Subjects -> BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (Total: 3830 journals)
    - ACCOUNTING (134 journals)
    - BANKING AND FINANCE (330 journals)
    - BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (1409 journals)
    - CONSUMER EDUCATION AND PROTECTION (20 journals)
    - COOPERATIVES (4 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SCIENCES: GENERAL (231 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SYSTEMS, THEORIES AND HISTORY (255 journals)
    - FASHION AND CONSUMER TRENDS (20 journals)
    - HUMAN RESOURCES (103 journals)
    - INSURANCE (26 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE (146 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND AID (103 journals)
    - INVESTMENTS (22 journals)
    - LABOR AND INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS (71 journals)
    - MACROECONOMICS (17 journals)
    - MANAGEMENT (631 journals)
    - MARKETING AND PURCHASING (116 journals)
    - MICROECONOMICS (23 journals)
    - PRODUCTION OF GOODS AND SERVICES (125 journals)
    - PUBLIC FINANCE, TAXATION (42 journals)
    - TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL DIRECTORIES (2 journals)

HUMAN RESOURCES (103 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 101 of 101 Journals sorted alphabetically
Accounting and Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Accounting and the Public Interest     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Accounting Auditing & Accountability Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Accounting Education: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Afro-Asian Journal of Finance and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Finance and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 48)
Asia Pacific Journal of Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 331)
Asian Review of Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Attachment & Human Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Australian Accounting Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
British Accounting Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Burnout Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Coaching : Theorie & Praxis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Contemporary Accounting Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Corporate Governance and Organizational Behavior Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Critical Perspectives on Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
EURO Journal on Decision Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
European Accounting Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
European Journal of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Evidence-based HRM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
FOR Rivista per la formazione     Full-text available via subscription  
German Journal of Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
HR Future     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Human Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Human Resource and Organization Development Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Human Resource Development International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Human Resource Development Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Human Resource Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 90)
Human Resource Management Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 85)
Human Resource Management Research     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Human Resource Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Human Resource Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intangible Capital     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Accounting and Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Accounting Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Accounting, Auditing and Performance Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Banking, Accounting and Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Behavioural Accounting and Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Critical Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Economics and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Ethics and Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Human Capital and Information Technology Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
International Journal of Human Resource Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Human Resources Development and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
International Journal of Management Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Management Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Accounting and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Journal of Accounting and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Accounting Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Accounting Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Chinese Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Contemporary Accounting & Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Corporate Citizenship     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Enterprising Communities People and Places in the Global Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of HR intelligence     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Human Capital     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Human Development and Capabilities : A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Human Resource and Sustainability Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Human Resource Costing & Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Human Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of International Accounting, Auditing and Taxation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Marketing and HR     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Organizational Effectiveness : People and Performance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Professions and Organization     Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Service Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Kelaniya Journal of Human Resource Management     Open Access  
New Horizons in Adult Education and Human Resource Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
NHRD Network Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Open Journal of Leadership     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 76)
Pacific Accounting Review     Hybrid Journal  
Personality and Individual Differences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Personnel Assessment and Decisions     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Personnel Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Professions and Professionalism     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Psychologie du Travail et des Organisations     Hybrid Journal  
Public Personnel Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Quarterly National Accounts - Comptes nationaux trimestriels     Full-text available via subscription  
Research in Accounting Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Research in Human Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Review of Accounting Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Review of Public Personnel Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Revista Gestión de las Personas y Tecnología     Open Access  
Revista Portuguesa e Brasileira de Gestão     Open Access  
South Asian Journal of Human Resources Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Southern African Journal of Accountability and Auditing Research     Full-text available via subscription  
Sri Lankan Journal of Human Resource Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Strategic HR Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Enterprising Communities People and Places in the Global Economy
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.281
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 1  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 2 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 1750-6204 - ISSN (Online) 1750-6212
Published by Emerald Homepage  [362 journals]
  • Service innovation in the hotel industry: the dynamic capabilities view
    • Authors: Babak Ziyae, Hossein Sadeghi, Maryam Golmohammadi
      Abstract: Consistent with the dynamic capabilities view tenets, this paper aims to conceptualize a theoretical framework of service innovation in the hotel industry. This study uses a qualitative method with a content analysis approach. The data were collected using a snowball sampling method and semi-structured interviews with 14 experts in Tehran's hotel industry. The findings demonstrate that the most significant factors are using the new technology, keeping up with it, training human labor, being up-to-date and adopting new infrastructures. Results also reveal that improper management and lack of knowledge are the most critical factors behind service innovation failure in the hotel industry. Regarding the infrastructures needed to develop service innovation in the hotel industry, the results show that adopting the newest technology in diverse aspects, human infrastructure, the capital and appropriate space and place are the key factors. This paper contributes to the literature by linking the service innovation perspective to the dynamic capabilities view. It explains how hotels can enhance service innovation to gain a competitive advantage. Therefore, both academicians and hoteliers can develop action plans by selecting and managing the service innovation process.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-04-09
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-12-2020-0205
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • How kinship resources alleviate structural disadvantage: self-employment
           duration among refugees and labor migrants

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Aliaksei Kazlou, Karl Wennberg
      Abstract: Economic integration of refugees remains a challenge for developed countries. Although refugees differ greatly from labor migrants in available resources and motivation toward self-employment, prevailing studies on minority and ethnic entrepreneurship tend to lump these different categories of migrants together. Based on theories of migrants’ economic embeddedness, the purpose of this paper is to analyze the extent to which family- and kinship-based resources affect self-employment duration among refugees and labor migrants. Based on Cox regression models, this longitudinal study estimates the self-employment duration of 10,519 refugees and 2,503 labor migrants starting businesses in Sweden in the period 2006–2012. Results reveal that while refugees are at a disadvantage to labor migrants in terms of self-employment duration, their higher level of family embeddedness in part helps them overcome these disadvantages. For refugees but not for labor migrants, co-location in an ethnic enclave also lowers the risk of them becoming unemployed after a spell in entrepreneurship. This original paper provides empirical and theoretical contributions to research on migrants’ self-employment success. It also discusses contributions for research on entrepreneurs’ social embeddedness and refugees’ entrepreneurship.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-04-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-03-2020-0025
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • Family across borders social capital and diaspora entrepreneurial
           preparedness

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Eva Karayianni, Elias Hadjielias, Loukas Glyptis
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to study the way in which family ties influence the entrepreneurial preparedness of the diaspora family business owner. In-depth interviews were carried out with 15 Cypriot family business owners hosted in various countries. The paper draws on social capital theory and uses an abductive analytical approach. The findings of this paper illustrate that family ties coming from the family across borders play a significant role for diaspora family business owners’ entrepreneurial preparedness. Hidden values deriving from the interpersonal relationships within the family across borders drive the diaspora family business owners to learn upon self-reflection and become entrepreneurially prepared, led by both urgency and esteem. This study provides practical implications for the entrepreneurial preparedness of diaspora family business owners and those who wish to become family business owners in a diaspora context. This study contributes theoretically through the conceptualization of “family across borders social capital” and “diaspora entrepreneurial preparedness”. It also contributes empirically to the fields of diaspora family business, entrepreneurial learning and diaspora entrepreneurship through new knowledge regarding the role of family across borders social capital in the entrepreneurial preparedness of the diaspora family business owner.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-04-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-03-2020-0030
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • Does family involvement help small migrant businesses survive' A
           closer examination of family in migrant entrepreneurship
    • Authors: Zonghui Li, Douglas Johansen
      Abstract: Drawing on the resource-based view, this study aims to examine how family involvement in migrant-founded small businesses gives rise to distinctive resources that help these businesses survive. Using microdata from the 2007 US survey of business owners (SBO), this study uses logit regression modeling to test the hypothesized relationships. Results show that small businesses founded by migrant entrepreneurs are less likely to survive and that family involvement weakens the negative relationship between founder migrant status and business survivability. In addition, the positive moderating effect associated with family involvement is further strengthened by the use of external/borrowing startup capital, thus migrant families founded small businesses with access to external capital have the highest probability of survival. This study contributes to the literature on both migrant entrepreneurship and family business. This paper finds family involvement in the business, interacting with the founder’s migrant status, tends to create distinctive resource endowments that help to compensate for the resource constraints associated with migrant entrepreneurs. Such resource endowments may take the form of high levels of solidarity among migrant family members and the spanning role of the migrant kinship networks extended from the country of origin to the country of residence.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-04-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-03-2020-0031
