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HUMAN RESOURCES (103 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 92 of 92 Journals sorted alphabetically
Accounting and Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Accounting and the Public Interest     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Accounting Auditing & Accountability Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Accounting Education: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Afro-Asian Journal of Finance and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Finance and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 49)
Asia Pacific Journal of Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 208)
Asian Review of Accounting     Hybrid Journal  
Attachment & Human Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Australian Accounting Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
British Accounting Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Coaching : Theorie & Praxis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Contemporary Accounting Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Corporate Governance and Organizational Behavior Review     Open Access  
Critical Perspectives on Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
EURO Journal on Decision Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Accounting Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
European Journal of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Evidence-based HRM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
FOR Rivista per la formazione     Full-text available via subscription  
German Journal of Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Human Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Human Resource and Organization Development Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Human Resource Development International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Human Resource Development Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Human Resource Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
Human Resource Management Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
Human Resource Management Research     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Human Resource Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Human Resource Research     Open Access  
Intangible Capital     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Accounting and Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Accounting Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Accounting, Auditing and Performance Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Banking, Accounting and Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Behavioural Accounting and Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Critical Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Economics and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Ethics and Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Human Capital and Information Technology Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
International Journal of Human Resource Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Human Resources Development and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
International Journal of Management Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Management Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Accounting and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Accounting and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Accounting Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Accounting Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Chinese Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Contemporary Accounting & Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Enterprising Communities People and Places in the Global Economy     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of HR intelligence     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Human Capital     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Human Development and Capabilities : A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Human Resource and Sustainability Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Human Resource Costing & Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Human Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of International Accounting, Auditing and Taxation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Marketing and HR     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Organizational Effectiveness : People and Performance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Professions and Organization     Free   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Service Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Kelaniya Journal of Human Resource Management     Open Access  
New Horizons in Adult Education and Human Resource Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
NHRD Network Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Open Journal of Leadership     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
Pacific Accounting Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Personality and Individual Differences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Personnel Assessment and Decisions     Open Access  
Personnel Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Psychologie du Travail et des Organisations     Hybrid Journal  
Public Personnel Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Research in Human Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Review of Accounting Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Review of Public Personnel Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Revista Gestión de las Personas y Tecnología     Open Access  
South Asian Journal of Human Resources Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Sri Lankan Journal of Human Resource Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Strategic HR Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Evidence-based HRM
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.537
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2049-3983 - ISSN (Online) 2049-3991
Published by Emerald Homepage  [360 journals]
  • The bright side of entitlement: exploring the positive effects of
           psychological entitlement on job involvement

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      Authors: Szu-Yin Lin , Hsien-Chun Chen , I-Heng Chen
      Abstract: Although the sense of entitlement was traditionally associated with a range of maladaptive personality characteristics, the purpose of the current study is to take an initial step to explore a positive implication of psychological entitlement. The target population for this study comprises employees from various industries in Taiwan. To examine the research hypotheses, structural equation modeling techniques were employed to perform a mediation analysis and conditional process analysis. The results of this research showed that career ambition mediates the relationship between psychological entitlement and job involvement, where psychological entitlement is positively related to career ambition, and career ambition is positively related to job involvement. Nonetheless, the authors' data did not support the proposed moderation effect of self-efficacy on the relationship between career ambition and job involvement. This work is among the first to investigate how an employee's psychological entitlement is associated with his/her job involvement and the boundary conditions that affect this relationship.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-05-13
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-05-2021-0097
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Organizational justice and employees' intention to stay: the mediating
           role of job satisfaction

