Subjects -> BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (Total: 3510 journals)
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    - BANKING AND FINANCE (297 journals)
    - BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (1231 journals)
    - CONSUMER EDUCATION AND PROTECTION (20 journals)
    - COOPERATIVES (4 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SCIENCES: GENERAL (202 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SYSTEMS, THEORIES AND HISTORY (235 journals)
    - FASHION AND CONSUMER TRENDS (20 journals)
    - HUMAN RESOURCES (103 journals)
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    - INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE (145 journals)
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    - TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL DIRECTORIES (2 journals)

HUMAN RESOURCES (103 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 92 of 92 Journals sorted by number of followers
Asia Pacific Journal of Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 222)
Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 77)
Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 75)
Human Resource Management Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74)
Human Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Human Resource Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
International Journal of Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 52)
Journal of Accounting and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Accounting Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Contemporary Accounting Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Review of Accounting Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Human Resource Development Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Accounting Auditing & Accountability Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Human Resource Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Personality and Individual Differences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
American Journal of Finance and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Accounting and Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Human Development and Capabilities : A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Human Resources Development and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
European Accounting Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Human Resource Management Research     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Human Resource Development International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Open Journal of Leadership     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Accounting and Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Critical Perspectives on Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Accounting Education: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Personnel Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Banking, Accounting and Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
European Journal of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Review of Public Personnel Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Public Personnel Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Management Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Human Resource Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
British Accounting Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Management Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
New Horizons in Adult Education and Human Resource Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Behavioural Accounting and Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Human Capital     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Accounting, Auditing and Performance Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Accounting and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Accounting Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Human Resource and Organization Development Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Attachment & Human Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Strategic HR Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Service Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Human Resource Costing & Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Professions and Organization     Free   (Followers: 5)
Afro-Asian Journal of Finance and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Human Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of International Accounting, Auditing and Taxation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Research in Human Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
German Journal of Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Contemporary Accounting & Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
South Asian Journal of Human Resources Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Organizational Effectiveness : People and Performance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Australian Accounting Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Corporate Governance and Organizational Behavior Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Accounting Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Chinese Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Coaching : Theorie & Praxis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Evidence-based HRM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Human Capital and Information Technology Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Ethics and Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of HR intelligence     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pacific Accounting Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Critical Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Marketing and HR     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Accounting and the Public Interest     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Economics and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Sri Lankan Journal of Human Resource Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intangible Capital     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
EURO Journal on Decision Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Human Resource and Sustainability Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
NHRD Network Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Human Resource Research     Open Access  
Personnel Assessment and Decisions     Open Access  
Kelaniya Journal of Human Resource Management     Open Access  
Revista Gestión de las Personas y Tecnología     Open Access  
Psychologie du Travail et des Organisations     Hybrid Journal  
FOR Rivista per la formazione     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Enterprising Communities People and Places in the Global Economy     Hybrid Journal  
Asian Review of Accounting     Hybrid Journal  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Review of Public Personnel Administration
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.225
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 14  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0734-371X - ISSN (Online) 1552-759X
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1175 journals]
  • The Structural Relationship of Family-Friendly Policies, Work-Life
           Balance, and Employee’ Subjective Wellbeing: Focusing on the
           Categorization of Family-Friendly Policies Based on the Job
           Demands-Resources (JD-R) Model

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Myeong Chul Ko
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Although family-friendly policies (FFPs) accommodate the interests of both an organization and its employees, the extant literature has paid limited attention to how employee wellbeing can be a positive outcome of FFPs. Drawing on the job demands-resources (JD-R) model and spillover theory, this study examines the relationship between FFPs and employees’ subjective wellbeing (SWB) through their sense of work-life balance (WLB) and organizational commitment. Using a survey of 946 South Korean public employees and partial least squares path modeling (PLS-PM), this study finds that FFPs are positively and indirectly associated with SWB via its influence on WLB and organizational commitment. The findings imply that through positive spillover effects, FFPs as job resources can generate greater organizational outcomes and better employee wellbeing.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-11-16T01:13:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X221136431
       
  • Emergency Service Workers: The Role of Policy and Management in
           (Re)shaping Wellbeing for Emergency Service Workers

