Western Journal of Legal Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Western New England Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
William & Mary Environmental Law and Policy Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
William & Mary Journal of Women and the Law     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
William and Mary Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Windsor Yearbook of Access to Justice / Recueil annuel de Windsor d'accès à la justice     Open Access  
Wirtschaftsrechtliche Blätter     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Wroclaw Review of Law, Administration & Economics     Open Access  
Yale Journal of Law & the Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Yale Journal of Law and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Yale Journal on Regulation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Yale Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 65)
Yearbook of European Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Yearbook of International Disaster Law Online     Full-text available via subscription  
Yuridika     Open Access  
Zuzenbidea ikasten : Irakaskuntzarako aldizkaria     Open Access  
交大法學評論     Open Access  

  First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Similar Journals
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Violence Against Women
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.918
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 58  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1077-8012 - ISSN (Online) 1552-8448
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • “Safety Is Elusive:” A Critical Discourses Analysis of Newspapers’
           Reporting of Domestic Violence During the Coronavirus Pandemic

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      Authors: Heather L. Storer, Brandon Mitchell, Claire Willey-Sthapit
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated incidences of domestic violence (DV). The framing of DV within media sources contributes to the public's understanding of DV. Using critical discourse analysis (CDA), this paper explores representations of safety within newspapers’ reporting of DV during the pandemic. The sample included newspaper articles (n = 31) from U.S. newspapers. The analysis involved multiple rounds of coding and employing “structured questions.” These articles depicted limited courses of action for DV survivors and represented safety as unattainable. Safety was constructed in four ways: homes are unsafe, social services are overburdened, government failures, and the elusiveness of safety. These discursive formations provide insight regarding “idealized” social responses to DV.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2023-01-20T06:36:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221150277
       
  • Will Boys Always Be Boys' The Criminalization of Street Harassment in
           Portugal

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      Authors: Beatriz Ribeiro
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Albeit one of the most pervasive forms of gender violence, street harassment tends to be either not considered a crime or to be faulty criminalized. This investigation contributes to better understand the overall inefficiency of existing laws through an analysis of the criminalization of street harassment in Portugal. Particularly, it searches for obstacles to implementation among those responsible for the process—the street-level bureaucrats of the Portuguese Public Security Police. Through 14 semi-structured interviews, three groups of obstacles to implementation were identified: perceptions of the legislation's content, a masculinist institutional culture, and personal characteristics. These are new findings that contribute to an understanding of the perpetuation of gender violence through state's institutions and workers.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2023-01-20T06:35:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221150276
       
  • Student Experiences Reporting Sexual and Gender-Based Misconduct to the
           Title IX Office at a Public State University

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      Authors: Aliya R. Webermann, Kathryn J. Holland, Christopher M. Murphy
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Twenty-five survivors completed anonymous surveys about reporting sexual and gender-based misconduct to their public university's Title IX office, including case characteristics, perceptions of the reporting and response process (e.g., helpfulness, respect), and experiences of institutional betrayal and support. Measures and open-ended responses described varied misconduct incidents, reporting behaviors, case outcomes, process issues, and negative process consequences. Additionally, process perceptions correlated with institutional betrayal and support. Findings illuminate how survivors’ Title IX process perceptions relate to experiencing harm or support from larger institutions, and offer insights into developing a Title IX process which maintains student rights and dignity regardless of outcome.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2023-01-13T06:31:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221150274
       
  • A Review of Intimate Partner Violence Interventions Relevant to Women
           During the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Lori E. Weeks, Christie Stilwell, Melissa Rothfus, Alyssa J. Weeks, Marilyn Macdonald, Lois A. Jackson, Suzanne Dupuis-Blanchard, Andie Carson, Elaine Moody, Heather Helpard, Anika Daclan
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Women have experienced increased rates of intimate partner violence (IPV) since the onset of the COVID-19 global pandemic, and at the same time requirements for physical distancing and/or remote delivery of services have created challenges in accessing services. We synthesized research evidence from 4 systematic reviews and 20 individual studies to address how IPV interventions can be adapted within the context of the pandemic. As many interventions have been delivered via various technologies, access to technology is of particular importance during the pandemic. Our results can inform the provision of services during the remainder of the COVID-19 pandemic including how to support women who have little access to in-person services.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2023-01-12T08:03:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221150275
       
  • Absence Versus Presence of Intimate Partner Violence in a Sample of
           Spanish Women: Conflict Resolution Strategies and Associated Variables

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      Authors: Marta Badenes-Sastre, Ana M. Beltrán-Morillas, Francisca Expósito
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Through two studies (N = 544 women), the role of types of relational problems (absence vs. presence of intimate partner violence [IPV]) in the use of conflict resolution strategies (exit and loyalty) was analyzed, considering the serial mediating effect of dependency and commitment and the moderating effect of benevolent sexism. The main results showed that higher scores in dependency and commitment predicted less use of exit strategies among women who reported IPV. No significant results were found regarding loyalty strategy and benevolent sexism. Ultimately, implications for women's perceived risk of future violence were discussed.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2023-01-11T07:30:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221147907
       
  • The Effect of Victim Attractiveness and Type of Abuse Suffered on
           Attributions of Victim Blame and Credibility in Intimate Partner Violence:
           A Vignette-Based Online Experiment

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      Authors: Maisie Hall, Agata Debowska, George K. Hales
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Victims of intimate partner violence (IPV) are frequently blamed and disbelieved, which may affect their willingness to report their abuse experiences. This vignette-based online experiment examines whether victim attractiveness (attractive vs. unattractive) and the type of abuse suffered (psychological vs. psychological plus physical abuse) may impact attributions of victim blame or victim credibility. The final sample included 167 UK residents (79% females) aged between 18 and 66 years (M = 33.17, SD = 11.26). Results indicated that the attractive victim was judged as being more credible than the unattractive victim. Results are discussed in light of societal attitudes toward IPV.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2023-01-10T05:36:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221150272
       
  • “Wherever There's Men, it can Happen”: Constructions of Violence
           Against Women by Young Adults in Ireland

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      Authors: Robert Bolton, Máire Leane, Fiachra Ó Súilleabháin, Claire Edwards, Caroline Fennell
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Given the growing concern about perpetration of violence against women (VAW) amongst young adults, this article examines how a sample (n = 27) of Irish young adults (18–24 years) construct the term VAW. Participants drew on personal experiences to describe the term and were cognisant of the gendered perpetration of domestic, psychological, and sexual violence. A group of participants, however, constructed narrow understandings of VAW that did not align with their routinized experiences of unwanted touching and sexual microaggressions. We call for initiatives to enable young adults to name and link together different forms of VAW.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2023-01-09T07:54:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221150273
       
  • Post-Gender-Based Violence Services Utilization Among Female Entertainment
           Workers in Cambodia: A Cross-Sectional Study

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      Authors: Sreymom Oy, Chan Hang Saing, Sokunthea Yem, Pheak Chhoun, Sovannary Tuot, Siyan Yi
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Little is known about service utilization among female entertainment workers (FEWs) after experiencing gender-based violence (GBV). This study explored factors associated with post-GBV service utilization among FEWs in Cambodia. We included 299 FEWs, who experienced any forms of GBV in the past 12 months. This study highlights low access (14.05%) to post-GBV services among FEWs. Factors associated with post-GBV services utilization were marital status, living conditions, mental health, and types of entertainment venues. To improve post-GBV services utilization, ensuring quality, and availability of services are required. Further research is needed to develop pathways toward a supportive environment for FEWs to access these services.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2023-01-09T07:53:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221147911
       
  • In Their Own Words: Women Veterans Identify the Personal Consequences of
           Military Sexual Trauma Victimization

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      Authors: Kristen M. Reinhardt, Virginia K. McCaughey, Stephanie A. Vento, Amy E. Street
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      This qualitative study provides a platform for women veterans to inform our perspective of their experienced impacts following military sexual trauma (MST). We engaged 23 women veterans in semistructured interviews and used a grounded theory-informed thematic analytic approach, to interpret women's experiences. Women described negative impacts of their MST experiences across psychological, behavioral, and occupational domains. Less frequently, women discussed experiences of posttraumatic growth. These results aid our understanding of the complexities of women's posttrauma experiences and suggest that holistic intervention frameworks focused on a range of potential intervention targets are warranted in helping women veterans recover from MST.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2023-01-09T07:52:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221147909
       
  • Exploring Factors Associated with Intimate Partner Violence Survivors’
           Use of Financial Safety Planning Strategies

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      Authors: Laura Johnson, Kristina Nikolova, Gretchen L. Hoge, Judy L. Postmus
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study was to explore financial strategies that intimate partner violence (IPV) survivors undertake when engaging in safety planning and to examine the relationship between these strategies and various survivor characteristics. As part of the cross-sectional study, a total of 425 female survivors of IPV were surveyed. To examine the relationship between financial safety planning strategies and participants’ demographic characteristics, abuse experiences, and financial knowledge, binomial logistic regression analyses were conducted. Factors associated with financial safety planning varied by strategy; ethnicity and nativity were often significantly associated. Implications for practice and areas for future research are discussed.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-12-29T12:46:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221147913
       
  • Understanding Intimate Partner Violence Among Ethnic and Sexual
           Minorities: Lived Experiences of Queer Women in Norway

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      Authors: Esra Ummak, Salman Turken, Deniz Akin
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing upon in-depth, semi-structured interviews, this study explored how queer women from ethnic minority backgrounds in Norway understand and experience intimate partner violence (IPV). Based on an intersectional approach, the study highlights and discusses how having multiple minority positions may inform and affect the way participants experience IPV. The analysis shows that participants’ experiences of IPV are shaped by their multiple minority statuses in Norwegian society. A discussion is provided that revolves around how being a sexual as well as an ethnic minority generates a significant power imbalance for the participants in their relationships.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-12-29T12:46:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221147912
       
  • Co-Occurring Intimate Partner Violence and Child Abuse in Eastern
           Democratic Republic of Congo: The Influence of Early Life Experiences of
           Abuse

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      Authors: Kathryn L. Falb, Alexandra Blackwell, Jean de Dieu Hategekimana, Munjireen Sifat, Danielle Roth, Meghan O’Connor
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Little is known about co-occurring intimate partner violence (IPV) against women and child abuse within families in humanitarian settings. Baseline data from 203 couples in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo were analyzed to assess associations between childhood experiences of abuse with present co-occurring violence. Over half of women (56.1%) and men (50.5%) reported co-occurring violence. Adjusted models demonstrate experiencing physical abuse as a child was associated with greatest odds of recent co-occurring violence while witnessing parental IPV had mixed influence. Programmatic approaches focused on reducing early childhood violence may be promising to prevent both IPV and child abuse.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-12-29T12:46:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221145302
       
  • Profiles of Childhood Victimization as Predictors of Sexual Aggression and
           Intimate Partner Violence Perpetration

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      Authors: Travis N. Ray, Michele R. Parkhill
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      The study utilized a latent profile analysis to evaluate distinct combinations of men's childhood victimization experiences and their communal predictive ability for sexual aggression (SA) and intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration. Men living in the United States (N = 399) completed assessments of emotional, physical, and sexual childhood victimization, as well as SA and IPV toward women. The results indicated that members of profiles characterized by moderate to high frequencies of childhood victimization—especially sexual victimization—were at increased risk of SA and IPV perpetration. Contrary to expectations, adult- versus peer-perpetrated victimization did not appear to substantially alter risk of perpetration.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-12-28T06:21:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221145298
       
  • Judicial Dilemmas of Female Domestic Violence Victims: An Empirical Study
           Based on Chinese Civil Judgments in 2020

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      Authors: Fang Gao
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Women are the primary victims of domestic violence, but their experiences are often ignored in Chinese judicial judgments. Among 350 Chinese civil judgments on domestic violence in 2020, more than 96% involved female victims, and they faced various judicial dilemmas when seeking civil remedies. The court confirmed the existence of domestic violence in 26% of the cases, and 27% of applications for personal safety protection orders were rejected. More than two-thirds of female plaintiffs’ divorce applications were not approved, and they received no compensation. This study analyzed the cause of these judicial dilemmas and proposed some solutions.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-12-26T07:07:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221145303
       
  • Birth Control Sabotage Motivation and Measurement: A Mixed-Methods
           Analysis among Latina Women

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      Authors: Karen Trister Grace, Nancy E. Glass, Elizabeth Miller, Kamila A. Alexander, Charvonne N. Holliday, Michele R Decker
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Reproductive coercion (RC) is a type of intimate partner violence that includes birth control sabotage (BCS). We explored the perceived intent behind BCS to refine RC measurement, using a mixed-methods design with a clinic-based sample of Latina women (13 interviews; 482 surveys). Women perceived partners used BCS for reasons beyond pregnancy promotion. Specifically, 16.8% of participants reported any past-year RC; this decreased to 9.5% when asked if their partner used BCS with the sole intent of getting them pregnant. RC measures and assessment should separate behavior from intent in BCS questions to not underestimate the prevalence and to guide clinical response.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-12-26T07:06:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221145292
       
  • Disclosing and Reporting of Consent Violations Among Kink Practitioners in
           the United States

