Subjects -> LAW (Total: 1397 journals)
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LAW (843 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 801 - 354 of 354 Journals sorted alphabetically
Varia Justicia     Open Access  
Veredas do Direito : Direito Ambiental e Desenvolvimento Sustentável     Open Access  
Veritas et Justitia     Open Access  
Verstek     Open Access  
Vertentes do Direito     Open Access  
Via Inveniendi Et Iudicandi     Open Access  
Vianna Sapiens     Open Access  
Victoria University of Wellington Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Villanova Environmental Law Journal     Open Access  
Villanova Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Violence Against Women     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
VirtuaJus - Revista de Direito     Open Access  
Vniversitas     Open Access  
Vox Juris     Open Access  
Waikato Law Review: Taumauri     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Washington and Lee Journal of Energy, Climate, and the Environment     Open Access  
Washington and Lee Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Washington Law Review     Free   (Followers: 2)
Washington University Global Studies Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Washington University Journal of Law & Policy     Open Access  
Washington University Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Wayne Law Review     Free  
Western Journal of Legal Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Western New England Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
William & Mary Environmental Law and Policy Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
William & Mary Journal of Women and the Law     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
William and Mary Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Windsor Yearbook of Access to Justice / Recueil annuel de Windsor d'accès à la justice     Open Access  
Wirtschaftsrechtliche Blätter     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Wroclaw Review of Law, Administration & Economics     Open Access  
Yale Journal of Law & the Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Yale Journal of Law and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Yale Journal on Regulation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Yale Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 64)
Yearbook of European Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Yearbook of International Disaster Law Online     Full-text available via subscription  
Yuridika     Open Access  
Zuzenbidea ikasten : Irakaskuntzarako aldizkaria     Open Access  
交大法學評論     Open Access  

  First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Similar Journals
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Violence Against Women
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.918
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 58  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1077-8012 - ISSN (Online) 1552-8448
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Chinese Women's Financial Independence and Their Intimate Partner Violence
           Victimization Experiences

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      Authors: Carrie K. W. Li, Jianhong Liu, Xuan Chen
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      China, as a traditional patriarchal society, provides an excellent context to examine whether and how increased financial independence of women may influence intimate partner violence. This study examines how financial independence influences Chinese women's victimization experiences of physical violence, psychological violence, controlling behavior, and sexual abuse. Data were collected from 600 married or divorced women aged between 20 and 60, who resided in a large metropolitan area in Southern China. Results indicated that while physical violence is reduced by women's financial independence, other forms of connective IPV against women are suggested as expressions of men's desire to keep financially independent women in place.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T05:37:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221097143
       
  • Hope Shattered: An Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis of Survivors’
           Experiences With Untested Rape Kits

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      Authors: Maria Hardeberg Bach, Courtney Ahrens, Rebecca Howard, Sherisa Dahlgren
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Rape survivors who submit to a medical forensic exam generally expect the resulting rape kit to be tested, but hundreds of thousands of rape kits have been left untested in police storage facilities nationwide. The current study sought to understand what the experience of having an untested rape kit was like for survivors. Using Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis, this study examined narratives of 15 survivors whose rape kits had been part of the rape kit backlog. Analysis suggested that survivors experience an extreme sense of betrayal and loss of faith in the criminal justice system when their kits are not tested. For these survivors, the rape kit was more than just evidence in a box; it was part of them. Implications are discussed.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T05:35:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221083335
       
  • The Impact of Victim Blaming and Locus of Control on Mental Health
           Outcomes Among Female Sexual Assault Survivors

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      Authors: Laura C. Wilson, Abigail Farley, Sierra F. Horton
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      To elucidate individual differences in sexual assault survivor outcomes, we examined locus of control as a moderator of the relationship between victim blaming and both posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and unhealthy alcohol use. The sample consisted of 82 female sexual assault survivors who had disclosed their victimization to at least one person. The results of this survey demonstrated that locus of control did not moderate the relationship between victim blaming and PTSD, or the relationship between victim blaming and unhealthy alcohol use. The findings further supported the direct relationship between victim blaming and a range of negative mental health outcomes among survivors.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-06-16T10:54:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221088304
       
  • How Social Responses to Child Sexual Abuse and Intimate Partner Violence
           Affect Homelessness Among Women in Two Rural Regions With Resource-Based
           Economies in Eastern Quebec