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • Digital transformation in West Africa: a two country, two-sector analysis
    • Authors: Nnamdi O. Madichie, Elvira Bolat, Nasiru Taura
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to explore opportunities and challenges of accelerating digital entrepreneurship development in key economic growth sectors in West Africa. The study uses case illustrations from the media and agriculture sectors to highlight some of the opportunities and challenges that have shaped current business practices in this digital space in West Africa. Technological infrastructure featured as one of the main challenges for fostering success in the media-tech cases and perhaps linked to the low internet penetration rates. Likewise, infrastructure proved to be a challenge in the agri-tech sector cases. This study highlights the importance of partnerships within the entrepreneurship ecosystems as a critical condition for ensuring positive benefits for all stakeholders within the entrepreneurial ecosystem taken from the lens of West Africa.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-04-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-06-2020-0114
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • Rural women characteristics and sustainable entrepreneurial intention: a
           road to economic growth in Bangladesh
    • Authors: Mohammad Rashed Hasan Polas, Valliappan Raju, Md Muhibbullah, Mosab I. Tabash
      Abstract: This study aims to provide a better understanding of the individual-level factors that affect rural women’s sustainable entrepreneurial intention in starting and running a business in Bangladesh and contributing to national economic growth. Data from a sample of 297 rural Bangladeshi women were analysed using a quantitative approach with Smart PLS 3.0 (SEM) and SPSS V25. This was to explore the direct influence of perceived capability, social perception and individual competencies on women’s intention to become sustainable entrepreneurs. The indirect consequences of these three variables on perceived opportunity were also evaluated. The studies confirmed a positive and significant association between perceived capability and social perception with the intention to become a sustainable entrepreneur. There is no conventional connection between women’s individual competencies and their intention to become an entrepreneur. Moreover, the data confirmed that perceived opportunity mediates the relationship between perceived capability and individual competencies with the intention to become an entrepreneur. However, no mediation role of perceived opportunity in the relationship between social perception and intention was found. This study is one of very few to explore through empirical analysis the relationship between women’s individual characteristics and their intention to become sustainable entrepreneurs and to investigate whether rural women are motivated to become empowered to contribute to economic development through sustainable entrepreneurial intention.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-04-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-10-2020-0183
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • Transforming higher education in Ghana in times of disruption: flexible
           learning in rural communities with high latency internet connectivity
    • Authors: Harry Barton Essel, Dimitrios Vlachopoulos, Dickson Adom, Akosua Tachie-Menson
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to explore the characteristics and potential effects of teaching and learning through audio teleconferencing (dial-in) with a cell phone. In addition, the study aims to identify the associations between the audio teleconferencing and video teleconferencing in a 12-week postgraduate course. The study is a cross-sectional survey conducted at the Department of Educational Innovations at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology from March to June 2020. The purposive sampling technique was used to sample 100 postgraduate students who registered for a course in the department. The data for the study were collected using the System Usability Scale (SUS) and 17-item self-administered eQuestionnaire. Multiple Linear Regression analysis, ANOVA, Independent sample T-test and Mann–Whitney U-test were used to estimate the differences in course achievements of students who experienced education through audio teleconferencing and those who experienced education through video teleconferencing. In total, 59% of the participating postgraduate students chose to attend the synchronous online lectures via audio teleconferencing (dial-in). The participants gave a high SUS score (SUS > 80.3; Grade A; Excellent) for audio conferencing service. Among the students in the audio teleconferencing cohort, the results evidenced a strong positive linear correlation, (r (57) = 0.79, p 
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-04-07
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-08-2020-0151
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • Interactive radio, social network sites and development in Africa: a
           literature review study
    • Authors: Marcos Komodromos
      Abstract: The technology determinism theory facilitated in assessing the impact of interactive radio and social network sites (SNSs) on development factors such as education, agriculture, health, and governance, by conducting an integrative and comprehensive literature review focusing on African countries. This paper aims to conduct this literature review to provide comprehensive empirical evidence on the impact of interactive radio and SNSs on development in Africa. This study examined articles that were retrieved from online databases including EBSCOhost, Elsevier, Science Direct, SAGE Journals, Springer and Wiley Online Library. The keywords used included interactive radio, radio, development in Africa, SNS, agriculture, education, health, peace and governance. Search phrases were formulated using boolean operators “AND” and “OR.” Study results revealed that interactive radio and SNSs improve knowledge among farmers and allow the dissemination of information on innovative agricultural techniques, which supports the adoption of sustainable practices. Interactive radio promotes political accountability because the strategies provide the voiceless and powerless communities with a platform to express themselves. This paper discovers that the incorporation of SNS with existing multimedia communication facilitates the dissemination of health-related information on illnesses such as Ebola, HIV, hypertension, diabetes and Polio, and interactive radio and SNS promote education among marginalized communities and under-served rural schools. The findings on the impact of interactive radio and SNSs do not represent all 54 countries in Africa. Although the studies included in this literature review were conducted in several countries such as South Africa, Nigeria, Somalia, Kenya, Malawi, Ghana, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia, this limited the generalizability of the findings and recommendations. Also, the other potential limitation is that using the inclusion-exclusion criteria could have resulted in bias when selecting the studies to include in the review. The paper might serve as a valuable source of information for students, academics and entrepreneurs where the impact of interactive radio and SNSs on agriculture, education, health and governance, which are core determinants of development in Africa, has been assessed for further case studies in this area. The use of interactive radio has helped in decreasing health issues caused by a deficiency in vitamin A among children in sub-Saharan Africa. The development of sustainable and effective interactive radio programs is dependent on the collaboration of the core stakeholders such as governmental ministries, donor organizations and the mass communication sector. Numerous open sources on technology radio stations are available to employ social media managers to help in the application of knowledge.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-04-05
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-06-2020-0111
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • Constraints to participation in the management of cooperative societies:
           insights for women in Awka community
    • Authors: Stellamaris Ifunanya Aju, Oluyemi Theophilus Adeosun
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to explore women’s participation in cooperative societies and the constraints in attaining management positions. Despite the importance of gender equality as a tool for national economic growth gaining prominent attention, women’s access to leadership and decision-making in cooperative societies remains under-researched. This study hinges on management and gender theories and systematic literature reviews. This study used a descriptive survey research design for primary data derived from a purposive non-random sampling technique that selected seven (7) active cooperative societies in Awka-South Local Government Area of Anambra State. Structured questionnaires were administered to the selected sample of 129 members. The hypotheses were analyzed using the T-test statistical model. This study revealed that social, legal, economic and cultural constraints affected women’s participation in cooperative societies in Awka, Anambra State. Also, that the African-based culture and family traditions, patriarchal societal system, household responsibilities and homemaker roles, religious associations, certain strict cooperative entry requirements, limitation on women’s access to resources and low paid wages and non-participatory training activities constrained the women. Therefore, the authors recommended that cooperatives should institute measures to encourage an increase in women members’ participation at the committee level and build their capacity own economic resources. This paper focuses on barriers that inhibit women’s participation in cooperative societies with a particular focus on their opportunities and outcomes.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-04-05
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-08-2020-0146
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • Women entrepreneurship and sustainable development: select case studies
           from the sustainable energy sector
    • Authors: Ritika Mahajan, Kaushik Ranjan Bandyopadhyay
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, it discusses the role of entrepreneurship, in general, and women entrepreneurship, in particular, in advancing the cause of sustainable development. Future research directions that emerge from the body of knowledge that the paper relied upon have been identified. Second, it presents unique cases of eight women-led enterprises in energy sector spread across three continents, namely, Asia, Africa and the USA; identifies the constraints and opportunities, analyses the business models and their impact on the quality of life pointers to demonstrate the role of women-led enterprises in sustainable development. The paper combines a schematic review of literature at the interface of entrepreneurship and sustainable development coupled with select relevant case studies addressing the interface. The real-life case studies, which are consciously chosen and compiled from secondary data sources, complement and testify the insights drawn from the schematic literature review. The framework for analyzing the case studies is designed around multidimensional drivers and factors that steer the women-led enterprises. The paper identified the need to look at entrepreneurship through the gendered lens not only for studying entrepreneurship as a discipline, in general, but also to gauge whether the inclusion of women as entrepreneurs is actually advancing the cause of sustainable development. Besides analyzing real-life case studies of accomplished women entrepreneurs to gauge their motivations and mindsets, the process of identification of pain points, identifying differentiating and innovative features, or studying the impact on society, economy and environment, the paper eventually created a schematic framework of key enablers, constraints and strategic response of women entrepreneurs. Given the dearth of adequate theoretical and empirical contributions on the study of effectuation, mindsets and drivers of how women entrepreneurship steers the process of sustainable development, the paper is an endeavour in that direction.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-03-17
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-11-2020-0184
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • Socio-cultural web and environmentally-driven community entrepreneurship:
           a portrayal of Abia Ohafia community in South-Eastern Nigeria
    • Authors: Ebere Ume Kalu, Leo-Paul Dana
      Abstract: This study is aimed at providing a deduction on the necessity of social and cultural capital for entrepreneurial outcomes on a community-wide scale. There is a drift from an individualised form of entrepreneurship to community-based entrepreneurship with a grand focus on social needs of current and emergent nature. This study is both archival and exploratory and has pictured culture and communality as drivers that are needful for enterprising communities. This paper finds communality, social network, social capital and trust as push-factors for community-based entrepreneurship and development drives. This study is an original exposé on the Abia Ohafia community’s Model of community-based entrepreneurship which thrives on strong institutions (like the Age Grade System) and age-long practices that have built trust and stability. This local community through its networks, culture and communalities creates relationships, rational innovation, consensual leadership and participatory followership under which resources, opportunities and solutions are deliberately advanced for meeting social and community purposes.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-03-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-12-2020-0211