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      Authors: Jessamyn Bowling, Susan Wright, J. Kevin Benson, Sean McCabe, Annelise Mennicke, Jessica Willard, Neha Kissler, Haley Good, Brianna Moody, Russell Stambaugh, Robert J. Cramer
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Kink practitioners are marginalized and experience adverse health and social outcomes, which are exacerbated by consent violations. This study aims to understand experiences of reporting consent violations within a kink context. Kink practitioners (N = 2,888) completed a survey focused on consent violations, reporting, and recommendations, with 767 (25.56%) of them reporting consent violations in the kink context. The type of consent violation (sexual assault or kink-related behaviors), disclosure, and reporting significantly differed based on gender, sexual orientation, and injury status, but not age. Additionally, recommended steps included avoidance of police and others in positions of power and increased accountability.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-12-21T07:48:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221145299
       
  • The Role of Mistrust in Sexual Revictimization: An Analysis of Serial
           Indirect Effects

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      Authors: Catherine J. Lutz-Zois, Alicia M. Selvey, Kirsten L. Anderson, Alec M. Smidt
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      A sample of 819 female college students completed measures of childhood sexual abuse (CSA), adult sexual victimization (ASV), mistrust, trauma-related symptoms, and drinking problems. Using a serial indirect effects model, we hypothesized that CSA would be associated with ASV through the indirect effects of mistrust → trauma-related symptoms → drinking problems. The results indicated that this serial indirect effects model was significant. When the order of the first two indirect effects was reversed, the model was not significant. These results highlight the importance of examining potential factors involved in sexual revictimization in tandem rather than in isolation.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-12-21T07:15:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221145294
       
  • Why Young Women Who Use Opioids Are at Risk for Rape: The Impact of Social
           Vulnerabilities and Sexually Coercive Drug Using Contexts

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      Authors: Lauren Jessell, Pedro Mateu-Gelabert, Honoria Guarino, Chunki Fong
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      This study tests a theoretically informed model to understand why women who use opioids (WWUO) are at risk of rape while using drugs. Structured interviews were conducted with 168 WWUO. Three domains were hypothesized to increase risk: the sexually coercive context of drug use, women's social vulnerability, and drug use severity. Logistic regression examined the odds of being raped by domain. One-third of WWUO had been raped while using drugs. The sexually coercive context and social vulnerability domains significantly increased women's odds of being raped. Prevention efforts should target social and contextual factors.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-12-20T07:53:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221137921
       
  • Understanding Intimate Partner Violence Service Delivery for Latinx
           Survivors in Rural Areas

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      Authors: Jeongsuk Kim, Cynthia Fraga Rizo, Christopher J. Wretman, Carolina Alzuru, Deena Fulton, Lisi Martinez Lotz, Brittney R. Chesworth, Ashley D. Givens, Rebecca J. Macy
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Using a statewide survey, this exploratory, cross-sectional study examined 78 domestic violence (DV) service organizations’ service delivery practices and perceived challenges to serving Latinx survivors in the context of rurality. Findings showed that DV organizations in rural areas perceived more challenges to delivering culturally appropriate services for Latinx survivors compared to those in other geographic settings even after accounting for client characteristics, service provision characteristics, and community resources. The study finding offers critical insights to ensure and enhance the provision of linguistically and culturally accessible services for rural Latinx survivors of intimate partner violence.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-12-14T07:14:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221140136
       
  • Correlates of Client-Perpetrated Violence Against Female Sex Workers in
           Bogotá

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      Authors: Carlos Iglesias Vergara, Reka Solymosi
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      This paper aims to estimate the prevalence of client-perpetrated violence against female sex workers (FSWs) in Bogotá and to understand what structural and environmental factors are associated with such victimization. The project used secondary data from interviews with 2,684 FSWs. Multivariable binary logistic regression was used to test for associations with client-perpetrated violence. Findings reveal that factors such as experiencing police harassment and social stigma were positively associated with client-perpetrated violence. Situational factors such as providing services in motels, hotels, on the street, and in cars were also associated with increased odds of becoming a victim of violence.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-12-09T07:52:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221142919
       
  • Depression, Anxiety, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Following Intimate
           Partner Violence: The Role of Self-Criticism, Guilt, and Gender Beliefs

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      Authors: Iona Naismith, Karen Ripoll-Nuñez, Gabriela Baquero Henao
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Intimate partner violence (IPV) predicts anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), yet the role of cognition in these pathways is poorly understood. This study explored whether self-criticism, guilt, and gender beliefs predicted psychological symptoms, using self-report data from 50 Colombian female IPV survivors with diverse socioeconomic statuses. Self-criticism and guilt were high and significantly associated with IPV. Self-criticism significantly predicted depression and PTSD, whilst only guilt predicted anxiety. Traditional gender role beliefs were associated with emotional abuse, but not with self-criticism, guilt, or symptoms. In conclusion, self-criticism and guilt are important treatment targets for female IPV survivors, regardless of gender beliefs.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-12-09T07:38:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221142917
       
  • Does Self-Silencing Behavior Mediate the Relation Between Rejection
           Sensitivity and Sexual Violence Victimization'

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      Authors: Stephanie L. Freitag, Mark F. Lenzenweger, H. Michael Crowson
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Previous research reveals that rejection sensitivity is associated with both sexual violence victimization and self-silencing behavior, yet the association among these variables has not been examined. As the foundation for this study, we propose a theoretical model that integrates these constructs. Using mediational analyses with bootstrapping, the results from a sample of 241 heterosexual college women revealed that consistent with the proposed model, self-silencing mediated the link between rejection sensitivity and reports of unwanted sexual contact and rape. The implications of the findings for the prevention of victimization/revictimization and interventions with victimized women are discussed.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-12-07T06:34:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221142918
       
  • Social Dynamics, Gendered Subjectivities, and Surreptitious Acts of Agency
           

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      Authors: Lucia Bracco Bruce, María Teresa Rodríguez Campos, Tesania Velázquez
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      The article analyzes women's inner subjective processes while engaged in male-to-female intimate partner violence (IPV) situations. Through in-depth interviews with 12 women who had suffered violence in a rural community in Peru, it examines three topics: social dynamics that simultaneously contribute to resist within and openly question IPV, the transformations of hegemonic femininity in the community and the implications on their gendered subjectivities, and women's surreptitious acts and processes of agency to recalibrate power within their situation of IPV. In conclusion, women experience inner psychic tensions about themselves, their partners, and their relationships, which enables them to question IPV while resisting within the violent situation.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-12-07T06:33:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221142916
       
  • The Experiences of Post-Separation Survivors of Domestic Violence During
           the Covid-19 Pandemic: Findings From a Qualitative Study in the United
           Kingdom

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      Authors: Ruchi Desai, Siddhartha Bandyopadhyay, Shazia Zafar, Caroline Bradbury-Jones
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Post-separation for domestic violence (DV) survivors is known to be a period of heightened risk of domestic homicide. Evidence points to increased rates of DV during the Covid-19 pandemic, with specific challenges in help-seeking from DV services, yet studies that capture this qualitatively are still emerging. This UK study investigated the experiences of 21 separated DV survivors (all women) during the Covid-19 pandemic. Inductive, thematic analysis highlighted participants’ psychological distress, isolation, fear of Covid-19 transmission, and detachment from support networks. The findings reflect the interconnected nature of adversities experienced by DV survivors and the exacerbation of these due to the insidious, multifaceted, and synergistic impacts of DV and the pandemic.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-12-07T06:31:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221142914
       
  • Dehumanized, Violated, and Powerless: An Australian Survey of Women's
           Experiences of Obstetric Violence in the Past 5 Years

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      Authors: Hazel Keedle, Warren Keedle, Hannah G. Dahlen
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Globally, significant numbers of women report obstetric violence (OV) during childbirth. The United Nations has identified OV as gendered violence. OV can be perpetrated by any healthcare professional (HCP) and is impacted by systemic issues such as HCP education, staffing ratios, and lack of access to continuity of care. The current study explored the experiences of OV reported in a national survey in 2021 by Australian women who had a baby in the previous 5 years. A content analysis of 626 open text comments found three main categories: “I felt dehumanised,” “I felt violated,” and “I felt powerless.” Women reported bullying, coercion, non-empathic care, and physical and sexual assault. Disrespect and abuse and non-consented vaginal examinations were the subcategories with the most comments.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-12-01T07:25:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221140138
       
  • Language Beyond Labeling: Toward a Language Ideologies Analysis of
           Anti-Violence Interventions

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      Authors: Julia Kowalski
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      As scholars explore anti-carceral approaches to gender violence, they question how to structure interactive practices to transform, rather than reproduce, dynamics of inequality and harm. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork conducted with frontline workers in north India, this article argues that the concept of language ideologies can help analyze how interactive practices address gender violence. Language ideologies are shared representations of how interaction connects speaker, audience, and context. By tracking the language ideologies that inform anti-violence interventions, researchers can better analyze the extraordinarily complex semiotic labor required to address gender violence.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-12-01T07:24:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221140135
       
  • Taking Advantage of a Window of Opportunity: Factors Associated With
           Jewish Bathhouse Attendants’ (Balaniyot) Assistance to Female Victims of
           Intimate Partner Violence

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      Authors: Lea Zanbar, Efrat Orlin, Keren Mintz-Malchi
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Victims of intimate partner violence may endure years of pain, fearing to turn for help. Informal service providers are potential sources of assistance. This study explored factors impacting two assistance outcomes provided by Jewish “balaniyot” (bathhouse attendants): actions aimed at protecting the woman, and actions aimed at protecting family integrity. Balaniyot (n = 166) completed self-report questionnaires assessing mastery, organizational commitment, spirituality at work, and beliefs about violence. All variables were associated with at least one outcome. Organizational commitment mediated most of these associations. The findings suggest the need to increase balaniyot's organizational commitment and condemnation of violence and offer them specialized training.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-11-30T07:41:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221140137
       
  • Help-Seeking Among Pregnant and Postpartum Women With Lifetime Experiences
           of Opioid Use Disorder and Intimate Partner Violence

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      Authors: Amber L. Hill, Meghan A. Keil, Judy C. Chang, Elizabeth E. Krans, Esther Kim, Elizabeth Van Nostrand, Elizabeth Miller, Chelsea Pallatino
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      We performed content analysis using a qualitative descriptive approach of 15 semistructured interviews with pregnant and postpartum women who have experienced opioid use disorder (OUD) and intimate partner violence (IPV) regarding their experiences seeking help with both issues. Participants described that their partners impacted their ability to seek OUD care; seeking help for OUD and IPV was siloed; they felt more comfortable disclosing OUD than IPV; they perceived pregnancy as a barrier and facilitator to OUD care; and they wished for integrated services. Pregnant and postpartum women experiencing OUD and IPV acknowledged these phenomena intersect and identified a need for more comprehensive services.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-11-28T08:02:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221140134
       
  • Motivations and Barriers to Help-Seeking Among Female Victims of Intimate
           Partner Violence in Ghana

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      Authors: Emmanuel Rohn, Eric Y. Tenkorang
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      This study used qualitative data from 30 women in three of Ghana's 16 administrative regions to explore motivations and barriers to help-seeking among victims of intimate partner violence. Results of the thematic analysis showed low reporting to formal support networks, such as the Domestic Violence and Victim Support Unit or the police, with higher preference for informal sources, such as family members and friends. Motivations to seek help included fatigue, severity of abuse, abusive partner's negligence in honoring marital obligations, and trust in family members. Barriers to help-seeking included: fear of divorce, stigmatization, lack of trust in formal support channels, sociocultural norms emphasizing gender role expectations, and family privacy.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-11-21T06:08:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221137924
       
  • Exploring the Perspectives of Professionals on Providing Intimate Partner
           Violence Services to Women With Disabilities

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      Authors: Fredinah Namatovu, Jens Ineland, Veronica Lövgren
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      This study explored the experiences and perceptions of professional service providers offering services to women with disabilities exposed to intimate partner violence (IPV). Eighteen in-depth interviews were conducted with service providers working in health care, social work, the police, women’s shelters, and the Centre for Violence Against Women. Our findings suggest that providing adequate IPV services to women with disabilities requires coordination and collaboration. IPV services were organized around five overarching themes: finding services; assessing the risk; identification; protection and care; and becoming independent. This approach was helpful for women who faced disability-related challenges in accessing IPV services.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-11-21T06:08:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221137916
       
  • Intimate Partner and Family Violence Among Women Tertiary Students in
           Australia: Prevalence and Cross-Cultural Differences

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      Authors: Laura Zark, John W. Toumbourou, Lata Satyen
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Most prior research on violence among tertiary students has been restricted to dating and sexual violence and neglected cross-cultural variation. To provide more comprehensive and intersectional understandings, this study examined the prevalence and cultural differences in intimate partner and family violence among women tertiary students in Australia. Data were collected from 1,845 women studying at post-secondary institutions and weighted by age and country of birth to reflect the population composition. Eighty-seven percent (86.7%) of participants reported having experienced violence (physical, sexual, psychological, and/or financial) from an intimate partner and/or family member during adulthood. Students who identified as Anglo were more likely to report victimization by intimate partners, while those who identified as non-Anglo and multicultural were more likely to report victimization by family members. The findings highlight the need for tertiary education institutions to prioritize preventing and responding to intimate partner and family violence in their culturally diverse student bodies.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-11-18T07:19:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221137922
       
