Subjects -> BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (Total: 3530 journals)
    - ACCOUNTING (132 journals)
    - BANKING AND FINANCE (306 journals)
    - BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (1229 journals)
    - CONSUMER EDUCATION AND PROTECTION (20 journals)
    - COOPERATIVES (4 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SCIENCES: GENERAL (201 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SYSTEMS, THEORIES AND HISTORY (235 journals)
    - FASHION AND CONSUMER TRENDS (20 journals)
    - HUMAN RESOURCES (103 journals)
    - INSURANCE (26 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE (145 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND AID (103 journals)
    - INVESTMENTS (22 journals)
    - LABOR AND INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS (61 journals)
    - MACROECONOMICS (17 journals)
    - MANAGEMENT (595 journals)
    - MARKETING AND PURCHASING (106 journals)
    - MICROECONOMICS (23 journals)
    - PRODUCTION OF GOODS AND SERVICES (143 journals)
    - PUBLIC FINANCE, TAXATION (37 journals)
    - TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL DIRECTORIES (2 journals)

HUMAN RESOURCES (103 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 92 of 92 Journals sorted by number of followers
Asia Pacific Journal of Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 224)
Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 76)
Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74)
Human Resource Management Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
Human Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Human Resource Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
International Journal of Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 50)
Journal of Accounting and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Contemporary Accounting Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Accounting Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Human Resource Development Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Review of Accounting Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Accounting Auditing & Accountability Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Human Resource Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Personality and Individual Differences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Human Resources Development and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
American Journal of Finance and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Accounting and Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Human Development and Capabilities : A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
European Accounting Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Human Resource Management Research     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Human Resource Development International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Open Journal of Leadership     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Accounting and Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Personnel Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Critical Perspectives on Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Accounting Education: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Banking, Accounting and Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
European Journal of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Management Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Public Personnel Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Review of Public Personnel Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Human Resource Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
British Accounting Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
New Horizons in Adult Education and Human Resource Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Management Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Human Capital     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Behavioural Accounting and Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Accounting, Auditing and Performance Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Accounting and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Accounting Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Human Resource and Organization Development Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Attachment & Human Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Strategic HR Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Service Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Human Resource Costing & Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
German Journal of Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Organizational Effectiveness : People and Performance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Human Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Professions and Organization     Free   (Followers: 5)
Journal of International Accounting, Auditing and Taxation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Research in Human Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Afro-Asian Journal of Finance and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Contemporary Accounting & Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Coaching : Theorie & Praxis     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
South Asian Journal of Human Resources Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Accounting Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Accounting Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Chinese Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Corporate Governance and Organizational Behavior Review     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Evidence-based HRM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Human Capital and Information Technology Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Ethics and Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of HR intelligence     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pacific Accounting Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Critical Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Marketing and HR     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Accounting and the Public Interest     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Economics and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Sri Lankan Journal of Human Resource Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intangible Capital     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
EURO Journal on Decision Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Human Resource and Sustainability Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
NHRD Network Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Human Resource Research     Open Access  
Personnel Assessment and Decisions     Open Access  
Kelaniya Journal of Human Resource Management     Open Access  
Revista Gestión de las Personas y Tecnología     Open Access  
Psychologie du Travail et des Organisations     Hybrid Journal  
FOR Rivista per la formazione     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Enterprising Communities People and Places in the Global Economy     Hybrid Journal  
Asian Review of Accounting     Hybrid Journal  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Human Relations
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.2
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 61  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0018-7267 - ISSN (Online) 1741-282X
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • CEO performance management behaviors’ influence on TMT flourishing, job
           attitudes, and firm performance

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      Authors: Amanda Christensen-Salem, Angelo Kinicki, Jaclyn Perrmann-Graham, Fred O Walumbwa
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Does a chief executive officer’s (CEO’s) ability to manage and motivate their direct reports impact firm financial performance' Good or bad, CEO leadership research is increasingly romanticized, leading to investigations of CEO traits as visionary and transformational behaviors at the expense of understanding whether the mundane, everyday management of a top management team (TMT) is important for firm performance. In this article, we developed and tested a model linking CEO performance management behaviors and firm performance through two mediating mechanisms. We hypothesized and found a positive relationship between CEO performance management behaviors and TMT flourishing. TMT flourishing related to TMT overall job attitudes and subsequently firm performance. Additionally, performance management behaviors were related to TMT overall job attitudes via TMT flourishing and performance management behaviors related to firm performance via TMT flourishing and job attitudes. Our analyses were based on a unique sample of 105 CEOs and 519 TMT members (60% response rate for CEOs and 90% response rate for TMT members). These findings provide important research directions for CEO research, performance management, upper echelons, and positive psychology research, highlighting the importance of CEO managerially oriented behaviors to create more optimally functioning environments for the TMT and organization.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-09-15T07:17:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221119767
       
  • The improvised language of solidarity: Linguistic practices in the
           

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      Authors: Gabriella Cioce, Marek Korczynski, Davide Però
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      There are considerable language barriers facing the potential collective labour organization of multi-ethnic migrant workers. From the research literature, we know little about linguistic practices that might overcome these barriers. Based on an ethnographic study of the participatory organizing of S.I. Cobas multi-ethnic migrant workers in the Italian logistics sector, we point to three linguistic practices that help overcome language barriers – translation, lingua franca and humour. We theorize these three linguistic practices as constituting an ‘improvised language of solidarity’. We argue that an improvised language of solidarity develops from, and can significantly support, participatory organizing.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-09-13T12:16:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221119775
       
  • Unpacking work–family conflict in the marital dyad: Interaction of
           employee fit and partner fit

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      Authors: Yeong-Hyun Hong, Maura J Mills, Yongwon Suh, Michael T Ford
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Can workers optimize their work and family lives when their involvement across both domains fits with their values, regardless of what their partners value' The current study suggests that it is not so simple; rather, we must take both employees’ and their partners’ perspectives into account in order to optimally understand the work–family interface. Herein we examine the relationships between employee fit (degree to which an employee’s role value aligns with his/her role involvement) and partner fit (degree to which a partner’s role value aligns with the employee’s role involvement) with work-to-family conflict, family-to-work conflict, life satisfaction, and turnover intentions. Using data from 179 dyads of South Korean employees and their matched spouses/partners, we put forth a fit assessment to determine degree of discrepancy within dyads, and test a model regarding how such fit is associated with outcomes. Results suggest that partner fit moderates the effects of employee fit on work-to-family conflict and family-to-work conflict, such that when partner fit rose, the negative effect of employee fit on conflict was strengthened. Thus, employees’ experiences of work-to-family conflict and family-to-work conflict were lowest when their role involvement was aligned with both their role value and their partner’s role value. Further, partner fit moderated the indirect (via work-to-family conflict, family-to-work conflict) effects of employee fit on life satisfaction (partially mediated), such that the effects were stronger when partner fit was high. Interestingly, partner fit also moderated the indirect effects of employee fit on turnover intentions (fully mediated) via work-to-family conflict, but not via family-to-work conflict. Implications and future research directions are discussed, including how this work advances relational considerations in work–family research both conceptually and empirically.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-09-10T06:15:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221117800
       