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • Role of ICT in emancipation of digital entrepreneurship among new
           generation women
    • Authors: Anuja Shukla, Priyanka Kushwah, Eti Jain, Shiv Kumar Sharma
      Abstract: The role of information and communications technology (ICT) has been tested in various contexts of online shopping and the results show that ICT has successfully transformed the way of doing business. This study aims to propose that if women have adequate internet skills, namely, operative, informational and creative skills, their entrepreneurial intentions will be high. This is descriptive research. The data was collected from 246 university students and analyzed using PLS-SEM. The results of the study show that students belonging to entrepreneurial backgrounds have a positive attitude toward entrepreneurship. The impact of internet skills was mixed on the relationship of entrepreneurial attitude and entrepreneurial intention. The sample was not generalized as the sample consisted of urban and internet-using women. Future research can test the model for rural women entrepreneurs or usage of m-commerce for the same. The results of the study show that women having the skills to operate the internet have higher intentions to become an entrepreneur. Thus, the e-commerce web-space can use the results to influence women of the new generation to use available tools in their journey of entrepreneurship. Women are an indispensable part of society. Empowering them will not only improve their confidence but will also strengthen the pillars of society. Extensive research work has been done in the context of women entrepreneurship. The study is a novel attempt to test the effects of internet skills on entrepreneurial intention among new generation women. The results will be very much useful for future research and will extend the body of academic literature.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-03-05
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-04-2020-0071
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • Supply chain risks, technological and digital challenges facing grocery
           retailers in South Africa
    • Authors: Progress Hove-Sibanda, Marumo Matshidiso, Paul Agu Igwe
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to examine the risks, innovations and technological enablers or barriers to the efficiency of the supply chain risk management (SCRM) implementation in the retail sector of South Africa. This study applied a qualitative research approach by conducting interviews with grocery retail store managers. Through convenience sampling, 12 representatives from 12 stores (1 representative per store was interviewed at each of the 12 stores) were interviewed. This study mainly found that most of the grocery retail stores experience late deliveries, damaged stock, theft, high fuel costs and expired stock from their respective suppliers. It was found that firms are faced with similar supply chain risks. In addition, innovations and technologies such as the internet of things (IoT) and social media are making an impact in wider industrial change. Adaptation of efficient and effective SCRM has had implications for practice related to improvements in the retail stores’ supply chain, the profitability of retail stores, marketing, promotions and consumer experiences. This study is unique as it provides new insight into variables that affects the quality of service in the retail sector; customer service in the retail sector; innovations and technology help mitigate SCRM experienced in the retail sector from a developing country perspective.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-03-05
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-05-2020-0104
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • CEO gender, power and bank performance: evidence from Chinese banks
    • Authors: Hsiu-I Ting
      Abstract: This study aims to investigate the relations between CEO gender, power and bank performance. First, this study examines the relation between CEO gender and power. Do female CEOs possess less power than male CEOs' As women reach the top, do they hold similar or even higher levels of power as men' Second, this study investigates the relation between the CEO gender and bank performance. How do female CEOs perform' Is the relation between gender and performance subject to CEO power' This study uses the following three performance measures: ROA, pre-tax ROA and pre-provision profit over assets. This study follows Finkelstein’s (1992) classifications and adopt five variables to measure the four dimensions of CEO power: duality and compensation share measure structural power; ownership captures ownership power; number of functional areas measures the power of expertise; and elite education captures prestige power. Logit model, ordinary least squares regression and quantile regression methods are used in the analysis. In a sample of Chinese banks, female CEOs are found to have similar power and performance as male CEOs. As women reach the top, they hold higher ownership and greater prestige power than men. Female CEOs even outperform male CEOs in non-state dominated banks. Female CEOs show their impact through their power: those with higher compensation shares or greater power are positively related to bank performance. Overall, the results show that as women reach the top, they hold a higher level of power than men. As females break through the glass ceiling, they perform better than males. Moreover, female CEOs show their impact through their power. Female CEOs who overcome the barriers are less traditional and more self-directed than their peers.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-03-01
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-04-2020-0065
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • An Islamic perspective of agripreneurs motivation
    • Authors: Khairul Hidayatullah Basir, Siti Fatimahwati Pehin Dato Musa
      Abstract: This paper aims to provide an understanding of agripreneurs motivation from the Islamic perspective. The objective of this paper is to explore the proposition that motivations to become agripreneurs is directly influenced by religious intentions and Islamic values, which would indirectly have an effect on entrepreneurial behaviour. An exploratory qualitative approach was used to capture the respondents’ Islamic values and intentions, which motivate them to become agripreneurs. In-depth face-to-face interviewing technique was adopted whereby the respondents were asked to share their thoughts, views and understanding of the issues presented. A sample of five Muslim agripreneurs were interviewed for this study. The study found that Islam plays a significant role in influencing the agripreneurs entrepreneurial motivation. Their entrepreneurial behaviour is also underpinned by some Islamic values, which have a positive impact on their mindsets and the growth of their businesses; such as having utmost faith in Allah (taqwa) and believing that Allah is the sole provider, makes them fearless in the business environment and results in a healthy competition amongst agripreneurs. The study has several limitations. Firstly, the study is based on a small sample of five Muslim agripreneurs who are willing to be interviewed in a specific Islamic environment such as Brunei. Thus, the findings cannot be generalised and may not be a true reflection of all Islamic countries and to Muslims residing in countries in which they are not the majority. Secondly, cultural differences within a country may influence the attitude towards entrepreneurship and entrepreneurship intentions. As this study focusses on Brunei, which is based on Malay Islamic Monarchy, the motivations might be different in other countries because of the cultural differences. Thirdly, agriculture types in this study are limited. Finally, the methodology is purely qualitative. The findings may assist the government to devise strategies and policies to attract more youth into agriculture particularly in creating a supportive environment for the farmers. The findings of this paper have shown that their Islamic motivations and values result in a more socially responsible entrepreneur in shaping the economy and community at large and more importantly, it also brings them closer to Allah. This paper highlights the role of Islam in influencing and motivating the respondents to become agripreneurs and persevere in the challenging business environment.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-02-26
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-08-2020-0147
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • Diffusion of innovations and labor market challenges: a multiple case
           study from Angola
    • Authors: Édney Santos, Daphne Halkias
      Abstract: The purpose of this qualitative multiple case study was to gain a deeper understanding of the views of stakeholders residing within impoverished communities in Angola on rapid technology diffusion and its implication on labor market challenges within their regions. To address this gap, and consistent with the qualitative paradigm, this paper conducted methodological triangulation of the study’s multiple data sources, including semistructured interviews and archival data in the form of government labor reports, reflective field notes and archival data to establish the trustworthiness of the study’s data analysis and findings. A gap in the literature exists between the general diffusion of technological innovations and socioeconomic development that results in an ambiguous connection between theory, academia and professional practice among sub-Saharan African countries. To inform governments in developing countries on how to effectively achieve the diffusion of innovations (DoI), this integrative literature review supports a broader qualitative multiple case study that offers insights into the views of stakeholders residing within impoverished communities in Angola, on rapid technology diffusion and its implication for labor market challenges. This overview of existing research offers a targeted knowledge base that can support future research and help promote the potential for socioeconomic development in low-income countries. By addressing the patterns of the relationship between various economic imbalances and the adoption of technology that promote the social divide, along with highlighting the importance of understanding the overall technological dualism between various social groups, promises effective policies for successful DoI in impoverished sub-Saharan African regions by evaluating its impact on local labor market challenges. The results of this multiple case study research oversee a thematic analysis of the data collected based on the study’s multiple sources, following a cross-case analysis in which this paper synthesizes the findings of the initial thematic analysis of data to answer the study’s central research question. The multiple case study approach in this research follows the concept of replication logic discussed by Yin (2017) in which the same findings are replicated across multiple cases as similarities and differences are traced across cases, and the study results obtained in this way are deemed robust and reliable. A potential key limitation in this study was associated to the participants’ limited experiences about the study’s central phenomenon, which if inadequate, could not have been reflective of the challenges faced and shared by the target population. This study mitigates the limitation with an observation in which a much sharper understanding of the participants’ knowledge about the topic of interest was developed. Another limitation was the sample size that could have been small and may not be representative of the entire population. This study mitigates the limitation through careful interpretation of the data and strong conclusion of results. For practical implications, this study emphasized the importance of participative approaches to ICT implementation that if well adapted by policymakers could lead to a more contextually anchored ICT-supported poverty alleviation within different dimensions of poverty. This study addresses an under-researched area on why innovation policy initiatives calling for technology diffusion in Angola continue to stall rather than combating labor market challenges in impoverished communities. This study brings the voices of local populations on technology diffusion in impoverished regions of Angola to the extant literature, launching the development of a body of knowledge that may point the way to a promising avenue of social change through innovation and technology diffusion. This research is original and significant in that it addresses an under-researched area on innovation policy initiatives calling for technology diffusion in Angola that continue to stall rather than combating labor market challenges in impoverished communities. This study also makes an original contribution to Rogers’s seminal theory and concept of diffusion of innovations. The study’s results guided further research in technology adoption and innovation diffusion within Angola, a nation faced with poor human capital development and an increasing proportion of the world’s poorest people and unemployment.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-02-26
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-12-2020-0198
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • Customer perception of adoption and use of digital financial services and
           mobile money services in Uganda
    • Authors: Tapiwanashe James Museba, Edmore Ranganai, Gianfranco Gianfrate