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      Authors: Emil Knezović , Ilma Neimarlija
      Abstract: This study investigates the relationships between the four dimensions of organizational justice (OJ) (distributive, procedural, interpersonal, and informational) and employees' intention to stay (ITS) in organizations in Bosnia and Herzegovina while considering the mediating role of job satisfaction (JS). Through a cross-sectional questionnaire-based survey, 336 responses were collected from employees in private companies and non-governmental organizations. Structural equation modeling was performed to test the hypotheses. Results indicate support for the relationships between dimensions of OJ and ITS, except in the case of procedural justice (PJ). Similarly, JS is a full mediator in all relationships, except for PJ. The study extends the literature by incorporating all four dimensions of OJ and testing them individually in relation to the ITS. Furthermore, the study deviates from a traditional approach of simple relationships by introducing the mediating role of JS. Finally, it contributes to the scarce literature in developing countries.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-05-13
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-07-2021-0156
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Demographic diversity, perceived workplace discrimination and workers'
           well-being: context matters

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      Authors: Maude Boulet , Marie Lachapelle , Sebastien Keiff
      Abstract: The main objective of this article is to contribute to the advancement of scientific knowledge on the determinants of perceived workplace discrimination and its consequences on workers' well-being in Canada. The authors used a representative sample of 7,706 workers aged 18 to 65 based on data from the 2016 General Social Survey of Canadians at Work and Home to conduct logistic regression models. Women and visible minorities are at greater risk of perceiving that they have experienced workplace discrimination, but immigrants' perceived workplace discrimination risk is no different from that of non-immigrants. This risk is higher in public administration than in other industries and varies between provinces. Perceived workplace discrimination increases stress and is associated with a lower level of self-reported mental health. Since perceived discrimination has a detrimental effect on workers' well-being, organizations should pay special attention to their employees’ perceptions. Relying only on official complaints of discrimination can lead organizations to underestimate this issue because many employees are not inclined to file an official complaint, even if they believe they have been discriminated against. The authors findings are original because they suggest that visible socio-demographic characteristics (gender and visible minority) affect perceived workplace discrimination, which is not the case for invisible socio-demographic characteristics (immigrant). They point out that the province of residence is an element of the context to be considered and they indicate that workers in the public sector are more likely to perceive discrimination than those in other industries. These empirical contributions highlight that, despite anti-discrimination laws and government efforts to promote equity, diversity and inclusion, perceived workplace discrimination persists in Canada, particularly among women and visible minorities and it has tangible impacts on the workers' well-being.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-05-10
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-08-2021-0179
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Are satisfied employees less inclined to quit' Moderating effects of
           human capital and abusive supervision

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      Authors: Yu-Chen Wei
      Abstract: The study investigates the moderating effect of individual human capital in the relationship between job satisfaction and turnover intention. In addition, the moderating effect of abusive supervision on moderation by individual human capital was considered. This study used cross-sectional, self-reported data from 133 human resource specialists and their supervisors, who responded to a matching dyad survey. The study found that human capital moderated the negative effects of job satisfaction on turnover intention. The results also verified the moderated moderating effect of abusive supervision on the interaction effect of human capital and job satisfaction on turnover intention. More specifically, the moderating effect of human capital on the relationship between job satisfaction and turnover intention was more pronounced when employees perceived high levels of abusive supervision. The study developed a moderated moderation model to understand the risk of human capital and abusive supervision for an organization and provided a new perspective indicating that job satisfaction is a key determinant in retaining low-human capital employees but not high-human capital employees. Accordingly, companies may strategically choose to employ suitable employees, rather than star employees. In addition, talent management should focus beyond reward/compensation and prevent negative leadership behaviors.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-04-28
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-07-2021-0141
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Person-environment fit: a luxury good for those who can afford it'

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      Authors: Franziska M. Renz
      Abstract: The study integrates organizational demography theory into person-environment fit theories to question the assumption that all employees can afford to strive for person-environment fit. The ethnic/racial diversity in organizations is investigated as a boundary condition in order to develop implications to mitigate the challenges of employees with precarious jobs, especially persons of color (POCs), in the society. Publicly accessible and objective data from organizations in the S&P 1500 index were collected through Compustat, ExecuComp, the Bloomberg Terminal and the websites of Fortune, the United States Census Bureau and the U.S. Department of Labor. A path analysis of time-lagged data was performed to support causal relationships between the examined constructs while controlling for alternative explanations. Unsafe working conditions moderate the U-shaped relationship between ethnic/racial diversity and turnover and turn it into an inverted U-shaped relationship because employees in precarious jobs, especially POCs, cannot afford to leave unsafe working conditions. Organizations with unsafe working conditions are more likely to invest in sustainability initiatives. However, organizations' financial performance does not benefit from this investment. The circumstance that not all employees can afford person-environment fit and its organizational outcomes are identified and empirically tested. Scholars can integrate this boundary condition in future research. Implications for practice and policy are also derived.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-04-19
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-04-2021-0072
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Examining employee retention and motivation: the moderating effect of
           employee generation