  • ‘I like the “buzz”, but I also suffer from it’: Mitigating
           interaction and distraction in collective workplaces

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      Authors: Yosha Wijngaarden
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Collective workplaces – such as coworking spaces, open workplan offices, maker spaces, or fab labs – are founded on one central premise: working alongside others leads to interactions, collaborations and access to ‘buzzing’ knowledge. Yet, at the same time, users of these places go there to do their (often freelance) work, requiring a productive, and therefore usually quiet, work environment. Drawing on interviews and ethnographic fieldwork in the Netherlands, this research explores how users of collective workplaces navigate the coworking paradox: the need for quiet workplaces and the desire for social interaction. It shows how interactions emerge through rituals and especially routines, and describes the spatio-temporal conditions under which these interactions may lead to successful forms of social exchange and community formation.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-09-09T06:36:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221121277
       
  • Professional responsibility in the borderlands: Facing irreconcilable
           accountability regimes in veterinary work

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      Authors: Berber R Pas, Lucas D Introna, Rinske Wolters, Ed Vosselman
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      (Dutch) veterinarians have increasingly been confronted with conflicting accountability regimes, related to data-driven, networked accountability systems, to decrease the use of antibiotics in veterinary practices. Based on our longitudinal ethnography (2012–2020), we propose a conceptual model that illustrates how professionals intra-actively become positioned in different accountability regimes, yet which is continually diffracted by the recalling of their responsibilities to proximal and distant others. By taking an agential realist approach, we contribute to recent critical perspectives on accountability by showing how veterinary professionals become positioned as specific accountable subjects and yet how such positioning simultaneously produces the ‘borderlands’ – a space of indeterminacy in which the accounting practices of the professional are continuously weighed in light of incommensurable responsibilities. Based on our results, we show how conflicting accountability regimes are—as often argued—not to be ‘fixed’ through commensuration, nor are they dysfunctional. Rather, they create the very condition of indeterminacy, opening up the possibility for professional responsibility. We offer suggestions for how to further investigate this appreciation of the borderlands, for example, by focusing on how the account holder can draw from other responsibilities to counter a dominant accountability regime, and how governing authorities can become positioned as responsible for keeping professionals in the borderlands.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-09-03T05:06:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221120161
       
  • An ethnographic study of organizational performances in business services:
           Space, staging and materiality

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      Authors: Robert Cluley
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      It is said that all the world is a stage. But how do organizations physically stage performances such as sales pitches and research presentations' Drawing on a 14-month-long ethnographic study at a Fortune 500 strategic research company, this article explains how. Emphasizing the active role of human and non-human actors, it uncovers three staging practices that organizations use to transform spaces into stages. Organizations theme stages by populating them with certain objects. They produce a style of performance by arranging relationships between performers and audiences. Finally, they order movements from one stage to others so that plots emerge. Theorizing these staging practices through a materialist dramaturgy, the article challenges existing organizational theory that tends to focus on the ways organizations control and script performances. The article shows that organizational performances in service and knowledge organizations can be improvisational. They are not preordained but they are organized.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-08-30T12:51:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221116865
       
  • 21st century bridling: Non-disclosure agreements in cases of
           organizational misconduct

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      Authors: Victoria Pagan
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      In this article I argue that non-disclosure agreements represent the latest in a continuum of tools used to silence women who seek justice in response to the misconduct of those in authority. I draw a connection between the use of these apparently objective, non-corporeal organizational processes and the historic use of the scold’s bridle, a corporeal instrument of control applied to physically silence. Specifically, I argue that both are on a continuum of violence from the antiquated, overt and embodied, to the present day, covert and epistemic with embodied effects. This article offers a critical phenomenological analysis of the effects on women who submitted evidence of their experiences to the UK Parliament Women and Equalities Committee Inquiry into the use of non-disclosure agreements in Discrimination Cases. By critically analysing these accounts I offer a contribution toward a continued understanding of the ways in which oppressive organizational practices according to gender continue to function and reproduce through practices of embodied epistemic injustice.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-08-24T06:49:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221119129
       
  • City governance and visual impression management: Visual semiotics and the
           Biccherna panels of Siena

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      Authors: Jane Davison, Elena Giovannoni
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      A major preoccupation in the contemporary organizational landscape is governance and how to cope with conflict and uncertainty. These challenges are particularly evident in the governance of cities, with their complex histories, politics and administrative processes. We argue that visual artefacts can form powerful visual impression management, constituting ‘visual governance’, for dealing with such complexities. We construct a framework from the visual semiotics of Umberto Eco, extended by medieval aesthetics. We analyse the pre-modern case of the Sienese Biccherna panels (painted covers and paintings linked to the city accounts) to show how their calligraphy, heraldry and pictures convey idealized reassuring images of orderly administration, in times of complicated, disordered underlying realities. In demonstrating how art and accounting are intertwined as tools of governance, and that there are contemporary resonances in corporate annual reporting, we add both to research in governance and to visual organizational research, and pave the way for further interdisciplinary work on the relationship between art and organizations.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-08-13T10:29:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221116035
       
  • The act of (de/re)growing: Prefiguring alternative organizational
           landscapes of socioecological transformations

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      Authors: Maria Ehrnström-Fuentes, Ingrid Biese
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      How does transformative change that restructures humans’ relations to the Earth come into being' The proposal for degrowth calls for a drastic reorganization of societies in order to deal with the current planetary socioecological and climate crises. Yet, there is a lack of understanding of how such socioecological transformations are brought into being. In this article, we examine prefigurative processes of socioecological transformations. We introduce the concept of the act of (de)growing, a prefigurative practice in which individuals engage at a personal level as they disentangle from organizational spaces governed by growth (act of degrowing), while entangling with nonhumans (cows, sheep, plants and seeds) to consciously make something else grow (act of growing) in the place that they inhabit. Drawing on 10 personal stories of degrowth in the Nordics, we identify four interlinked dimensions of socioecological transformations that bring new degrowth inspired organizational landscapes into being (disentangling from growth; organizing with nonhumans in place; the emergence of novel subjectivities in place; and the formation of translocal networks of support). We discuss the implications that these dispersed situated forms of socioecological transformations have for breaking with the systemic inertia of societal institutions built on economic growth.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-08-09T01:12:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221112241
       
  • Spatializing gossip as chaotic and multiple liminal space

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      Authors: Yihan Liu, Ziyun Fan
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      How do we understand gossip as spatialization processes' How can we address such processes through liminal space' In this article, we challenge the trap of social determinism in understanding gossip, and argue that gossip should be conceptualized through the mutual constitution and contestations between social relations and space. We draw on a three-month participant observation case study to explore such interactive processes and relations through the lens of liminal space. This article contributes to the existing literature on gossip by addressing the overlooked importance of ‘space’ in theorizing and understanding gossip. We emphasize that space acts as a localized context for, and an active participant in, enabling or constraining social interactions for gossip. In doing so, we explore the theoretical potential and empirical possibility of theory blending of liminal space and gossip that can shed light on future research on unmanaged and marginalized social practices in organizations.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T10:16:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221112230
       