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      Authors: Ben Farr-Wharton, Yvonne Brunetto, Aglae Hernandez-Grande, Kerry Brown, Stephen Teo
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the impact of psychosocial safety climate (PSC) levels and strength on the job stress and psychological distress of emergency services workers within street level bureaucracies (SLBs). The reason for the research is because the nature of their work and organizational context pre-disposes them to elevated level of psychological distress, and places them at a higher risk of subsequent debilitating physical and mental diseases, which is a cost borne by employees, their families, friends, SLBs, and taxpayers. Survey data was obtained from 274 emergency services workers (including police, and paramedics), nested within 43 workgroups, in Australia. Multilevel regression indicated that lower levels of PSC were associated with higher levels of job stress and psychological distress. Also, PSC strength had a partial moderating effect. The findings justify governments intervening legislatively to ensure SLBs’ take responsibility for ensuring a supportive PSC to mitigates the impact of exposure to workplace trauma.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-10-28T09:30:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X221130977
       
  • The Effect of Organizational Reputation on Public Employees’ Retention:
           How to Win the “War for Talent” in Constitutional Autonomous Agencies
           in Mexico

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      Authors: Edgar O. Bustos
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Retaining valuable employees is a critical task for public organizations to present themselves as competent and efficient to their multiple audiences. However, despite the importance of staff mobility dynamics for public organizations, retention is an issue that has not been thoroughly studied in human resource management research. In the case of Mexico, retaining the most valuable staff is becoming more difficult because its public administration is characterized by corruption and patronage. The article argues that reputation sustains a reciprocity exchange between employees and employers, which is reflected in longterm labor relationships. Using a survey of employees of five Constitutional Autonomous Agencies in Mexico, the article shows that having a positive reputation is a crucial factor for public employees when deciding whether to stay or leave their jobs. The findings imply that building and maintaining a positive reputation must be relevant for public managers because of its implications for HRM.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-10-20T01:16:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X221130973
       
  • Choosing Jobs in the Public, Non-Profit, and For-Profit Sectors: Personal
           Career Anchors Moderating the Impact of Sector Image and Reputation

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      Authors: Roland Pepermans, Mathieu Peiffer
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      We expand on Cable and Turban’s employer knowledge model to investigate how sector attractiveness, that is, image and reputation, predicts management graduates’ sector-specific pursuit intentions, moderated by career anchors. The non-profit sector has the warmest image, followed by the public sector, while the latter is perceived as the least competent and shows the weakest reputation. Each sector’s competence image (but not its warmth image) and reputation significantly predict sector-specific pursuit intentions. The security, service, and challenge anchors confirmed their unique positive moderating impact, respectively for the public, non-profit, and for-profit sectors, although the challenge anchor reduced the public sector’s attractiveness. This study accentuates the importance of matching sector features with personal characteristics for understanding sector attractiveness to job seekers. Consequently, we offer new insights concerning sector-related recruitment practices and sector branding.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-10-20T01:12:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X221130972
       
  • Human Capital Drivers of Employee Intent to Innovate: The Case of Public
           Procurement Professionals

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      Authors: Ana-Maria Dimand, Sawsan Abutabenjeh, Evelyn Rodriguez-Plesa, Mohamad G. Alkadry, Susannah Bruns Ali
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Innovation is often promoted as the path to overcoming the burdens of bureaucratic organizations and fostering improved service to the public. In a moment where governments face dynamic administrative and policy challenges, there is great need for leveraging innovative ideas from public sector employees. What is less clear are which factors of employee human capital correlate with feeling encouraged to innovate. We test how three types of human capital influence innovation: organization level, industry specific, and individual specific human capital. We also explore whether there are differences in feeling encouraged to innovate linked to education, training, and demographics such as gender, race, and age. Using survey responses from 2,191 public procurement officers from various levels of government in the United States, we find human capital components including experience, education, training, and age correlate with feeling encouraged to innovate, though not always in expected ways.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-09-20T11:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X221123294
       