  • Influence of Ambivalent Sexism on Intimate Partner Violence Tolerance and
           Mental Violence in a Chinese Female Sample: Relationship Causality
           Orientation as a Moderator

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      Authors: Chunhui Yang, Wanlan Liu, Yihuan Wang, Shuang Xu, Yuxi Xu, Lujia Yang, Qi Zhou, Junyi Li
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      The current study examined how the general tolerance of women's intimate partner violence and mental violence perpetration are affected by women's ambivalent sexism and relationship causality orientation. One hundred and forty-nine of 221 Chinese female participants recruited on an online platform were included in the final data analysis. The results showed that causality orientation plays a moderating role. Specifically, as controlled orientation increased, the relationship between hostile sexism and intimate partner violence tolerance became stronger. As the autonomous orientation increased, the relationship between benevolent sexism and intimate partner violence tolerance became weaker. Hostile sexism and controlled orientation positively predict women's mental violence perpetration.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-11-18T07:17:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221137919
       
  • Responsibility or Responsibilization in Medical Evidencing of Domestic
           Violence' The Belgian Case Analyzed Through a Care Ethical Lens

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      Authors: Eva Vergaert
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      The prosecution of domestic violence remains a complex process within criminal policy in Belgium. Evidence is often reliant on medical certificates or injury reports, necessary for victims who want to file official complaints. However, medical evidencing is a contentious issue. Based on qualitative research among public prosecutors, victims, and general practitioners in Belgium, this study analyses the challenges these groups face through an ethics of care lens. Despite their crucial importance in legal procedures, the use of certificates is surrounded by contradictions. The issues point to an unequal distribution of responsibilities, which masks institutional and political responsibilities and enhances the responsibilization of victims.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-11-18T07:16:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221134824
       
  • A Complex Relationship: Intimate Partner Violence, Identification With the
           Aggressor, and Guilt

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      Authors: Alana Siegel, Elit Shaked, Yael Lahav
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      This study explored the relation between guilt and identification with the aggressor (IWA) and the moderating role of IWA in the relation between intimate partner violence (IPV) and guilt. An online survey was conducted among a convenience sample of 700 women. IPV survivors demonstrated elevated guilt, and IWA was related to guilt. Furthermore, IWA moderated the relation between IPV and guilt: Among participants with low IWA levels, IPV was unrelated to guilt, but among participants with high IWA levels, IPV was related to guilt. These findings suggest that IWA may be a key element in explaining guilt among IPV survivors.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-11-16T07:00:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221137917
       
  • Promoting Compassionate Responses to Disclosures of Sexual Violence in
           University Settings: Exploring the Impact of a Social Marketing Campaign

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      Authors: Emma Irvine-Collins, Emma Moore, Kailun Cao, Melissa Curley, Christine Ablaza, Emma Heard
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      This study explores a social marketing campaign aimed to promote compassionate responses to disclosures of sexual violence from peers and raise awareness of university-based formal support services. Findings from a survey (n  =  189) and follow-up focus groups (n  =  11) conducted with university students in Australia indicated that exposure to the campaign may support students’ self-perceived confidence in responding compassionately to disclosures of sexual violence and raise awareness of university-based formal support services. These findings suggest social marketing may be a useful tool to form part of universities’ sexual violence response and prevention strategies. These findings may help inform future university campaigns.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-11-11T06:15:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221134822
       
  • Taking Practical Steps: A Feminist Participatory Approach to Cocreating a
           Trauma- and Violence-Informed Physical Activity Program for Women

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      Authors: Francine E. Darroch, Colleen Varcoe, Gabriela Gonzalez Montaner, Jessica Webb, Michelle Paquette
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Trauma- and violence-informed physical activity (TVIPA) is a feasible approach to improve access/engagement in physical activity for pregnant/parenting women with experiences of trauma. Through feminist participatory action research, 56 semistructured interviews were completed to understand TVIPA. Four themes were identified: (1) “I have to be on edge”: Trauma and violence pervade women's lives, (2) “It should be mandatory that you feel safe”: Emotional safety is essential, (3) “The opportunity to step up and be decision-makers and leaders”: Choice, collaboration, and connection create safety, and (4) “It's a good start for healing,” strengths-based and capacity building foster individual and community growth.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-11-11T03:57:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221134821
       
  • Patriarchy's Link to Intimate Partner Violence: Applications to
           Survivors’ Asylum Claims

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      Authors: Daniel G. Saunders, Tina Jiwatram-Negrón, Natalie Nanasi, Iris Cardenas
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Eligibility for asylum for survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV) has recently been contested. We summarize social science evidence to show how such survivors generally meet asylum criteria. Studies consistently show a relationship between patriarchal factors and IPV, thereby establishing a key asylum criterion that women are being persecuted because of their status as women. Empirical support is also provided for other asylum criteria, specifically: patriarchal norms contribute to state actors’ unwillingness to protect survivors, and survivors’ political opinions are linked to an escalation of perpetrators’ violence. The findings have implications for policy reform and supporting individual asylum-seekers.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-11-09T07:25:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221132299
       
  • Relationships Between Stigma and Intimate Partner Violence Among Female
           Sex Workers Living With HIV: Social and Economic Exclusion

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      Authors: Amelia Rock, H. Luz McNaughton Reyes, Vivian Go, Suzanne Maman, Martha Perez, Yeycy Donastorg, Deanna Kerrigan, Clare Barrington
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Violence against female sex workers (FSWs) perpetrated by their intimate (i.e., non-commercial) partners, particularly against FSWs living with HIV, is understudied. Stigma can deplete the economic resources, social relationships, and mental well-being of stigmatized people, which may increase their intimate partner violence (IPV) risk. We quantitatively assessed relationships between HIV stigma and sex work stigma and IPV victimization among FSWs living with HIV in the Dominican Republic (n = 266). Enacted HIV stigma, in the form of job loss, and anticipated HIV stigma, in the form of fear of exclusion by family, were associated with increased IPV risk. Potential association mechanisms, including increased economic vulnerability and social isolation, and programmatic responses are discussed.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-11-08T02:21:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221127722
       
  • Researching Men's Violence Against Women as Feminist Women Researchers:
           The Tensions We Face

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      Authors: Sandi Dheensa, Karen Morgan, Beverly Love, Helen Cramer
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Qualitative and feminist researchers aim to build rapport, show empathy, be non-judgemental, and equalise power imbalances. A crucial challenge researchers face is how to navigate and balance competing aims and values when interacting with and interviewing participants who have perpetrated intimate partner violence and abuse towards women. In this article, four female researchers evaluating perpetrator programmes for abusive men use reflexive analysis to identify the tensions encountered in such research. We outline how these tensions affected us and the data produced, and end with recommendations, which we hope will help prepare researchers, particularly women, for conducting interviews with violent/abusive men.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-11-03T07:40:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221134823
       
  • Constructing Professional Intervention with IPV Across Generations in a
           Faith-Based Society: An Intersectional Perspective

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      Authors: Ilanit Tuito, Tova Band-Winterstein, Zvi Eisikovits
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      The intersectionality between the social and personal dimensions influencing the construction of intimate partner violence in the ultra-Orthodox Jewish community is examined by studying attitudes toward professional intervention among community members coping with IPV. Semi-structured interviews were conducted among 38 information-rich participants coping with IPV, from three generations in the ultra-Orthodox community. Three themes emerged: “Don't think you can do it alone”: Professional intervention as a preferred option; “I did everything to hide the situation”: The end of the era of shame';“If it's not his problem, then it's my problem”: Professional intervention as a concept of reference. The study findings indicate the ways in which professional intervention among ultra-Orthodox couples coping with IPV is affected and affects the community.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-11-02T06:03:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221134825
       
  • College Student Perceptions of the Root Causes of Sexual Violence Before
           and After a Curricular Intervention

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      Authors: Jessica L. Liddell, Sydney Mei Sheffield, Katherine M. Johnson, Alyssa M. Lederer
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Campus sexual violence is prevalent and consequential. After a climate survey at our university revealed high rates of sexual violence, a semester-long academic course was designed as a curricular intervention for first-year students. This study examines an assignment completed at the beginning and end of the course. Students were asked: “What are the root causes of sexual violence'” Thematic analysis of papers revealed that many students altered or expanded their thinking to more complex, structural factors compared to their initial perceptions. An academic course may broaden students’ understanding of the determinants of sexual violence.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-10-31T07:04:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221132300
       
  • Partner Violent Men's Perspectives on the Factors That They Believe
           Contributed to Their Abusive Behaviors

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      Authors: Penelope K. Morrison, Adren D. Warling, Rhonda Fleming, Judy Chang
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      While research on perpetration of intimate partner violence (IPV) is growing, few studies have sought to explore perpetrators’ perspectives on their abusive behaviors. Thus, much remains unknown regarding how perpetrators view their abuse. We conducted 34 semistructured, open-ended interviews with men convicted of an IPV crime in which we broadly explored their perspectives on contributors to abuse. A history of exposure to violence as children, experiences with other traumatic events, and other causes (e.g., drug abuse) were the most cited. Our findings highlight areas where intervention efforts need to be tailored to address the unmet needs of men who perpetrate.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-10-31T06:07:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221134827
       
  • In Memorium: Charles T. (Terry) Hendrix, September 27, 1933–August
           19, 2022

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      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T04:34:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221134376
       
  • Concurrent Intimate Partner Violence: Survivors’ Health and
           Help-Seeking

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      Authors: Woojong Kim, Hyunkag Cho, Seunghye Hong, Abbie Nelson, Jennifer Allen
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined intimate partner violence patterns using the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, a nationally representative sample collected in 2010. The latent class analysis detected six distinctive patterns: Sexual Violence, Psychological Aggression, Multiple Violence, Coercive Control, Physical and Psychological Violence, and Stalking. Multiple Violence was the most common among males, while Coercive Control was the most common among females. Multiple Violence and Physical and Psychological Violence perpetrators inflicted more negative health consequences than the other types. Intervention and prevention approaches that consider perpetrator types as a part of survivor need assessments will improve services.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-10-21T05:56:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221132307
       
  • Through Myths, Attitudes, or Norms' The Relationship Between Low
           Self-Control and Sexual Aggression

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      Authors: Alexander T. Vazsonyi, Neslihan Güney Karaman, Hüsna Albayrak, Dan Liu
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      This study tested the direct and indirect effects of low self-control on sexual aggression and violence, mediated through rape myth acceptance, date rape attitudes, and promiscuous sexual norms among college-aged men. Self-report data were collected from 369 male college students attending a large university in the southeastern United States. The final model with all three mediators indicated significant mediated effects through date rape attitudes as well as promiscuous sexual norms on sexual aggression; it explained 16% (Cox & Snell) and 23% (Nagelkerke) of the variance. Study findings support the importance of low self-control on sexual aggression among male college students.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-10-21T05:56:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221132306
       
  • Perpetrator Blame Attribution in Heterosexual Intimate Partner Violence:
           The Role of Gender and Perceived Injury

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      Authors: Malvika D’Costa, Donald H. Saklofske
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Partner violence resulting in physical injury is more often blamed on men than women for perpetrating the same offence, as men are often perceived to be more capable of inflicting injury. The current study used vignettes in a mixed-model design to examine the influence of perpetrator and observer gender, and weapon presence on observer blame. A split-plot analysis of variance produced a significant effect of perpetrator gender and an interaction effect of perpetrator gender and weapon presence. These findings suggest that perpetrator gender may be more important than weapon presence when examining observer perceptions.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-10-20T01:27:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221132298
       
  • Barriers Faced by American Indian Women in Urban Wisconsin in Seeking Help
           Following an Experience of Intimate Partner Violence

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      Authors: Jeneile Luebke, Peninnah Kako, Alexa Lopez, Marin Schmitt, Anne Dressel, Kathryn Klein, Lucy Mkandawire-Vahlmu
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      American Indian (AI) women experience high rates of intimate partner violence (IPV) and face many barriers when help-seeking. This study aims to understand better the context of IPV and help-seeking behaviors for urban AI women after experiences with IPV. Postcolonial and Indigenous feminist frameworks framed this critical ethnography study. Semistructured interviews with 34 AI IPV survivors living in Wisconsin urban areas were conducted. Our findings highlight context-specific structural barriers to help-seeking after experiences of IPV heightened by the COVID-19 pandemic. Context-specific and survivor-led interventions are necessary to address and reduce barriers that urban AI women face.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-10-17T07:13:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221132304
       
  • Technology-Facilitated Gender-Based Violence, Hate Speech, and Terrorism:
           A Risk Assessment on the Rise of the Incel Rebellion in Canada