      Abstract: This paper aims to investigate the impact of fintech, mobile money and digital financial services in Uganda and factors impacting adoption of the services. The study will also determine their social impact through financial inclusion in the Ugandan market. This study covers the adoption and use of fintech, mobile money and digital financial services in Uganda. A case study approach was used through a survey questionnaire for 400 randomly selected participants within the Kampala region. Questionnaire was designed to measure customer perception of digital financial services and adoption including mobile money and agency banking. The adoption of mobile money services is driven by mobile devices penetration and the need for access to financial products and services for the unbanked. Results support CGAP (2013) that observed that mobile money adoption was based on two key variables: social network and social interactions of the customer and a segment of customers who can be described as mobile technology leaders (early adopters). There has been positive impact on person to person transfers, grocery payments and mobile money providers have to continue to simplify the access to financial services and bring convenience to the bottom of the pyramid. And mobile money positively impacts sustainable developmental goals covering Gender Equality (SDG5), SDG 8 – Decent Work and Economic Growth; expanding financial inclusion through mobile money and SDG 10 – Reduce Inequalities. This study has limitations commonly prevalent with qualitative research, including the small size limited to Kampala and challenges of making generalisations beyond this context. The paper might serve as a valuable source of information for government and fintech companies in developing the digital financial services ecosystem as well as for students and academics for further case studies in this area. This paper serves as one of the first qualitative research papers concerning mobile money and digital financial services adoption, solely focused on Uganda. Its value is in its showcasing of the importance of mobile money among customers in emerging markets.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-02-22
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-07-2020-0127
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • A deplorable community in Bangladesh: tea garden workers
    • Authors: Md. Saidur Rahaman, Syed Muhammod Ali Reza, Md. Mizanur Rahman, Md. Solaiman Chowdhury
      Abstract: Throughout history, tea garden workers are treated as slaves of employers and live an inhuman life in modern society. This paper aims to provide an account of the deplorable community (workers) of the tea garden in Bangladesh. The authors used a mixed-method research approach to conduct this study. In the first stage, using a semi-structured questionnaire, Focus group discussions (FGDs) were done by forming two groups from two districts to get a clear picture of the tea garden workers’ living standards in Bangladesh. Based on the findings of the FGD, the researchers prepared a structured questionnaire containing the basic elements of their quality of work life. In this stage, the authors collected the information from 200 tea workers about their quality of work life. The major finding showed that the overall country’s economy is booming because of tea workers’ contributions, but their economic conditions gradually become impoverished. The workers’ are living with colossal poverty and vulnerability. Besides, the workers are supposed to get fundamental rights, including food, clothing, shelter, education and health, but the higher authorities were found indifferent to take the necessary initiative to implement these rights. The data was collected only from the tea garden workers. This study excluded any other parties (trade union leaders, panchayats, garden managers and owners). Thus, it is suggested that the researchers should conduct a similar study covering the opinion, including all the parties. Both the workers and the higher authorities of the tea garden might benefit from this study’s findings. Workers will be more aware of their basic rights. The authorities can also prepare some effective policies to improve the overall quality of life of the tea workers. To the best knowledge of the authors, this is the first study on tea garden workers’ inhuman life in Bangladesh in the entire emerald insight publishers.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-02-15
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-10-2020-0176
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • Meritocracy, personality traits and recruitment: some insights from the
           Qatari enterprising community
    • Authors: AbdulWahab Esmaeel Baroun
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to provide a picture on the impact of the meritocracy and personality traits on the recruitment process in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in the State of Qatar. The study used ADANCO software for carrying a structural equation modelling analysis and for descriptive statistics. The findings showed that meritocracy and personality traits had an impact on recruitment process. In addition, meritocracy showed to be more important than personality traits in the recruitment process. This research is conducted only in one country, i.e. the State of Qatar, and findings cannot be generalised for other countries in the Gulf Cooperation Council and abroad. Extending this research in other countries and comparing the findings will help create a better portray on the role of meritocracy and personality traits on the recruitment process. This paper will help the Qatari and other SMEs owners to use a more comprehensive approach during the recruitment of their employees, considering that the process of recruitment plays an important role within the overall human resource management. Recruiting the right people has become an extremely daunting mission for SMEs, given that competition for talent is increasingly becoming a very tough and uncompromising issue. To the best of the author’s knowledge, this is the only paper that has researched the role of meritocracy and personality traits on the recruitment process in the SMEs in the State of Qatar and abroad. Separate studies were conducted that treat the impact of meritocracy and personality on recruiting the right person(s) for the company, but none treated these aspects together in one single paper.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-02-15
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-12-2020-0216
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • Examining network characteristic dynamics of kinship-based families on
           performance within Indonesian SMEs
    • Authors: Hardo Firmana Given Grace Manik, Nurul Indarti, Andy Susilo Lukito-Budi
      Abstract: This study aims to examine the moderating effect of firm age and size on the relationship between network characteristics (network centrality, network density and tie strength) and firm performance. This study also aims to investigate the difference in the effect of network characteristics on the firm performance of Javanese and Minang ethnic enterprises. An explanatory research design was adopted, which involved a survey in the form of a structured questionnaire of target owners and managers of 34 Javanese ethnic enterprises in North Sumatra, Indonesia and 100 Minang ethnic enterprises in Yogyakarta, Central Java, Jakarta and Bogor, Indonesia. The data is analysed using structural equation modelling. The findings of this study confirm resource dependency and social capital theory. Network centrality, network density and tie strength have a significant effect on firm performance. The results also show support for the moderating role of firm age on the relationship between network characteristics and firm performance. The moderating role of firm size is not supported. The comparative test of the influence of the three network characteristics on ethnic enterprise performance confirms that Javanese ethnic enterprises have identity-based networks, while Minang ethnic enterprises use calculative-based networks. The originality of this study lies in the investigation of the role of family and external partners in the running of ethnic enterprises at start-up and during the growth phase. The definition of “family” is based on a kinship perspective due to the specificity of Asian cultures, particularly in Indonesia. Of the hundreds of tribes in Indonesia, the Javanese and Minang were chosen because both are well-known as entrepreneurial tribes, have unique cultural values and have active migrants to other provinces.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-02-11
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-03-2020-0021
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • Challenges and enablers of women entrepreneurs’ career advancement in
           Vietnam’s coffee industry
    • Authors: Giang NT Nguyen, Thinh Gia Hoang, Tam Minh Nguyen, Thanh Thien Ngo
      Abstract: This paper aims to explore the motivational factors and contextual facilitators of female entrepreneurs in Vietnam’s coffee industry and also the barriers facing them. This study adopts the grounded theory approach, using semi-structured in-depth interviews with 31 women entrepreneurs in the coffee industry in the rural Central Highlands of Vietnam. This study found that necessity-driven factors play an important role in motivating female entrepreneurs to advance their careers. However, these factors may be transformed into the opportunity-driven motives. Furthermore, the findings suggest that Asia’s collectivism culture and family support significantly affect the success of the women entrepreneurs, although gender inequality is not perceived as a serious constraint in entrepreneurial activities. This study has implications for the literature of women entrepreneurs regarding motivations and contextual influences in agricultural and rural areas of Vietnam. However, the sample size is relatively small which limits the concept generation of the study. For further research, a larger sample size with different business sectors should be considered to generate more explicit findings. The findings from this study can assist the policymakers in developing strategies and governmental policies to support the career advancement of women entrepreneurs and improving gender equality in Vietnam. This study contributes to the literature about understanding the motives and the roles of socioeconomic contexts in women’s entrepreneurial activities in agricultural and rural areas.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-02-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-04-2020-0075
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • Viability of artisanal timber milling: cases from Ghana
    • Authors: Camillus Abawiera Wongnaa, Michael Nyarko, Monica Addison, Dadson Awunyo-Vitor
      Abstract: A key strategy in the policy of saw millers and artisanal millers supplying the domestic market with legal and sustainable lumber is the transformation of chainsaw operators into legal artisanal millers to stop the production of illegal timber and supply only authorized wood to local trade points. The challenge, however, is how to develop the concept of its viability and acceptability to the chainsaw operators. Specifically, existing and potential investors’ knowledge about the possible costs and revenue is non-existent. This study aims to examine the financial and economic viability of the artisanal timber milling (ATM) business in rural Ghana. Using data from three operational artisanal milling companies in Ghana, net present value, internal rate of return, profitability index and payback period were used in analyzing the viability of artisanal timber milling. The results showed that the ATM business is financially and economically viable, attractive and profitable. ATM business has the potential to create more jobs in the timber industry, reduce illegalities in the forestry sector and improve the living standard of individuals used by the sector. As part of ATM’s medium and long-term strategies, the study encourages stakeholders to consider assisting existing and potential actors who have the passion to venture into this business to acquire concessions and financial support from financial institutions.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-02-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-08-2020-0153
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • When simplicity becomes complexity: negotiations between a Mennonite
           enterprising community and the Government of Belize
    • Authors: Carel Roessingh, Michiel Verver
      Abstract: A central theme in the literature on entrepreneurship in remote communities – be they religious, indigenous, rural or migrant communities – is the balance between continuity and change or tradition and modernity and the role of entrepreneurship in maintaining or uprooting this balance. The purpose of this paper is to examine this dynamic in the context of Springfield, a small settlement of Old Order Mennonites in Belize, Central America. This study draws on ethnographic research conducted in the Mennonite settlement of Springfield, Belize, between 2002 and 2019, as well as written correspondence with key stakeholders from Springfield. This paper identifies three issues of contention between the Springfield Mennonites and the Belizean state: the agricultural census issue, the buying land issue and the cow tagging issue. Each of these revolves around state demands for assimilation into (digitalized) administrative systems and Mennonite resistance to these demands based on their religious-moral code. This study describes the negotiations around these issues. The focus in most literature on entrepreneurship in remote communities is on how internal community dynamics shape the balance between continuity and change and, in extension, the space for entrepreneurship. The originality of the paper lies in shifting the focus to the relationship between the community and external stakeholders, especially the state.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-02-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-09-2020-0166
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • Performance of Ghanaian women businesses community: the moderating role of
           social competence
    • Authors: Cynthia Ayorkor Sallah, Livingstone Divine Caesar