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      Authors: C. Christopher Lee , Hyoun Sook Lim , Donghwi (Josh) Seo , Dong-Heon Austin Kwak
      Abstract: This study explored moderating effects of employee generations on factors related to employee retention and motivation in the workplace. The authors developed a survey instrument and collected the survey data via Amazon Mechanical Turk. After filtering out bad responses, the authors ended up with 489 sample cases for this study. The authors used structural equation modeling for data analysis. Evidence showed that only transformational leadership was significantly related to retention of Generation X employees and only work–life balance had a significant relationship with intrinsic motivation. For Generation Y employees, transformational leadership was the only factor affecting their retention while both transformational leadership and autonomy showed significant impacts on their intrinsic motivation. Generation Z employees reported that only transformation leadership affected their retention while transformational leadership, corporate social responsibility and autonomy were significantly related to their intrinsic motivation in the workplace. All three generations showed statistical significance between intrinsic motivation and employee retention. This study could help business practitioners increase employees' work motivation and retention. First, our results revealed interesting similarities and differences between generations in terms of the factors that affected employees' retention and motivation. Second, this study proved that employees' generation affects the impacts of transformational leadership, CSR, autonomy, WLB and technology on their motivation and retention in the workplace. Third, the results of our study also showed that employees of different generations are intrinsically motivated by different factors, proving the importance of considering generational differences in motivation literature.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-04-18
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-05-2021-0101
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • High-performance work systems in an Arab Middle Eastern context: analysis
           from multisource data

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      Authors: Mohammed Aboramadan
      Abstract: The absence of robust information on the application of Human resources managemnet (HRM) practices in the Arab Middle Eastern region has generated an urgent need to understand what and how HRM practices can be used to manage employees in the region. Therefore, building on the social exchange theory and job demands-resources (JD-R) model, this paper proposes a model to examine the effects of high-performance work systems (HPWS) on employees' work-related outcomes, namely, job performance, organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) and innovative work behavior (IWB) in a non-industry setting in an Arab Middle Eastern context. In this model, work engagement was theorized to serve as an intervening mechanism among the aforementioned relationships. Data were collected from 210 academic staff working in the Palestinian higher education sector, together with evaluations from 30 supervisors. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was employed to analyze the data. The results indicate that HPWS positively affect employees' job performance, OCB and IWB. Moreover, work engagement partially mediates these relationships. The results can be useful for managers in the Middle East pertaining to the role HPWS can play in boosting employees' job performance, OCB and IWB. HRM research in Middle East, although limited, is mainly focused on examining the impact of HPWS on organizational rather than individual outcomes. In response to the scholarly call made on the strong need to conduct more HRM research in the Middle East (Budhwar et al., 2019), this research represents the first study that examines the impact of HPWS on in-role and extra-role performance in an Arab Middle Eastern context. Furthermore, the study contributes to the HRM research by relying on a sample from a non-industry sector rather than a sample from a manufacturing setting. Finally, this research is one of the few studies that explore the outcomes of HPWS in an academic setting through the intervening mechanism of work engagement.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-04-15
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-04-2021-0070
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Leader humility and team effectiveness: a moderated mediation model of
           leader-member exchange and employee satisfaction