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      Authors: Catherine Flynn, Pénélope Couturier, Simon Turcotte, Kim Dubé, Christophe Levesque, Philippe-Benoit Côté, Simon Lapierre
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      This study presents findings from a qualitative study conducted in two relatively remote, primarily rural regions of the Canadian province of Quebec whose resource-based economic structures exacerbate inequalities between men and women. The purpose of this study was to understand how violence and homelessness intertwine in women's life courses in such regions. On the basis of past research showing that gender socialization around traditional roles and conservative values is particularly tenacious in non-urban areas, we conducted life-course interviews with 22 women in 13 different towns and villages of these two regions. Our content analysis of these interviews showed that specific social responses have forced women to maintain relationships with their aggressors or with people who have protected them, thus relegating these women's lives to the private sphere while reducing their opportunities for social participation in the public sphere. These social responses, together with women's economic and social disadvantages in these regions, were also the main factors that explain homelessness experienced by the participants in this study. Our analysis of these responses illustrates the patriarchal social structure of power in these regions, which is perpetuated in the interpersonal, institutional, and representational dimensions and keeps women in precarious, subordinate social positions, while ostracizing or punishing women who try to resist.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-06-09T01:41:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221083329
       
  • Marriage Trafficking: Demand, Exploitation, and Conducive Contexts—A
           Study in China–Vietnam Border Areas

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      Authors: Xiaochen Liang
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      This study contributes to the marriage trafficking literature by highlighting its demand, unique forms of exploitation, and conducive context through a qualitative study in China–Vietnam border areas. The findings indicate: (a) local demand for marriage constitutes a premise for the emergence and development of a marriage trafficking market, (b) three forms of exploitation distinguish marriage trafficking from other trafficking forms; (c) the local contexts conducive to the formation and facilitation of marriage trafficking also impede trafficked women's agency. In-depth interviews were conducted with marriage trafficked women who have not exited the trafficking situations, and with key local social network actors in the trafficking areas.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T06:09:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221094064
       
  • What We Think When We Think About (Interpersonal) Violence: Understanding
           Knowledge Production

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      Authors: Nadine Shaanta Murshid
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Amid growing consensus that violence against women is structurally produced, neoliberalism produces an individualist understanding of violence that blames women while simultaneously framing it as personal failings of men, obscuring the link between the structural and the personal. Using examples from federal grant funding opportunities in the United States, activism in Bangladesh, and data from qualitative research, I analyze how such individual readings of violence get produced–reproduced. I call for radical responsibility to produce equitable and just research that serves the communities that we study, not just the interests of grant funders and the neoliberal university.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-05-23T06:29:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221083333
       
  • Evaluating the Impact of Policy and Programming on Female-Victim Intimate
           Partner Homicide at the County Level in Florida

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      Authors: Julio Montanez, Amy Donley, Amy Reckdenwald
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Legal and social service interventions aim to mitigate intimate partner violence (IPV) and keep IPV from becoming lethal. Accordingly, this study examines the impact of policies and programs on female-victim intimate partner homicide (FVIPH) rates across the 67 counties of the state of Florida. It focuses on community coordinated response efforts, batterer intervention programs, local domestic violence (DV) ordinances, DV fatality review teams, and DV shelter programs. Results indicate that community coordinated response efforts are associated with decreasing FVIPH rates. Discussions of findings, limitations, and implications are provided accordingly.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-05-17T05:27:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221083328
       
  • “It Was All Wrong and Shameful to Beat Her”: Discursive Analysis of
           Men’s Talk of Intimate Partner Violence

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      Authors: Isaac Dery, Constance Awinpoka Akurugu, Cuthbert Baataar
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, our aim is to foreground men's discourses on gender-based violence as linked to gendered hierarchies, power struggles, and social respectability in Ghana. Situated within decolonial feminist theories and drawing on interviews, we argue that men's interpretations of masculinity and the possibility of perpetrating violence against women is significantly mediated by such intersectional factors as sociocultural background, education, and broader societal normative requirements. The findings deepen the understanding of the ambiguities and contradictions that characterize men's talk of violence. The article discusses how these ambiguities and contradictions serve as important domains for engendering critical attitudes toward violence against women.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-05-09T12:03:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221083332
       
  • More Talent, More Leeway: Do Violence Against Women Arrests Really Hurt
           NFL Player Careers'