  • Critical theory in use: Organizing the Frankfurt School

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      Authors: Robert Cluley, Martin Parker
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      The Frankfurt School was an interdisciplinary grouping of left-wing thinkers whose contributions to the social sciences and humanities made them one of the most influential groups of scholars from the last century. Their work has inspired decades of critical organizational research. Yet, across this body of thought, few organization theorists have considered the Frankfurt School as an organization. This article argues that we cannot apply Frankfurt School theories to organizations unless we understand how the School managed its own activities. Reading the School’s texts and examining its working practices through historical documents, we show that Frankfurt School thinkers did not ignore everyday organizational tasks, nor did they grudgingly accept them as a practical necessity. Rather, they embraced them as components of a dialectical theory of organizing and society – which we term critical theory-in-use. Defining what it means to be a critical scholar today is, we conclude, not just a matter of reading Frankfurt School theory but also understanding how this research institute endured for so long and had such a significant influence.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-07-25T05:55:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221111219
       
  • ‘No decision is permanent!’: Achieving democratic revisability in
           alternative organizations through the affordances of new information and
           communication technologies

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      Authors: Genevieve Shanahan
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      It seems natural to understand organizational democracy as granting members of the organization the right to choose the rules that govern their actions. But what meaning does a rule have if one can choose to change rather than follow it' By investigating the understudied dimension of democracy I call revisability, this article suggests that an organization’s rules can be meaningful – they can effectively coordinate action – while remaining continually open to democratic modification. To support this claim, I present an activist ethnography of the Open Food Network, an alternative organization that builds open-source software for the decentralized coordination of short food chains, working in a democratic, non-hierarchical manner. Using the communicative constitution of organizations literature to conceptualize the requirements of democratic revisability and coordinating rules, I argue that this case demonstrates the possibility of achieving both ends simultaneously through the affordances of new information and communication technologies (ICTs). This article thus contributes an account of the concept of democratic revisability, and a generalized model of one means by which democratically revisable and effective coordinating rules can be established and maintained with the support of ICT affordances.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-07-22T01:34:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221112821
       
  • Conceptualizing business logistics as an ‘apparatus of security’ and
           its implications for management and organizational inquiry

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      Authors: Peter Fleming, Richard Godfrey, Simon Lilley
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Global commodity capitalism necessitates the fast and efficient movement of all manner of entities across the globe. Importantly, this commercial flow needs to be secured against the undocumented and unregulated flow of illegitimate people, finance and information, counterfeits, drugs, terror and other undesirables. The organizational practices of business logistics are central for achieving this objective. Yet they have received little attention in management and organization studies to date. We suggest a fruitful avenue is via Foucault’s notion of ‘biopower’ – particularly his less discussed concept (in management studies, at least) of an apparatus of security. This is useful for understanding the emergent organizational/management practices of security in the border spaces in which business logistics operate. If ‘Society Must Be Defended’, as Foucault ironically notes in his famous lecture series that introduces biopower, then so too must contemporary organizations and their net-like activities within the global economy.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-07-11T07:32:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221110458
       
  • Age diversity and the monitoring role of corporate boards: Evidence from
           banks

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      Authors: Mohamed Janahi, Yuval Millo, Georgios Voulgaris
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      We investigate how age diversity on corporate boards affects their monitoring performance. Despite the critical importance of the monitoring function of the board, previous studies focus mainly on the advisory role of age-diversified boards. Our emphasis is on banks where the opacity in their complex operations poses a challenge for external stakeholders to assess performance and thus they heavily rely on the board for monitoring managerial activities. We examine how age diversity affects one of the primary monitoring roles of corporate boards – a responsibility over the provision of high-quality financial reports. Using a large panel data of banks in the United States (N = 7005) our findings suggest that age-diversified boards are associated with less earnings management, indicative of higher-quality reporting. Our results still hold for different indicators of the monitoring performance of the board in other areas, such as loan risk. Further analysis reveals that, as age diversity increases, the strength of the board’s monitoring effectiveness also increases. Overall, our findings suggest that age-diversified boards are more effective at monitoring managerial decision making.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-07-11T07:30:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221108729
       
  • I spoke up, did you hear' The impact of voice (in)congruence on
           employee-initiated constructive changes

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      Authors: Limei Zhang, Jian Liang, Fangzhou Liu
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Why do employees voice ideas for constructive changes in their organization and then fail to pursue those changes' To answer this question, we examined how individuals’ voice experiences with managers influence their initiative in pursuing constructive changes. Viewing the voicer–manager dyad as the basic unit of analysis, we propose that (in)congruence between manager-rated and employee self-rated voice behavior provides individuals with important cues about whether they receive respect for their voiced ideas. This sequentially influences whether employees prefer to pursue constructive changes after speaking up. Using time-lagged survey data collected from 191 employee–manager dyads, we tested our hypotheses using a multilevel polynomial regression framework. The findings show that the experience of voice congruence increases an individual’s perceived respect for voice from the manager, which, in turn, leads to greater effort in implementing constructive changes. This relationship is stronger for individuals who believe that they cannot speak up to the manager without clear solutions and careful preparation (i.e. voice quality belief). The theoretical and practical implications of this study are also discussed.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-07-07T11:47:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221110781
       
  • Drivers of career success among the visually impaired: Improving career
           inclusivity and sustainability in a career ecosystem

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      Authors: A Uday Bhaskar, Yehuda Baruch, Seeta Gupta
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Visual impairment, as a form of disability, remains understudied in the context of employment and careers. Drawing on career ecosystem and career sustainability theories, we explore factors that lead to career success and career sustainability of visually impaired individuals. We collected qualitative data from 66 visually impaired individuals from India who had experienced varying degrees of career attainment. We applied grounded theory to study their deep-seated attitudes and ingrained behaviors that help build successful and sustainable careers. High-career-attainment participants were extremely resilient, able to bounce back after rejection, and willing to adopt certain key psycho-social processes such as non-acceptance of rejection, relatability (forging positive relations with the sighted), family support, enabling self through technology, and influence mindset change, which led them to be ‘masters of circumstance.’ Conversely, the characteristics of low-career-attainment participants included their unquestioning acceptance of fate, higher degrees of skepticism, and obligation to support the family, which led them to become ‘victims of circumstance.’ We contribute to the career ecosystems and career sustainability literature by expanding it to wider populations and crystalizing processes that influence careers. The findings have policy implications for visually impaired individuals as well as for other people with disabilities, as well as for organizations and governments. Individuals should challenge conventional norms, be persistent and improve self-efficacy. Organization should think out of the box in order to win the war for talent by employing hidden talent.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-07-05T11:01:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221103529
       
  • Of charities and choice: Researching the choices of the long-term
           unemployed on third-sector employability programmes