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      Authors: Aarif Mohd Sheikh
      Abstract: This research study examines the impact of leader humility (LH) on team effectiveness (TE) via the mediating mechanism of leader-member exchange (LMX). It also proposes employee satisfaction (ES) as a moderating variable in the relationship between LH and TE. This study examines relationships among the study variables in the Indian context, using a sample of 589 employees serving the banking sector in Jammu and Kashmir, India. The data analysis was carried out via confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling. The results showed a significant positive influence of LH on TE. The results also posit a partial mediating effect of LMX on LH and TE interplay, and ES acts as a moderator between LH and TE. Thus, the results supported the hypothesized moderated mediation model and suggested implications for theory and practice. Further, the potential limitations and future directions are placed at the end. Organizational implications include that organizations should develop attractive organizational mechanisms to ensure better LMX and ES for enhancing employee effectiveness. Besides, organizations should attract and retain effective and humble leaders; and leaders should use humble attitude and behavior in dealing with employees, eventually ensuring higher TE. This study tested LMX and job satisfaction as intervening variables in the relationship between LH and TE in the Indian context; the framework under context has received scarce research attention. The results suggest that organizations that focus on producing humble leaders succeed in enhancing and maintaining higher organizational effectiveness.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-04-01
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-06-2021-0119
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Organizational compassion, person-organization fit and discretionary
           behaviours in non-governmental organizations: a moderated model

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      Authors: Francis Kasekende , Sentrine Nasiima , Rodgers Byamukama
      Abstract: The authors proposed that Organizational Compassion and Person-Organization-Fit dimensions interactively predict Discretionary Behaviours among employees in the Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) sector in Uganda. The authors employ structural equation modelling to test hypotheses. The research was carried out in two studies; the second one was done six months after the first study. Two samples of respondents were drawn from NGOs operating in West Nile and Kampala regions, respectively. Discretionary behaviours were significantly related to the cross-sectionally assessed predictors including organizational compassion and supplementary fit. Complementary fit did not significantly predict discretionary behaviours. Both supplementary fit and complementary fit moderated the association between organizational compassion and employee discretionary behaviours among both rural and urban setting placed NGOs. In order to boost employee exhibition of discretionary behaviours, leaders of NGOs should always endeavour to find viable organizational compassion-supplementary fit and organizational compassion-complementary fit blend that can add value to NGOs in Uganda. This is one of the few studies that have focused on testing the interaction effects of organizational compassion and person organization fit dimensions on discretionary behaviours. These results highlight both supplementary fit and complementary fit as key individual resources that promote the effects of organization compassion on discretionary behaviours among NGO workers in Uganda.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-03-24
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-07-2020-0097
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Assessing the moderating role of organizational culture in the
           relationship between organizational leadership and organizational
           efficiency in the banking sector

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      Authors: Francisca Omama Koranteng , Faisal Iddris , Gabriel Dwomoh , Courage Simon Kofi Dogbe
      Abstract: This study explored the moderating role of organizational culture in the relationship between organizational leadership and organizational culture in the banking sector. The sample comprised of 331 full-time bank employees in the Ashanti region of Ghana. The reliability and validity of the data was tested using confirmatory factor analysis, with structural equation modeling as the main means of analysis, run using Amos (V23) in the data analysis. The study concluded that all four leadership styles (transformational, transactional, servant and sustainable leadership styles) had a positive effect on banks' efficiency. Organizational culture also had a direct positive effect on banks' efficiency in Ghana. The study concludes that organizational culture positively moderated the relationship between organizational leadership and organizational efficiency in the banking industry. This implies organizational culture strengthens the relationship between organizational leadership and organizational efficiency in the banking industry. – A limitation of this study was to consider organizational culture as a composite variable, instead of considering the effects of the individual dimensions (clan culture, adhocracy culture, hierarchy culture and market culture). Although using the composite variable was not theoretically wrong, each of the four dimensions had unique characteristics and may influence organizational outcomes differently, and should have been considered. To achieve strategic organizational outcomes, leaders are to comprehend the various leaderships styles and how they could be transformed to influence organizational outcomes. Past studies have paid limited attention to the interaction between organizational leadership and organizational culture, and how this affects organizational efficiency.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-03-18
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-07-2021-0143
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Work–family conflict and happiness: the moderating role
           of national culture