      Abstract: This paper aims to investigate the moderating dynamics of social competence in the relationship between intangible resources and the performance of women businesses from an emerging market context. Developed economy literature provides ample evidence of a positive relationship between intangible resources and the performance of women business ventures. Little is known of the complexity of this orthodoxy in developing markets such as Ghana. In particular, this paper investigates the moderating role of social competence in the relationship between intangible resources available to women entrepreneurs and performance. An exploratory sequential mixed method research design was used. First phase involved qualitative data collected through interviews, and the second phase was quantitative data collected from 264 participants. Content analysis and multiple regression analysis were used. Social competence is important to the success of women businesses as it influences the outcome of entrepreneurial interactions and communications. Also, it positively moderated the relationship between organisational reputational capital (RC) and women business growth. On the flip side, it negatively moderated the relationship between human capital, social capital, individual RC and women business growth. To sustainably grow their businesses, women entrepreneurs must ascertain the right level of social competence needed. The utilization of social competence at higher rather than lower levels could mean more costs and more training for which the business may not have immediate use. This paper advocates the need to improve the content of entrepreneurial training packages to include the reinforcement of social competency skills in terms of relationship management as this may be the key to the facilitation of access to resources for innovation and growth.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-02-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-12-2020-0209
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • Digital financial inclusion, informal economy and poverty reduction in
           Africa
    • Authors: Ikechukwu Kelikume
      Abstract: This paper aims to examine the relationship between mobile phones, the internet, financial inclusion, the informal economy and poverty reduction. The study examines the relationship between mobile phones, the internet, financial inclusion, the informal economy and poverty reduction using the system generalized method of moments approach and a panel data set of 42 African countries for the period 1995–2017. The study shows that mobile penetration and internet usage have significant positive relationship with the informal sector. Financial inclusion has significant effects, meaning that increased financial inclusion is associated with a developed informal economy. Also, mobile penetration and internet usage play significant roles in the relationship between financial inclusion and the informal economy. Further, mobile penetration and internet usage have a significant positive relationship with poverty reduction. Similarly, financial inclusion has significant effects, meaning higher financial inclusion is associated with increased poverty reduction. The informal economy also has significant effects, suggesting that the development of the informal economy is associated with poverty reduction. Most importantly, mobile penetration, internet usage and financial inclusion play significant roles in the link between the informal economy and poverty reduction.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-02-04
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-06-2020-0124
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • A new approach to stimulate rural entrepreneurship through village-owned
           enterprises in Indonesia
    • Authors: Ikeu Kania, Grisna Anggadwita, Dini Turipanam Alamanda
      Abstract: Village-owned enterprises, in this study called Badan Usaha Milik Desa (BUMDes), are rural communities economic empowerment program developed by the Indonesian Government to encourage the growth of rural entrepreneurship by using the potential of locally owned resources. However, the implementation and effect of the BUMDes program are questionable. Thus, this study aims to investigate the role of BUMDes in encouraging rural entrepreneurship and strengthening rural economic development. In addition, this study also explores challenges in implementing the BUMDes program. This study uses a qualitative method with a case study approach. Data were obtained through in-depth interviews using purposive sampling techniques to key people in management at five BUMDes in Garut Regency, West Java, Indonesia, which have successfully implemented the BUMDes program. The findings of this study indicate that BUMDes are proven to encourage rural entrepreneurship with the dimensions of exploration and empowerment, capacity building and the support and involvement of all stakeholders. BUMDes were established in accordance with government policies based on the village discussion process as the culture of the Indonesian people by involving elements of the village government, associations and the community. However, the challenges in implementing BUMDes are still faced by managers including implementation and regulatory mismatches, lack of qualified human resources and lack of synergy between the village government and BUMDes. In this study, the development of a local economic empowerment program as a driver of rural entrepreneurship is carried out in the Indonesian context. In addition, based on the unique nature of case studies, making this study can only be implemented in cases that have similar characteristics. Therefore, in the context of other countries, it can be done by modifying the results obtained based on the conditions and potential of each region. Although recognition of entrepreneurship is one of the main determinants of rural economic development, empirical research in this area is relatively rare. Thus, this study adds a new perspective on the BUMDes program as an effort to grow rural entrepreneurship.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-02-04
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-07-2020-0137
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • Does growth enhancement support scheme (GESS) contribute to youth
           development in informal farm entrepreneurship' Evidence from rural
           communities in Nigeria
    • Authors: Joseph Ikechukwu Uduji, Elda Nduka Okolo-Obasi, Simplice Anutechia Asongu
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the impact of a growth enhancement support scheme (GESS) on youth development in informal farm entrepreneurship in Nigeria. Its special focus is to investigate the impact of the GESS on rural youths’ adoption of new technologies needed to sustainably increase food security in Nigeria. This paper adopts a survey research technique, aimed at gathering information from a representative sample of the population, as it is essentially cross-sectional, describing and interpreting the current situation. A total of 800 rural youths were sampled across the six geopolitical zones of Nigeria. The result from the use of a bivariate probit model indicates that the GESS has a significant impact on rural youths’ innovations in farming. This suggests that information and communication technology could provide new opportunities for making farming more interesting and enterprising for rural young people. It implies that while old male and female farmers are less likely to adopt the new farming technologies needed to achieve Nigeria’s agricultural transformation agenda (ATA), a younger generation can help introduce new technologies, while also learning from traditional methods. This research adds to the literature on informal farm entrepreneurship and rural communities’ debate in developing countries. It concludes that engaging youths in GESS should form the foundation of the ATA in Nigeria, which, in turn, would offer adequate combination of new and traditional solution to address the challenges of food insecurity in Sub-Saharan Africa.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-02-01
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-06-2020-0116
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • Financial well-being of Retirees Community in Nigeria
    • Authors: Benard Alkali Soepding, John C. Munene, Dagwom Yohanna Dang
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the financial well-being of often-neglected group in the society. The authors examined the role of risk management and social capital in the financial well-being of the retirees in Nigeria. A quantitative method of research is used with a six-point Likert scale questionnaire. A survey was conducted to 376 retirees from public organizations to determine the perception of their financial well-being in post-retirement era. The sample population is selected using the simple random sampling technique. An exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling are used to analyze the data. The results indicate that both risk management and social capital are significant predictors of retirees’ financial well-being in the Nigeria context. All respondents have a good education background. This study focused on retirees who have worked in public organizations in Nigeria. Thus, it is likely that the results may not be generalized to other settings. The results show that to promote financial well-being among retirees, the focus should be put mainly on individual risk management and maintaining good social capital. The present study is first of its kind that focuses on contributory role of risk management and social capital in influencing the financial well-being of retirees in Nigeria. Findings make a novel contribution to retirees’ financial well-being literature by clarifying the significant role played by risk management and social capital in promoting the financial well-being of retirees in a developing country, specifically in Nigeria.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-01-27
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-09-2020-0170
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • Innovation capabilities of women enterprise in informal settings
    • Authors: Oluyemi Theophilus Adeosun, Ayodele Ibrahim Shittu, Stellamaris Ifunanya Aju
      Abstract: This paper aims to explore how women entrepreneurs in informal settings, especially in the fishing sub-sector in rural communities, relate to different dimensions of innovation. Specifically, this paper examines how women entrepreneurs engage in process, managerial and technological innovations. This paper also examines how they fund their business, develop their products across the value chain innovatively and how it influences their business output and welfare. A face-to-face structured interview was administered among 100 women entrepreneurs in the fishing agriculture sub-sector in the Anam community, Anambra East LGA, in Anambra State. The study uses the multiple logistic regression model, descriptive analysis technique and it is quantitative in approach. The research is situated within the Local Innovation Systems and adopts diffusion innovation theory. The study established the following: level of education and learning capabilities are significant predictors of process innovation capabilities among women-owned enterprise in informal settings; level of education, years of fishing experience and learning capabilities are significant predictors of technological innovation capabilities among women-owned enterprise in informal settings; and level of education is the only significant predictor of management innovation capabilities among women-owned enterprise in informal settings. This paper focuses attention on the issue of innovation by women who operate in the informal sector of the fishing sub-sector in the agricultural value chain with attention for their productivity and welfare.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-01-18
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-04-2020-0063
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • Organic food women entrepreneurs-TISM approach for challenges
    • Authors: Shweta Dahiya, Anupama Panghal, Shilpa Sindhu, Parveen Siwach
      Abstract: Organic food is getting attention these days from consumers and producers, in pursuit of safe and chemical-free food. In India, there is an upsurge in entrepreneurs in the organic food sector, with women entrepreneurs signalling higher numbers. Women entrepreneurs have the potential to contribute significantly to the field of organic food; the only requirement is to address the challenges faced by them. This paper aims to attempt at exploring and modelling the challenges faced by women entrepreneurs in the organic food sector. Significant challenges were identified through literature review, primary data collection and expert opinions. The identified challenges were then modelled through total interpretive structural modelling and fuzzy-matriced impact cruises multiplication applique techniques to give a meaningful contextual relationship. This study identified “poor government support” and “less awareness” amongst the stakeholders, as the most strategic challenges with the highest driving power to influence other challenges. In contrast, “low funding options” and “fewer buyers” emerged as the most dependent challenges for organic food women entrepreneurs in India. The model proposed in the study gives a roadmap for different stakeholders in the food industry to scale up organic food women entrepreneurs in India.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-01-18
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-04-2020-0068
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • Social responsibility approach among universities’ community
    • Authors: Marsela Thanasi-Boçe, Selma Kurtishi-Kastrati
      Abstract: This study aims to explore the extent to which universities in developing countries have adopted social responsibility (SR) and track its implementation. Through content analysis, the study examined the SR activities in 14 universities in Albania and North Macedonia. A framework for assessing SR in universities was developed based on the ISO 26000/2010 standard and the main SR domains relevant to the university context were identified and analysed. A comparison between public and private universities was made and best practices were highlighted. The results showed that the highest scoring domain is organisational governance, while the environment domain scored lowest. No significant differences between public and private universities were identified in the disclosure of the university social responsibility (USR) domains. Domains were assessed based on the online content the universities disclosed and did not consider any unpublished content. The best SR practices are promoted to increase other universities’ level of engagement with the USR approach. The study adds to the contributions in the USR literature by providing a better understanding of the application of USR in developing countries. The developed framework may be used to assess USR engagement in a practical way.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-01-18