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      Authors: Jonathan Payne, Peter Butler
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      ‘Work-first’ (or ‘workfare’) activation policies severely restrict the choices of the unemployed. Can third-sector organisations (TSOs), with their person-centred mission, support long-term unemployed adults to make their own choices, given individual and societal constraints' Commentators often focus on ‘what works’ in supporting those with complex needs; others draw on the ‘capabilities approach’ (CA). With commentators often talking past each other, two key issues emerge. First, what constitutes real choice, and, second, how do we deal with the testimonies of programme users when those experiencing social deprivation may overstate the choices available to them' We argue that the CA’s dichotomisation of ‘true/real’ versus ‘constrained/no’ choice is problematic for a balanced assessment of choice possibilities across different programmes. Building on insights from current literatures, we develop a framework for researching choice possibilities. Using qualitative research, we apply this framework to a TSO employability programme in England, and find users have more control over their choices compared with UK workfare policy. The article contributes to international debates on the value of the CA, the links between programme form, user choice and well-being, and the scope for TSOs to deliver on their user-centred mission and prefigure better alternatives to workfare.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-06-23T06:07:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221105854
       
  • Working around: Job crafting in the context of public and professional
           accountability

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      Authors: Erik Renkema, Manda Broekhuis, Maria Tims, Kees Ahaus
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Professionals are expected to justify their actions to clients, disciplinary committees and courts in multiple accountability systems. Although developed to reflect professional standards, is it possible that these systems induce proactive behaviours that counteract their goals and instead serve to protect the professional' This article examines the types of stimuli professionals acquire from the public and professional accountability contexts and how these stimuli motivate engagement in specific proactive behaviours. An interpretive grounded theory study was conducted; it included 31 in-depth interviews with physicians from eight hospitals. The study revealed that accountability systems trigger and motivate professionals to engage in self-serving, proactive job-crafting behaviours. Professionals simultaneously manage their perceived accountability pressures and their personal interests. Context-specific factors that motivate individuals to craft their jobs are identified, and we reveal four distinct stimuli–motivation–job-crafting patterns that are linked to specific performance episodes (i.e. work stages). Our findings emphasize the importance of taking specific work contexts (i.e. accountability) and work stages into account when studying job-crafting behaviours. This study contributes to understanding professionals’ motivations and behaviours in the context of accountability, which is essential, as the quality and safety of their work are matters of public concern.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T10:49:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221104011
       
  • On alliance teams: Conceptualization, review, and future research agenda

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      Authors: Martijn van der Kamp, Brian Tjemkes, Valérie Duplat, Karen Jehn
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      With organizations working together more readily than ever before, it is becoming increasingly common to have teams of individuals from different organizations. These “alliance teams” bring together people across organizations to achieve collaborative outcomes. There is a lack of consensus among researchers on how to conceptualize an alliance team and fragmentation of the research across fields and theoretical perspectives has inhibited the development of a coherent body of knowledge on alliance teams. We aim to bring greater conceptual clarity and integrate the research on alliance teams by analyzing existing definitions of alliance teams to inductively arrive at a conceptualization of alliance teams along three key dimensions: factionalism, team scope of responsibility, and team entitativity. We then systematically review the diverse literature and derive three key research foci: diversity, goal ambiguity, and team connectivity to other teams. Our review shows that the three-dimensional (3D) conceptualization opens up valuable research opportunities and stimulates research across dimensions and foci when examining alliance team functioning and effectiveness. We use alliance team leadership, a critical topic in alliance team research, as an illustration of how the 3D conceptualization can help integrate and advance research on alliance teams. We conclude by providing a future research agenda.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-06-17T12:29:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221104985
       
  • A process model of peer reactions to team member proactivity

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      Authors: Melissa Twemlow, Maria Tims, Svetlana N Khapova
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Team member proactivity refers to self-starting, future-directed behavior to change a team’s situation or the way a team works. While previous studies have shown that individuals generally benefit from their proactivity, few studies have explored how others in a team experience it. This is important as the way peers perceive team member proactivity could be critical for the initiative to be effective. We conducted a five-month in-depth study to uncover how peers from three self-managing agile teams react to instances of team member proactivity. Our findings suggest a process model of team member proactivity, in which we show that peers react at two distinct moments during proactive episodes. Depending on its perceived success and whether peers directed their reaction to the proactive employee or at their initiative, peer reactions unfolded in four different pathways: by (1) belittling the proactive team member, (2) criticizing the proactivity initiative, (3) supporting the proactive initiative, or (4) admiring the proactive team member. We explain how and why these reactions are formed by showcasing their cognitive, affective, and behavioral evaluations. Our findings contribute to the proactivity literature, provide a process perspective for understanding how peers perceive proactivity, and present implications for sustaining proactivity in teams.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-06-10T10:43:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221094023
       
  • Mitigating the harms of abusive supervision on employee thriving: The
           buffering effects of employees’ social-network centrality

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      Authors: Shuye Lu, Lei Wang, Dan Ni, Debra L Shapiro, Xiaoming Zheng
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      This article builds on the scant literature regarding antecedents and consequences of employee thriving, a positive psychological state characterized by the joint experience of vitality and learning. Guided by conservation of resource (COR) theory and the social embeddedness perspective, we predict that the social-network centrality of employees helps them buffer against the negative effects of abusive supervision. Via a pilot study, a field study, and two scenario-based experiments, we find patterns supporting our hypotheses. Specifically, employees’ perception of abusive supervision is negatively associated with their level of thriving and, thereby also, with their performance-related outcomes such as task performance, organizational citizenship behavior (OCB), and creativity. However, abusive supervision’s negative association with employees’ thriving weakens when employees are more central in their advice and friendship networks. Our research adds to the sparse but growing literature on thriving, and supplements the mostly reactive- and/or dyadic-oriented strategies previously identified as ways to cope with abusive supervisors. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-06-10T10:39:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221091469
       
  • Abjection in extremely gendered colonial organizations: Female military
           firefighter officers in Brazil

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      Authors: Eloisio Moulin de Souza, Joanna Brewis, Richard Godfrey
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      It is often suggested that some occupations are inherently more suited to men or to women. Such beliefs can become norms that can have powerful effects on those who inhabit, or wish to enter, such occupations. This article explores the discursive framing of gendered occupations by considering the experience of cis female military firefighter officers in the masculine world of the Corpo de Bombeiros Militar in the Brazilian state of Espírito Santo. We identify this Global South organization as extremely gendered but also profoundly colonial in its patriarchal order and its hierarchical culture and structure. We use Kristeva’s and Butler’s work on abjection to understand how these officers and their bodies are differentiated. Based on interviews and document analysis, we foreground their abjection using three examples: the organization’s physical entrance test, the maternal body and its masculine organizational grammar. Yet, just as they are targets of exclusion, these women and their bodies are also necessary to maintain the hypermasculinity of this organization. Our contribution is to analyse abjection in a specific hypergendered organizational context where masculinity is not only amplified by the co-presence of military service and firefighting, but also where gender relations, structure and culture have deep colonial roots.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T07:20:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221098759
       
  • Presenting as a chief strategy officer: A discourse-analytical study of
           elite subjectivities and vulnerabilities

