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HUMAN RESOURCES (103 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 92 of 92 Journals sorted by number of followers
Asia Pacific Journal of Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 222)
Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 77)
Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 75)
Human Resource Management Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74)
Human Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Human Resource Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
International Journal of Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 52)
Journal of Accounting and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Accounting Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Contemporary Accounting Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Review of Accounting Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Human Resource Development Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Accounting Auditing & Accountability Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Human Resource Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Personality and Individual Differences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
American Journal of Finance and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Accounting and Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Human Development and Capabilities : A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Human Resources Development and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
European Accounting Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Human Resource Management Research     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Human Resource Development International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Open Journal of Leadership     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Accounting and Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Critical Perspectives on Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Accounting Education: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Personnel Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Banking, Accounting and Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
European Journal of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Review of Public Personnel Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Public Personnel Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Management Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Human Resource Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
British Accounting Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Management Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
New Horizons in Adult Education and Human Resource Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Behavioural Accounting and Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Human Capital     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Accounting, Auditing and Performance Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Accounting and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Accounting Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Human Resource and Organization Development Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Attachment & Human Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Strategic HR Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Service Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Human Resource Costing & Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Professions and Organization     Free   (Followers: 5)
Afro-Asian Journal of Finance and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Human Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of International Accounting, Auditing and Taxation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Research in Human Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
German Journal of Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Contemporary Accounting & Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
South Asian Journal of Human Resources Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Organizational Effectiveness : People and Performance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Australian Accounting Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Corporate Governance and Organizational Behavior Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Accounting Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Chinese Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Coaching : Theorie & Praxis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Evidence-based HRM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Human Capital and Information Technology Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Ethics and Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of HR intelligence     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pacific Accounting Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Critical Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Marketing and HR     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Accounting and the Public Interest     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Economics and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Sri Lankan Journal of Human Resource Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intangible Capital     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
EURO Journal on Decision Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Human Resource and Sustainability Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
NHRD Network Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Human Resource Research     Open Access  
Personnel Assessment and Decisions     Open Access  
Kelaniya Journal of Human Resource Management     Open Access  
Revista Gestión de las Personas y Tecnología     Open Access  
Psychologie du Travail et des Organisations     Hybrid Journal  
FOR Rivista per la formazione     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Enterprising Communities People and Places in the Global Economy     Hybrid Journal  
Asian Review of Accounting     Hybrid Journal  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Evidence-based HRM
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.537
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2049-3983 - ISSN (Online) 2049-3991
Published by Emerald Homepage  [362 journals]
  • Inclusive leadership and workers' safety behaviour during Covid-19
           pandemic

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      Authors: Kunthi Afrilinda Kusumawardani , Maria Jacinta Arquisola , Grace Amin , Meta Restiawati
      Abstract: COVID-19 pandemic underlines the need for effective leadership to resolve the crisis. This study aims to examine the impact of inclusive leadership on safety behaviours via the mediating role of the safety climate. This research studied and compared two of the industries most affected by the pandemic, specifically banking and education. The questionnaire was undertaken among 111 from the education sector and 159 from the banking sector. Structural equation modelling – partial least square (SEM – PLS) was used to analyse the results. The study suggested that inclusive behaviour shaped the safety behaviours among employees through the safety climate. However, the influence of inclusive leadership on the safety environment and safety behaviours of education staff in the company was not as powerful as in the banking sector. There's a connection between inclusive leadership and worker protection. Besides, inclusive leadership and its effect on safety behaviour are culturally based. High levels of collectivism encourage leaders to care deeply for their employees' well-being, as demonstrated in this study by the promotion of a healthy working atmosphere, especially in times of crisis. This research potentially adds to the current literature on leadership and safety behaviour and offers valuable management recommendations.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-11-17
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-04-2021-0064
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Linking meaningful work and nurse turnover intention: a multilevel
           modeling

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      Authors: Decha Dechawatanapaisal
      Abstract: This study aims to examine the moderating role of perceived supervisor support at the team level on the relationships between meaningful work, job embeddedness, and turnover intention at the individual level. A cross-sectional study was performed in 52 work-units from private general hospitals in Thailand. A total of 719 nurses completed a self-reported questionnaire. The hypotheses were tested through a multilevel approach. The results indicate that job embeddedness mediates the relationship between meaningful work and intention to quit, and that perceived supervisor support at the team level reduces turnover intention by reinforcing the impact of meaningful work on job embeddedness. Despite a possible absence of common method variance, social desirability bias may exist due to a single-source survey data. The generalizability of the findings may be limited due to the nature of the sample, which involved only one industry. Coaching supervisors on management and communication styles and providing team members with a say in concerns and expectations potentially improve how supervisors can be more supportive toward their respective team members. The novelty of this study lies in its inclusion of meaningful work and a supportive constituent from team supervisors in the mediational pathway of job embeddedness-turnover model by considering a cross-level perspective.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-10-11
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-01-2022-0016
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Impact of team voice on employee voice behavior: role of felt obligation
           for constructive change and supervisor expectations for voice