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-11-2020-0193
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • Groping environmental sensitivity as an antecedent of environmental
           behavioural intentions through perceived environmental responsibility
    • Authors: Sandeep Singh, Priyanka Sharma, Nameeta Garg, Rajni Bala
      Abstract: This paper aims to study the mediating role of perceived environmental responsibility on the relationship between environmental sensitivity and pro-environmental behavioural intentions. The sample of the study was 256 respondents. The snowball sampling technique was applied to reach the maximum number of respondents. The data was collected with three standardized scales. It was conducted on the general mass in the northern region of India. The hypotheses were tested by applying partial least square structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM). The study exhibits a significant positive effect of environmental sensitivity (ES) on environmental responsibility (ER) and environmental behavioural intentions (EBI). Environmental responsibility has a significant positive effect on environmental behavioural intentions. As expected, environmental responsibility partially mediates the relationship between environmental sensitivity and environmental behaviour intentions. The study has tested the theory-driven hypotheses and confirmed the indirect effect of environmental sensitivity on environmental behavioural intentions. The sample of the study is mixed with various units such as students and professionals. The sample was not represented in any particular section of society. The responses of the respondents were measured at a five-point Likert scale. For better results, the seven-point Likert scale can be better. The study can be replicated in another region of India. Multi-group analysis can be a better scope of research in the future. The model can be compared based on demographic information, region, etc. The government can rectify or make various policies on environmental protection based on the findings. The results can be useful for identifying training needs for the general mass. The study suggests that the government can organize various seminars on specific issues at the general platform. Overall, the study is also useful in policymaking and implementation regarding environmental protection. As per the best of our knowledge, this is the first study exploring a causal link between environmental sensitivity, environmental responsibility and environmental protection conducted in India. The observed mediation effect of the ES on the EBI through ER adds new knowledge on the topic. As per the methodology point of view, the latest guidelines regarding PLS-SEM and mediation are followed, which can be useful for research in the future. Overall, the findings of the study exhibit an important contribution to the academic, methodology and general mass.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-01-13
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-09-2020-0169
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • Role of NGOs in women empowerment: case studies from Uttarakhand, India
    • Authors: Minisha Gupta
      Abstract: Women empowerment is essential for the growth and development of the nation. This study aims to identify the role of non-government organisations (NGOs) in promoting women empowerment through immediate livelihood facilities. Women are creative enough to start their own venture, but they are not able to explore the available opportunities because of male dominance, lack of education and proper government support. Thus, NGOs play a major role in training and empowering women to attain immediate livelihood. The role of NGOs in empowering women has been explored using the case study method. A total of five case studies of women who attained training and started their own venture have been developed using in-depth interviews. Women empowerment occurs through venture creation and entrepreneurship, which can be attained with proper training and information. Motivation and effective leadership help women in gaining confidence, and they aim to achieve their goals. Proper information about government policies, networking with customers, relationship with self-help groups (SHGs) and NGOs also help them in attaining empowerment. This study indicates to the government and researchers that, instead of initiating new policies, it is important to focus on the existing policies and improve them. NGOs or SHGs must focus on providing immediate livelihood through venture creation or entrepreneurial activities. Women need to be more socialised and develop a habit of partnership with their friends and neighbours to extend their ventures (Dixit et al., 2020). To meet the demand of sustainable and green environment, women must be trained about green manufacturing and to prepare products which are environmentally friendly and sustainable (Agarwal et al., 2020). Instead of initiating new policies, government must review their existing policies and provide equal opportunities to increase female workforce. This study focusses on the role of NGOs in empowering women by focussing on their immediate livelihood through venture creation or entrepreneurship.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-01-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-04-2020-0066
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • Enterprise survival in the high-tech community: persuasion and power in
           board decisions
    • Authors: Ronit Yitshaki, Eli Gimmon, Susanna Khavul
      Abstract: This study aims to examine the extent to which board size, the use of power by venture capital investors and entrepreneurs’ interpersonal tactics such as persuasion to sway board decisions, influence the long-term survival of start-ups. This study used a mixed-methods approach. The quantitative part is based on data collected from 179 chief executive officers (CEOs) of high-tech start-ups community financed by venture capitalists (VCs) in Israel of which 59 did not survive. To achieve a better understanding of these findings, semi-structured interviews with 12 entrepreneurs were conducted. Smaller boards were positively associated with venture survival. The use of power by VC investors positively influenced start-up survival. CEO persuasion had a negative effect on venture survival; however, its interaction with board size suggests that it had a lesser effect on very small boards. Although investors’ control over decision-making contributes to long-term survival, entrepreneurs should be aware of the possible detrimental effects of exercising a high level of persuasion in board processes. The findings also suggest that a small board size is preferable for start-up survival. Exploring the effect of board processes on venture survival is considered complex. A unique sample of high-technology start-ups consisting of both surviving and failed start-ups was analyzed to explore the effects of persuasion and power in board processes.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2021-01-05
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-08-2020-0152
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2021)
       
  • Challenges faced by necessity entrepreneurship, the case of Syrian
           refugees in Jordan
    • Authors: Saad Zighan
      Abstract: This study aims to understand the challenges facing Syrian refugee entrepreneurs in Jordan and offers professional support to refugee entrepreneurs, with a view to improve their economic and social status, aid cultural integration and ultimately to help turn their business idea into reality. A total of 62 semi-structured interviews were conducted with Syrian refugees in Jordan. The study reveals that refugee entrepreneurs are both entrepreneurs of necessity and opportunity. Refugee entrepreneurship improves social welfare and drives economic growth. Nevertheless, refugee entrepreneurship faces many challenges and difficulties, mainly in terms of financing difficulties, cultural differences and a lack of business management skills. Future studies could investigate if the research results can be generalised to global refugee entrepreneurship by gathering data from other countries and comparing the subsequent results with this research. The research shows that programmes and instruments should be created to support refugee entrepreneurship. It is also suggested that both social and economic support is needed to prompt refugee entrepreneurs. International cooperation and international organisations are important to support refugees and support countries that receive them, with a view to reduce the economic burden on these countries, which will in turn improve the quality of life for refugees. The increasing number of refugees is becoming a very serious social issue. The international community should contribute to helping those refugees through economic, social and cultural integrations. This paper focuses refugee entrepreneurship to understand refugees’ entrepreneurial behaviour and any challenges facing Syrian entrepreneurship in Jordan.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2020-12-15
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-09-2020-0168
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Book Review
    • Book Review
      Nnamdi O. Madichie
      Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, Vol. 14, No. 5, pp.811-814Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy2020-12-07
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-11-2018-0085
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Environmental commitment and environmental sustainability practices of
           manufacturing small and medium enterprises in Uganda
    • Authors: Kasimu Sendawula, Vincent Bagire, Cathy Ikiror Mbidde, Peter Turyakira
      Abstract: This study aims to examine the relationship between environmental commitment and environmental sustainability practices of manufacturing small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in Uganda. This study employed a cross-sectional and correlational design using evidence from 106 manufacturing SMEs in Uganda. Data was analyzed through Statistical Package for Social Sciences Version 23. Results show that environmental commitment is a significant predictor of environmental sustainability practices and its dimensions which comprise of eco-friendly packaging, energy efficiency, waste management and water conservation of the manufacturing SMEs in Uganda. This study offers initial evidence on the association between environmental commitment and environmental sustainability practices using evidence from a developing country’s perspective. The results also provide new insights on the relationship between environmental commitment and the dimensions of environmental sustainability practices which comprise of eco-friendly packaging, energy efficiency, waste management and water conservation.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2020-12-07
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-07-2020-0132
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Revival of the traditional handicraft enterprising community in Pakistan
    • Authors: Mohsin Shafi, Lixi Yin, Yue Yuan, Zoya
      Abstract: This study aims to examine issues affecting the growth and survival of traditional handicraft enterprising community in Pakistan, and analyzes their strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats, as well as develops strategic solutions to overcome the problems identified for their revival. This exploratory study is based on a descriptive approach because it attempts to investigate the critical issues faced by traditional handicraft enterprising community. To operationalize the theoretical approach, this paper used a SWOT analysis of craft enterprising community. After thoroughly reviewing relevant literature, this study put forward strategic solutions for the revival of the traditional enterprising community. Moreover, secondary data on employment and gender wage gap were used to provide empirical evidence of the issues identified and emphasize the importance of strategic solutions. This study found that traditional handicraft producers are facing many problems that hinder their survival and growth. This paper, therefore, makes some essential strategic recommendations on how to overcome these issues. The current research argues that Pakistan’s handicraft industry must be revived; else, centuries-old traditional culture and patrimonial knowledge will vanish. Moreover, there is a need to attract foreign investment to overcome resource limitations and improve the competitive capability of the enterprising community. Notably, government intervention is necessary for the revival of the traditional handicraft industry. This study provides in-depth knowledge of issues faced by the Pakistani traditional handicraft enterprising community and suggests possible strategic solutions for the problems identified. Unlike previous studies, this research also discusses the essential characteristics of traditional handicrafts that differentiate them from identical mechanized products.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2020-12-01
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-07-2020-0129
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Regional economic performance and the differential prevalence of corporate
           and family business
    • Authors: Zografia Bika, Peter Rosa
      Abstract: Previous studies have largely examined interregional variations of small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) rather than family firm concentrations. This paper aims to address this gap through an analysis of firm type indicators across Europe from the Eurostat database, using social, economic and demographic statistics at the NUTS 2 regional level to ascertain the nature, prevalence and regional contexts of family firm concentrations. Hierarchical clustering is performed to map the regional distribution of the European family business. Results show that the co-existence of family SMEs with large firms is negatively related to regional economic performance, and this variation has implications for the understanding of the survival and strategic behaviour of family firms. The study promotes a new family business “in context” than “by context” point of view and paves the way for further empirical work with interregional family business data at various spatial levels.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2020-11-12