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      Authors: Daniel Sailofsky
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines whether arrests for an act of violence against women have a negative impact on National Football League (NFL) player careers and whether this impact has become more negative over time. Framed by criminological deterrence and conflict theories, I conduct a Bayesian multi-level negative binomial regression on a matched pairs sample of all 117 NFL players arrested for an act of violence against women between 2000 and 2019 (n = 234). Results show that the effect of an arrest on player careers is negligible, though it has become slightly more detrimental over time. Player value and performance are stronger predictors of post-arrest career trajectories, and average or better performance negates any detrimental impact of an arrest.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-05-06T08:29:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221092477
       
  • Contextual Factors Associated With Women's Attitudes Toward Intimate
           Partner Violence in Tajikistan: Findings From the 2012 and 2017
           Demographic and Health Surveys

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      Authors: Hakim Zainiddinov
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      The study employed data from the 2012 and 2017 Tajikistan Demographic and Health Surveys to examine two time periods on media access, interview setting, and sociodemographic predictors of intimate partner violence (IPV) justification attitudes among representative samples of women aged 15–49 years old (9,656 and 10,718 women, respectively) in Tajikistan. The odds of justifying IPV were higher for women who had access to radio and lower for those who had access to newspaper and television. The presence of the husband and other women during the interview was associated with lower justification of IPV. The findings emphasize the importance of contextual factors in developing effective IPV intervention policies.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-04-21T05:08:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221079371
       
  • Transmuting Girls Into Women: Examining the Adultification of Black Female
           Sexual Assault Survivors Through Twitter Feedback

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      Authors: Michael G. Curtis, Annika S. Karlsen, Leslie A. Anderson
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      The present study explored the adultification of young Black girls, specifically through the mythos of the fast-tailed girl, by examining the commentary on Twitter associated with the #SurvivingRKelly hashtag. Applying critical discourse analysis, three discursive themes emerged: (1) calling out the culture of accepting, (2) resistance through provocation and inquiry, and (3) challenging transgenerational dating. This study's results indicate the need for further research on the social construction of Black girlhood and how societal and cultural beliefs may serve as discursive mechanisms by which the adultification of young Black girls is perpetuated.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-04-20T06:53:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221083334
       
  • Education, Class, and Female Genital Cutting among the Samburu of Northern
           Kenya: Challenging the Reproduction of the “Ignorant Pastoralist”
           Narrative in Anticutting Campaigns

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      Authors: Hannelore Van Bavel
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Based on ethnographic research among the Samburu of northern Kenya, this article examines the association between formal education and the abandonment of female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C). It challenges the notion that Samburu continue cutting out of “ignorance” of the health and legal implications of cutting. The findings show that, rather than a causal effect of “knowledge” on cutting-related attitudes and behavior, formal education can replace FGM/C as a source for status, respect, and adulthood. In addition, alternative expectations apply to formally educated Samburu. Challenging the reproduction of the “ignorant pastoralist” narrative in anticutting campaigns is important because of the harm such narratives inflict on pastoralist communities.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-04-15T05:56:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221079376
       
  • Parricide, Mental Illness, and Parental Proximity: The Gendered Contexts
           of Parricide in England and Wales

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      Authors: Caroline Miles, Rachel Condry, Elspeth Windsor
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Parricide is underresearched in the UK, and the contexts of this gendered form of violence are poorly understood. Heide’s typology provides an advanced understanding of parricide in the United States, where the majority of parent-killings involve firearms. This article develops a UK-based analysis of the contexts of parricide, combining national statistics with police case study data (n = 57) and case review data (n = 21). Our findings indicate that mental illness plays a key role, combined with a gendered context of “parental proximity” and the simultaneous responsibilization and marginalization of parent-victims (particularly mothers), supporting the need for feminist analyses of parricide.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-04-12T08:05:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221077127
       
  • The Role of Structural Factors in Support-Seeking Among Women Experiencing
           Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) in Mwanza, Tanzania: Findings From a
           Qualitative Study

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      Authors: Veronica Selestine, Sheila Harvey, Gerry Mshana, Saidi Kapiga, Shelley Lees
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      In this qualitative study of women participating in an intimate partner violence (IPV) prevention trial, experiences of IPV and the context that shapes support-seeking were explored through in-depth interviews and focus groups discussions. Decisions to seek support were influenced by a range of factors including fear of further abuse, shame, acceptance of IPV as normal, belief that IPV is a private matter between the couple, economic dependence on male partners, and a poorly responsive legal and justice system. Gender empowerment programs need to intervene at the social, cultural, political, and economic levels that shape justification and meanings attached to IPV and women’s decisions in seeking support.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-02-25T05:58:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221077130
       