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      Authors: Um-e-Rubbab , Muhammad Irshad , Sayyed Muhammad Mehdi Raza Naqvi
      Abstract: Promotive and prohibitive voice behavior is essential for effective team performance and organizational sustainability. However, the existing literature is limited on the role of team voice in predicting employee voice behavior. The authors proposed that team members' voices serve as a cue for engagement in felt obligation for constructive change, which sets the path for employees' engagement in promotive and prohibitive voice behavior. This study further proposed that supervisor expectation for voice may alter the relationship between team voice and felt obligation for constructive change of employees. The authors' proposed model is based on social information processing theory. The data were collected from 313 telecommunication sector employees and the companies supervisors through a multi-source time-lagged design. Linear regression analysis and the Preacher and Hayes Process for mediation and moderation were used to test the proposed hypothesis. The results support the direct effect of team voice on promotive and prohibitive voice behavior, and the indirect effect of team voice on promotive voice behavior through the mediation of felt obligation for constructive change was also supported. However, mediation of felt obligation for constructive change between team voice and prohibitive voice behavior was not supported. The results also support the moderation of supervisor expectation for voice between team voice and felt obligation for constructive change. Findings of the study may help organizational practitioners and managers about the value of promotive and prohibitive voice behavior for better team functioning through team voice. The study also highlights the importance of supervisor expectations for voice to strengthen the association between team voice and felt obligation for constructive change among employees. Both dimensions of voice behavior, i.e. promotive and prohibitive voice, are crucial for improved organizational functioning and preventing the organization from harm and loss. Organizations should create environments high on voice behavior to remain competitive and meet the challenges of dynamic business environments.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-10-11
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-10-2021-0225
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Employees' adoption of HR analytics – a theoretical framework based on
           career construction theory

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      Authors: Kiran Dhankhar , Abhishek Singh
      Abstract: Drawing upon the career construction theory, the present study aims to propose and test a mediation model exploring the association among technology readiness, adoption of human resource (HR) analytics by HR professionals, and organizational career growth. A survey has been conducted to collect data from HR professionals (N = 347) working in various industrial sectors in India. The data collected is analyzed for mediation using SPSS PROCESS Macro (Model 4). The study provided evidence about the mediating role of individual adoption of HR analytics between technology readiness (motivators, inhibitors) and organization career growth (career goal progress, professional ability development, promotion speed and remuneration growth). Firstly, the results provide evidence in relation to the career construction theory with respect to adoption of human resource analytics by HR professionals. Secondly, the study findings validate the technology readiness model in the context of adopting HR analytics. Thirdly and most significantly, the study proposes a novel theoretical framework for adoption of HR analytics by HR professionals in organizations. The findings imply that HR professionals' technology readiness (motivators and inhibitors) can facilitate better adoption of HR analytics in organizations. Moreover, the adoption of HR analytics shall promote better career growth for HR professionals. The present study builds and tests a theoretical framework based on technology readiness, individual adoption of HR analytics, and organization career growth. The study is the first of its kind to the best of the authors' knowledge.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-10-07
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-02-2022-0053
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Impact of boredom on perceived inequity and discretionary behaviors: a
           latent growth curve approach

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      Authors: Shih Yung Chou , Bo Han , Charles Ramser
      Abstract: This study seeks to examine the effect of work-related boredom and a perceived lack of external stimulation on benevolent and entitled employees' perceived inequity and discretionary workplace behaviors. A total of 668 useable three-wave panel data were obtained via Amazon Mechanical Turk during a three-month period. The hypothesized model was tested using a latent growth curve modeling via EQS 6.4 for Windows. This study finds the following results. First, benevolent employees who experience higher initial work-related boredom report positive inequity. Second, entitled employees who experience higher initial work-related boredom and a perceived lack of external stimulation report negative inequity. Third, increases in work-related boredom and a perceived lack of external stimulation result in a faster increase in entitled employees' perceived negative inequity. Fourth, entitled employees who perceive higher negative inequity at the initial measurement period report higher interpersonal deviance. Finally, increases in entitled employees' perceived negative inequity result in a faster increase in interpersonal deviance. This study highlights how employees may assess their effort and rewards when experiencing boredom. This study also offers some practical recommendations that help human resource managers manage boredom in the organization effectively.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-10-04
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-01-2022-0024
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The interplay of gendered identities and employees perception of
           organizational citizenship behavior

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      Authors: Navneet Kaur , Lakhwinder Singh Kang
      Abstract: Drawing from the gender schema theory and social role theory, the purpose of this study is to assess the gender-congruent nature of organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) through the mediating role of gender role orientation (femininity and masculinity) in the relationship between individuals sex and OCB dimensions. It also explores the moderating effect of gender ideology on the influence of sex on the exhibition of gender-congruent OCBs. Data were collected in two waves with a time lag of three weeks from frontline employees and their peers working in the Indian private banking sector. PROCESS macro was used to assess the hypothesized relationships. The results indicated that femininity mediated the influence of sex on OCBs directed toward co-workers (OCBI). However, the mediating role of femininity was not confirmed in the association between sex and OCBs targeted toward customers (OCBC). Further, masculinity mediated the influence of sex on OCBs directed toward the organization (OCBO). Gender ideology also moderated the relationship between sex and OCBs, such that traditional women displayed more OCBI as compared to egalitarian women, while egalitarian women displayed more OCBC than traditional women. Additionally, traditional men were found to display more OCBO than egalitarian men. The paper contributes to the existing literature by suggesting that the performance of OCBs depends upon various gender identities, with each gender identity having its own and significant effect on the performance of OCB.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-09-28
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-05-2021-0106
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Rethinking recruitment ethically through the lens of corporate
           social responsibility (CSR)

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      Authors: Vic Benuyenah
      Abstract: Traditional recruitment practices tend to be rigorous, but some of its elements can be improved. The length of applications, missing or unstated salary details and lack of anonymity in some emerging countries' recruitment processes mean that recruitment standards remain questionable and unethical. This paper presents a conceptual discourse on how current recruitment activities can be improved in light of progress made with global Internet infrastructure and CSR standards. This is primarily a conceptual paper intended to discuss unethical recruitment practices. The author used selected studies and case studies to present the case for improvements in the field of recruitment. Compared with easy apply options popularised through recruitment websites, organisations continue to favour traditionally lengthy and complicated applications. The incidence of unstated salary, lack of anonymity and poor communication from some recruiters imply that more has to be done in these areas of CSR. As with most conceptual papers, this study lacks adequate empirical support. The claims and propositions made are largely based on a scanty number of current research and industry observations. This study will have potential application in scenarios where recruiters are seeking to improve their practice; however, the recommendations may not be applicable to all organisations. The understanding of ethical values and their application to recruitment will vary from culture to culture. The paper offers a clear path to debating recruitment ethics and improvements in current practices. No known studies have specifically targeted this area of ethical recruitment.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-09-22
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-05-2022-0113
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Workers' well-being and job performance in the context of COVID-19: a
           sector-specific approach