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      Authors: Esli Chan
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      With the proliferation of the internet, emerging groups such as the men's rights movement involuntary celibate (incel) community have new ways to reproduce real-world harm and gender-based violence (GBV) against women. This study conducts a critical discourse and semantic analysis of the incels.co webpage and the Alek Minassian van attack using the Violent Extremism Risk Assessment and the Cyber Extremism Risk Assessment tool. It reveals that Canadian violent extremism frameworks minimize online GBV as a form of extremism. GBV, which extends from online to offline realities, is not captured in theoretical frameworks for terrorism and hate speech.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-10-13T07:40:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221125495
       
  • Adolescents’ Victim-Blaming Responses to Narratives About Sex
           Trafficking: Strategies for Curriculum Development

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      Authors: Ashley Hedrick McKenzie, Barbara Friedman, Anne Johnston
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      In the United States, sex-trafficking awareness and prevention has increasingly become part of government-mandated health education. This exploratory study surveyed 250 U.S. adolescents to learn more about the use of media narratives in curricula about sex trafficking in light of research findings about victim-blaming responses to survivor narratives, as well as adolescents’ still-developing emotion-regulation skills. Victim blaming is counterproductive to the goals of trafficking awareness and prevention curricula. Participants viewed one of four narrative messages about a sex-trafficking victim/survivor. Over half of participants reported victim-blaming responses after viewing the message. Participants reported low perceived efficacy regarding the ability to recognize the signs of trafficking, and some participants experienced intense fear responses to the messages. Victim blaming was not associated with fear or perceived efficacy, contradicting predictions from the Extended Parallel Process Model. This study concludes with recommendations for educators and others tasked with communicating with adolescents about sex trafficking.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-10-10T06:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221127723
       
  • Mapping Coercive Violence

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      Authors: Allison E. Monterrosa, Angela J. Hattery
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      We conceptualize a new and distinct form of intimate partner violence: coercive violence. Coercive violence is a form of intimate partner violence in which the abuser intentionally engages in acts that expose his partner to state surveillance and violence at the behest of institutions or the state, including the child welfare system and the criminal legal system. Because the violence is perpetrated by an institution rather than an individual, it is difficult for the victim/survivor to seek justice or retribution. We conclude with suggestions for future research that interrogates coercive violence, its impacts on victims/survivors, and strategies for preventing it.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-10-06T08:53:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221125499
       
  • Types of Economic Abuse in Postseparation Lives of Women Experiencing IPV:
           A Qualitative Study from Finland

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      Authors: Anniina Kaittila, Mia Hakovirta, Heini Kainulainen
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      There is growing interest in economic abuse as a form of violence against women, but the research has largely addressed cohabiting couples thus far, with few detailed explorations of women's experiences of economic abuse in postseparation life. Using interviews with 11 women experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV), this study investigates the types of economic abuse in the lives of these women. Inductive thematic analysis revealed four types of postseparation economic abuse (PSEA): economic sabotage, withholding resources, financial harassment, and stealing. These results help better understand and recognize the different forms of PSEA. Recommendations are provided for incorporating PSEA as a central component of IPV research, practice, and policy.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-09-30T06:59:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221127727
       
  • Intimate Partner Violence, Economic Insecurity, and Health Outcomes Among
           American Indian and Alaska Native Men and Women: Findings From a National
           Sample

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      Authors: Lisa Fedina, Yuliya Shyrokonis, Bethany Backes, Katie Schultz, Louise Ashwell, Steven Hafner, Andre Rosay
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Limited data are available on experiences of intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexual violence (SV) and health outcomes among American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) populations. This study explores the relationship between IPV and SV, food insecurity, housing insecurity, healthcare access, and self-reported physical and mental health status in a nationally representative sample of AIAN adults (N = 3,634). IPV and SV were associated with poorer physical and mental health at the bivariate level, but not in multivariate analyses. Economic inequalities are a salient predictor of health and may be compounded by demographic and geographic contexts.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-09-28T05:32:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221127725
       
  • Stories of Hope and Health: Wisdom From Older Mexican–American Women Who
           Broke Free From the Entangled Web of Love and Violence

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      Authors: Chris A. Divin, Deborah L. Volker, Jane D. Champion
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      This interpretive qualitative study explores the lived experience of intimate partner violence (IPV) among 12 older Mexican–American women aged 55–85 with past experiences of IPV to understand how it shaped their lives. Sociocultural factors that influenced the IPV experience and sustained health amidst adversity were explored. Denzin’s interpretive interactionism along with Antonovsky’s salutogenic theory guided this study. These women survived IPV and discovered ways to foster health and thrive in later years. They all vowed to break the cycle of violence for future generations. Their wisdom offers hope and has implications for healthcare professionals, future research, and advocacy efforts.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-09-26T06:07:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221127720
       
  • Engagement of Sexual Violence Survivors in Research: Trauma-Informed
           Research in the THRIVE Study

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      Authors: Katherine M. Anderson, Maile Y. Karris, Alexandra Fernandez DeSoto, Sara Giovanna Carr, Jamila K. Stockman
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Given the potential for retraumatization among survivors of sexual violence engaged in research, we aimed to provide pertinent knowledge and exemplification of the integration of trauma-informed practice to research with survivors. Grounded in trauma-informed care, we discuss the need for trauma-informed research, drawing upon experiences and data from a longitudinal case-control study on sexual violence. Through trauma-informed research settings, we can improve research experiences for survivors of sexual violence, as demonstrated by positive experiences of participants in The THRIVE Study. By meeting the needs of survivors, researchers can increase participation while maximizing the research quality and advancement of research.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-09-23T11:09:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221125501
       
  • The Association Between Resources, Accessibility, and Female Victim
           Intimate Partner Homicide at the County-Level in Florida

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      Authors: Kayla Toohy, Amy Reckdenwald, Ciara Peebles, Jason Ford
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Limited research has been conducted to understand possible relationships that exist between IPH and access to DV services. The current study adds to the literature by expanding traditional measures of DV services to capture presence, as well as access, and examines the impact on female IPH victimization across 67 Florida counties between 2005 and 2015. Using exposure reduction arguments, we shed light on factors associated with female victim IPH rates and support previous research findings showing a continuation in the disparity of IPH rates between urban and rural areas within county boundaries. We also demonstrate the importance of accessible shelter and safe homes in combating IPV and IPH rates.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-09-22T05:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221127726
       
  • “Pornography Encouraged Me to Belittle Women”: A Thematic Analysis of
           Men's Reflections on Violence Against Women and Ceasing Pornography Use

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      Authors: Natalie Jovanovski, Meagan Tyler
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Within a context of increasingly ubiquitous pornography consumption among men, little is known about men who reject pornography, their motivations to stop consuming it, and their concerns about the treatment of women. In this article, we explore the stated motivations of 124 men who have decided to stop consuming pornography, in order to understand what role—if any—concerns about violence against women and gender equality played in their decision. Specifically, we focus on the implications of these findings for future research on the role of men in preventing or addressing harmful attitudes about women through their everyday practices.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-09-16T04:31:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221125502
       
  • “It's Just Kind of This Thing That I Need to Navigate”: Young Women's
           Stories of Recoveries After Domestic Abuse in Childhood

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      Authors: Tanya Beetham
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Those who experience parental domestic abuse in childhood are affected in multiple ways, but existing research uses a narrow lens, relying on psychotherapeutic and neuroscientific understandings. This article uses a dialogical theory to explore women's recovery stories. Interviews were conducted with 10 women in England and a voice-centered narrative analysis was used. This article attends to gendered, psychotherapeutic, and neoliberal narrative resources that shaped participants’ stories. It concludes that recoveries after domestic abuse in childhood can be considered as dynamic processes that are individual, as well as shaped by social, political, and relational contexts that shape storytelling practices.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-09-15T07:25:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221125498
       
  • The Reliability and Predictive Validity of Sense of Coherence Scale for
           American Survivors of Gender-Based Violence

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      Authors: Zeynep Zonp, Denise Saint Arnault
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigated the reliability and predictive validity of the Sense of Coherence (SOC) scale for 299 American survivors of gender-based violence (GBV). First, confirmatory factor analysis examined the construct validity of the SOC-13. Then, relationships between SOC and clinical scales were examined. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the 3-factor solution, and Cronbach's alpha reliability values for comprehensibility, manageability, and meaningfulness subscales and total score of SOC-13 were: .62, .53, .65, and .81, respectively. Multiple regression revealed that age, posttraumatic growth, depression, and posttraumatic stress scores explained 53% of the variance of SOC scores. We interpret this to suggest that SOC is a protective factor in GBV, especially in younger women. Clinical implications are suggested.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-09-15T07:25:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221120445
       
  • Me Too' Yes, Me Too! Sexual Harassment of Female Expatriates in
           China’s Overseas Enterprises

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      Authors: Tianhan Gui
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Through in-depth interviews with Chinese female expatriates who have worked in the country's overseas enterprises in developing countries, this study found that female expatriates frequently encountered sexual harassment and other forms of gender-based prejudice from both home and host countries. The lack of organizational gender consciousness and mechanisms to address gender inequality contributes to women's vulnerability to gender-based workplace hostility. Thus, it is necessary for Chinese enterprises to reassess their organizational policies and cultures when expanding their international horizons to create more inclusive workplace environments. Implications to enhance organizational policies and mechanisms against gender discrimination are discussed.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-09-15T06:34:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221125497
       
  • Factors Influencing the Use of Domestic Violence Restraining Orders in Los
           Angeles

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      Authors: Nilpa D. Shah, Grace Nguyen, Jennifer A. Wagman, Deborah C. Glik
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Domestic violence restraining orders (DVROs), although a widely used legal intervention in preventing future risk of intimate partner violence (IPV), there is a lack of documentation on the facilitators and barriers of utilization of DVROs among IPV survivors in Los Angeles County (LAC). We conducted 19 key informant interviews with various professionals working in domestic violence prevention in LAC. Factors such as survivors' motivation, ease of navigating the legal procedures, and availability of community resources facilitate the use of DVROs. Fear, ambivalence, structural barriers to access DVROs, and issues with the criminal justice system make it harder for survivors to obtain DVROs.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-09-06T04:45:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221120442
       
  • Mothers, Domestic Violence, and Child Protection: The UK Response

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      Authors: Stacey Stewart, Elaine Arnull
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Research highlights that mothers are often blamed for their child's exposure to domestic abuse and they are given a leave ultimatum. This article furthers discussion, guided by the question “how do (UK) mothers with violent partners experience social work interventions'” Nineteen mothers located around England and Wales were interviewed. Data were analyzed using deductive thematic analysis. The findings resonate with research from a decade earlier showing mothers felt blamed and were responsibilized for the violence they experienced and given the leave ultimatum by social workers. This article calls for a change in social work practice for mothers experiencing domestic abuse.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-09-02T06:02:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221097141
       
  • Gender-Based Violence, Subjective Quality of Life, and Mental Health
           Outcomes Among Palestinian Women: The Mediating Role of Social Support and
           Agency

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      Authors: Guido Veronese, Fayez Azez Mahmid, Dana Bdier
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      We tested the association between gender-based violence (GBV), subjective quality of life, and mental distress manifested by anxiety, depression, and stress among Palestinian women exposed to political and military violence. Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale-21, Berlin Social Support Scales, WHO-5 subjective Quality of Life Scale, Women's Agency Scale 61, and Violence Against Women Questionnaire were administered to 332 purposely selected participants. Structural equation modeling was applied to address the study hypothesis. A conceptual model depicting GBV as a predictor, mental distress as an outcome variable, and agency and social support as mediators was confirmed.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-31T02:54:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221099988
       
  • Men’s Reflections on Romantic Jealousy and Intimate Partner Violence
           in Mwanza, Tanzania

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      Authors: Diana Aloyce, Heidi Stöckl, Donati Malibwa, Esther Peter, Zaina Mchome, Annapoorna Dwarumpudi, Ana Maria Buller, Saidi Kapiga, Gerry Mshana
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Romantic jealousy is a prominent trigger for intimate partner violence. Yet, there are few studies on this relationship in sub-Saharan Africa and none captures men's perspectives. To expand the existing knowledge on romantic jealousy and its relation to intimate partner violence, our study analyzed 30 in-depth interviews with male participants. Triggers of romantic jealousy included suspicion or confirmed infidelity, reduced attention from their partners, and challenges to male supremacy. Men reported that intimate partner violence was a frequently used response to triggers of romantic jealousy. Social norms and inequitable gender norms were key underlying factors to all those triggers.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-30T07:08:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221108421
       
  • Centering Our Voices: Experiences of Violence Among Homeless African
           American Women

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      Authors: Emily Deal, Maren Hawkins, Maria Del Carmen Graf, Anne Dressel, Ashley Ruiz, Belinda Pittman, Marin Schmitt, Emma Krueger, Alexa A. Lopez, Lucy Mkandawire-Valhmu, Peninnah Kako
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Women experiencing homelessness who are also survivors of violence require uniquely tailored programs to accommodate complex needs. To understand how violence shaped the lives of formerly homeless African American women, an instrumental case study design and community-based participatory research approach was utilized in this qualitative study. Focus group interviews with graduates (N = 40) from a long-term transitional housing program were conducted. Using thematic analysis, identified themes included: cycles of violence, violence in the community, relationships with children, and coping with violence. These themes illustrated survivors’ growth through supportive programming and highlighted services dedicated to empowering women who have experienced violence.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-26T06:41:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221117599
       