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-11-2019-0116
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Influence of work–family conflict on the emergence of nascent
           mumpreneurs community in Jordan
    • Authors: Rasha Abdelsalam, Shafig Al-Haddad, Jusuf Zeqiri
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to find out the influence of work–family conflict on mumpreneurial intentions in Jordan, specifically among the community of nascent mumpreneurs. A quantitative-cross sectional study was conducted where a convenience sampling was used to gather information from 81 nascent mumpreneurs. The data were collected through an online survey distributed to nascent mumpreneurs in Jordan. The findings showed the mumpreneurs intentions of nascent mumpreneurs were influenced mainly by the work–family conflict on mumpreneurs intentions among nascent mumpreneurs. It is recommended that more incubators should be established specifically for mumpreneurs and use the results of this study to better develop workshops and training to future and potential mumpreneurs.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2020-11-09
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-07-2020-0138
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Entrepreneurship education intention and entrepreneurial intention amongst
           disadvantaged students: an empirical study
    • Authors: Umesh Shrivastava, Satya Ranjan Acharya
      Abstract: Disadvantaged students face social exclusion and undergo a different treatment than mainstream students. This alters their entrepreneurial intention subsequently. This study aims to investigate the factors affecting disadvantaged students’ intention in their willingness to undergo entrepreneurship education as a vocational course. The variables include self-efficacy, need for achievement (nAch) and family background. The paper further examines whether entrepreneurship education intention enhances their entrepreneurial intention. This study uses a deductive quantitative study as the chosen approach as it ensures complete anonymity and hence researcher bias is minimized. The sample consists of the third year, final year and postgraduate first year disadvantaged students from different streams of engineering, economics, arts and commerce. The study was conducted with a total of 319 students completing the questionnaire which used a five-point Likert scale. Using the theory of planned behavior (TPB), the results show that willingness of disadvantaged students to study entrepreneurship as a vocational course is highly driven by their family background followed by self-efficacy and nAch. The results further strengthen the TPB and has implications for educators of entrepreneurship and a possibility of a widening of entrepreneurship education in disadvantaged community. The study measured attitudes and willingness with intentions, but not actual behavior as this was a cross-sectional study. Also, repeated observations could not be made and dynamics of change could not be captured. This is one of the few studies focused on entrepreneurial intention of students who are socially excluded and therefore it offers a possibility of widening of entrepreneurship education in countries such as India which display a collectivist culture and provides an intention-based linkage to entrepreneurship education among disadvantaged students. This study also puts subjective norm as a strong predictor of intentions which previous studies have refuted. The findings also suggest that there is a strong intent to study entrepreneurship among disadvantaged students in India, which makes entrepreneurship education a seemingly acceptable choice of education and suggests promise for its wider reach and penetration.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2020-11-04
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-04-2020-0072
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Financial literacy programs and youth entrepreneurial attitudes: some
           insights from the Jordanian community
    • Authors: Nour Walid Aljaouni, Baker Alserhan, Kimberly Gleason, Jusuf Zeqiri
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of a financial literacy program (FLP) recently implemented in Jordanian junior high and high schools as part of a national financial literacy agenda on students’ attitudes toward entrepreneurship relative to a control sample of students who had not yet participated in the FLP. This paper also examines the role of moderating variables, including students’ perception of teachers’ attitudes (TA) on students’ entrepreneurial attitudes. Survey methodology was used to obtain data and hierarchical regression analysis was used to test hypotheses. Results indicate that students who completed the FLP exhibited significantly higher entrepreneurial awareness than those that had not yet participated in the program. Students who took the entrepreneurship module of the FLP exhibited significantly lower entrepreneurial intention than those that had not yet taken the entrepreneurship module. However, TA did not impact students’ attitudes. The study examines a sample of middle and high school students in only one district in Amman, Jordan, and cannot be generalized to other communities where the FLP has been implemented. The findings provide valuable insights for educators, policymakers and non-governmental organizations considering large scale, publicly funded FLPs as part of the K-12 educational system. Stakeholders should consider reforms to the implementation of entrepreneurship education as part of the FLP in Jordanian schools and other developing country K-12 programs. This study is the first to examine the new Jordanian literacy program and the impact it has on attitudes toward entrepreneurship of middle and high school students.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2020-10-26
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-07-2020-0128
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Intra-transfer of ownership factors and external transfer of ownership
           effects: evidence from the Gauteng enterprising community, South Africa
    • Authors: Risimati Maurice Khosa
      Abstract: This paper aims to determine the perceptions of family-owned small enterprises on the external transfer of ownership and intra-transfer of ownership using empirical data. This permitted the research to successfully point out the factors that influence the internal transfer of ownership, and also, the effects of intra-transfer of ownership from a viewpoint of both family members and non-family members in small family-owned enterprises. A quantitative research design was used to conduct this research, where primary data was gathered from a sample of 257 respondents using convenience and snowball sampling techniques. Data was collected through a survey instrument distributed via internet-based surveys (SurveyMonkey) and through a drop-off method. The gathered data was then captured, coded and analysed using Stata (version 15) statistical software. The results divulged that intra or internal transfer of ownership is the preferred avenue compared to external transfer of ownership. This is because, when a family business is transferred to the next generation, it presents some benefits to family members working in the business and to the family at large. As a result, the empirical results show that factors that influence the internal transfer of ownership include: favouritism; security, stability and growth; a formal and structured succession plan. Business improvement and organisational change are then the effects of external transfer ownership. Although these effects make business sense, family members will advocate for internal transfer of ownership for them not to lose the benefits that come with the internal transfer of ownership. This paper adds to the current family business research in South Africa, thus reducing the shortage of such research. Moreover, the paper proposes further research that will provide tested, practical and detailed guidelines of survival in the next generation. The paper empirically highlights the perils of selecting a successor based on favouritism rather than merit and possible consequences, thereby assisting those involved in family enterprise succession to make an informed decision when choosing a successor. This research paper provides empirical evidence of the internal transfer of ownership factors and external transfer of ownership effects from a South African perspective.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2020-10-14
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-04-2020-0053
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • The marionette: embeddedness in a community of family-controlled firms
    • Authors: Hanna Astner
      Abstract: Being embedded in family has proven to bring opportunities and facilitate resources for a firm. However, it has its dark side, where too much family involvement may hamper the entrepreneur’s ability to develop psychological ownership of the firm. By focusing on the role that family plays in entrepreneurship, this paper aims to explore how embeddedness and agency interact during the entrepreneurial process. The research questions are as follows: how does family interact in the entrepreneurial process' How does embeddedness inform this process' The paper builds on a longitudinal case study of a small firm that is part of a local community of family-controlled firms. The narrative was created through in-depth interviews with the business owner covering a period of eight years from the opening to the closure of the firm. Departing from theories of family embeddedness, the family is viewed as part of the context. The findings show how agency operates in a community of family-controlled firms and how entrepreneurship is thus partly executed outside the firm’s legal boundaries. The metaphor of a marionette illustrates how family may tie up and restrain an entrepreneur. This hampers the entrepreneur in developing psychological ownership of the firm and thereby restrains the firm’s development. This shows a downside to having too much positive influence from embeddedness. The paper stresses the social role of family by emphasising the value that a family can bring to an entrepreneurial process and thereby to society at large. Practitioners need to reflect on the effects of embeddedness. By recognising the downsides of too much help from outsiders, they may instead strive for a balance. By introducing the theory of psychological ownership to the literature on embeddedness, this paper opens the space for future developments of this cross-section. The paper contributes to the entrepreneurship literature by unfolding the mechanisms of family embeddedness and illustrating how embeddedness informs the entrepreneurial process in different ways. Even though over-embeddedness has been investigated before, this has primarily focused on the negative control from outside the firm. This paper uses the notion of psychological ownership to shed light on the previously hidden problem of too much positive influence from family.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2020-10-12
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-01-2020-0011
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Teleworking in Portuguese communities during the COVID-19 pandemic
    • Authors: Fernando Tavares, Eulália Santos, Ana Diogo, Vanessa Ratten
      Abstract: Human beings spend about a third of their day working, so it is very important that they are integrated into a good community work environment. When the setting is teleworking in a family and housing context, it is important to keep a good environment and also a good physical, psychological and ergonomic aspects to attain job performance. The purpose of this paper is to characterize teleworking carried out in Portuguese communities in the context of the state of emergency caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. A survey questionnaire was used, which analyzed general information about teleworking and the individual’s adaptation process and the difficulties they faced during the teleworking period. The sample consists of 359 individuals aged 18 years or over, who were teleworking in their homes and in a family environment. The results show that adapting to teleworking was easy or very easy and that it happened very quickly. The main difficulties encountered by the individuals were the lack of professional interaction/communication with coworkers, the lack of resources related to support infrastructures, such as the internet or a printer, and the reconciliation of teleworking with family life/household chores/dedication to children and time/schedule management. This study hopes to contribute to the increase of the scientific knowledge in the teleworking field and to allow companies to rethink the teleworking strategies to optimize resources and costs and to improve the organization’s productivity without harming the quality of life and well-being of their workers.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2020-09-23
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-06-2020-0113
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Entrepreneurial ecosystem and social entrepreneurship: case studies of
           community-based craft from Kutch, India
    • Authors: Santana Pathak, Sujata Mukherjee
      Abstract: This study aims to explore social entrepreneurial ecosystems (EEs) in the craft sector in the state of Gujarat, India. With liberalization, India witnessed the growth of social entrepreneurship and is considered one of the pioneering countries in social innovation. The objective of the research was to answer the research question: what role do various stakeholder groups play in creating and promoting craft sector social EEs. The study is based on a qualitative case study approach of methodological triangulation combining analysing documents, a participant observation and semi-structured interviews. Two case studies – one of the Ajrakh craft cluster from Ajrakhpur and the other of Kala Cotton from Aadeshar, Bhuj are studied to explore the symbiotic linkages of social entrepreneurship ecosystem in Kutch district of Gujarat, India. A total of 24 in-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with stakeholders of the EE. The study concludes that the role of like-minded individuals/social entrepreneurs, social enterprises, design networks and educational institutions is vital towards revival and sustainability of craft as economic commodities geared for scalability. Furthermore, the engagement of the systemic condition agents such as various local and national level institutions, the communities play an important role to revitalize, redeem and commercialize craft infrastructure based on active engagement, innovation and services. This paper fulfils an identified need to study how traditional craft-based enterprises can be enabled, revived, grown and sustained.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2020-09-21