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      Authors: Maude Boulet , Annick Parent-Lamarche
      Abstract: The main objective of this study is to scrutinize the relationship between workers' well-being and job performance across sectors during the first lockdown. The authors also aim to examine the indirect effects of satisfaction with work-life balance, reopening of schools after closure, workload and teleworking on performance through well-being. The authors used a sample of 447 Canadian workers collected online during the first lockdown to perform a series of structural equation models. The results show that workers' well-being increases job performance and satisfaction with work-life balance has a positive indirect effect on job performance through well-being in all sectors. This finding suggests that workers' well-being mediates the relationship between satisfaction with work-life balance and performance. However, the reopening of schools, increased workload and teleworking do not have universal effects across sectors. All organizations should implement human resources (HR) practices that promote workers' well-being and family-friendly workplaces, especially during the pandemic. Conversely, teleworking has a sector-specific effect that must be considered when implemented. This study stands out by strengthening the bridge between workers' well-being and job performance. The effects of well-being and satisfaction with work-life balance on job performance are universal, while the impact of reopening of schools, increased workload and teleworking are sector-specific.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-09-21
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-07-2021-0139
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Exploring the antecedents of high-performance work practices: empirical
           evidence from Ibero-America

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      Authors: Isis Gutiérrez-Martínez , Antonio Sancho y Maldonado , Rodrigo Costamagna , Francois Duhamel
      Abstract: This article analyzes the impact of the national culture, the dependence of the sector of activity on human capital, and the multinational character of the firm involved, on the degree of implementation of high performance work practices (HPWPs) in Ibero-American companies. This quantitative study results from a survey of 614 Ibero-American firms, in 6 different countries. Multiple regressions were performed to test the hypothesis proposed. HPWPs for employee recruitment and selection have been frequently implemented in Ibero-American countries. Three factors, i.e. national culture, degree of multinationality, and degree of dependence of the sector of activity on human capital, have a strong influence on the degree of implementation of HPWPs in general, at different degrees. For example, recruitment and selection practices are conditioned by the degree of multinationality, individualism, uncertainty avoidance, and power distance, while they are not influenced by masculinity and by the sector of activity. HR managers must align the design and execution of HPWPs with the national culture, and with the characteristics of the sector of activity, they belong to. Domestic companies should also aspire to achieve the higher standards of multinational companies for specific HPWPs. This study, to the authors’ best knowledge, is the first to provide insights into the influence of the three factors mentioned above on the degree of implementation of HPWPs in Ibero-American firms, using multiple regression analysis. The authors examine in this article a larger set of HPWPs than does most of the existing empirical literature.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-09-20
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-04-2021-0069
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Moderating role of resistance to change in the actual adoption of HR
           analytics in the Indian banking and financial services industry

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      Authors: Meenal Arora , Anshika Prakash , Amit Mittal , Swati Singh
      Abstract: This study aimed to evaluate the factors that determine an individual's decision to adopt human resources (HR) analytics. This study attempts to extend Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology - 2 (UTAUT2) to identify the lag rate in adoption. Responses were obtained from 387 HR employees of the Banking Financial Services and Insurance (BFSI) sector in metropolitan cities of India through nonprobabilistic purposive sampling. The analysis was performed through hierarchical regression, structural equation modeling and moderation of resistance to change. The results suggest that performance expectancy, hedonic motivation and data availability are endorsed by proponents of the intention to adopt HR analytics. In contrast, effort expectancy, social influence, quantitative self-efficacy and habits did not influence behavioral intention (BI). Additionally, the actual use behavior (UB) of HR analytics was determined by BI and facilitating conditions. Furthermore, the moderating effect of resistance to change is explored. This study makes a significant contribution to the literature on the adoption of HR analytics. By appropriately concentrating on the adoption intention of HR analytics, organizations can intensify healthy employee relationships, thus encouraging the actual usage of HR analytics. This study formulates a conceptual framework for the adoption of HR analytics that can be used by top management to formulate strategies for the implementation of HR analytics. Moreover, this study aimed to expand UTAUT2, emphasizing the concept of data availability and quantitative self-efficacy and examining the moderating role of resistance to change in the relationship between BI and UB.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-09-08
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-12-2021-0249
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Differences in the organizational-commitment–rewards relationship
           between Chinese managers and Japanese expatriates in manufacturing
           companies in China

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      Authors: Keisuke Kokubun , Misako Yasui
      Abstract: As China attracts more and more foreign enterprises today, it is getting more important to consider how to enhance the organizational commitment (OC) of host country employees. This paper aims to examine the differences in the relationship between OC and rewards among Chinese managers and Japanese expatriates who work for Japanese manufacturing companies in China. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to analyze survey data gathered from 539 Chinese managers and 354 Japanese expatriates working for a total of 19 Japanese manufacturing companies in China. The findings reveal that, for Chinese managers, role clarity had a stronger influence and autonomy had a weaker influence on OC than for Japanese expatriates. A possible reason is the ethnocentric culture of Japanese companies that leads to Japanese expatriates not sufficiently empowering local human resources. Moreover, there was no difference between senior- and junior-level Chinese managers in the association of any kind of reward with OC. The most significant limitation concerns its generalizability. The authors recommend that future research use other nations' expatriates as reference groups to objectively clarify the characteristics of Chinese workers, thus testing the validity of this research. The results of this research may be used to reshape future human-resource-management practices in several types of the company located in China to facilitate attracting and employing the employees most able to make long-term contributions to the company. Although previous research has elucidated OC–rewards relation in particular countries, it has not met the potential requirements of the expatriates who face the difference in OC–rewards relation with host country national managers. In this sense, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, this research was the first attempt to tackle this theme by contributing to the literature.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-09-07
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-09-2021-0196
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Making Generation Y employees want to stick to their jobs: the roles of
           individualized consideration transformational leadership, occupational
           self-efficacy, and personal growth initiative