  • “There Is Always an Excuse to Blame the Girl”: Perspectives on Sexual
           Harassment at a Jordanian University

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      Authors: Irina Bergenfeld, Cari Jo Clark, Seema Sandhu, Kathryn M. Yount, Aida A. Essaid, Jude Sajdi, Rand Abu Taleb, Zoe Robbin, Brian Batayeh, Ahad Zwooqar, Rachael A. Spencer
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Sexual harassment (SH), defined as unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature, presents a global public health issue and a barrier to empowerment for women and girls. To understand the perceived causes of SH in the Jordanian university context, we conducted focus groups (n = 6) and participatory data collection with students (n = 317) and interviews with staff and administrators (n = 5) at a public university. These data identified norms governing men's and women's behavior, institutional climate and policies, tribal conservatism and protection of perpetrators, and early socialization as underlying SH. Campus-based interventions should adopt approaches aimed at multiple levels of the social ecology.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-02-24T04:39:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221079373
       
  • Missing Stories: Women with Physical Disabilities' Navigation and
           Responses to Domestic and Family Violence

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      Authors: Karen Jordan
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      There is significant global evidence that highlights both the high rates of domestic and family violence (DFV) for women with disabilities and the challenges they can face when navigating and responding to DFV. The purpose of this study was to understand women with physical disabilities’ experiences of help-seeking when they did not access generalist DFV services. Presented are the participants’ lived experiences of navigating and responding to DFV. Key findings include how participants resisted ableism, challenged assumptions about passivity, and the impacts of this resistance on their navigation of DFV.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-02-21T05:32:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221079377
       
  • Nonconsensual Distribution of Sexually Explicit Images Within a Context of
           Coercive Control: Frequency, Characteristics, and Associations with Other
           Forms of Victimization

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      Authors: Christina M. Dardis, Elizabeth C. Richards
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      The present study examined the frequency and characteristics of nonconsensual distribution of sexually explicit images (NCD) among undergraduates (n = 496) and its co-occurrence with other forms of interpersonal violence (e.g., physical, sexual, and psychological abuse). Overall, 17.34% of participants reported NCD victimization; most were women (90.70%). Women who reported NCD from current/former partners (71.79%), compared to non-romantic acquaintances, reported more additional interpersonal violence from the same perpetrator and marginally higher threats of NCD, but were no more likely to receive NCD demands. NCD appears to occur within a pattern of elevated violence; prevention and intervention efforts are needed.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-02-10T09:54:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221077126
       
  • The Relationship of DNA Evidence to Prosecution Outcomes in Sexual Assault
           Cases

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      Authors: Theodore P. Cross, Laura Siller, Maja Vlajnic, Megan Alderden
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined the relationship between DNA evidence and outcomes of prosecution of sexual assault. Researchers coded data from prosecutor and crime laboratory files for sexual assault cases referred to prosecutors between 2005 and 2011 in a metropolitan jurisdiction in the northeastern United States. Cases with a DNA match were significantly more likely to move forward and result in conviction, even with other predictor variables statistically controlled. Analyses suggest DNA evidence contributes to case progression but also is a result of it. These findings strengthen the case for quality forensic medical examinations, investment in DNA analysis, and increased prosecutor training.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-02-10T03:57:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221077124
       
  • Rape Myth Acceptance and General Self-Efficacy: Gender, Race, and Ethnic
           Differences of Knowing a Sexual Assault Victim among University Students

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      Authors: John Charles Navarro, Kathleen Ratajczak
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Knowing a sexual assault victim and general self-efficacy (GSE) were examined as predictors of rape myth acceptance (RMA) among university students. Where knowing a sexual assault victim was associated with greater rejection of rape myths among female students, most notably White females, a null effect occurred on male students, except for Black males whose RMA increased. Higher self-efficacy predicted the overall rejection of rape myths differently among identity intersections, most prominently with victim blaming. Knowing a sexual assault victim moderated GSE and RMA for male students and Latinos. These findings offer practical and critical implications as universities grow in diversity.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-01-25T05:24:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012211068056
       