  • A Tradition of Public Service in Families

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      Authors: Alberto Jacinto
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      While much is known about the public sector workforce, less is known about parental influences as a determinant of public sector work. This paper begins to answer this question by estimating a simple model of intergenerational transmission to test whether public sector work is passed down in families. Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and its intergenerational component indicate that children of public sector mothers are five percentage points (42%) more likely to work in the public sector than the children of private sector mothers. Heterogeneity analyses reveal the important role unions play in the transmission of public sector work. However, the main results do not vary by child race or gender. The results have implications for recruitment strategies in the public sector and highlight the role of parents as possible sources of public service motivation for children.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-09-17T10:59:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X221123296
       
  • The Impacts of Telework Options on Worker Outcomes in Local Government:
           Social Exchange and Social Exclusion Perspectives

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      Authors: Myungjung Kwon, Mikyong Kim-Goh
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      While telework has been adopted widely in local governments because of the numerous potential benefits that it offers for the workforce, organizations, and society, little research has been done to examine if and how telework achieves expected worker outcomes in local governments. Drawing on insights from the social exchange and social exclusion theories, this article extends previous telework research by demonstrating the differential effects of telecommute and telework options on job satisfaction and performance of local government workforce. Data were collected through an online survey of workers at a large local government agency in California. Results showed that telework and telecommute options improved job satisfaction and performance of workers in the local government agency due to flexible work schedules and locations. In addition, telecommuters having more interpersonal interaction opportunities which reduce feelings of social isolation/work alienation experienced higher job satisfaction and performance than teleworkers.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-09-01T11:50:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X221121051
       
  • Employer Value Propositions for Different Target Groups and Organizational
           Types in the Public Sector: Theory and Evidence From Field Experiments

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      Authors: Florian Keppeler, Ulf Papenfuß
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Public employers struggle with recruiting talents and labor market competition. Research on the understudied topic of employer branding can help address this challenge. This study presents five large-scale, pre-registered field experiments (n = 155,634) aimed at increasing the number of individuals initially interested in a job at a public employer. In social media ads, public sector values served as signaled employer value propositions (EVPs). The results show the importance of target groups and points of difference related to public employers’ organizational type. Significantly fewer women show interest in a job, and for a municipal administration, a fair pay EVP has a negative effect. This study enhances the understanding of potential recruits’ environment- and self-processing, bridges EVPs with public values theory, and provides a missing theoretical link between publicness and recruitment. It shows the importance of testing common assumptions about what works in recruitment in field studies with high external validity.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-08-30T07:15:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X221121050
       
  • The Renaissance of Performance Appraisal: Engaging Public Employees
           Through Perceived Developmental Purpose and Justice

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      Authors: Francesco Vidè, Lorenza Micacchi, Marta Barbieri, Giovanni Valotti
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Performance appraisal is recognized as a powerful human resource management (HRM) practice. However, its effectiveness depends on how public employees perceive appraisal systems. Based on the Social Exchange Theory, this study aims to empirically explore the impact of the perceived developmental purpose of performance appraisal on a relevant and critical individual attitude in public HRM literature, such as work engagement. Additionally, the study investigates perceived performance appraisal justice as a potential mediator of such a relationship. The analysis of an online survey administered to 1,482 Italian civil servants through a structural equation model shows that perceived developmental appraisal has a positive impact on the work engagement of public employees. This relationship is partially mediated by interactional performance appraisal justice perceptions, while distributive and procedural justice do not significantly affect work engagement. This contribution addresses specific research gaps in the public sector HRM literature. Our results suggest that public organizations can enhance engagement through perceived developmental, interactional, and fair performance appraisal systems.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-08-25T08:20:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X221116584
       
  • From Bureaucrats to Entrepreneurs to Networkers, Advocates, and Empaths:
           Reappraising Human Resources Management Ideals and Practices in Public
           Administration

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      Authors: Sabina Schnell, Catherine Gerard
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      This article assesses how changing paradigms of public administration have been reflected in public sector human resources management over time. It finds that large-scale reform acts, such as the Pendleton Act or the Civil Service Reform Act and the National Performance Review reflected the “ideals” of the rule-following bureaucrat of the Old Public Administration (OPA) and of the result-seeking entrepreneur of New Public Management (NPM). However, the advocate, empath, and networker of New Public Administration (NPA) and New Public Service (NPS) has not been pursued through similarly encompassing reform efforts. While gradual changes such as a more representative bureaucracy and increased collaborative governance have paved the way for a deeper integration of NPA and NPS values into human resource policy and practice, more efforts are needed to promote advocates, empaths, and networkers as the core of the “new” public service. We conclude by making some tentative suggestions in this direction.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-08-11T07:08:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X221117283
       