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      Authors: Parul Malik , Pooja Malik
      Abstract: Based on the self-determination and affective events theories, the current research examined the mediating role of occupational self-efficacy (OSE) between individualized consideration transformational leadership (ICTL) and affective commitment relationship. Furthermore, this study tests the moderating role of personal growth initiative on the relationship between ICTL and OSE. To examine the relationship, the authors carried out a time-lagged study spanning over four months for analyzing the indirect effect of ICTL on affective commitment via OSE among 382 Generation Y employees working in Indian IT (information technology) organizations. Results were analyzed using Process macro. The study results revealed that OSE significantly mediated the relationship between ICTL and affective commitment. It was also established that the positive relationship between ICTL and OSE was stronger among employees who perceived higher levels of personal growth initiative. The findings carry substantial implications for researchers and organizational practitioners. Indeed, the results indicate that human resource management practitioners are required to nurture an ICTL approach for boosting employees' affective commitment levels. The study proposed a model focusing on the role of ICTL in enhancing employees' OSE and affective commitment. Also, the study contributes to existent research by demonstrating the role of personal growth initiative in understanding the relationship between ICTL and OSE. Moreover, this study provides theoretical and practical implications.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-07-2021-0148
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Stay positive: studying the change patterns in academics' job and life
           satisfaction during the Covid-19 pandemic through growth curve modeling

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      Authors: Majid Ghasemy , Lena Frömbling
      Abstract: During the Covid-19 outbreak, universities around the globe were closed or went online due to lockdowns implemented to curb the pandemic's spread. This study aims to examine the changes in Malaysian academics' job and life satisfaction during a testing four-month period, from the beginning of the first Covid-19 lockdown until two months after it ended. It also assesses the impact of affective states and age group on these two constructs. In this longitudinal study, the authors collected data from 220 academics in Malaysia at three time points in 2020, namely the beginning of the lockdown (April), the end of the lockdown (June) and two months after the lockdown (August). The authors applied multivariate latent growth curve (LGC) modeling to study changes in job satisfaction and life satisfaction. In addition, we added age group, as a time-invariant covariate, as well as positive and negative affect, as two time-varying covariates, to our LGC model. The authors estimated the LGC model using the EQS 6.4 statistical package. The results show that both job and life satisfaction were stable over time, although their means were below the average. Positive affect was a significant predictor of both types of satisfaction, and age group was a significant predictor of job satisfaction. The main implication the authors draw from this study is connected to job and life satisfaction's mean values being below average. In line with the affective events theory (AET), the authors recommend paying particular attention to work environment features, such as providing sufficient infrastructure for employees working from home and keeping social relations intact. Especially young academics should receive sufficient support. The study is one of a limited number that examined longitudinal effects during the Covid-19 pandemic in the domains of human resource management and organizational behavior. Hence, this study expands our knowledge of employees' affect and attitudes during an unprecedented global health crisis, particularly in the under-researched area of the Malaysian higher education sector.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-08-31
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-09-2021-0207
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Person-environment fit, organizational commitment and retirement
           intentions: a serial mediation model

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      Authors: Khaled Lahlouh , Aïcha Oumessaoud , Moustafa Abdelmotaleb
      Abstract: The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of person–environment (P–E) fit, specifically person–organization (P–O) fit, on retirement intentions through a serial mediation mechanism mobilizing person–job (P–J) fit and affective organizational commitment as mediators. The relationships were examined using the Hayes (2013) serial mediation model. A time-lag approach was adopted, with data collected from managers aged 50 and over working in the French banking sector (N = 204). The empirical results show that the P–O fit is both directly and indirectly related to retirement intentions through P–J fit and affective organizational commitment. Nevertheless, the study’s findings show the explanatory power of the authors’ antecedents to predict the two types of retirement considered in this study. By considering retirement in its plurality this study extends prior research models by examining the mechanisms through which P–O fit influences different retirement intentions.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-08-29
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-11-2021-0234
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • How social self-efficacy and emotional self-efficacy moderate the
           relationship between occupational stress and knowledge hiding in Brazilian
           software industry

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      Authors: Cherine Jneid
      Abstract: Software industry, one of the most knowledge-intensive industries, in Brazil has increased opportunities of evolution. Its competitive advantage relies on the efficiency of the organizational knowledge management, but the knowledge hiding, its antecedents and moderators are still understudied. This study seeks to identify a new antecedent to knowledge hiding, such the occupational stress. The author focused on the moderating effect of social self-efficacy and emotional self-efficacy in the relationship between occupational stress and knowledge hiding in software industry in Brazil. The author collected data from 189 software industry Brazilian employees in 30 firms using a time-lagged research design. This study demonstrated that employees with high levels of social self-efficacy (SSE) and emotional self-efficacy (ESE) or both have more tendency to engage on knowledge hiding behavior comparing to their colleagues with low SSE and ESE. This study showed that SSE and ESE related positively to rationalized hiding, evasive hiding and playing dumb. The author’s main contribution relies on the finding related to the joint role of social self-efficacy and emotional self-efficacy on engaging employees under occupational stress conditions in knowledge hiding behaviors.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-08-24
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-03-2021-0040
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The role of organizational justice and job satisfaction in mitigating
           turnover intention of emotionally exhausted employees: evidence from
           Vietnam