  • Income Inequality and Pregnancy-Associated Homicide in the US: A
           Longitudinal, State-Level Analysis

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      Authors: Lauren Dyer, Dovile Vilda, Emily Harville, Katherine Theall, Maeve Wallace
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Pregnancy-associated homicide remains an understudied yet critical issue. Using restricted use mortality files provided by the National Center for Health Statistics and the National Violent Death Reporting System, annual state-level pregnancy-associated homicide ratios were estimated as the count of deaths divided by the number of live births. The exposure, the state Gini index, was categorized into tertiles to compare states by levels of income inequality. In the final adjusted longitudinal linear model, those who experienced the greatest amount of income inequality had a significant 1.28 per 100,000 homicide rate when compared to the lowest income inequality tertile.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-26T06:41:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221120446
       
  • Who Can You Trust' The Impact of Procedural Justice, Trust, and Police
           Officer Sex on Women's Sexual Assault Victimization Reporting Likelihood

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      Authors: Kayleigh A. Stanek, Kathleen A. Fox, Cody W. Telep, Rick Trinkner
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Sexual assaults are underreported to the police, even though this crime affects one in four college women. Using a vignette design, this study fills a gap in the literature by examining the influence of prior police perceptions, procedurally unjust treatment, and the sex of the responding officer on college women's likelihood to report sexual assault. Results indicate positive prior police perceptions significantly increase students’ perceived likelihood to report sexual victimization. Even when controlling for prior perceptions, procedurally unfair treatment significantly decreases the likelihood of future victimization reporting. Responding officer sex does not affect students’ decision to report.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-26T06:41:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221097139
       
  • “It's Like a Drive by Misogyny”: Sexual Violence at UK Music
           Festivals

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      Authors: Hannah Bows, Aviah Day, Alishya Dhir
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Despite increasing scholarly and media attention on sexual violence in public spaces, including those associated with the night-time economy and licensed venues, music festivals have been largely absent from research and policy. This paper presents the findings from the first UK study of sexual violence at music festivals, drawing on data from interviews with 13 women who have experienced some form of sexual harassment or assault at a festival. Analysis reveals that sexual violence at festivals occurs on a continuum and represents an extension of rape culture through which sexual violence is culturally condoned and normalized, enabled through a number of environmental and culture features that are unique to festivals.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-25T11:00:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221120443
       
  • Resurfacing Gender: A Typology of Conflict-Related Violence Against Women
           for the Northern Ireland Troubles

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      Authors: Aisling Swaine
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      The “Troubles” in Northern Ireland are often assumed to represent an outlier in respect of contemporary global discourse on conflict-related violence against women (CRVAW), and particularly “strategic rape.” CRVAW has neither commanded the narrative nor imagery of that conflict nor specifically recognized globally as part of women's experiences of it. A composite and comprehensive analysis of CRVAW for that context has been absent. Based on primary and secondary research, and analytically advanced through gender and critical harm theory, the article presents the first typology of CRVAW for the Northern Ireland Troubles. The article maps and evidences a range of gendered harms directly and indirectly resulting from the conflict enacted by state and nonstate actors. It argues that a resurfacing of gender is required to ensure current global debates on CRVAW are informed by a reconsideration of what constitutes “strategic” harm in armed conflict.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-25T05:35:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221114923
       
  • Women Survivors of Adolescent Dating Violence Describe the Maintenance of
           Their Abusive Relationships: First Person Stories via YouTube

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      Authors: Jennifer Hegel, Jorden A. Cummings, Kelsi Toews, Laura A. Knowles, Whitney Willcott-Benoit, Alisia M. Palermo, Kendall A. Deleurme
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      The current study explores the personal stories of young women on their own experiences with adolescent dating violence and focuses on their perceptions of the relevant factors that maintained the relationship over time. To this end, we analyzed seven publicly available videos on YouTube of women explaining their experiences of adolescent dating violence, including how they perceived their relationships to be maintained over time. We identified four major sources these survivors perceived as contributing to the maintenance of adolescent dating violence: the Self, the Partner, the Relational Dynamic, and Other People.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-25T05:35:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221099986
       
  • The Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Staff in Violence Against Women
           Services

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      Authors: Caitlin Burd, Jennifer C. D. MacGregor, Marilyn Ford-Gilboe, Tara Mantler, Isobel McLean, Jill Veenendaal, Nadine Wathen
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic has been harmful to survivors of abuse. Less understood is the impact on staff in the violence against women (VAW) service sector. Using interpretive description methodology, we examined staff experiences during the pandemic in Ontario, Canada, and found four core themes: (1) the emotional toll of the work; (2) remote (doesn't) work; (3) work restructuring; (4) efforts to stay well and subthemes nuancing staff experiences in a sector vulnerable to vicarious trauma. This research underscores the need to mitigate experiences of stress, heavy workloads, and guilt for staff in VAW services during crises and provides action-oriented recommendations.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-25T04:48:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221117595
       
  • Understanding the Link Between Reproductive Coercion and Covert Use of
           Contraception as a Safety Strategy for Women Experiencing Violence in
           Nairobi's Urban Informal Settlements

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      Authors: Shannon N. Wood, S. Rachel Kennedy, Irene Akumu, Catherine Tallam, Ben Asira, Linnea A. Zimmerman, Nancy Glass, Michele R. Decker
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      This mixed-methods study examined the relationship between reproductive coercion (RC) and covert contraceptive use among intimate partner violence survivors in Nairobi, Kenya. Quantitative analyses utilize baseline data from the myPlan Kenya trial (n = 321). Purposive in-depth interviews (IDIs) (n = 30) explored women's reproductive safety strategies. Multinomial analyses indicated increased covert use and decreased overt use compared to nonuse, for women experiencing RC; logistic models similarly report increased odds of covert use with RC experience. Qualitative data contextualize women's reasons for use and challenges faced. Integration of reproductive safety strategies into family planning and violence services can improve the safe use of contraception.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-24T08:05:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221108422
       
  • Perceptions of a Hypothetical Sexual Assault: The Impact of the
           Interrelationships Between Eight Situational Factors

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      Authors: Michael J. Marks, Yuliana Zaikman
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      The current research examined the interactions between various factors that contribute to perceptions of a woman's sexual assault. Participants read a vignette about an assault in which we varied eight factors. We assessed the impact of these factors and their interactions on participants’ perceptions of the assault. Participants’ perceptions were more driven by the characteristics of the victim rather than the perpetrator. The factor that had the most overall impact on perceptions of the sexual assault was whether the victim explicitly agreed to go to the perpetrator's home. Implications of our results are discussed in various contexts.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T07:39:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221117601
       
  • Intimate Partner Violence in an Orthodox Jewish Community in the United
           States: A Qualitative Exploration of Community Members’ Perspectives

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      Authors: Vithya Murugan
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      This study sought to understand the needs and priorities of the Orthodox Jewish community around intimate partner violence in a medium-sized midwestern city. Twelve Orthodox Jewish rabbis, Rebbetzins, and community members (including survivors) were recruited to participate in in-depth, semistructured interviews. Interviews were analyzed using Dedoose via a mixed content analysis approach. Interviews revealed four themes: (1) Orthodox Gender Norms and Socialization: Risk or Protective Factor' (2) Awareness of DV Services in the Community; (3) Barriers to help-seeking; and (4) Salience of Rabbis and Rebbetzins. Recommendations for culturally congruent programs and practices are discussed.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T07:39:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221120444
       
  • “I Felt Better When I Moved Into My Own Place”: Needs and Experiences
           of Intimate Partner Violence Survivors in Rapid Rehousing

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      Authors: Leila Wood, Rachel Voth Schrag, Maggy McGiffert, Josh Brown, Bethany Backes
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Accessing stable housing is a basic need for intimate partner violence (IPV) survivors, and rapid rehousing programs are a critical way to address homelessness. However, little is known about survivor experiences, needs, and outcomes in rapid rehousing services within IPV agencies. This study uses an exploratory approach to understand the needs and experiences of 31 survivors using vouchers facilitated by an IPV program in the U.S. Southwest. Thematic analysis of structured interviews resulted in four summary themes: getting to housing, managing multiple needs, accessing support, and facing barriers. Practice and evaluation implications are discussed.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T07:39:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221117600
       
  • American Women’s Experiences With Intimate Partner Violence during the
           Start of the COVID-19 Pandemic: Risk Factors and Mental Health
           Implications

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      Authors: Debra L. Oswald, Astrīda S. Kaugars, Mary Tait
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      In an online survey, women self-reported high prevalence of intimate partner violence during the early days of the pandemic. Risk factors for experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV) included having a child under the age of 18, being a sexual minority, living in a rural community, and stressors related to healthcare access, income/employment stress, and COVID-19 exposure or illness. Women who worked during the pandemic and were older were less likely to experience IPV. Women who reported IPV also reported increased anxiety and depression. The results are discussed in terms of clinical and policy implications for supporting women who are victims of IPV.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T07:38:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221117597
       
  • How Helpful Is Bystander Intervention' Perspectives of Dating and
           Sexual Violence Survivors

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      Authors: Sarah McMahon
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      While bystander intervention education has demonstrated promise as a strategy to reduce dating and sexual violence (DSV) on campus, little is known about whether survivors on whose behalf the interventions take place find these helpful. This paper uses qualitative, in-depth interviews with 33 DSV survivors to explore their perspectives on bystander intervention. Results indicate that while some interventions were identified as helpful, especially those that provided support to the survivor, many were not helpful enough or even harmful. Further work is needed to understand the consequences of bystander action.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T07:38:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221117596
       
  • Conceptualizing Physicians’ Roles in Addressing Intimate Partner
           Violence: A Critical Discourse Analysis of Resources for Canadian
           Physicians

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      Authors: Alice Cavanagh, Melissa Kimber, Harriet L. MacMillan, Stacey A. Ritz, Meredith Vanstone
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Resources addressing intimate partner violence (IPV) play a role in shaping how physicians conceptualize and perform their roles in caring for affected patients. This study combines environmental scanning with critical discourse analysis (CDA) to parse how roles of physicians were represented in 28 education materials and policy documents about IPV, taking the Canadian training milieu as an example. We developed a cyclical model of three core physician roles in addressing IPV—learning about IPV, identifying patients experiencing IPV, and responding to patients’ disclosures of IPV. The construction of these physician roles is suggestive of an ongoing process of medicalization of IPV.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T07:38:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221114922
       
  • “Living in the Darkness”: Technology-Facilitated Coercive Control,
           Disenfranchised Grief, and Institutional Betrayal

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      Authors: Delanie Woodlock, Michael Salter, Molly Dragiewicz, Bridget Harris
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      This article draws on interviews with 20 Australian women subjected to technology-facilitated coercive control (TFCC), foregrounding their accounts of grief and institutional betrayal. Findings show that while the harms of TFCC were significant, survivors’ experiences were often minimized and dismissed by justice institutions. Women experienced grief due to abuse and separation from partners who had betrayed them. This loss was compounded when seeking help. We propose that disenfranchised grief is an underexplored response to domestic violence and institutional betrayal as well as a potential intervention site, particularly in relation to technology-facilitated abuse.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T07:37:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221114920
       
  • Which Aspects of Social Support Enhance Positive Mental Health in the
           Context of Intimate Partner Violence'

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      Authors: Setayesh Pir, Ladan Hashemi, Pauline Gulliver, Tracey McIntosh, Janet Fanslow
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      While there is evidence that social support can mitigate mental illness symptoms associated with intimate partner violence (IPV), there is a need to explore if social support can promote positive mental health. In this New Zealand (NZ) population-based study of women who had experienced physical and/or sexual violence (n = 453), structural equation modeling (SEM) showed that most facets of social support (friends, family, and neighbors) had a significant correlation with each dimension of positive mental health, as measured by Keyes’ Mental Health Continuum Short Form (MHC-SF). Safety from IPV (no recent IPV experience) is a prerequisite before social support can assist women to attain positive mental health. Further work is required to ensure friends, family, and communities have the knowledge and resources to provide effective social support.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T07:37:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221114919
       
  • Image-Based Sexual Abuse as a Means of Coercive Control: Victim-Survivor
           Experiences

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      Authors: Nicola Henry, Nicola Gavey, Kelly Johnson
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Scholars and practitioners increasingly acknowledge the ways that abusive partners create, distribute, or threaten to distribute intimate images without consent, yet little empirical research has comprehensively explored image-based sexual abuse within intimate partner contexts. This article responds to this gap and reports on the findings of a study involving interviews with 29 women and one gender-diverse person who experienced image-based sexual abuse as part of a pattern of “coercive control.” The authors argue that abusive partners use intimate imagery as a means of exerting power and control, and as a tactic of intimidation, entrapment, and degradation. They note that law, policy, and practice responses should recognize the gendered nature of image-based sexual abuse and its growing use as a means of coercive control.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T07:37:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221114918
       
  • Academic and Career Outcomes Following Sexual Assault in Early Adulthood:
           A Comparison of LGBQ+ and Heterosexual Women