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      Authors: Eric Knight, Paula Jarzabkowski
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Do elite strategists always project powerfulness in how they talk about their strategy work' Whilst the strategy discourse literature has often assumed that those occupying senior strategy positions project strength in how they negotiate power through discourse, our findings challenge and elaborate this assumption by revealing aspects of vulnerability and powerlessness in how they talk about themselves as elite strategists. Based on the strategy discourse of 48 elite strategists around the world, our findings extend the literature at the intersection of power and subjectivity, strategy discourse, and strategy work in three ways. First, we illuminate surprising vulnerability and powerlessness in some elite strategists’ discourses about themselves, an element that goes beyond the assumption of exclusivity and influence embedded in current studies. Second, we contribute to the discursive opening up of the strategist role itself, showing how elite strategists position themselves in contrast to a variety of ‘others’ in strategy work beyond traditional hierarchies. Finally, we advance understandings on discursive competence in the strategy professional field, illuminating new ways in which its discursive competitiveness and continuity is manifest.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T01:05:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221099773
       
  • Keeping up with the Joneses: Social comparison of integrating work and
           family lives

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      Authors: Dawn S Carlson, Matthew J Quade, Min (Maggie) Wan, K Michele Kacmar, Kui Yin
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Does everyone around you seem to be juggling the work and family roles more successfully than you' This research examines the influence of social comparison of work–family balance in the work role overload to emotional exhaustion relationship through two paths – a spillover path to both job and family emotional exhaustion for the job incumbent and a crossover path to the spouse to their own family emotional exhaustion. Further, we examine whether the personality trait of social comparison orientation exacerbates these processes. We used matched responses over two time periods from 403 dual-earning, married couples living in the United States to test our hypotheses. We found support for all our hypothesized relationships. Social comparison plays a role in individuals’ perception of work–family demands, which may contribute to undesirable consequences for both the job incumbent and the spouse.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-05-25T10:25:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221094686
       
  • Walking back to happiness: The resurgence of latent callings in later life

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      Authors: Jane Sturges, Catherine Bailey
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Working in a domain to which one feels called has been heralded as a source of deep meaning and fulfilment, but not everyone is able to pursue their calling through paid employment. Current thinking positions such abandoned occupational callings as a source of regret, stress and disappointment but, by focusing on the perspectives of those still in mid-career, extant research has overlooked the potential for a calling to re-emerge in late adulthood. Drawing on life history narratives from retired individuals who felt called to music at an early age but did not pursue a musical career, we contribute to the corpus of work on unanswered callings by proposing the construct of latent callings to explain how callings may be held in the individual’s identity set primed to re-emerge, and reveal the mutable calling identity scripts that re-awaken the potential to live out a calling later in life. Our research shows how latent callings may be resumed via accommodation, deferred and emergent pathways and highlights the potential for a previously unanswered calling to become a source of social connection, deep happiness and enjoyment late in life.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-05-19T05:17:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221095759
       
  • What enables us to better experience our work as meaningful' The
           importance of awareness and the social context

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      Authors: Evgenia I Lysova, Luke Fletcher, Sabrine El Baroudi
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Why does becoming more aware of yourself and your wider work environment enable you to experience greater meaningful work' Drawing upon mindfulness-to-meaning and interpersonal sensemaking theories, we argue that in a state of awareness individuals are cognitively flexible and are able to interpret relevant interpersonal cues in ways that enable them to experience their work as meaningful. Study 1 is a quantitative diary study over a period of six weeks that tests the state-level relationships between awareness, cognitive flexibility, and meaningful work. We find that awareness is, directly and indirectly, related to three of four dimensions of meaningful work via cognitive flexibility. Study 2 qualitatively explores what individuals cognitively attend to in the social context when they reflect upon the most meaningful work events that occurred each week, over four weeks. Findings reveal that ambivalent work events are experienced as meaningful when individuals attend to interpersonal cues in their work context that convey a sense of worth, care, and/or safety. Overall, our article advances knowledge about meaningful work as a state-level experience that is facilitated by awareness, cognitive flexibility, and cues from the social context. It shows the importance of integrating meaningful work, mindfulness, and interpersonal sensemaking literatures.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T11:14:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221094243
       
  • Thinking outside Pandora’s box: Revealing differential effects of coping
           with physical and psychological menopause symptoms at work

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      Authors: Belinda Steffan, Kristina Potočnik
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Menopause is one of the most distinctive and individualised aspects of health-related gendered ageing at work, which is important as more women than ever before are working through their entire menopause cycle. We turn to the life-span development model of Selection, Optimisation and Compensation (SOC), which has great potential to provide a more nuanced review of adaptive behavioural strategies for potential work-related resource loss owing to menopause. In this article, we provide evidence from two studies: study 1 was an inductive analysis of 21 interviews; study 2 tested a number of hypotheses emergent from study 1 on two survey samples (N = 381). We found that women with severe menopause symptoms were adversely affected at work; however, the use of SOC alongside supervisory and female peer support, ameliorated the negative impact of physical menopause symptoms on work performance. We also identified that SOC use was actually detrimental to work performance when used to manage psychological menopause symptoms. Our findings advance the understanding of gendered ageing at work, specifically managing menopause at work, through the lens of SOC theory. We show how engaging in agentic adaptive behaviours can be both beneficial and detrimental for differentially managing physical and psychological menopause symptoms at work.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-05-12T11:18:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221089469
       
  • Sometimes enough is enough: Nurses’ nonlinear levels of passion and
           the influence of politics

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      Authors: Wayne Hochwarter, Samantha Jordan, Ilias Kapoutsis, Jennifer Franczak, Mayowa Babalola, Abdul Karim Khan, Yingge Li
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Does work politics get in the way of nurses’ passions even when mired in a global pandemic' To address this question, we examined the nonlinear associations of general work passion with job outcomes for practicing nurses and investigated whether these relationships were consistent across levels of perceived work politics. Results from multi-source, time-separated data indicated that passion possessed nonlinear associations with job satisfaction (inverted U-shape), work effort (U-shape), organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) (U-shape), and work performance (U-shape). Furthermore, passion demonstrated nonlinear relationships with job satisfaction and work effort when perceptions of organizational politics (POPs) were high (inverted U-shape) and low (U-shape). A nonlinear relationship emerged when POPs were high (inverted U-shape) when examining work passion associations with OCBs and job performance. Conversely, nonlinear associations were nonsignificant when POPs were low. These findings question the often-held assumption of linearity in the organizational sciences, in general, and support the speculation of more complex passion – outcome forms, specifically. We discuss implications of these results for nursing practice and scholarship, strengths, limitations, and avenues for future research.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T09:35:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221088535
       
  • When ‘I’ becomes ‘we’: An ethnographic study of power and
           responsibility in a large food retail cooperative

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      Authors: Guy Huber, David Knights
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Based on ethnographic research of a large food retail cooperative in New York (the Co-op), this article raises the research question of whether organizations can cultivate an ethic of responsibility to others and, if so, how this can be secured in everyday working practices' It draws principally on the work of Foucault and especially his later writings on the care of the self and ethics but seeks to link these deliberations to Levinas in identifying responsibility to the Other as prior to identity. Indeed, one message that we seek to convey is that attachments to identities are frequently a stumbling block for developing ethically responsible relations and organizations and this may necessitate some normative control. While recognizing that normative control can easily become oppressive and there were occasional signs of this where staff were watching one another and demanding compliance, our research provides a platform for exploring conversations about alternative forms of organization. We explore how relations of power can produce ethically progressive relations, through generative norms that give space to, and nurture, care and responsibility for others to constitute morally engaging organizational life.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T09:32:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221085445
       