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      Authors: Phong Dong Nguyen , Nguyen Phong Nguyen , Lam D. Nguyen , Thu Ha Le
      Abstract: This study examines employee emotional exhaustion and turnover intention as the consequences of problematic customer behaviors and tests the role of perceived organizational justice and job satisfaction in mitigating these consequences. A four-hypothesis model was tested using partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) based on a two-phase survey of 369 frontline services employees in Vietnam with a three-month time lag. The study shows that abusive and unreasonably demanding customer behaviors have positive effects on emotional exhaustion, which, in turn, reduces job satisfaction and, subsequently, turnover intention. It also reveals that organizational justice mechanisms attenuate the positive association between emotional exhaustion and turnover intention. Job satisfaction indirectly mitigated the turnover intention of emotionally exhausted employees who had to deal with problematic customer behaviors, especially in the service sector in Vietnam, an emerging market. Building upon the social exchange theory (SET) and the conservation of resources theory (COR), this study extended the research on organizational justice with respect to emotional exhaustion in the customer service sector that received less attention previously. Rather than merely focusing on the interpersonal factors (e.g. respect and sensitivity) as organizational support does, organizational justice encompasses employees' perception of fairness of outcome and the whole process in an organization to reach decisions.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-06-2021-0115
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Linking empowering leadership with workplace proactivity: the mediating
           role of psychological safety and knowledge sharing

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      Authors: Abhishek Singh
      Abstract: This study aims to explore the association between empowering leadership and workplace proactivity. The data have been collected through questionnaires from both the medical and non-medical staff members working in four National Accreditation Board for Hospitals & Healthcare (NABH)–accredited private hospitals in India. Confirmatory factor analysis has employed test reliability and validity and PROCESS MACRO (model 6) to test the proposed serial mediation model. The results support the proposed hypotheses of the serial mediation model. Additionally, the authors have also found that psychological safety is a strong mediating variable than knowledge sharing between empowering leadership and workplace proactivity. The findings should be interpreted by considering the cross-sectional research design and self-reported measures. An organization can use the findings to promote employee proactivity at the workplace. The study makes an attempt to explore the underdeveloped relationship between empowering leadership and workplace proactivity in the context of Indian NABH-accredited hospitals based on the self-determination theory.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-08-19
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-07-2021-0140
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Unravelling the role of organizational commitment and work engagement in
           the relationship between self-leadership and employee creativity

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      Authors: K. Jnaneswar , Gayathri Ranjit
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to examine the serial mediating mechanism between self-leadership and employee creativity through organizational commitment and work engagement. Drawing on the self-determination theory and broaden and build theory, this study investigates the indirect effect of self-leadership on employee creativity through organizational commitment and work engagement. The relationships were investigated using PROCESS macro for SPSS. Data were collected from 324 employees working in the Indian automobile industry. Structural equation modelling was used to evaluate the model fit of the measurement model. The results of the study revealed that self-leadership impacts employee creativity. Further, the findings showed that both organizational commitment and work engagement individually mediate the relationship between self-leadership and employee creativity. The key finding of this research was the partial serial mediation of organizational commitment and work engagement in the relationship between self-leadership and employee creativity. This is one of the primary studies that examined the serial mediating effect of organizational commitment and work engagement in the relationship between self-leadership and employee creativity. This study contributes to the existing literature on self-leadership and employee creativity by evincing the mediating mechanism of organizational commitment and work engagement.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-08-09
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-08-2021-0164
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Finding one's own way: how newcomers who differ stay well

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      Authors: Jenny Chen , Helena D. Cooper-Thomas
      Abstract: Being different from others can be stressful, and this may be especially salient for newcomers during organizational socialization when they may be expected to fit in. Thus, drawing on conservation of resources theory, the authors examine the effects of newcomers' individual differentiation on their subsequent emotional exhaustion. The authors test a multiple mediation model with data from 161 UK graduates collected at three times using structural equation modeling. The results largely support the hypotheses, identifying individual differentiation as a motivational resource associated with the proactive behavior of changing work procedures. In turn, changing work procedures links with the personal resource of positive affect, which facilitates the relational resource of social acceptance and predicts lower emotional exhaustion. Individual differentiation predicts lower social acceptance also, but not via monitoring as anticipated. The results provide novel insights into the effects of individual differentiation on emotional exhaustion in the context of organizational socialization. The study highlights that, while newcomers high in individual differentiation face depletion of the relational resource of social acceptance, they can still adjust well and avoid emotional exhaustion through changing work procedures to foster positive affect.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-08-04
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-06-2022-0153
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Measuring the personal perspective on work engagement: An empirical
           exploration of the self-anchoring work engagement scale in Poland

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      Authors: Konrad Kulikowski
      Abstract: Work engagement is among the most influential constructs in human resource management, but work engagement's current understanding overlooks what employees consider as engagement. The author aims to advance the human resources theory and practice by discussing the need for understanding engagement from the employee point of view, and the author explores the properties of a self-anchoring work engagement scale – the measure capturing the personal perspective on work engagement. The author has presented a conceptual discussion providing a rationale for capturing employee personal perspective on work engagement as supplementary to multi-item measures capturing researcher perspective. Based on empirical evidence, the author tests convergent and discriminant validity of self-anchoring work engagement in relation to job resources, job demands and burnout; the author confronts the nomological network of self-anchoring scale with previous work engagement meta-analysis. The obtained results provided preliminary evidence supporting convergent and discriminant validity of self-anchoring work engagement. The analysis of the nomological network of self-anchoring work engagement in comparison to the previous meta-analysis revealed that self-anchoring work engagement might be more strongly related to challenging job demands than the multi-item researcher perspective work engagement. The author's findings provide a modicum of evidence that asking employees about self-assessment of employees' work engagement on a 0–10 scale provides researchers with access to a freely available measurement method of the personal perception on work engagement.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-07-12
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-01-2022-0002
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Regulatory-focused job crafting, person-job fit and internal
           employability–examining interrelationship and underlying mechanism