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      Authors: Elizabeth A. Moschella-Smith, Sharyn J. Potter, Elizabeth A. Mumford
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Young adults (aged 18–24) who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or queer (LGBQ+) report high rates of sexual assault (SA) victimization, yet much of the research on adverse outcomes resulting from SA has overlooked LGBQ+ victims. A probability-based sample of 901 adults was recruited to examine the negative academic and career outcomes attributed to SA during early adulthood among LGBQ+ cisgender women. LGBQ+ women were more likely to report negative impacts on academic and career goals (e.g., changed course of study) and transitions (e.g., switched jobs) following SA victimization than heterosexual women. Implications for research and LGBQ+ services are discussed.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T07:37:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221101919
       
  • “He Will Not Leave Us Alone and I Need the Courts to Help”:
           Defendants’ Use of Nonphysical Violence in Domestic Violence Protective
           Order Cases

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      Authors: Erika M. Redding, Kathryn E. Moracco, Clare L. Barrington, Allyson M. Corbo
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      District court judges who make final determinations in domestic violence protective order (DVPO) cases in North Carolina indicate often using heuristics, such as the presence of visible injury, to guide their assessment of violence severity. This approach is concerning as it minimizes nonphysical intimate partner violence. We conducted a thematic analysis of DVPO plaintiff complaints to identify the types of nonphysical vioence described and its effects on plaintiff health outcomes. Most case files included descriptions of nonphysical violence and plaintiffs described fear as a significant mental health outcome. Findings highlight the potentially deleterious impact of nonphysical violence on the well-being of DVPO plaintiffs.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T07:37:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221101921
       
  • Reflecting on Legal Responses to Intimate Partner Femicide in Scotland

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      Authors: Rachel McPherson
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      This article considers legal responses to intimate partner femicide in Scotland. It reflects on how the plea of provocation on the basis of infidelity has been used, pointing to misrepresentation of the relationship between domestic abuse and stalking. From there, findings from 57 intimate partner femicide cases are presented. These findings indicate problematic stereotypes in how intimate partner femicide cases are reported and the operation of the “love narrative” in sentencing. It is concluded that more must be done to label intimate partner femicide cases appropriately and that improvements are achievable within the current criminal justice framework.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T07:36:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221094068
       
  • Initial Reports From Early Adopters of Restorative Justice for Reported
           Cases of Campus Sexual Misconduct: A Qualitative Study

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      Authors: Sheila M. McMahon, Kaaren M. Williamsen, Heike B. Mitchell, Anna Kleven
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Campus sexual misconduct (CSM) continues to be a significant public health concern on U.S. college campuses. Updates to Title IX now allow informal resolution of reported cases of CSM, including the use of restorative justice (RJ) processes. This qualitative study sought to understand the experiences of early adopters of RJ for CSM through semistructured interviews with 10 current and former administrators who have adopted RJ for CSM. Findings suggest that RJ for CSM is a promising practice, one which requires key stakeholder engagement, thoughtful training for RJ facilitators, and extensive preparation of the parties for successful implementation.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-18T06:57:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221108419
       
  • Sexual Violence Among Sorority Women: Victimization Experiences, Contexts,
           and Disclosure

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      Authors: Jill C. Hoxmeier, Julia O’Connor, Sarah McMahon
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study was to examine and compare sexual violence (SV) victimization among sorority women and unaffiliated counterparts. Results showed sorority women were more likely than unaffiliated women to report experiencing some types of SV, consuming alcohol prior to victimization, and to identify their perpetrator as a hookup/casual partner. More women, regardless of affiliation, informally disclosed their victimization compared to formally reporting; many did not tell anyone because they did not think it was serious enough. The findings point to implications for harm reduction, bystander intervention, and primary prevention programming, as well as institutional policy to address SV.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-18T06:56:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221108417
       
  • Women Are Survivors: Public Services Announcements on Violence Against
           Women in Latin American

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      Authors: Marta Mensa, Jean M. Grow
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      This study considers the role that public service announcements (PSAs) play in addressing violence against women (VAW) in Latin America. Using content analysis, the study examines 407 PSAs about VAW from 20 Latin American countries. The results show that 62.3% of the PSAs encourage bystanders to denounce violence while portraying women as victims in 48.8% of the PSAs. However, 71.7% of PSAs did not include a helpline or how to report the crime, only 11.8% of the PSAs have non-narrative, or factual information, about VAW, and just 6.4% engage in compelling narrative messaging or storytelling.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-18T06:56:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221104509
       
  • Sexualized Violence and Neoliberal Discourse

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      Authors: Liam Downey, Asa Iacobucci, Micah A. Pyles
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Researchers have paid relatively little attention to the role that sexual and gender violence play in reinforcing neoliberal discourse. We address this issue by demonstrating that the portrayal of women and girls in the mainstream media, female body practices based on this portrayal, gendered sexual-agency norms, sexual harassment, and rape are not only sexualized and violent, but they also display a common set of cultural scripts drawn from both patriarchal and neoliberal discourse. We thus conclude that these images, practices, and norms are forms of sexualized violence that reinforce patriarchal and neoliberal discourse and, thus, the gender and class orders.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-18T06:56:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221094071
       
  • An Exploratory Investigation Into Women's Experience of Sexual Harassment
           in the Workplace

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      Authors: Ashleigh Spiliopoulou, Gemma L. Witcomb
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      The recent surge in online movements challenging the culture of silence surrounding sexual harassment has created new spaces for women to share their stories. This research employed a qualitative, exploratory design to study 199 comments on a public online community forum: “What's The Wildest Thing That Happened To You As A Working Woman'”. Inductive thematic analysis was performed on the data which resulted in three overarching themes: “a harassment endemic,” “the (im)balance of power,” and “it's in the culture”. Sexual harassment was centered as a normal part of women's workplace experience, as was lack of affirmative action from employers which increased the severity of experiences. Organizations must commit to challenging the structures and individuals that perpetuate unsafe working conditions for women.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-16T05:41:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221114921
       
  • Intimate Partner Violence and Age at Marriage in Mali: The Moderating
           Influence of Polygynous Unions

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      Authors: Brittany E. Hayes, Carlijn van Baak
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Polygyny and early marriage — both prevalent in Mali — are risk factors for intimate partner violence (IPV). Relying on data from the 2018 Malian Demographic and Health Surveys, the study examines the effects of polygyny and age at marriage, while controlling for known risk factors of IPV, on the likelihood of experiencing IPV. Findings reveal that polygyny is associated with IPV. However, polygyny has a moderating influence on the association between age at marriage and the experience of physical abuse and controlling behavior. The complex nature of women's experiences and the need for culturally specific programming are reviewed.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-16T05:40:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221108418
       
  • Differential Treatment of Sexual Assault Cases by US Army Law Enforcement
           Personnel

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      Authors: Eric R. Carpenter
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Using data received through the Freedom of Information Act, this observational study explores whether Army law enforcement personnel do not find probable cause in sexual assault cases at higher rates than in other serious crimes. The study compares sexual assaults, homicides, robberies, and assaults in the Army from 2008 to 2014 and July 2015 to 2017. For the first period, the study finds that the odds are 5.30 times greater that Army law enforcement will not find probable cause in a sexual assault case when compared to other crimes, and for the second period the odds are 4.39 times greater.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-16T05:40:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221101915
       
  • Adolescent Girls and Their Family Members’ Attitudes Around Gendered
           Power Inequity and Associations with Future Aspirations in Karnataka,
           India

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      Authors: Kalysha Closson, Ravi Prakash, Prakash Javalkar, Tara Beattie, Raghavendra Thalinja, Martine Collumbien, Satyanarayana Ramanaik, Shajy Isac, Charlotte Watts, Stephen Moses, Mitzy Gafos, Lori Heise, Marissa Becker, Parinita Bhattacharjee
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Intergenerational differences in inequitable gender attitudes may influence developmental outcomes, including education. In rural Karnataka, India, we examined the extent of intergenerational (adolescent girls [AGs] vs. older generation family members) dis/agreement to attitudes around gendered power inequities, including gender roles and violence against women (VAW). Unadjusted and adjusted logistic regression examined associations between intergenerational dis/agreement to attitude statements and AGs’ future educational and career aspirations. Of 2,457 AGs, 90.9% had a matched family member (55% mothers). While traditional gender roles were promoted intergenerationally, more AGs supported VAW than family members. In adjusted models, discordant promotion of traditional gender roles and concordant disapproval of VAW were associated with greater aspirations. Results highlight the need for family-level programming promoting positive modeling of gender-equitable attitudes.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-12T07:22:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221097142
       
  • A Popular Approach, but Do They Work' A Systematic Review of Social
           Marketing Campaigns to Prevent Sexual Violence on College Campuses

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      Authors: Chelsey Lee, Jessica Bouchard, Jennifer S. Wong
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      College campuses continue to face high rates of sexual violence and social marketing campaigns have emerged as a common prevention strategy. However, there exists no summative research examining the effectiveness of this approach. A systematic search yielded 15 evaluations of eight unique prevention campaigns, which contributed to 38 individual outcome measures across four outcome categories (i.e., knowledge, attitudes, intentions/efficacy, and behavior). Summative results are mixed, but show promising campaign effects for increasing knowledge, modification of some attitudes toward sexual violence, intentions to participate, and actual participation in prevention activities. More evaluative research is needed for a comprehensive understanding of campaign effectiveness.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-11T08:10:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221092476
       
  • A Trisonance: Identities of Women Whose Mothers Were Murdered by Their
           Fathers

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      Authors: Shani Pitcho-Prelorentzos, Elazar Leshem, Michal Mahat-Shamir
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      The current qualitative study aimed to examine the narrative identities of women bereaved to intimate partner femicide. Eleven adult Israeli female offspring whose biological mothers were murdered by their biological fathers were interviewed for the purpose of this study. Due to the uniqueness of their loss experience and circumstances, participants’ identity is narrated as a “trisonance”: They are not like their fathers, their mothers, nor as society perceives them. This very particular route for identity reconstruction as a means of psychological survival is discussed in light of the literature on identity construction and bereavement and derives recommendations for practice.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-10T07:43:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221092478
       
  • Alcohol Use Before Sexual Violence and Cognitive Appraisals: Differential
           Associations With Barriers to Help-Seeking

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      Authors: Alexandra N. Brockdorf, Kathryn J. Holland, Shaina A. Kumar, Anna E. Jaffe, David DiLillo
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      The current study examined two cognitive appraisals—labeling (identifying an unwanted sexual experience as sexual violence) and self-blame—as potential mechanisms between survivor alcohol use before sexual violence and three help-seeking barriers (minimization, negative treatment, and social-emotional barriers) among non-service-seeking sexual violence survivors. Participants were 141 undergraduate women who completed self-report measures. Three parallel mediation models were tested. Survivors who were drinking were more likely to label their victimization as sexual violence and, in turn, perceived fewer minimization and greater social-emotional barriers. Further, survivors who were drinking blamed themselves more and, in turn, perceived greater negative treatment and social-emotional barriers.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-10T06:50:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221097144
       
  • Street Harassment Interpretations: An Exploration of the Intersection of
           Gender and Race/Ethnicity, and Mediator Variables

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      Authors: Jennifer Herrera, Bill McCarthy
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      How does the intersection of gender and race/ethnicity influence street harassment interpretations' What roles do attitudes and past experience play in these relationships' We examined these questions through an exploratory study of 163 Californian respondents and four hypothetical scenarios: being told to smile, being called “sexy,” hearing kissing noises, and being followed. Our findings revealed Black, Latina, and White women were more critical of these behaviors than men in their race/ethnic group. Women across all race/ethnicities interpreted the scenarios similarly with minor nuances. Street harassment views were strongly associated with prior experiences instigating street harassment and support for harassment myths.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-10T06:49:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221094067
       
  • Understanding Violence Against Women in the Caribbean Through an
           Exploration of Men's Perspectives

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      Authors: Debra D. Joseph, Adele D Jones
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Qualitative research with 60 males (16–80 years) from two Caribbean countries was carried out to explore men’s perspectives on domestic violence (DV). An inductive latent/thematic approach to data analysis supported by analytic software led to five key domains being identified: (1) meanings of violence; (2) patrinormative culture; (3) normalization of violence; (4) male victimization; and (5) blame attribution and empathy. Patriarchal values, together with childhood exposure to violence, were found to reduce empathic capacity and contribute to the normalization of DV. In addition, the minimization of male victimization and the lack of behavior-change support services for men were identified as contributory factors.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-09T07:45:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221104845
       
  • “I Could Never Tell My Parents”: Barriers to Queer Women's College
           Sexual Assault Disclosure to Family Members

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      Authors: Nicole Bedera, Kristjane Nordmeyer, Kathryn J. Holland
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Queer women are at high risk of college sexual victimization, but they face barriers to formal support services. As a result, informal support is critical. This study uses data from 40 open-ended interviews to explore family members’ reactions to queer women's disclosures and examine whether their family is a reliable source of informal support. Findings indicate that family reactions are often more harmful than helpful. In comparison to research focused on heterosexual survivors, we find family reactions to be more extreme and disparaging of queer survivors’ sexual identities. In fact, family members’ negative reactions may pose barriers to accessing formal services.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-07T05:02:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221101920
       