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      Authors: Manli Gu , Chee Meng Tan , Yee Sen Ho , Li Liu
      Abstract: This study aims to demonstrate how national culture, as measured using the Hofstede’s cultural dimensions, moderates the relationship between work–family conflict (WFC) and individual-level subjective well-being (SWB). Using a two-level hierarchical linear model, this study analysed data from the “Family and Changing Gender Roles IV” survey from the International Social Survey Programme’s (ISSP). A total of 33,044 participants across 41 countries in 2012 were interviewed, but this investigation was limited to 23,277 individuals across 37 countries when all the necessary variables used in this analysis were accounted for. National cultural indicators (the moderators) were measured using Hofstede's cultural dimensions, which are individualism–collectivism, masculinity–femininity, uncertainty avoidance and indulgence–restraint. This study presented two main results. Firstly, although family-to-work conflict has an overall negative impact on SWB, this negativity is stronger among participants from individualistic cultures. Secondly, just like family-to-work conflict, work-to-family interference has an adverse impact on workers’ well-being as well, though this effect is more prominent in indulgent cultures. This paper is novel on two accounts. Firstly, it is one of the few articles that investigates the impact of WFC on SWB using a large multi-country dataset, which allows us to generalize results across multiple cultures. This is unlike many papers in the literature that presented findings from single-country sources, which contextualizes outcomes to a single nation. Secondly, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, the article is the first in examining the role played by the Hofstede’s indulgence–restraint dimension in moderating the effect of WFC on SWB.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-03-14
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-01-2021-0001
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Do human resource management practices boost up employees' impersonal
           trust' Evidence from the banking sector of Bangladesh

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      Authors: Sarmin Sultana , Md. Shariful Alam Khandakar
      Abstract: The main purpose of the study is to identify the relationship between human resource management (HRM) practices and impersonal trust. The study focuses on five HRM practices, namely training, fair reward and promotion opportunity, employment security and performance appraisal and impact of those on impersonal trust. Data for the study have been collected from 384 front line service provider female employees of 39 private commercial banks through non-probability judgmental sampling technique and analyzed by applying structural equation modeling-partial least square (SEM-PLS) method. The findings of the study reveals that all the five HRM practices, namely training, fair reward and promotion opportunity, employment security and performance appraisal, are positively and significantly related with impersonal trust. Private commercial banks in Bangladesh are rapidly growing and facing huge competition to improve the competitive advantage of employees. Impersonal trust of employees is required for achieving competitive advantage. Due to the lack of research and scanty of knowledge in that field, the study offers a new avenue of existing knowledge to the stakeholders and researchers on how to develop impersonal trust with necessary recommendations.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-03-11
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-08-2020-0111
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Organizational climate and organizational politics: understanding the role
           of employees using parallel mediation

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      Authors: Swati Tripathi , Divya Tripathi
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to inspect the influence of organizational climate on the social desirability of political behaviour of employees. It also examines perception of politics and perceived behavioural choice as the underlying mechanisms that mediate the relationship between organizational climate and social desirability of political tactics. Finally, the paper studies the influence of desirability of politics on frequency of use of political tactics. The study uses data (n = 234) collected from a large public sector organization in India. The inter-relationships are tested empirically using structural equation modelling. The findings suggest that organizational climate significantly influences the social desirability of political tactics such that positive climate leads to lower social desirability of political tactics. Also, perception of politics and perceived behavioural choice mediate the relationship between organizational climate and desirability of political tactics. Finally, the social desirability of political tactics positively and significantly influences frequency of political tactics used. Because of the nature of the study, generalization must be made with caution since it has been conducted in an Indian public sector organization, and errors due to measurement method could be present. The study provides a better understanding of the relationship between organizational climate and political behaviour and clarifies the mediating role of perception of politics and behavioural choices. It also elucidates the need for organizations to accept the active role of employees in determining the nature of workplace politics. The study establishes political perceptions and perceived behavioural choice as important mediators between climate and political behaviour, fostering in-depth research into the environmental aspects of public sector organizations. It also establishes employees as autonomous members of the organization who make political choices by taking into account their organizational contexts, a concept much newer to highly formalized and codified public sector organizations.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-02-10
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-08-2020-0107
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Relationship between transformational leadership, proactive personality,
           creative self-efficacy and employee creativity at food processing SMEs in
           Indonesia