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      Authors: Sanjeet Kumar Sameer , Pushpendra Priyadarshi
      Abstract: This paper examines the relationships between regulatory-focused job crafting, i.e. promotion- and prevention-focused job crafting, person-job fit and internal employability and explores the direct and underlying mediation process using conservation of resources and job demands-resources theories. Survey data collected from 425 executives of India based public sector enterprises were used to test hypotheses. Promotion- and prevention-focused job crafting respectively had a contrasting relationship with needs-supplies fit. The relationship with demands-abilities fit was statistically significant only in the case of prevention-focused job crafting. These two job crafting forms respectively had a positive and a negative effect on internal employability, both directly as well as indirectly through person-job fit. Employees can pursue promotion-focused job crafting and avoid prevention-focused job crafting to improve their person-job fit as well as internal employability which subsequently may have multiple favourable outcomes at an organizational and individual level. The study, for the first time, empirically investigates the differential role of individuals' efforts in the form of promotion- and prevention-focused job crafting, in influencing internal employability and explains its underlying mechanism through person-job fit. These interrelationships may have important implications for employees' job demand management process and job choices.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-07-11
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-08-2021-0163
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Stimulating product and process innovation through HRM practices: the
           mediating effect of knowledge management capability

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      Authors: Son Thanh Than , Phong Ba Le , Thai Phong Le , Dung Thi Nguyet Nguyen
      Abstract: This study aims to investigate the influence of human resource management (HRM) practices on two aspects of innovation capability namely product and process innovation. It also attempts to clarify the HRM-innovation relationship by examining the mediating roles of specific components of knowledge management capability (KMC) namely knowledge acquisition, knowledge sharing and knowledge application. This research used the quantitative method and structural equation modeling (SEM) approach to examine hypotheses with data obtained by survey from 325 participants in 98 Vietnamese firms. The empirical findings show the evidence on the mediating roles of components of KMC in the HRM-innovation relationship and indicate that HRM practices have a greater impact on product innovation compared to its effects on process innovation. In contrast, all three components of the KMC produce larger impacts on process innovation than on product innovation. In particular, it highlights the key role of knowledge sharing in predicting product and process innovation in comparison to the roles of knowledge acquisition and knowledge application. CEOs/managers should practice and manage their human resource to foster organizational capability for product and process innovation directly or indirectly via enhancing aspects of KMC namely knowledge acquisition, sharing and application. By investigating the mediating mechanisms of specific components of KMC, the paper has significantly contributed to advancing the body of knowledge of innovation theory and providing deeper insights on the correlation between HRM practices and aspects of innovation capability namely product and process innovation.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-07-06
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-04-2021-0068
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Teleworking during the COVID-19 pandemic: a leader-member exchange
           perspective

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      Authors: Yuhsuan Chang , ChungJen Chien , Li-Fang Shen
      Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated the process of teleworking and teleworking is expected to be a central feature of workplaces of the future. The present study examines the effect of leader-member exchange (LMX) and perception of loneliness on the relationship between proactive coping and the work productivity of teleworkers during the COVID-19 crisis time. Using structural equation modeling (SEM), this study the study is based on a survey of 572 teleworkers in Taiwan drawn from a variety of industry sectors. Through the application of a hypothesized moderated mediation model, the indirect effects of proactive coping on work productivity via LMX are stronger for employees who experience a higher level of perceived loneliness. The results have contributed to current understanding on the success of telework at the individual level and extends research framework of teleworking. Using self-report questionnaire is one of the limitations; however, this was feasible data collection method during COVID-19. Organizations need to provide further training aimed at enhancing proactive coping and dealing with future work challenges in the complex and dynamic workplace. This study is the first among its type to examine proactive coping and job productivity from a LMX during COVID-19.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-05-31
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-10-2021-0220
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Relations outside the workplace matter! A nexus of coworker ostracism,
           relational capital, alternate belongingness and knowledge hiding

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      Authors: Tehreem Fatima , Ahmad Raza Bilal , Muhammad Kashif Imran , Muhammad Waqas
      Abstract: The current study aims to investigate the impact of coworker ostracism on coworker-directed knowledge hiding through the mediating role of relational social capital and moderating role of alternate belongingness in Pakistani higher educational settings. A time-lagged study was carried out in which data from teaching and non-teaching faculty (N = 217) from the higher education sector of Lahore, Pakistan, were collected through multi-stage sampling. The collected data were analysed using moderated mediation analysis (PROCESS model 4 and 7). The results revealed that ostracism from coworkers has an unfavourable impact on relational social capital that in turn promotes knowledge hiding. Nonetheless, if ostracized employees had sources to fulfil belongingness needs outside the work settings, this negative association was strengthened. The authors have taken the role of belongingness outside the workplace in explaining the coworker ostracism and knowledge hiding relationship in higher educational settings and identified the explanatory role of relational social capital.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-05-26
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-06-2021-0123
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The bright side of entitlement: exploring the positive effects of
           psychological entitlement on job involvement

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      Authors: Szu-Yin Lin , Hsien-Chun Chen , I-Heng Chen
      Abstract: Although the sense of entitlement was traditionally associated with a range of maladaptive personality characteristics, the purpose of the current study is to take an initial step to explore a positive implication of psychological entitlement. The target population for this study comprises employees from various industries in Taiwan. To examine the research hypotheses, structural equation modeling techniques were employed to perform a mediation analysis and conditional process analysis. The results of this research showed that career ambition mediates the relationship between psychological entitlement and job involvement, where psychological entitlement is positively related to career ambition, and career ambition is positively related to job involvement. Nonetheless, the authors' data did not support the proposed moderation effect of self-efficacy on the relationship between career ambition and job involvement. This work is among the first to investigate how an employee's psychological entitlement is associated with his/her job involvement and the boundary conditions that affect this relationship.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-05-13
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-05-2021-0097
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Organizational justice and employees' intention to stay: the mediating
           role of job satisfaction