  • Book Review: Human Resources Information Systems: A Guide for Public
           Administrators

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      Authors: Jiwon Suh
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-07-26T09:13:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X221115865
       
  • Battling COVID-19: Public Personnel Management, Trust, and Social
           Resilience During a Global Crisis

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      Authors: Eran Vigoda-Gadot, Nissim Cohen, Shlomo Mizrahi
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      We present three studies that examine the relationship between perceptions about public personnel management and social resilience during a crisis among frontline public healthcare servants who battled the COVID-19 pandemic. Based on theories of public personnel management, crisis management, trust, and resilience, we suggest a model and hypotheses that may extend our knowledge about perceived social resilience, both internal (organizational) and external (communal and national). We tested our model with the results of an online survey conducted in early 2021 among 437 healthcare employees from the Ministry of Health (n1 = 87), hospitals (n2 = 200), and Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs; n3 = 150) across Israel. The findings generally support direct and indirect relationships between perceptions of good public personnel management, defined as healthcare system resilience, participation in decision-making and information sharing, and group-level organizational citizenship behavior, and perceived national and community resilience, and trust. Implications, extensions, and recommendations for future theoretical and empirical studies are discussed along with practical proposals.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T01:07:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X221111479
       
  • The Emotional Toll of the COVID-19 Crisis on Local Government Workers

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      Authors: Cynthia Barboza-Wilkes, Esther Gonzalez, William Resh, Stephanie Wong
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the emotional intensity that accompanies crises, rarely is emotional labor explicitly discussed as a required aspect of crisis response work. We explore the emotional toll of COVID-19 crisis on local government employees. We introduce a dynamic mixed-methods approach to the study of emotional labor during times of crisis and highlight the utility of diary research designs in public human resource management scholarship. By combining waves of survey data, semi-structured interviews, and daily diary prompts, we provide evidence of how changes in workload, exogenously imposed fears, and emotional spillover blur the work-home boundaries of local government officials during the pandemic. We also show how isolation from peers and the public can lead to conflict and search for social support from both external and internal sources. We highlight how the application of the job demands-resources (JD-R) theory gives insight to the burnout and disengagement faced by local government employees during the COVID-19 stay-at-home order.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-07-04T09:54:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X221108501
       
  • Antecedents of Work Engagement in the Public Sector: A Systematic
           Literature Review

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      Authors: Norfadhillaton Zahari, Maniam Kaliannan
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      This article systematically reviewed the body of literature concerning work engagement in public organizations, aiming to examine the antecedents of work engagement in the public sector. Web of Science and Scopus, two prominent journal databases, were utilized to identify relevant literature. Adopting the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) approach, a final of 48 articles were systematically analyzed as research samples. The review identified five main themes: organizational and team factors, perceived leadership, job-related experience, individual, and organizational intervention factors. Generally, most studies reviewed emphasized individual and job-design-related factors as antecedents of work engagement in the public sector. Only minimal emphasis has been placed on organizational intervention compared to the other factors. This study also found that most literature addressed a single or a few themes of work engagement antecedents instead of a comprehensive work engagement model comprising all related aspects. This systematic review ends with directions for future studies to aid future scholars.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-06-14T01:33:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X221106792
       
  • Work-Family Conflict and Burnout Amid COVID-19: Exploring the Mitigating
           Effects of Instrumental Leadership and Social Belonging