  • Shifting the Center: Relocating Refugee Men in Strategies Aiming to
           Address Violence Against Women

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      Authors: Jenny Maturi
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      This article aims to problematize individualistic strategies developed in western institutions to address violence against women and suggests more collective responses that engage refugee men. The data comes from a qualitative research project in Southeast Queensland, Australia. Thirty-one interviews with frontline workers from domestic violence and refugee settlement organizations reveal dissenting voices that challenge the hegemony of dominant groups who either advocate gender equality or overemphasize cultural differences. These dissenting voices suggest new knowledge being mobilized by refugees and associated communities, presenting opportunities for nongovernmental organizations and community groups to find ways to align across their differences toward a common goal.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-07T05:02:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221101918
       
  • The Elephant in the Room: Toward an Integrated, Feminist Analysis of Mass
           Murder

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      Authors: Elizabeth Yardley, Laura Richards
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      This article argues for a new approach to making sense of mass murder, emphasizing the urgency of recognizing the proliferation and significance of misogyny and domestic violence among perpetrators of this type of homicide. It is vital that scholarship recognizes the political economy of neoliberal patriarchy and seeks to better understand how harmful subjectivity develops in this context. We propose a new multilevel framework for the analysis of mass murder and issue a call to action for a global program of independent qualitative research and activism to tackle its drivers, prevent further harm, and save lives.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-07T05:01:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221101917
       
  • Rural and Urban/Suburban Victim Professionals’ Perceptions of
           Gender-Based Violence, Victim Challenges, and Safety Advice During the
           COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Kellie R. Lynch, T.K. Logan
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      This study surveyed a national sample of victim service professionals (N  =  222) and compared rural versus urban/suburban participants’ perceptions of a variety of issues, such as the impact of the pandemic on gender-based violence victimization and safety advice for isolated victims. Increased interference with victim employment and the abuser monitoring of online activities were reported by participants across all communities. However, urban/suburban participants rated the magnitude of all victim challenges as greater, while more rural participants noted child abuse as a particular problem in their communities. The results highlight the importance of community context for improving coordinated responses to gender-based violence (n  =  101).
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-07T05:00:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221099987
       
  • Mitigating Loss and Trauma: The Continuing Bonds Experience of Daughters
           Bereaved to Intimate Partner Femicide

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      Authors: Shani Pitcho-Prelorentzos, Elazar Leshem; , Michal Mahat-Shamir
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      The current study sheds light on the continuing bonds experience of adult Israeli daughters whose mothers were murdered by their fathers. Through 11 semi structured interviews, common externalized and internalized continuing bonds with the deceased mothers were closely examined. The interpreted results supported the existence of bonds, yet revealed a unique manifestation; the bonds were purposefully and defensively restricted, which seemed to be an adjustive compromise in light of the strong traumatic component of the loss. Our results contribute to the theoretical and clinical understanding of the restrictive effect that trauma components have on loss components in cases of traumatic bereavement.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-07T04:59:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221099985
       
  • Men Have Gender and Women Are People: A Structural Approach to Gender and
           Violence

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      Authors: Samantha Applin, John-Michael Simpson, Anna Curtis
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      The relationship between violence and patriarchal gender systems is structural and coconstitutive; yet structural analyses that account for gender in explanations and conceptualizations of violence are often absent from violence scholarship. Additionally, there are numerous underassessed areas in more gender-nuanced, “gender-based” violence paradigms. We address the shortcomings of both types of research and propose a cohesive theoretical framework that captures the ways in which violence is patriarchy-enhancing and patriarchy-facilitated. Violence shapes and influences gender performances and structures and, concomitantly, the gender order shapes and influences violence in given contexts.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-07T03:57:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221104844
       
  • The Rapid Uptake of Digital Technologies at Domestic Violence and Sexual
           Assault Organizations During the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Heather L. Storer, Eva X. Nyerges
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Emerging evidence suggests that the COVID-19 pandemic disproportionately impacted survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault (DV/SA). This research note explores DV/SA service providers’ (n = 20) perceptions of how their organizations responded to the pandemic. Results of a thematic content analysis indicated that survivors were adversely affected by sheltering with abusive partners and by external environmental conditions. Organizations responded to shifting community needs by adapting face-to-face services to virtual formats and revising pre pandemic safety planning protocols. School-based prevention programming required significant adjustments. Therefore, the pandemic catalyzed the integration and optimization of emerging technologies and provided opportunities for organizational innovation.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-07T03:50:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221094066
       
  • Women's Agency as Reason for Life Threats Among the Pashtuns in Pakistan:
           Narratives of Women Fleeing Honor Killing and Masculine Domination

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      Authors: Saeeda Khan, Shanthi Thambiah, Ying Hooi Khoo
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      This article uses the narratives of survivors of honor killing to show that women's agency is the reason for life threats because it undermines masculine domination. The findings show that life threats are made against women engaging in behaviors not aligned to cultural norms as perceived by male members of their family, to escape shame and gossip, and it is a manifestation of men losing control over women. These survivors of honor-based violence have undermined masculine domination by acting in unanticipated ways and by fleeing to a shelter home in the face of overwhelming cultural sanctions and structural inequalities.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-07T03:50:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221092468
       
  • Corrigendum to Chinese Women’s Financial Independence and Their Intimate
           Partner Violence Victimization Experience

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      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-07-25T09:50:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221116475
       
  • Trapped in My Roles as a Woman With No Help: Experiences of Intimate
           Partner Violence Against Chinese Women

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      Authors: Jiepin Cao, Xu Liu, Rosa M. Gonzalez-Guarda
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      An understanding of intimate partner violence (IPV) experiences is a crucial first step toward shaping effective responses. However, relevant knowledge among Chinese women is scant. This study described Chinese women’s IPV experiences by analyzing 46 posts shared by 42 women on a public online forum. Five overarching themes were identified using conventional qualitative content analysis: being trapped in my roles, no power in the relationship, the struggles are real but I need to tolerate, I want to leave but have no help, and hope for the future. This study has important implications for future research, practice, and education.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-07-16T03:09:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221104504
       
  • The Influence of Group Identification with Student Subgroups on
           Perceptions of Bystander Intervention to Prevent Sexual Assault

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      Authors: Rachel E. Riggs, Koji Yoshimura
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      College students can use bystander intervention tactics to prevent sexual assault within their communities. One's group memberships and group identification—conceptualized within social identity theory—could influence attitudes and behaviors related to bystander intervention. College students (n = 1,170) participated in an online survey measuring group membership with student subgroups, identification, and bystander intervention perceptions. Subgroups in this study included fraternities/sororities, student organizations, National Collegiate Athletic Association athletes, club/intramural sports, and spiritual/faith-based organizations. For various student subgroups, group identification was significantly correlated with individuals’ perceived willingness and likelihood to engage in bystander intervention and their perceptions about the helpfulness of bystander intervention tactics.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-07-12T09:47:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221104842
       
  • Online Guidance for Domestic Violence Survivors and Service Providers: A
           COVID-19 Content Analysis

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      Authors: Ruth Fleury-Steiner, Susan L. Miller, Lauren C. Camphausen, Kaelyn F. Burns, Jennifer A. Horney
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      To assess COVID-19 information and services available to domestic violence service providers, survivors, and racially and culturally specific communities in the U.S., a content analysis of 80 national and state/territorial coalition websites was performed in June 2020. COVID-19 information was available on 84% of websites. National organizations provided more information for survivors related to safety and mental health and for racially and culturally specific communities. State/territorial coalitions provided more information for providers on COVID-19 and general disaster preparedness. COVID-19 and social distancing measures implemented to control it diminished help-seeking in unique ways. Greater online access to information and resources may be needed to address changing needs of survivors during disasters and emergencies.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-07-08T06:12:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221092469
       
  • Technology-Based Responses to Technology-Facilitated Domestic and Family
           Violence: An Overview of the Limits and Possibilities of Tech-Based
           “Solutions”

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      Authors: Diarmaid Harkin, Robert Merkel
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      It is increasingly common for domestic and family violence to have an element of technology-facilitated abuse (TFA). As a result, technology-based responses have emerged to address TFA. Using observations from several empirical research projects into TFA, it will be shown that technology-based responses are necessary without being sufficient, and that they have persistent limitations that need to be recognized. Relatedly, it will be argued that there should be an ongoing emphasis on the development of human resources as a support for those experiencing TFA, particularly the use of professional DV support workers.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T05:37:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221088310
       
  • Chinese Women's Financial Independence and Their Intimate Partner Violence
           Victimization Experiences

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      Authors: Carrie K. W. Li, Jianhong Liu, Xuan Chen
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      China, as a traditional patriarchal society, provides an excellent context to examine whether and how increased financial independence of women may influence intimate partner violence. This study examines how financial independence influences Chinese women's victimization experiences of physical violence, psychological violence, controlling behavior, and sexual abuse. Data were collected from 600 married or divorced women aged between 20 and 60, who resided in a large metropolitan area in Southern China. Results indicated that while physical violence is reduced by women's financial independence, other forms of connective IPV against women are suggested as expressions of men's desire to keep financially independent women in place.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T05:37:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221097143
       
  • How Social Responses to Child Sexual Abuse and Intimate Partner Violence
           Affect Homelessness Among Women in Two Rural Regions With Resource-Based
           Economies in Eastern Quebec

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      Authors: Catherine Flynn, Pénélope Couturier, Simon Turcotte, Kim Dubé, Christophe Levesque, Philippe-Benoit Côté, Simon Lapierre
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      This study presents findings from a qualitative study conducted in two relatively remote, primarily rural regions of the Canadian province of Quebec whose resource-based economic structures exacerbate inequalities between men and women. The purpose of this study was to understand how violence and homelessness intertwine in women's life courses in such regions. On the basis of past research showing that gender socialization around traditional roles and conservative values is particularly tenacious in non-urban areas, we conducted life-course interviews with 22 women in 13 different towns and villages of these two regions. Our content analysis of these interviews showed that specific social responses have forced women to maintain relationships with their aggressors or with people who have protected them, thus relegating these women's lives to the private sphere while reducing their opportunities for social participation in the public sphere. These social responses, together with women's economic and social disadvantages in these regions, were also the main factors that explain homelessness experienced by the participants in this study. Our analysis of these responses illustrates the patriarchal social structure of power in these regions, which is perpetuated in the interpersonal, institutional, and representational dimensions and keeps women in precarious, subordinate social positions, while ostracizing or punishing women who try to resist.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-06-09T01:41:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221083329
       
  • Marriage Trafficking: Demand, Exploitation, and Conducive Contexts—A
           Study in China–Vietnam Border Areas

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      Authors: Xiaochen Liang
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      This study contributes to the marriage trafficking literature by highlighting its demand, unique forms of exploitation, and conducive context through a qualitative study in China–Vietnam border areas. The findings indicate: (a) local demand for marriage constitutes a premise for the emergence and development of a marriage trafficking market, (b) three forms of exploitation distinguish marriage trafficking from other trafficking forms; (c) the local contexts conducive to the formation and facilitation of marriage trafficking also impede trafficked women's agency. In-depth interviews were conducted with marriage trafficked women who have not exited the trafficking situations, and with key local social network actors in the trafficking areas.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T06:09:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221094064
       
  • What We Think When We Think About (Interpersonal) Violence: Understanding
           Knowledge Production

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      Authors: Nadine Shaanta Murshid
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Amid growing consensus that violence against women is structurally produced, neoliberalism produces an individualist understanding of violence that blames women while simultaneously framing it as personal failings of men, obscuring the link between the structural and the personal. Using examples from federal grant funding opportunities in the United States, activism in Bangladesh, and data from qualitative research, I analyze how such individual readings of violence get produced–reproduced. I call for radical responsibility to produce equitable and just research that serves the communities that we study, not just the interests of grant funders and the neoliberal university.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-05-23T06:29:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221083333
       
  • “It Was All Wrong and Shameful to Beat Her”: Discursive Analysis of
           Men’s Talk of Intimate Partner Violence

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      Authors: Isaac Dery, Constance Awinpoka Akurugu, Cuthbert Baataar
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, our aim is to foreground men's discourses on gender-based violence as linked to gendered hierarchies, power struggles, and social respectability in Ghana. Situated within decolonial feminist theories and drawing on interviews, we argue that men's interpretations of masculinity and the possibility of perpetrating violence against women is significantly mediated by such intersectional factors as sociocultural background, education, and broader societal normative requirements. The findings deepen the understanding of the ambiguities and contradictions that characterize men's talk of violence. The article discusses how these ambiguities and contradictions serve as important domains for engendering critical attitudes toward violence against women.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-05-09T12:03:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221083332
       
  • More Talent, More Leeway: Do Violence Against Women Arrests Really Hurt
           NFL Player Careers'

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      Authors: Daniel Sailofsky
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines whether arrests for an act of violence against women have a negative impact on National Football League (NFL) player careers and whether this impact has become more negative over time. Framed by criminological deterrence and conflict theories, I conduct a Bayesian multi-level negative binomial regression on a matched pairs sample of all 117 NFL players arrested for an act of violence against women between 2000 and 2019 (n = 234). Results show that the effect of an arrest on player careers is negligible, though it has become slightly more detrimental over time. Player value and performance are stronger predictors of post-arrest career trajectories, and average or better performance negates any detrimental impact of an arrest.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-05-06T08:29:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221092477
       