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      Authors: Emil Knezović , Ilma Neimarlija
      Abstract: This study investigates the relationships between the four dimensions of organizational justice (OJ) (distributive, procedural, interpersonal, and informational) and employees' intention to stay (ITS) in organizations in Bosnia and Herzegovina while considering the mediating role of job satisfaction (JS). Through a cross-sectional questionnaire-based survey, 336 responses were collected from employees in private companies and non-governmental organizations. Structural equation modeling was performed to test the hypotheses. Results indicate support for the relationships between dimensions of OJ and ITS, except in the case of procedural justice (PJ). Similarly, JS is a full mediator in all relationships, except for PJ. The study extends the literature by incorporating all four dimensions of OJ and testing them individually in relation to the ITS. Furthermore, the study deviates from a traditional approach of simple relationships by introducing the mediating role of JS. Finally, it contributes to the scarce literature in developing countries.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-05-13
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-07-2021-0156
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Demographic diversity, perceived workplace discrimination and workers'
           well-being: context matters

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      Authors: Maude Boulet , Marie Lachapelle , Sebastien Keiff
      Abstract: The main objective of this article is to contribute to the advancement of scientific knowledge on the determinants of perceived workplace discrimination and its consequences on workers' well-being in Canada. The authors used a representative sample of 7,706 workers aged 18 to 65 based on data from the 2016 General Social Survey of Canadians at Work and Home to conduct logistic regression models. Women and visible minorities are at greater risk of perceiving that they have experienced workplace discrimination, but immigrants' perceived workplace discrimination risk is no different from that of non-immigrants. This risk is higher in public administration than in other industries and varies between provinces. Perceived workplace discrimination increases stress and is associated with a lower level of self-reported mental health. Since perceived discrimination has a detrimental effect on workers' well-being, organizations should pay special attention to their employees’ perceptions. Relying only on official complaints of discrimination can lead organizations to underestimate this issue because many employees are not inclined to file an official complaint, even if they believe they have been discriminated against. The authors findings are original because they suggest that visible socio-demographic characteristics (gender and visible minority) affect perceived workplace discrimination, which is not the case for invisible socio-demographic characteristics (immigrant). They point out that the province of residence is an element of the context to be considered and they indicate that workers in the public sector are more likely to perceive discrimination than those in other industries. These empirical contributions highlight that, despite anti-discrimination laws and government efforts to promote equity, diversity and inclusion, perceived workplace discrimination persists in Canada, particularly among women and visible minorities and it has tangible impacts on the workers' well-being.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-05-10
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-08-2021-0179
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • On the relationship between procedural justice and organizational
           citizenship behavior: a test of mediation and moderation effects

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      Authors: Phan Dinh Nguyen , Lobel Trong Thuy Tran
      Abstract: This study conceptualizes job engagement and satisfaction as a crucial mediating mechanism in the relationship between procedural justice and citizenship behavior at individual level (OCB) under the boundary conditions of perceived supervisor support (PSS) and rewards and recognition (RR). The survey data were obtained from two periods of time. To reduce the potential bias, the authors approached respondents from different business units and measured RR and OCB from different points of time. The authors assessed the path significance at 95% bias-corrected confidence interval or more by the PLS algorithm and bootstrapping statistics. Using an import-export company data, this study substantiates a positive effect of the proposed mediational mechanism of job engagement and satisfaction. In addition, the authors substantiate moderating roles of PSS and RR in the relationships between procedural justice and job satisfaction and, between job engagement and OCB, respectively. This study is an important extension in enhancing the procedural justice and OCB relationship. The results do not only underscore the contributions of job engagement and satisfaction as vital mediators to the assumed relationship but also lend support to the inclusion of the moderating effects of PSS and RR.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-05-24
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-05-2021-0107
      Issue No: Vol. 10 , No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Are satisfied employees less inclined to quit' Moderating effects of
           human capital and abusive supervision

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      Authors: Yu-Chen Wei
      Abstract: The study investigates the moderating effect of individual human capital in the relationship between job satisfaction and turnover intention. In addition, the moderating effect of abusive supervision on moderation by individual human capital was considered. This study used cross-sectional, self-reported data from 133 human resource specialists and their supervisors, who responded to a matching dyad survey. The study found that human capital moderated the negative effects of job satisfaction on turnover intention. The results also verified the moderated moderating effect of abusive supervision on the interaction effect of human capital and job satisfaction on turnover intention. More specifically, the moderating effect of human capital on the relationship between job satisfaction and turnover intention was more pronounced when employees perceived high levels of abusive supervision. The study developed a moderated moderation model to understand the risk of human capital and abusive supervision for an organization and provided a new perspective indicating that job satisfaction is a key determinant in retaining low-human capital employees but not high-human capital employees. Accordingly, companies may strategically choose to employ suitable employees, rather than star employees. In addition, talent management should focus beyond reward/compensation and prevent negative leadership behaviors.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-04-28
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-07-2021-0141
      Issue No: Vol. 10 , No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Examining employee retention and motivation: the moderating effect of
           employee generation