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-06-2020-0112
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Applying the theory of planned behaviour to hospitality management
           students in Nigeria: the mediating role of self-confidence
    • Authors: Innocent Otache
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to explore the mediating role of self-confidence in the relationship between the constructs of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) (i.e. attitudes towards behaviour [ATB], subjective norms [SN] and perceived behavioural control [PBC]) and the entrepreneurial intentions (EIs) of hospitality management students. This study adopted a quantitative approach. A self-reported questionnaire was used to collect data from a randomly selected sample of 126 hospitality management students from two federal polytechnics in Nigeria. To test the hypotheses formulated, partial least squares structural equation modelling was performed using SmartPLS software. The results indicated that ATB and PBC had significantly positive links with EIs. The link between SN and EIs was only positive but not statistically significant. Further analysis showed that self-confidence had a significantly positive link with EIs and mediated the relationships between ATB and EIs and between PBC and EIs. The findings have policy and practical implications for governments, policymakers and administrators of higher education institutions in Nigeria and other countries. To the author’s best knowledge, this is the first study to provide empirical evidence of the mediating effect of self-confidence on the relationship between the TPB constructs and students’ EIs. Theoretically, the findings of this study lend credence to the applicability of the TPB in predicting students’ EIs across different contexts. More importantly, this study has modified the TPB by demonstrating that the effectiveness of the TPB constructs in influencing EIs depends on the degree of self-confidence that prospective entrepreneurs possess.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2020-09-17
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-03-2020-0035
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • ICT, social media and COVID-19: evidence from informal home-based business
           community in Kuwait City
    • Authors: Yasser Saleh
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to provide information on the importance of information and communication technologies (ICTs) and social media for the development of informal home-based business (HBBs) community in Kuwait City. This research is used as a qualitative methodology, which helps the researcher to come to original and direct quotations about the HBBs owners’ thoughts and experiences. In this paper, a multi case-based approach was used, respectively, we have used 14 cases, where 7 operate in the food sector and 7 in the entertainment/game sector. All these informal HBBs are located in Kuwait City. The results of the research showed that the respondents use Instagram, WhatsApp, Snapchat, email and websites to communicate with customers and cooperate with business partners. Banks’ applications, such as “Edfali”, are used for doing the payments related to the business. Home-based owners are usually motivated by passion and love for the business, independence, additional source of income, succeeding in a family business, hobby or not finding an appropriate job in other companies. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we had the opportunity to interview only 14 HBBs and only from two sectors, the food and entertainment/game sector. Further research can be done with more cases and more sectors to see how ICTs and social media help these businesses to develop their activity and spread the business in different places. This paper provides useful information on the role of ICTs and social media for the informal HBBs, especially during the crisis, such as the COVID-19 pandemic. It might help business owners to prepare adequate strategies to cope with difficult situations and create better conditions for their businesses. This paper is the first research that treats the informal HBB community in Kuwait City. It could serve as a good base for further studies related to the impact of ICTs and social media on the business performance.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2020-09-10
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-07-2020-0131
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Coronavirus (Covid-19) and the entrepreneurship education community
    • Authors: Vanessa Ratten
      Abstract: Covid-19 (coronavirus) has significantly affected education communities particularly in terms of the massive shift towards online learning. This has meant a quick transformation of the curriculum and learning styles to a digital platform. Despite the dramatic change, there is a lack of understanding about what this means particularly for the community of entrepreneurship educators in the higher education sector that rely on practical and immersive training for learning requirements. This paper is a literature review that discusses how communities of entrepreneurship education practitioners can deal with the Covid-19 pandemic. A review of the current literature on Covid-19 and entrepreneurship education is conducted that highlights the need to incorporate a community approach. This enables a better understanding about how communities of educational stakeholders including teachers, students and institutions can facilitate a more proactive and positive attitude. The paper finds that managing the Covid-19 crisis is difficult for entrepreneurship educations due to the need for practical and real life examples. This means the use of augmented reality and artificial intelligence is needed to simulate the real environment. This will enable a more community orientated approach to the study and practice of entrepreneurship. This paper is among the first to suggest how this change has taken place and what it means for educational management, thereby providing a unique and timely commentary about how coronavirus has altered in positive and negative ways entrepreneurship education.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2020-08-12
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-06-2020-0121
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Impact of natural disasters on New Zealand regional family businesses:
           perspectives of baby boomer family business owners
    • Authors: Julia Yonghua Wu
      Abstract: This paper aims to describe what baby boomer family business owners in New Zealand perceive the implications of earthquakes on their business and succession planning. The current study focuses on how some businesses have survived significant uncontrollable contingencies, for instance, natural disasters. This paper also documents the insight of what baby boomer family business owners value in their succession planning. Qualitative method was undertaken, comprising face-to-face in-depth interviews with 18 participants, who are baby boomers family business owners in New Zealand. Driven by the unique social and political conditions in New Zealand, baby boomer family business owner’s revealed unique mind-sets and motivations that are oriented in their family value and/or the sense of self-fulfillment. As a result, they are able to adapt to uncertainties and reflect on their adaptability. Although approaching their retirement age and survived earthquakes, most interviewees neither have any urgency to establish or execute succession plans nor are they prepared for contingencies. A profitable trade sale has been identified as a preferred exit strategy. The current study is aimed to fill in the gap of exploring how some baby boomers’ family businesses in New Zealand survived deadly earthquakes and how they approach their own succession planning. It is hoped that this research will contribute to the well-being of family businesses and be of value to practitioners who provide professional advises for family firms and those who aspire to a career in family businesses. This paper also aims to shed light on the implication of aging population and government policies on family businesses. The findings are, therefore, useful for academics, professional consultants, advisors and regulators. However, natural disasters, social unrest and many uncontrollable events disrupt business operations and can be viewed as uncontrollable contingencies. Ageing population and generation-based similarities are also common to many countries and communities. Nonetheless, the interdisciplinary research on ageing population is scant in the context of financial planning, management accounting or taxation at the firm level. This paper also calls for more in-depth exploration on the implications of demographical factors on the organisations and their success or demise.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2020-06-18
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-10-2019-0111
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • How does the territory impact on entrepreneurial family embeddedness'
    • Authors: Paula Martínez-Sanchis, Cristina Aragón-Amonarriz, Cristina Iturrioz-Landart
      Abstract: This paper aims to explore how territory impacts on entrepreneurial families’ (EFs) embeddedness to unveil the role that territories play on the continuity and development of EFs. To study complex contexts where subjective realities are analyzed, a constructivist qualitative approach is recommended. Given that, this paper develops a qualitative methodology in which 25 semi-structured interviews were carried out and analyzed based upon the use of ATLAS.ti, following an open-coding approach. This paper found out that the territory can condition EFs’ embeddedness in different ways. First, through the cultural embeddedness, the shared territorial understanding of values and norms inherited by the history of the territory. Second, by the political embeddedness, i.e. the power exercised by territorial economic actors and non-market institutions. Third, through the structural embeddedness generated by the territorial social networks and the generation of close relationships and finally, through the so-called cognitive embeddedness, the territorial actors’ representations, interpretations and meanings. These four modes of territorial embeddedness are unfolded in a set of 16 territorial factors that impact on EFs’ embeddedness. Most of the identified factors, 14 out of the 16, are acting mainly over one of the embeddedness modes studied (cultural, political, structural and cognitive), while two of them, because they are operating simultaneously on various modes of embeddedness, have been considered transversal factors. EFs have, to a great extent, been recognized as major generators of positive externalities in the territories in which they are located, and to date, the literature has focused on the impact that firms and family firms have on regional development. However, how the territory conditions the embeddedness of these families, especially how it impacts on the EFs’ territorial embeddedness, remains unexplored. This paper proposes a framework of 16 factors that help to understand the embeddedness dynamics between EFs and territories, serving as a starting point for future research avenues. Additionally, regional policy makers may use it as a guidance to build policy mix that considers these territorial factors to boost EFs’ embeddedness.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2020-06-13
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-09-2019-0087
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Competencies development for women edupreneurs community – an
           integrated AHP-TOPSIS approach
    • Authors: Jitendra Kumar Dixit, Vivek Agrawal, Sucheta Agarwal, Shqipe Gerguri-Rashiti, Dina Sabry Said
      Abstract: Education is the most promising and prominent domain for entrepreneurs who are willing to infuse innovation and creation to initiate the change in existing educational practices. These changing agents are known as edupreneurs. Educational domain generates an opportunity for women entrepreneurs to balance work and life, both. However, women edupreneurs community needs to enhance their competencies and capacities to handle diverse issues and challenges posed by stakeholders. This paper aims to explore competencies helpful in designing a customized leadership development program, especially for women edupreneurs community. From the extensive literature, a number of competencies for women's edupreneurs were found and 12 competencies were selected in this study after experts’ opinions. These competencies were analyzed by an integrated analytical hierarchy process (AHP)-TOPSIS approach. The study has extracted competencies (visionary, delegative, inquisitive, learning agility, cognitive ability, self-reflection, tolerance, decisive, self-development, receptive to feedback, building partnership networks and save face) to be included in leadership development program specially designed for women edupreneurs community engage in operating child care, pre-school, primary-elementary schools and secondary-high schools, addressing the problems and issues related to students and parents community. Future leadership development programs designed for women edupreneurs can include these competencies and trainers, educators and policymakers can follow the suggested structure for execution purpose. This study is an initial attempt to set a benchmark for improving competencies of women edupreneurs.
      Citation: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy
      PubDate: 2020-06-10
      DOI: 10.1108/JEC-04-2020-0060
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global
           Economy
    •  
 
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