  • Narratives of workplace resistance: Reframing Saudi women in leadership

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      Authors: Liela A Jamjoom, Albert J Mills
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Despite considerable social, economic, and organizational advancements that Saudi women have achieved in the past two decades, research on Saudi women in leadership continues to focus on the structural, organizational, and societal challenges the women face. Often missing from analyses are the micro ways in which the women resist and negotiate with/against organizational challenges. Using a postcolonial feminist lens, we asked: how do Saudi women leaders resist power in the workplace' This question was posed to reinsert the value of Saudi women within organizational narratives, generate deeper understanding of a marginalized group of women, and understand resistance as located within socio-political-ethical structures. Our contributions are threefold: (1) this study advances the literature on Saudi women in organizations by focusing on resistance as a point of entry and analysis; (2) we add a less antagonistic relationship between power/resistance, and reconceptualize agency/resistance as one inclusive of subtle and individual forms of resistance, and one that moves beyond the limits of the liberal imaginary; (3) our study also adds to the burgeoning scholarship on workplace resistance in non-Western contexts, which advocates for situated knowledge and the decolonization of management.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-04-19T06:07:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221087593
       
  • An event-oriented approach to the transmission of ex-leaders’
           entrepreneurial endeavor to employees’ entrepreneurial intention

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      Authors: Qingyan Ye, Duanxu Wang, Kai Zeng
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Departing from the conventional feature-oriented approach, this study introduces event system theory to highlight the importance of salient workplace events in shaping employees’ motivation for entrepreneurship and to uncover how the spatial and temporal issues inherent in the event of ex-leaders’ entrepreneurial endeavor may combine to influence employees’ entrepreneurial intention. The results of two time-lagged studies reveal that ex-leaders’ entrepreneurial success, relational proximity, and time proximity interact to affect employees’ entrepreneurial intention such that the positive impact of ex-leaders’ entrepreneurial success on employees’ entrepreneurial intention is stronger in the presence of high relational proximity and time proximity. The results further indicate that employees’ entrepreneurial self-efficacy functions as a crucial mechanism in translating this impact of ex-leaders’ entrepreneurial endeavor. These findings highlight the value of an event-oriented approach to investigating the impact of workplace events on employee outcomes.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-04-12T11:21:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221084495
       
  • Official truth, applied deconstruction and post-inquiry sensemaking in the
           Mull of Kintyre helicopter crash

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      Authors: Frank Mueller, Andrea Whittle, Susan Addison
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      On 2 June 1994, an RAF Chinook helicopter crashed into the Mull of Kintyre, Scotland, killing all crew members and intelligence personnel on board. In this article, we analyse the 17-year campaign to set aside the finding of gross negligence against the two pilots. Existing literature has tended to focus on sensemaking during the inquiries that typically follow an accident, crisis, or disaster. However, we have a more limited understanding of the post-inquiry sensemaking occurring after an inquiry has published its findings. Drawing insights from the sociology of science and sociology of knowledge, we conceptualise post-inquiry sensemaking as three phases involving a ‘black box’ being constructed and closed, re-opened and overturned. We propose the concept of ‘applied deconstruction’ to make sense of the latter two phases. We identify the components of the ‘engine of applied deconstruction’, namely: animated actors who seek to ‘open the black box’; the building of a coalition that spans institutional sites of power; activities of discrediting the official version and crediting alternative versions; and activities of ‘lamination’ that build successive ‘layers’ of doubt. We conclude by discussing the implications arising from our case for advancing the understanding of post-inquiry sensemaking.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-04-01T09:52:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221082881
       
  • To be or not to be political' Racialized cognitive scripts and
           political motivation

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      Authors: Madeleine Wyatt, Elena Doldor, Fatima Tresh
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      How do employees become politically motivated' In this study, we examine how ethnic minority employees interpret political experiences at work and form motivations to act politically (or not) by uncovering attribution-based political scripts. We propose that cognitive scripts entail learning about the political landscape at work and motivational pathways (personal responses to the political landscape). Adopting a mixed methods approach, we interviewed 40 ethnic minority employees and extracted 810 spontaneous causal attributions about beneficial or detrimental career-related political experiences. Using latent class analysis, we identified how combinations of these attributions formed six political scripts. The content of these scripts revealed that most political experiences motivated participants to opt out of the political arena, unless political activity was legitimized or enabled by senior gatekeepers. Our findings advance scholarship on political cognition, political will, and racialized politics at work by highlighting how the wider organizational political environment shapes employees’ political motivation. We also demonstrate how politics can be perceived as racialized and offer practical suggestions for ways organizations can make workplace politics more racially inclusive.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-03-27T07:38:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221083660
       
  • Ventriloquial reflexivity: Exploring the communicative relationality of
           the ‘I’ and the ‘it’

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      Authors: Frank Meier, Brigid Carroll
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Can an exploration of managers’ real-time organizational talk make way for a profoundly revised theory of reflexivity' Indeed, our analysis of the reflexivity literature reveals four significant points of contestation – the subject/object distinction, temporality, representation and agency – all of which revolve around the interplay of an ‘I’ (at least one reflexive agent) and an ‘it’ (something to be reflexive about). The focus of this inquiry lies in how the ‘I’ and the ‘it’ are constituted communicatively and what generates, sustains and animates them in interaction. Such interactions are sourced from a post-experience master programme for practising managers, thus providing naturally occurring data amendable to a ventriloquial analysis. We identify and demonstrate three types of reflexive moments: conflating, bifurcating and animating. We subsequently theorize these as instances of ventriloquial reflexivity, using the terms conflating, bifurcating and animating to express the different moments in which speakers co-orient to the communicative constitution of the ‘I’ and the ‘it’. Ventriloquial reflexivity allows us to explore reflexivity as an interactional and situated accomplishment, thus further pointing to how reflexive practices can be understood and enhanced.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-03-27T07:36:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221078493
       
  • The role of organizational settings in social learning: An ethnographic
           focus on food-delivery platform work

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      Authors: Claire Le Breton, Sophia Galière
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      How do organizational settings influence learning mechanisms and their outcomes' Based on a 26-month online and offline ethnography, the article specifically analyses couriers’ learning in the context of food-delivery platform work, marked by the heterogeneity of the working crowd, the gig nature of the job and the digitally mediated, individualized and automated management apparatus. Drawing on social learning theory, and in particular on communities of practice (CoPs), the results of the study unpack how the digital nature of online peer discussion groups enables three interrelated learning mechanisms (sharing, symphonizing and shaping). The digitalness of CoPs indeed allows for a high degree of responsiveness in exchanges and a commutativity of shared knowledge that overcome the structural barriers to social learning inherent in the low-skilled platform context. The present study finally challenges the widespread approach that views online worker groups as a potential locus for resistance; its findings suggest that they also indirectly contribute to maintaining power relations through the social learning processes they enable.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-03-17T10:35:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221081295
       