  • Faculty and Staff Perceptions of Title IX Mandatory Reporting Policies at
           Two Institutions

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      Authors: Sarah Koon-Magnin, Christina Mancini
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Most faculty and staff at postsecondary institutions are mandatory reporters who must disclose sexual assault to a Title IX Coordinator. However, scholarship examining their role is sparse. We address this gap by investigating perceptions and experiences of employees (n = 166) at two institutions. Findings indicate that most employees are aware of their reporting duties, likely to comply, have received training, and support mandated reporting. Additionally, we find significant sociodemographic differences in perceptions of mandatory reporting. Those who have had a direct experience reporting have mixed reactions to the process. We discuss research and policy implications.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-01-25T01:12:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012211070315
       
  • Blameworthy Suspects and “Real Rape”: Assessing the Effects of Rape
           Culture-Specific Suspect Culpability Factors on the Police Decision to
           Arrest

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      Authors: Brittany L. Acquaviva, Katherine A. Meeker, Eryn Nicole O’Neal
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Police are considered “gatekeepers” of the criminal-legal system because their decisions significantly impact case outcomes. Using rape culture as our theoretical framework, we examine rape culture-specific factors that influence police arrest decisions in sexual assault cases reported to Los Angeles police. Importantly, extant research using this approach has overwhelmingly focused on indicators of “genuine victims,” and few studies have assessed rape culture-specific indicators of suspect culpability in sexual assault case processing. The present study addresses this gap. Findings indicate that arrest decisions are motivated by rape culture-specific indicators of suspect culpability and “real rape.” Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-01-25T01:12:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012211070314
       
  • Intimate Partner Violence in Fiji: How the Perpetrator Is “Rewarded”
           for Perceived Victim Suffering

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      Authors: James Johnson, Shonell Smith-Enoe, Shanhong Luo, Maria Giuseppina Pacilli, Stefano Pagliaro
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Although intimate partner violence is rampant in Fiji, limited research has investigated the perception of appropriate legal sanctions for the perpetrators. We explored whether victim characteristics and perceived victim suffering would independently or jointly influence perpetrator-directed legal sanctions. Undergraduates read an IPV passage with the victim portrayed as a sexual norm violator, a career-focused mother, or a control victim. At high levels of perceived victim suffering, participants “rewarded” the perpetrator by reporting less punitive reactions and reduced perceived culpability in the norm violating victim condition. No differences emerged at low levels of perceived suffering. Implications for the Metanorm Perspective are discussed.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-01-20T01:04:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012211070311
       
  • Violations of Sexual and Information Privacy: Understanding Dataraid in a
           (Cyber)Rape Culture

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      Authors: Martha McCaughey, Jill Cermele
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Technology-facilitated sexual violence is a violation unique to the digital age that extends the analog-era rape culture, but electronic privacy invasions are often an overlooked part of these violations. This article examines three emblematic cases of information privacy violations that get used, framed, or rationalized in connection with violations of sexual privacy. In showing how aggressive electronic intrusions borrow the well-worn tropes of rape culture, we show how violations of sexual and information privacy are linked in the digital age. Digital violations of both sexual and information privacy are impacted simultaneously by rape culture and surveillance culture, which are mutually reinforcing.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-01-18T02:53:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012211070316
       
  • Opening the “Black Box”: Student-Generated Solutions to Improve Sexual
           Violence Response and Prevention Efforts for Undergraduates on College
           Campuses

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      Authors: Brittnie E. Bloom, Eunhee Park, Dallas Swendeman, Laury Oaks, Stephanie Sumstine, Claire Amabile, Stoddy Carey, Jennifer A. Wagman
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Campus-based sexual violence and sexual harassment (SVSH) are prevalent issues that impact students detrimentally. Guided by community-based participatory research, this qualitative study assessed undergraduate students’ perceptions of available campus SVSH resources, gaps in services, and recommendations for solutions for SVSH at three universities in California via interviews and focus groups. Approximately half of participants were unaware of available SVSH services, while others had varying knowledge of service availability and experiences with services. Students want better-funded, trauma-informed, and survivor-centered services and providers who share their identities and lived experiences. We provide multi-level student-centered solutions to improve current campus-based SVSH prevention efforts.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-01-18T02:53:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012211068063
       