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      Authors: Michelle Allgood, Ulrich Thy Jensen, Justin M. Stritch
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic brought disruptions to government workplaces, including abrupt transitions to remote work for many employees. Remote work can offer a physically distant environment and greater flexibility for individual employees and organizations; remote work also creates or exacerbates potential work-life balance tensions. Drawing on Job-Demands Resources theory, we propose that two organizational resources, instrumental leadership (a vertical organizational resource) and a sense of social belonging (a horizontal organizational resource), help prevent burnout by alleviating conflict between work- and family-life activities. Using survey responses from local government employees collected during the COVID-19 pandemic (May 2020), we show that employees with a strong sense of social belonging experience less work-family conflict and, in turn, report lower levels of burnout. We also find that social belonging, as a horizontal organizational resource, appears more important for reducing burnout in a period characterized by disruption than the more formal, vertical resource of instrumental leadership.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-06-11T10:12:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X221101308
       
  • Public Value at Cross Points: A Comparative Study on Employer
           Attractiveness of Public, Private, and Nonprofit Organizations

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      Authors: Adrian Ritz, Kristina S. Weißmüller, Timo Meynhardt
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      A commonly held assumption is that public service motivation (PSM) positively affects individuals’ attraction to government, but there are also private and nonprofit organizations that are beneficial to the common good. Therefore, the goal of this study is to shed light on an understudied topic in Public Administration, namely, how the public value of public, private, and nonprofit organizations affects their attractiveness to citizens and how PSM moderates this relationship. We find that employer attractiveness is strongly influenced by organizations’ public value regardless sectoral affiliation. This attribution of public value interacts with citizens’ PSM. For high-PSM individuals, the relationship between public value and attractiveness is stronger than for low-PSM individuals. Furthermore, high PSM exercises an asymmetric effect, punishing organizations with low public value more strongly in the private sector. These results highlight important implications for HR practitioners in all three sectors seeking to attract and retain highly motivated employees.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-06-03T09:15:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X221098153
       
  • Sexual Harassment and Employee Engagement: Exploring the Roles of Gender,
           Perceived Supervisory Support, and Gender Equity Climate

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      Authors: Taha Hameduddin, Hongseok Lee
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      The creation of inclusive workplaces in which individuals can thrive constitutes an important goal for many organizations. Despite recognition of this fact, persistent adverse workplace experiences, such as sexual harassment, threaten to relegate inclusion to mere rhetoric. While previous research has identified several outcomes of sexual harassment, we examine the relationship between sexual harassment and employee engagement, a strong driver for improved service delivery, organizational performance, and employee motivation. Building on the job demands-resources model, we consider three moderators that may influence this relationship: gender, perceived supervisory support, and the gender equity climate. The results indicate that sexual harassment has a negative relationship with employee engagement, but that this relationship differs between male and female employees. However, we found no significant moderating effects of perceived supervisory support and gender equity climate. The article ends with a discussion of the findings and implications for theory and practice.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-05-18T09:27:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X221095404
       
  • Workplace Disruption in the Public Sector and HRM Practices to Enhance
           Employee Resilience

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      Authors: Phil Kim, Wonhyuk Cho, In Yang
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      This article aims to analyze workplace dynamics in the public sector under highly disruptive environments. Survey data collected from 1,430 public employees in South Korea reveal that workload and work intensity have increased 13% to 15% on average compared to pre-pandemic conditions. Yet this impact on working conditions seems to be unevenly distributed across the public sector; the proportion of pandemic-affected workforce in each public organization ranged from 10% to 80%. More than 70% reported flexible work arrangements in place to alleviate the disruption, though less than 20% enjoyed access to occupational health and safety consultation to handle this change. We found that baby boomer men, who have the fewest family responsibilities, are most satisfied with flexible work arrangements, while millennial women, with the most domestic commitments, are least satisfied, leaving ample room for improvement. Results of a randomized survey experiment showed that resilience-enhancing Human Resource Management (HRM) practices such as special leave assistance programs influenced civil servants’ perceptions of workload and work intensity. Higher levels of satisfaction with resilience-enhancing HRM were found to be associated with lower levels of turnover intention, though this relationship was weaker among employees whose work became too intense or heavy (“numbing effect”) under the pandemic.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-05-06T10:47:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X221095399
       
  • Teleworking at Different Locations Outside the Office: Consequences for
           Perceived Performance and the Mediating Role of Autonomy and Work-Life
           Balance Satisfaction