  • Gaslighting and dispelling: Experiences of non-governmental organization
           workers in navigating gendered corruption

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      Authors: Sanela Smolović Jones
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      How does corruption adopt gendered guises and how do women combat it in practice' Theorizing from the basis of a 30-month ethnography within a women’s non-governmental organization (NGO), the article proposes gaslighting as a way of interpreting gendered corruption, owing to its elusive but pernicious nature. Gaslighting is posited as the deployment of tactics to make women doubt their sanity and as a means of securing personal advantage. Gaslighting triggers embodied forms of struggle, and the article offers the notion of dispelling as denoting the persistent, patient and reiterative counter-practice of NGO practitioners to assert democratic norms of liberty and equality. The article provides rich empirical insight both into how corruption is enacted through the citing of patriarchal norms and how such norms are contested through the bodies of practitioners. These insights are important at a time when governments globally claim gender equality while undermining it in practice.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-03-17T04:36:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221083274
       
  • Untangling the team social capital–team innovation link: The role of
           proportional task conflict as well as group- and differentiated
           individual-focused transformational leadership

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      Authors: Jakob Stollberger, Amer Ali Al-Atwi, David De Cremer
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Findings from prior research on the relationship between a team’s social network architecture and team innovation have been inconclusive. Integrating social network theory with input–process–output models of team innovation, our research aims to reconcile the mixed findings in the literature by introducing a novel process perspective as well as highlighting a relevant contingency factor to untangle the team social capital–team innovation link. We propose that team social capital, operationalized as bridging and bonding social capital, negatively influences team innovation via team proportional task conflict, which is the level of task conflict teams experience proportional to the general level of team conflict (i.e. task, relationship and process conflict). In addition, we expected group and differentiated individual-focused transformational leadership to buffer the negative indirect effect of team social capital on team innovation via team proportional task conflict. Results from time-lagged data collected from research and development teams in Iraq revealed that teams with bonding and bridging social capital are less innovative because they experience less proportional task conflict. Furthermore, group-focused transformational leadership buffered the negative indirect relationship of team bridging social capital on team innovation via proportional task conflict. Theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-03-09T01:16:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221080995
       
  • Re/searching leadership: A critique in two agonies and nine fits

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      Authors: Jackie Ford, Nancy Harding, Sarah Gilmore
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Since the 19th century, much academic effort has been expended researching leadership. Bodies of theory have risen to dominance, proved unsatisfactory and been replaced by another generation of ultimately disappointing leadership thought. This repetitive pattern continues, so we ask what motivates this continuing, seemingly fruitless search' Focusing on researchers and not leadership per se, our analysis is inspired by two surprisingly complementary sources: psychoanalytical theory and Lewis Carroll’s epic nonsense poem, The Hunting of the Snark: An Agony in Eight Fits. Together they lead to a theory that re/search is motivated by unconscious desires to experience the transformational object—an ultimately unachievable search but one that unconsciously sustains the ever-growing field of leadership research. In contributing a new psychoanalytical theory of unconscious motivations that inspire our research, we also demonstrate the inspiration poetry may offer organizational researchers. We conclude by offering a ninth fit, which leaps into the void of future thought and finds that the leadership Snark was, in fact, a Boojum.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-02-24T09:30:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221079167
       
  • Organizational responses to political sanctions: Voluntary state
           co-optation and strategic acquiescence in China’s futures market

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      Authors: Hua Wei, John Hassard
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      What can an organization do to survive when its existence is a problem for political institutions' Drawing information from China’s futures market, we address this question through analysing forms of corporate political activity (CPA) among the nation’s ‘red capitalists’, notably using CPA concepts to decode power dynamics between Chinese financial organizations and the state. Deploying a multi-method, longitudinal and reflexive case approach, we explain how a ‘rogue’ futures exchange was targeted by a major regulatory crackdown, yet ostensibly survived; principally by negotiating new forms of institutional control. This saw the enrolling of state actors and resources to shape politically acceptable forms of corporate behaviour, a process framed theoretically through the concept of voluntary co-optation; or the strategic steps the focal organization took to yield power to the state in return for enhanced corporate legitimacy. Constructing a two-phase empirical account, including detailed diagrammatic explanations, the article assesses how a range of lobbying-oriented and guanxi-related practices influenced the organization in repositioning and reconstructing itself through progressive strategic acquiescence, as forces of political capital (‘whom you know’) and intellectual capital (‘what you know’) combined to shape the firm’s decision responses and bolster its functional credibility amid a hostile institutional climate.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-02-24T09:29:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221077995
       
  • Are narcissistic CEOs good or bad for family firm innovation'

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      Authors: Paola Rovelli, Alfredo De Massis, Luis R Gomez-Mejia
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Despite anecdotal evidence showing that some CEOs possess narcissistic personality traits, research on this individual characteristic is still lagging behind. Though the literature has established that narcissistic CEO traits may affect firm performance, it is not clear whether they act as constructive or destructing forces in family firms. This is particularly important given family firms’ attention towards the preservation of socioemotional wealth. A question thus arises: Can family firms benefit from narcissistic CEOs or should they avoid appointing individuals with this personality trait' Our analysis of unique data from Italian CEOs – collected through a survey and a psychometric test – reveals that CEO narcissism is lower in family firms, and among family CEOs. Nevertheless, in family firms, more narcissistic CEOs tend to exploit greater innovation opportunities by fostering higher top management teams strategic decision comprehensiveness. Our findings advance our understanding of narcissism in leadership positions, highlighting its importance for family firms’ innovation and providing meaningful contributions for research on CEO personality, family business and innovation, as well as for practitioners.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-02-15T08:50:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221076834
       
  • Playful work design: Conceptualization, measurement, and validity

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      Authors: Yuri S Scharp, Arnold B Bakker, Kimberley Breevaart, Kaspar Kruup, Andero Uusberg
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      In three different studies, we challenge the traditional view that work and play are mutually exclusive phenomena. We introduce the concept of playful work design – the proactive cognitive-behavioral orientation that employees engage in to incorporate play into their work activities to promote fun and challenge. In Study 1, we utilized expert-ratings and iterative exploratory factor analyses to develop an instrument that measures (1) designing fun and (2) designing competition. Additionally, Study 1 evidences the divergent and convergent validity of the subscales as well as their distinctiveness. Specifically, playful work design was indicative of proactivity as well as play, and designing fun especially correlated with ludic traits (i.e. traits focused on deriving fun; e.g. humor), whereas designing competition particularly correlated with agonistic traits (i.e. traits focused on deriving challenge; e.g. competitiveness). Study 2 cross-validated the two-factor structure, further investigated the nomological net of playful work design, and revealed that playful work design is distinct from job crafting. Finally, Study 3 examined the predictive and incremental validity of the playful work design instrument with self- and colleague-ratings two weeks apart. Taken together, the results suggest that the instrument may advance our understanding of play initiated by employees during work.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-02-10T09:14:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267211070996
       
  • Dynamic relationships between leader–member exchange and employee
           role-making behaviours: The moderating role of employee emotional
           ambivalence