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      Authors: Aletta Dewi Maria , Heru Yulianto , Dyah Palupiningtyas , Heri Usodo
      Abstract: This study aims to determine the effect of transformational leadership and creative self-efficacy (CSE) on employee creativity. In addition, this study will also discuss the role of CSE as a mediator in the relationship between transformational leadership and employee creativity, and the role of proactive personality as a moderator in the relationship between CSE and employee creativity. The research samples were 102 supervisors and 876 employees from 102 small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) engaged in the food processing industry in three major cities in Central Java, Indonesia, namely Semarang, Salatiga and Surakarta. SPSS 22 was used to test the research hypothesis using hierarchical regression analysis. The results showed that CSE mediated the relationship between transformational leadership and employee creativity. In addition, the results also showed that proactive personality acted as a moderator for CSE and employee creativity. This study has several limitations. First, that the sample size is limited only to food processing SMEs. Second, questionnaires were self-reported by respondents. Self-reporting may not always result in reliable and accurate responses. Lastly, this study uses a cross-sectional research design. This study presents strong theoretical and managerial implications that can be used by food processing SMEs to evaluate the consequences of transformational leadership, proactive personality, and CSE on employee creativity. This study adds to the existing literature by describing the relationship between transformational leadership, CSE, proactive personality and employee creativity in a comprehensive manner.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-02-07
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-03-2021-0033
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Are undergraduate students good proxies for HRM professionals' A
           comparison of responses in a hiring decision study

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      Authors: Heather M. Clarke , Kara A. Arnold
      Abstract: There is a dearth of human resource management (HRM) literature examining the generalizability of research employing undergraduate student participants. The purpose of this study is to conduct an experiment to compare the job applicant evaluations and hiring decisions of undergraduate student participants with those of working adults with hiring experience. This study employed a between-person 2 × 2 × 4 experimental design: participant group (undergraduate students or working adults with hiring experience) × job gender-type (male typed or female typed) × job applicant (heterosexual female, lesbian female, heterosexual male or gay male). Participants read descriptions of a job and a job applicant and then evaluated the applicant. The results supported a moderated mediation model where participant group moderated the interaction of applicant gender and job gender-type in predicting perceptions of competence, which in turn predicted perceptions of person-job fit, likeability and respect-worthiness, which then predicted hiring decisions. Undergraduate student participants, but not working adults with hiring experience, evaluated female applicants applying for a male-typed job in a manner consistent with gender stereotypes and were less likely to hire the female applicant than the male applicant. To inform HRM practice, research must reflect real-world decision-making. The literature on the roles of gender stereotypes and bias in hiring, and other important HRM decisions, relies heavily on undergraduate student participants. Findings of this study suggest a need to further examine whether those studies can be generalized to working adults actually making those decisions.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2022-01-27
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-05-2021-0091
      Issue No: Vol. 10 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Entrepreneurial leadership and employee innovative behavior in the
           software development firms: do employees' epistemic curiosity and creative
           process engagement matter'