  • Women of Color Student Survivors’ Perceptions of Campus Sexual
           Assault Prevention Programming

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      Authors: Nadeeka Karunaratne, Jessica C. Harris
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      This article presents a qualitative study of 44 Women of Color undergraduate student survivors’ perceptions of campus sexual assault prevention programming using the framework of standpoint theory. Participants held perceptions concerning online training prior to college, the in-person presentations they attended during new student orientation, and the lack of information relayed through prevention programs about sexual assault perpetration. Findings highlight the need for continued research investigating the standpoints of Women of Color students to better inform implementation of prevention efforts.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-01-12T03:44:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012211070310
       
  • The Feasibility of a Novel Recruitment Protocol for Collecting Survivor
           Data via Disclosure Recipient Referrals

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      Authors: Sarah E. Ullman, Emily A. Waterman, Katie M. Edwards, Jania Marshall, Christina M. Dardis, Lindsey M. Rodriguez, Emily R. Dworkin
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      The current arricle describes a novel recruitment protocol for collecting data from sexual assault and intimate partner violence survivors referred to research studies by individuals to whom they had previously disclosed. Challenges in both recruiting participants and interpreting data are described. Only 35.8% of cases had usable data for both survivors and disclosure recipients, suggesting that this referral method had limited success in recruiting matched pairs. Suggestions for modifications to improve the protocol for future research are offered. Potential advantages and drawbacks of various methods for recruiting dyads are described in order to facilitate future research on survivors’ disclosure processes, social reactions, and the influence of social reactions on survivor recovery.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-01-11T03:56:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012211070610
       
  • Athlete Multiple Perpetrator Rape (MPR) as Interactional and
           Organizational Deviance: Heuristic Insights from a Multilevel Framework

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      Authors: James E. Sutton
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Although athlete multiple perpetrator rape (MPR) has frequently been covered in the media, it has received more limited scholarly attention. Accordingly, I synthesize findings from multiple disciplines and integrate insights from the MPR, institutional betrayal, and organizational deviance literatures to establish a heuristic framework for understanding athlete MPR. I ultimately argue that athlete MPR is both an act of interactional deviance and an act of organizational deviance. This undertaking represents one of the only works to focus explicitly on athlete MPR. It is additionally the first to examine any form of sexual assault through an organizational deviance lens.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-01-05T06:33:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012211070312
       
  • The Value and Validity of Self-Reported Survey Data on the Rape
           Experiences of College Students

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Christopher Krebs, Christine H. Lindquist, Lynn Langton, Marcus Berzofsky, Michael Planty, Nakisa S. Asefnia, Bonnie E. Shook-Sa, Kimberly Peterson, Jessica Stroop
      First page: 1911
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      Self-reported survey data on the extent and nature of rape and sexual assault experienced by a population represent an important source of information because these crimes often go unreported, and are thus undercounted in law enforcement or other official statistics. This article compares Campus Climate Survey Validation Study (CCSVS) data to Clery Act data in an effort to (1) assess the validity of the CCSVS data and the Clery Act data based on the extent to which they corroborate one another, and (2) estimate the extent to which Clery Act data potentially underestimate the true incidence of rape. The results help to establish the extent to which self-report surveys on sexual victimization are needed to understand the magnitude of the problem among a given population.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-02-21T05:32:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221079372
       
  • Intimate Partner Violence Against Women During the COVID-19 Lockdown in
           Italy: A Multicenter Survey Involving Anti-Violence Centers

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      Authors: Patrizia Romito, Martina Pellegrini, Marie-Josèphe Saurel-Cubizolles
      First page: 2186
      Abstract: Violence Against Women, Ahead of Print.
      This study explores intimate partner violence (IPV) evolution during the lockdown with a sample of 238 women (44% cohabitating and 56% not cohabitating with the perpetrator), attending five antiviolence centers in Italy (June–September 2020). Questions included 12 items on IPV and, for each item, a question about whether violence increased/stayed the same/decreased during lockdown; an indicator of IPV modifications was constructed. Two distinct patterns, confirmed after adjustment for socio-demographic factors, emerged: IPV increased for 28% of cohabitating and decreased for 56% of non-cohabitating women. Such results suggest the efficacy of physical distancing—strictly controlled by the State—in the prevention of IPV.
      Citation: Violence Against Women
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T02:01:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10778012221079374
       
 
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