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      Authors: Hai-Jiang Wang, Lixin Jiang, Xiaohong Xu, Kong Zhou, Talya N Bauer
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      We set out to understand how role-making works and what roles employees and leaders play in this process. Employees often make changes to their work roles, such as by negotiating their job responsibilities and seeking challenging tasks. In this study, we suggest that role-making behaviours influence and are influenced by the dyadic relationship between leaders and employees, otherwise known as leader–member exchange (LMX). We collected three waves of survey data from a sample of Chinese employees who were recent college graduates (n = 203). The results from cross-lagged panel analyses showed that (1) LMX and job-change negotiation were reciprocally related to each other and (2) initial LMX was associated with increased challenge-seeking behaviours, although these behaviours did not lead to greater LMX later on. In addition, we found evidence that when employees experienced a high level of emotional ambivalence (a conflicting, mixed and complex emotional state), the direct and reciprocal relationships between LMX and role-making behaviours were weakened. Our findings advance the understanding of the development of leader–employee relationships in the workplace and have implications for strengthening employee perceptions of high-quality relationships with their leaders by making changes to their workplace roles.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-02-08T05:19:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221075253
       
  • Algorithmic governmentality and the space of ethics: Examples from
           ‘People Analytics’

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      Authors: Richard Weiskopf, Hans Kause Hansen
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Does human reflexivity disappear as datafication and automation expand and machines take over decision making' In trying to find answers to this question, we take our lead from recent debates about People Analytics and analyze how the use of algorithmically driven digital technologies like facial recognition and drones in work-organizations and societies at large shape the conditions of ethical conduct. Linking the concepts of algorithmic governmentality and space of ethics, we analyze how such technologies come to form part of governing practices in specific contexts. We conclude that datafication and automation have huge implications for human reflexivity and the capacity to enact responsibility in decision making. But that itself does not mean that the space for ethical conduct disappears, which is the impression left in some literatures, but rather that is modified and (re) constituted in the interplay of mechanisms of closure (like automating decision making, black boxing and circumventing reflexivity), and opening (such as disclosing contingent values and interests in processes of problematization, contestation and resistance). We suggest that future research investigates in more detail the dynamics of closure and opening in empirical studies of the use and effects of algorithmically driven digital technologies in organizations and societies.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-02-01T09:37:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221075346
       
  • Theorising work–life balance endeavours as a gendered project of the
           self: The case of senior executives in Denmark

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      Authors: Maria Adamson, Sara Louise Muhr, T Alexandra Beauregard
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Recent work–life balance (WLB) studies offer considerable insight into the challenges and strategies of achieving WLB for senior managers. This study shifts the focus from asking how to asking why individuals are so invested in pursuing a particular kind of WLB. Through analysing 62 life history interviews with male and female senior executives in Denmark, we develop the concept of the gendered project of the self to theorise WLB. We show how for the executives, WLB was not simply an instrumental process of time or role management; instead, pursuing WLB in a certain way was a key part of acquiring and maintaining a particular desired subjectivity or a sense of self as a better person, better worker and better parent. We argue that theorising WLB as the gendered project of the self allows us to explicate the mechanisms through which gendered social and cultural expectations translate into how male and female executives can and want to pursue their WLB goals – first by driving one’s desire for WLB and, second, by shaping and restricting what is desired. In doing so, we highlight the importance of scrutinising the role of broader WLB discourses in shaping the experience and uptake of organisational WLB policies.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-01-22T12:21:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267211073309
       
  • Objectal resistance: The political role of personal objects in workers’
           resistance to spatial change

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      Authors: Laurent Taskin, David Courpasson, Céline Donis
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Flexwork, that is, the combination of shared offices and telework, is one of the major changes affecting the workplace these days. But how do employees react to these transformations of their work environment' In this article, we investigate employees’ resistance to the introduction of flexwork in a large Belgian organization. We show employees resisting this workspace transformation through the use of personal objects as means to physically reconnect to the place, using objects to convey their claims and objectively occupy places. Though space has become a key analytic concept in the study of organizations, research still largely neglects the concrete role played by personal objects in the capacity of workers to resist change in the occupation of workspaces. We highlight the mutual constitution of objects and space in practices of resistance to workspace change. We show specifically how the politicality of these materials – referred to here as objectal resistance – comes from the meaning that people assign to objects when they place them in order to re-establish workers’ bodily presence at work – that is, from acts of objects embodiment and emplacement. We contribute to studies of resistance in the workplace by showing that objectal resistance is a complex combination of overt and covert activities, which leads to seeing the classic opposition between recognition and post-recognition politics in a new light.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-01-19T09:57:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267211067142
       
  • Revisiting conflict: Neoliberalism at work in the gig economy

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      Authors: Alessandro Niccolò Tirapani, Hugh Willmott
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      What is the role of conflict in bringing about radical change' Taking the case of the gig economy, we study the conditions of possibility for fairer alternative ways of organising to emerge. Currently, some commentators underscore the sense of freedom of working as a self-employed contractor; others focus on its negative and exploitative dimensions. Less attention has been given to the potential emergence of (radical) conflicts around the nature of gig work. Thus, we contribute to the study of conflict in organisation theory by appreciating two different yet interrelated phenomena. First, how neoliberal gig work mobilises positive fantasies of individualised economic prosperity and independence, leading to reformist responses to social and contractual disputes. Second, how the dark side of gig work can trigger radical conflicts, which reject the assumptions underpinning the ‘self-employed contractors’ business model. We argue that the potential for radical (labour) revolts is buffered by neoliberal individualisation and hegemonic ideology – articulated in the phenomenon that we term ‘econormativity’. Yet, as the latter offers no resolution to structural grievances, conflict continues to simmer in the background. The article aims to advance, principally from an organisation studies perspective, our understanding of conflict and its role in unleashing radical alternatives.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-01-08T06:42:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267211064596
       
  • How is social inequality maintained in the Global South' Critiquing
           the concept of dirty work

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      Authors: Ghazal Zulfiqar, Ajnesh Prasad
      First page: 2160
      Abstract: Human Relations, Ahead of Print.
      Extant research on dirty work—occupations involving physical, social, or moral taint, which affect worker identities—has been read primarily through the lens of social identity theory (SIT). There are two notable shortcomings that emerge as a consequence of dirty work being too heavily reliant upon the precepts of SIT, which we seek to remedy in this article: (1) the overemphasis on the symbolic to the detriment of the material has led to false optimism regarding the ability for subjects doing dirty work to exercise agency in constructing their own sense of selves, and (2) the failure to substantively account for the role of identity differences suggests that empirical research on the phenomenon is devoid of proper historical and cultural contextualization. Drawing on a qualitive study on low-caste toilet cleaners in Pakistan, our findings were largely incongruous with the scholarly conceptualization of dirty work that has been propagated to date. We explicate the embedded role of power and context in dirty work, which are not adequately considered using SIT alone. Repudiating the overly romanticized version of the concept, we argue that SIT’s account of dirty work ought to be complemented by status construction theory going forward.
      Citation: Human Relations
      PubDate: 2022-06-03T01:17:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00187267221097937
       
 
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