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      Authors: Muhammad Awais Khan
      Abstract: Building on self-determination theory, this study empirically examined the influence of entrepreneurial leadership (EL) style on employee innovative behavior (EIB) in the context of software development firms located in the twin cities of Pakistan (Rawalpindi and Islamabad). For the present study, an employee survey (online questionnaire) was used for data collection. The data were collected through an adopted questionnaire by using emails and messaging applications. Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM) was used to analyze data collected from 245 respondents. The findings of this study delineate that entrepreneurial leadership positively and significantly influences employee innovative behavior. Moreover, the relationship between entrepreneurial leadership and employee innovative behavior was partially mediated by employee epistemic curiosity (EC) and creative process engagement (CPE). The sequential mediation by the employee epistemic curiosity and creative process engagement between the link of entrepreneurial leadership and employee innovative behavior was also confirmed. In innovation-intensive organizations like software development firms, entrepreneurial leadership style can foster employee innovative behavior that is critical for organizational innovation success. This study provides information to the strategic leaders on how leadership behaviors can drive employee innovative behavior, particularly in the context of software development companies. This study is an attempt to extend the scarce literature on the mechanisms through which leadership styles impact employee innovative behavior. Specifically, the mediating roles of employee epistemic curiosity and creative process engagement have been explored through a self-determination perspective.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2021-12-31
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-02-2021-0020
      Issue No: Vol. 10 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Good soldier syndrome. Do organizational cynicism and work
           alienation matter'

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      Authors: Sabia Singh , Gurpreet Randhawa
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of organizational cynicism (OCyn) on organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) among bank employees with a focus on the role of work alienation (WA) as a potential mediator. Using standardized questionnaire, data were collected from 381 employees working in the banking sector of Punjab, a northern state of India. Statistical techniques such as hierarchical multiple regression and confirmatory factor analysis along with PROCESS macro were used for data analysis. Results reveal that OCyn has a significant negative effect on OCB. Further, WA is found to be significantly partially mediating the relationship between the aforementioned constructs. This study pertains to a single sector i.e., banking sector restricting the generalizability to other industrial and vocational settings. Further, it may be difficult to draw any causal inferences as the research design adopted for this study is cross-sectional in nature. In order to promote OCBs among bank employees, the formation of negative workplace attitudes such as OCyn and WA needs to be regulated. This can be achieved through improving communications network, encouraging participative decision-making activities, conducting psychological counseling and stress management training sessions. This study is one of the scarce empirical research works that have substantiated the direct impact along with the indirect impact of OCyn (through work alienation) on OCB among bank employees.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2021-12-21
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-01-2021-0004
      Issue No: Vol. 10 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Burnt to a crisp' Understanding drivers of burnout amongst New Zealand
           workers

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      Authors: Jarrod Haar
      Abstract: Job burnout is a popular topic for researchers and a pressing issue for employees and employers. However, the most popular measure has become widely critiqued, and a new construct – the Burnout Assessment Tool (BAT) – has been offered as a better way to assess burnout. The study uses data from 1,022 employees across a wide range of occupations, sectors and industries. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and odds ratio calculations are explored. The present psychometric properties of the BAT construct are supported. Overall, 11.1% of employees met the high burnt-out risk threshold. Determinants of burnt-out risk were explored, with significant findings from high perceptions of organizational support, large firm-size, young age and long work hours found. No gender differences. The odds ratio provides greater insights into the risks associated with factors, especially working 55+ hours/week, which resulted in 580% higher risk of burnt-out risk. The findings highlight the danger of burnt-out risk and provide a useful benchmark for those exploring the burnt-out risk rate. The BAT has not been tested in New Zealand across a sample of employees. Given the large size and breadth of employees, this provides useful generalizability to the BAT-NZ. The determinants tested here are all unique to the literature and provide new insights.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2021-12-03
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-07-2021-0132
      Issue No: Vol. 10 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Illegitimate tasks and occupational outcomes: the impact of vertical
           collectivism