  • The Role of Structural Factors in Support-Seeking Among Women Experiencing
           Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) in Mwanza, Tanzania: Findings From a
           Qualitative Study

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      Authors: Veronica Selestine, Sheila Harvey, Gerry Mshana, Saidi Kapiga, Shelley Lees
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      In this qualitative study of women participating in an intimate partner violence (IPV) prevention trial, experiences of IPV and the context that shapes support-seeking were explored through in-depth interviews and focus groups discussions. Decisions to seek support were influenced by a range of factors including fear of further abuse, shame, acceptance of IPV as normal, belief that IPV is a private matter between the couple, economic dependence on male partners, and a poorly responsive legal and justice system. Gender empowerment programs need to intervene at the social, cultural, political, and economic levels that shape justification and meanings attached to IPV and women’s decisions in seeking support.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-02-25T05:58:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221077130
       
  • Parricide, Mental Illness, and Parental Proximity: The Gendered Contexts
           of Parricide in England and Wales

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      Authors: Caroline Miles, Rachel Condry, Elspeth Windsor
      First page: 87
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Parricide is underresearched in the UK, and the contexts of this gendered form of violence are poorly understood. Heide’s typology provides an advanced understanding of parricide in the United States, where the majority of parent-killings involve firearms. This article develops a UK-based analysis of the contexts of parricide, combining national statistics with police case study data (n = 57) and case review data (n = 21). Our findings indicate that mental illness plays a key role, combined with a gendered context of “parental proximity” and the simultaneous responsibilization and marginalization of parent-victims (particularly mothers), supporting the need for feminist analyses of parricide.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-04-12T08:05:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221077127
       
  • Contextual Factors Associated With Women's Attitudes Toward Intimate
           Partner Violence in Tajikistan: Findings From the 2012 and 2017
           Demographic and Health Surveys

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      Authors: Hakim Zainiddinov
      First page: 112
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      The study employed data from the 2012 and 2017 Tajikistan Demographic and Health Surveys to examine two time periods on media access, interview setting, and sociodemographic predictors of intimate partner violence (IPV) justification attitudes among representative samples of women aged 15–49 years old (9,656 and 10,718 women, respectively) in Tajikistan. The odds of justifying IPV were higher for women who had access to radio and lower for those who had access to newspaper and television. The presence of the husband and other women during the interview was associated with lower justification of IPV. The findings emphasize the importance of contextual factors in developing effective IPV intervention policies.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-04-21T05:08:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221079371
       
  • Intimate Partner Violence in Fiji: How the Perpetrator Is “Rewarded”
           for Perceived Victim Suffering

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      Authors: James Johnson, Shonell Smith-Enoe, Shanhong Luo, Maria Giuseppina Pacilli, Stefano Pagliaro
      First page: 134
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Although intimate partner violence is rampant in Fiji, limited research has investigated the perception of appropriate legal sanctions for the perpetrators. We explored whether victim characteristics and perceived victim suffering would independently or jointly influence perpetrator-directed legal sanctions. Undergraduates read an IPV passage with the victim portrayed as a sexual norm violator, a career-focused mother, or a control victim. At high levels of perceived victim suffering, participants “rewarded” the perpetrator by reporting less punitive reactions and reduced perceived culpability in the norm violating victim condition. No differences emerged at low levels of perceived suffering. Implications for the Metanorm Perspective are discussed.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-01-20T01:04:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012211070311
       
  • Stories of Backlash in Interviews With Survivors of Intimate Partner
           Violence Against Women in Sweden

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      Authors: Maria Wemrell
      First page: 154
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Despite high gender equality ratings, Sweden shows a high prevalence of intimate partner violence against women (IPVAW). Suggested factors underlying this apparent paradox include backlash effects against women's empowerment. This study explores stories of backlash in interviews with 23 IPVAW survivors in Sweden. Thematic analysis identified categories of narrative segments referring to phenomena provoking violence; the victims’ resources, agency, breaking with gender norms and resistance, and the partner's feelings of subordination, while case-centered narrative analysis pointed to divergences between how these categories appear in the stories. The study underscores the complexity of links between gender (in)equality and IPVAW in Sweden.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-07-11T04:33:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221088312
       
  • “Are You Safe at Home'”: Clinician's Assessments for Intimate
           Partner Violence at the Initial Obstetric Visit

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      Authors: Cecilia Huang, Amber Hill, Elizabeth Miller, Abdesalam Soudi, Diane Flick, Raquel Buranosky, Cynthia L. Holland, Lynn Hawker, Judy C. Chang
      First page: 185
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Few studies have empirically examined patient–clinician conversations to assess how intimate partner violence (IPV) screening is performed. Our study sought to examine audio-recorded first obstetric encounters’ IPV screening conversations to describe and categorize communication approaches and explore associations with patient disclosure. We analyzed 247 patient encounters with 47 providers. IPV screening occurred in 95% of visits: 57% used direct questions, 25% used indirect questions, 17% repeated IPV screening later in the visit, 11% framed questions with a reason for asking, and 10% described IPV types. Patients disclosed IPV in 71 (28.7%) visits. There were no associations between disclosure and any categories of IPV screening.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-12-07T06:32:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221142915
       
  • Exploring Help-Seeking Predictors Among Colombian Victims of Intimate
           Partner Violence in Different Age Groups

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      Authors: Diana M. Padilla-Medina, Eusebius Small, Silviya Pavlova Nikolova
      First page: 202
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined the extent, source, and individual, microsystem, exosystem, and macrosystem-level (Heise's Ecological Model) predictors of help-seeking behaviors among women of different age groups in Colombia. Data on 12,915 married or cohabitating women who had experienced diverse forms of intimate partner violence (IPV) were obtained from the Colombia Demographic Health Survey 2015. More than half of the Colombian women who reported some form of IPV experience did not seek any help. Women aged 25–39 were less likely to seek help. Type of violence and experience of IPV and education were the strongest predictors of help-seeking among women in all age groups. Implications for research and programming are discussed.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-07-06T06:41:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221088308
       
  • Women's Formal Help-Seeking Before and After Their Abusive Partner
           Initiates Relationship Violence Treatment

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      Authors: Christopher M. Murphy, Nkiru Nnawulezi, Laura Ting
      First page: 229
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Intimate partner violence survivors (N = 122) reported on formal help-seeking before and after their male partners enrolled in a Relationship Violence Intervention Program (RVIP). At baseline, only 20% of survivors had ever received domestic abuse (DA) counseling. DA counseling was more common among survivors with more extensive partner abuse exposures, and for black women residing in suburban versus urban communities. New help-seeking was associated with survivor perceptions of the abusive partner's stage of change. RVIP impact may be enhanced through culturally sensitive survivor outreach that is responsive to a broad range of needs and includes repeated contact over time.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T05:37:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221088309
       
  • Evaluating the Impact of Policy and Programming on Female-Victim Intimate
           Partner Homicide at the County Level in Florida

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      Authors: Julio Montanez, Amy Donley, Amy Reckdenwald
      First page: 253
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Legal and social service interventions aim to mitigate intimate partner violence (IPV) and keep IPV from becoming lethal. Accordingly, this study examines the impact of policies and programs on female-victim intimate partner homicide (FVIPH) rates across the 67 counties of the state of Florida. It focuses on community coordinated response efforts, batterer intervention programs, local domestic violence (DV) ordinances, DV fatality review teams, and DV shelter programs. Results indicate that community coordinated response efforts are associated with decreasing FVIPH rates. Discussions of findings, limitations, and implications are provided accordingly.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-05-17T05:27:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221083328
       
  • Police Investigators’ Perceptions of the Challenges Associated With
           Interviewing Adult Sexual Assault Complainants

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      Authors: Nina Westera, Mia Gentle, Martine Powell, Rachel Zajac
      First page: 276
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Although police organizations have devoted considerable effort to training investigators in evidence-based witness interviewing techniques, there is some suggestion that current practices do not meet the multifaceted requirements of sexual assault cases. Here, we assessed the specific challenges inherent in conducting interviews with adult sexual assault complainants, by conducting in-depth interviews with 21 experienced investigators from both Australia and New Zealand. The challenges that investigators identified fell into three broad themes: meeting the evidential needs of sexual assault investigations, establishing credibility, and managing complainant vulnerabilities. We discuss how the investigative interview process might be modified in line with these challenges.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-10-26T07:39:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221120447
       
  • When she is Standing Left, she Might be Blamed. Responsibility Attribution
           for Sexualized Violence Moderated by Rape Myth Acceptance and Benevolent
           Sexism

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      Authors: Katharina T. Halicki, Robin Hauser, Michaela Wänke
      First page: 300
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      The present research contributes to the literature on victim blaming in cases of sexualized violence. Our findings show that even subtle cues, such as positioning in a picture, can influence blame attribution, particularly for people who are motivated to do so. In our experimental study we could show that with increasing rape myth acceptance as well as with increasing benevolent sexism, participants assigned more responsibility for later occurring sexualized violence to a woman displayed on the left-hand side compared to a woman displayed on the right-hand side of a picture.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-31T02:54:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221108420
       
  • Transmuting Girls Into Women: Examining the Adultification of Black Female
           Sexual Assault Survivors Through Twitter Feedback

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      Authors: Michael G. Curtis, Annika S. Karlsen, Leslie A. Anderson
      First page: 321
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      The present study explored the adultification of young Black girls, specifically through the mythos of the fast-tailed girl, by examining the commentary on Twitter associated with the #SurvivingRKelly hashtag. Applying critical discourse analysis, three discursive themes emerged: (1) calling out the culture of accepting, (2) resistance through provocation and inquiry, and (3) challenging transgenerational dating. This study's results indicate the need for further research on the social construction of Black girlhood and how societal and cultural beliefs may serve as discursive mechanisms by which the adultification of young Black girls is perpetuated.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-04-20T06:53:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221083334
       
  • Faculty and Staff Perceptions of Title IX Mandatory Reporting Policies at
           Two Institutions

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      Authors: Sarah Koon-Magnin, Christina Mancini
      First page: 347
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Most faculty and staff at postsecondary institutions are mandatory reporters who must disclose sexual assault to a Title IX Coordinator. However, scholarship examining their role is sparse. We address this gap by investigating perceptions and experiences of employees (n = 166) at two institutions. Findings indicate that most employees are aware of their reporting duties, likely to comply, have received training, and support mandated reporting. Additionally, we find significant sociodemographic differences in perceptions of mandatory reporting. Those who have had a direct experience reporting have mixed reactions to the process. We discuss research and policy implications.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-01-25T01:12:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012211070315
       
  • Patient Advocates’ Perspectives on the Care of Sexual Assault Survivors
           in Chicago-Area Emergency Departments

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      Authors: Kristen D. Chalmers, Ramya Parameswaran, Nicole E. Dussault, Jeanne M. Farnan, Sonia Oyola, Keme Carter
      First page: 370
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Emergency departments (EDs) providing care and forensic examinations for sexual assault (SA) survivors are often supported by SA patient advocates. This study explored advocates’ perspectives regarding problems and potential solutions in SA patient care through a focus group with 12 advocates. Thematic analysis identified two major themes: provider–patient interactions and ED–hospital systems. Challenging aspects of provider–patient interactions included (a) provider attitudes and (b) disempowering behaviors. Within ED–hospital systems, themes included time constraints, efficiencies, and hospital preparation. Advocates surveyed were optimistic about an increased presence of SA nurse examiners and enhanced protocols and provider training to improve survivors’ experiences.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-18T03:23:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221097140
       
  • The Pursuit of Medical Care for Female Victims of Nonfatal Strangulation
           at the Time of Police Response

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      Authors: Nicole Wilkes
      First page: 388
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Survivors of nonfatal strangulation face a number of physical health consequences, some of which can be fatal if untreated. Despite the known health risks and connections to delayed fatalities, little is known about strangulation and victims’ pursuit of medical care. Using data collected from prosecutors’ case files (n = 143), this study attempts to understand what factors contribute to victims receiving medical attention following a nonfatal strangulation assault reported to police. Findings indicate that the suspect disrupting an emergency call increases the likelihood of the victim pursuing medical care. Implications are discussed.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-12-07T07:16:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221140133
       
  • Socioecological Framework for Drivers of Conflict and Postconflict
           Violence Against Women and Girls

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      Authors: Maureen Murphy, Manuel Contreras-Urbina, Michelle Spearing, Aisling Swaine
      First page: 406
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      This article advances our understanding of the drivers and multidimensional nature of conflict-related violence against women and girls (CRVAWG). It presents an adapted socioecological model, which supports research, analysis, and programming and can be further adapted as the empirical evidence base grows. Although models to help explore violence against women and girls generally have advanced over recent decades, these have not addressed the specific dynamics of conflict-affected settings. This article makes a unique contribution by bringing together research on CRVAWG and presenting a new model for deepening current approaches to understanding and preventing CRVAWG.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-08-09T08:10:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221094065
       
 
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