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      Authors: C. Christopher Lee , Hyoun Sook Lim , Donghwi (Josh) Seo , Dong-Heon Austin Kwak
      Abstract: This study explored moderating effects of employee generations on factors related to employee retention and motivation in the workplace. The authors developed a survey instrument and collected the survey data via Amazon Mechanical Turk. After filtering out bad responses, the authors ended up with 489 sample cases for this study. The authors used structural equation modeling for data analysis. Evidence showed that only transformational leadership was significantly related to retention of Generation X employees and only work–life balance had a significant relationship with intrinsic motivation. For Generation Y employees, transformational leadership was the only factor affecting their retention while both transformational leadership and autonomy showed significant impacts on their intrinsic motivation. Generation Z employees reported that only transformation leadership affected their retention while transformational leadership, corporate social responsibility and autonomy were significantly related to their intrinsic motivation in the workplace. All three generations showed statistical significance between intrinsic motivation and employee retention. This study could help business practitioners increase employees' work motivation and retention. First, our results revealed interesting similarities and differences between generations in terms of the factors that affected employees' retention and motivation. Second, this study proved that employees' generation affects the impacts of transformational leadership, CSR, autonomy, WLB and technology on their motivation and retention in the workplace. Third, the results of our study also showed that employees of different generations are intrinsically motivated by different factors, proving the importance of considering generational differences in motivation literature.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-04-18
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-05-2021-0101
      Issue No: Vol. 10 , No. 4 (2022)
       
  • High-performance work systems in an Arab Middle Eastern context: analysis
           from multisource data

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      Authors: Mohammed Aboramadan
      Abstract: The absence of robust information on the application of Human resources managemnet (HRM) practices in the Arab Middle Eastern region has generated an urgent need to understand what and how HRM practices can be used to manage employees in the region. Therefore, building on the social exchange theory and job demands-resources (JD-R) model, this paper proposes a model to examine the effects of high-performance work systems (HPWS) on employees' work-related outcomes, namely, job performance, organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) and innovative work behavior (IWB) in a non-industry setting in an Arab Middle Eastern context. In this model, work engagement was theorized to serve as an intervening mechanism among the aforementioned relationships. Data were collected from 210 academic staff working in the Palestinian higher education sector, together with evaluations from 30 supervisors. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was employed to analyze the data. The results indicate that HPWS positively affect employees' job performance, OCB and IWB. Moreover, work engagement partially mediates these relationships. The results can be useful for managers in the Middle East pertaining to the role HPWS can play in boosting employees' job performance, OCB and IWB. HRM research in Middle East, although limited, is mainly focused on examining the impact of HPWS on organizational rather than individual outcomes. In response to the scholarly call made on the strong need to conduct more HRM research in the Middle East (Budhwar et al., 2019), this research represents the first study that examines the impact of HPWS on in-role and extra-role performance in an Arab Middle Eastern context. Furthermore, the study contributes to the HRM research by relying on a sample from a non-industry sector rather than a sample from a manufacturing setting. Finally, this research is one of the few studies that explore the outcomes of HPWS in an academic setting through the intervening mechanism of work engagement.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-04-15
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-04-2021-0070
      Issue No: Vol. 10 , No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Leader humility and team effectiveness: a moderated mediation model of
           leader-member exchange and employee satisfaction

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      Authors: Aarif Mohd Sheikh
      Abstract: This research study examines the impact of leader humility (LH) on team effectiveness (TE) via the mediating mechanism of leader-member exchange (LMX). It also proposes employee satisfaction (ES) as a moderating variable in the relationship between LH and TE. This study examines relationships among the study variables in the Indian context, using a sample of 589 employees serving the banking sector in Jammu and Kashmir, India. The data analysis was carried out via confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling. The results showed a significant positive influence of LH on TE. The results also posit a partial mediating effect of LMX on LH and TE interplay, and ES acts as a moderator between LH and TE. Thus, the results supported the hypothesized moderated mediation model and suggested implications for theory and practice. Further, the potential limitations and future directions are placed at the end. Organizational implications include that organizations should develop attractive organizational mechanisms to ensure better LMX and ES for enhancing employee effectiveness. Besides, organizations should attract and retain effective and humble leaders; and leaders should use humble attitude and behavior in dealing with employees, eventually ensuring higher TE. This study tested LMX and job satisfaction as intervening variables in the relationship between LH and TE in the Indian context; the framework under context has received scarce research attention. The results suggest that organizations that focus on producing humble leaders succeed in enhancing and maintaining higher organizational effectiveness.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-04-01
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-06-2021-0119
      Issue No: Vol. 10 , No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Organizational compassion, person-organization fit and discretionary
           behaviours in non-governmental organizations: a moderated model

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      Authors: Francis Kasekende , Sentrine Nasiima , Rodgers Byamukama
      Abstract: The authors proposed that Organizational Compassion and Person-Organization-Fit dimensions interactively predict Discretionary Behaviours among employees in the Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) sector in Uganda. The authors employ structural equation modelling to test hypotheses. The research was carried out in two studies; the second one was done six months after the first study. Two samples of respondents were drawn from NGOs operating in West Nile and Kampala regions, respectively. Discretionary behaviours were significantly related to the cross-sectionally assessed predictors including organizational compassion and supplementary fit. Complementary fit did not significantly predict discretionary behaviours. Both supplementary fit and complementary fit moderated the association between organizational compassion and employee discretionary behaviours among both rural and urban setting placed NGOs. In order to boost employee exhibition of discretionary behaviours, leaders of NGOs should always endeavour to find viable organizational compassion-supplementary fit and organizational compassion-complementary fit blend that can add value to NGOs in Uganda. This is one of the few studies that have focused on testing the interaction effects of organizational compassion and person organization fit dimensions on discretionary behaviours. These results highlight both supplementary fit and complementary fit as key individual resources that promote the effects of organization compassion on discretionary behaviours among NGO workers in Uganda.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-03-24
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-07-2020-0097
      Issue No: Vol. 10 , No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Evidence-based HRM

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

       
 
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