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      Authors: Server Sevil Akyurek , Ozge Can
      Abstract: This study aims to understand essential work and occupational consequences of employees’ illegitimate task (ILT) experiences (unreasonable and unnecessary task demands) under the influence of vertical collectivist (VC) values. Data were collected via a survey from 503 teachers in the Turkish public education sector. The hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling. Findings of this study reveal that unnecessary tasks decrease employees’ professional identification and perceived occupational prestige, whereas unreasonable tasks weaken their workplace well-being. Results also show that employees with higher VC orientation feel these adverse effects to a lesser extent. This study demonstrates that individual-level cultural values play a significant role in understanding task-related dynamics and consequences at the workplace. It brings new theoretical insights to job design and work stress literature regarding what similar factors can mitigate task pressures on employees. A key practical insight from the findings is that human resources management experts should create a positive task environment where ILT demands are not welcome by analyzing jobs and skill requirements in detail, communicating task decisions regularly with employees and providing them with the necessary work support. Understanding the impact of ILT can greatly help to assess the quality of the education system and the value of teaching occupation in society. ILT have been mainly discussed without considering the effect of different cultural orientations. This is the first study empirically showing the diverse effects of two ILT dimensions on essential occupational outcomes in connection to individual-level cultural influences.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2021-11-30
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-02-2021-0025
      Issue No: Vol. 10 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Informal learning as mediating mechanism for the relationship between
           learning climate and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB)

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      Authors: Muhammad Qamar Zia , Tobias M. Huning , Aamir Feroz Shamsi , Muhammad Naveed , Riaz Ahmed Mangi
      Abstract: The goal of this study was to examine the mediating mechanism of informal learning between dimensions of learning climate and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). In addition, the study also aimed to investigate the learning climate, in the dimensions of learning facilitation, learning appreciation and error avoidance as antecedents of informal learning. The data were gathered from sports items manufacturing small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in Sialkot, Pakistan. Sialkot is home to manufacturing businesses that export their products worldwide. Survey data of 318 middle managers collected at 2 different times were used for testing the research model using structural equation modeling (SEM). The results demonstrate that facilitation and appreciation learning climate have a positive relationship with informal learning and error-avoidance has a negative relationship with informal learning. The analysis also revealed that informal learning mediated the linkage between learning climate dimensions and OCB. Moreover, informal learning is significantly related to OCB. HR practitioners and organizational leaders of SMEs can use, encourage and promote informal learning to improve the skills and knowledge of employees at low cost. For instance, management should strategically implement informal learning at the workplace by providing a supportive learning climate. Previous studies have overlooked the impact of informal learning on OCB and its mediating effect. The present study addresses this gap by examining the mediating mechanism of informal learning between learning climate and OCB.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2021-11-19
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-10-2020-0132
      Issue No: Vol. 10 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • The way you make me abuse: impression management matters

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      Authors: Yuan-Ling Chen , Ting Yi Chu
      Abstract: Drawing on the perspectives of emotional labor, self-concept and impression management, this study presents two major findings: (1) employees' excessive reliance on impression management can bother supervisors, and (2) the effectiveness of impression management depends on how the management affects targets' attribution of characteristics to actors. The study uses a cross-sectional design and a sample of 259 employees to investigate the antecedents of abusive supervision and, in this regard, the potential mediating effects of impression management. Through Mplus analysis, the authors specifically show that deep acting and surface acting affect impression management and that impression management activates abusive supervision. Emotional labor is critical in triggering abusive supervision through impression management. The study specifically shows that impression management mediates two types of relationships: (1) the relationship between deep acting and abusive supervision, and (2) the relationship between surface acting and abusive supervision. The findings contribute to the abusive supervision literature by clarifying how impression management functions. This study, by addressing how emotional labor is a potential antecedent of abusive supervision, reveals that impression management can be a mixed blessing, insofar as emotional labor can contribute to abusive supervision.
      Citation: Evidence-based HRM
      PubDate: 2021-11-02
      DOI: 10.1108/EBHRM-04-2021-0059
      Issue No: Vol. 10 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Evidence-based HRM

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