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      Authors: Samantha Alexandra Metselaar, Laura den Dulk, Brenda Vermeeren
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Enhanced communication technologies increasingly allow us to work anytime and anywhere. Many organizations have moved from traditional offices to flexible workplaces in which employees are allowed to vary their work hours and work at different locations both outside and inside the office. So far, findings are inconclusive regarding the effects of teleworking and few studies have examined its use by employees. Our study, which addresses the pre-COVID-19 context, is based on COR theory and explores how employees working in a Dutch public sector organization (N = 873) use teleworking and what the consequences of this are for individual perceived performance. With respect to teleworking, we focus on time spent working from home and time spent working elsewhere. To test hypotheses, we conducted SEM in AMOS using a two-step approach. Mediation analysis showed that the paths from teleworking to performance via autonomy and work-life balance satisfaction were significant for working from home.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T04:53:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X221087421
       
  • Blurred Lines: Exploring the Impact of Change Complexity on Role Clarity
           in the Public Sector

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      Authors: Stéphanie Verlinden, Jan Wynen, Bjorn Kleizen, Koen Verhoest
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Over the past few decades, social, economic, and political developments have forced public organizations to continuously adapt to changing circumstances, casting them in ongoing cycles of organizational change. The continuous introduction of various types of change in an employee’s work environment may generate substantial levels of role ambiguity, which in turn could hamper performance and satisfaction. Given the increasing degree of change complexity in the public sector, it is surprising that no research has investigated whether more complex change is associated with greater reductions in role clarity. To gain a better understanding of how change complexity impacts organizations and their employees, we analyze survey data from the Australian Public Service Employee Census using propensity score matching. Results indicate that increasing levels of change complexity results in greater reductions of role clarity, suggesting that change trajectories sometimes exceed employees’ capability to adapt.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-05-04T10:28:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X221093573
       
  • How Leader’s Red Tape Interacts With Employees’ Red Tape From the Lens
           of the Job Demands-Resources Model

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      Authors: Jolien Muylaert, Adelien Decramer, Mieke Audenaert
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Currently, the public sector is undergoing a major digital transformation. Although this digitization is seen as a positive transformation, digital tools can also put additional job demands on employees, resulting in negative HR outcomes. An example of a job demand resulting from such digital tools is red tape. By building on the job demands-resources model, we developed a theoretical model investigating the relationship between red tape originating from digital tools and turnover intention. Our data analysis (N = 779 teachers; 91 school leaders) provides evidence for a positive indirect relationship between red tape originating from digital tools and turnover intention, through emotional exhaustion. Additionally, our results also suggest that the amount of red tape perceived by an employee’s leader will exacerbate the strength of this indirect relationship, hereby providing evidence that a factor at leader-level can exacerbate effects on a lower level.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T06:44:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X221087420
       
  • When Perceptions of Public Service Harms the Public Servant: Predictors of
           Burnout and Compassion Fatigue in Government

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      Authors: Brenda Sciepura, Elizabeth Linos
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Public servants’ mental health can impact how, how well, and to whom services are delivered. In this article, we extend the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) framework to consider whether employees’ perceptions of themselves, their co-workers, and beneficiaries predict higher psychological distress during the COVID-19 pandemic. Through a survey of state and local public servants (n = 3,341), we report alarming rates of psychological distress: one in three employees are burnt out and one in five are experiencing compassion fatigue. Those who view government as the place to make a difference, and those who perceive co-workers as competent, are less likely to report distress. Those who attribute poverty to systemic factors, and not to individual flaws of beneficiaries, experience higher distress. These findings suggest an urgent need to prioritize public servant mental health, and show that individual perceptions of self and others can predict variation in psychological distress, even in periods of widespread crisis.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T10:42:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X221081508
       
  • Wellbeing During a Crisis: A Longitudinal Study of Local Government Civil
           Servants

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      Authors: Joëlle van der Meer, Brenda Vermeeren, Bram Steijn
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 crisis has affected numerous areas of civil servants’ working life. We investigate, using the JD-R model, the impact of the current crisis on civil servants’ wellbeing. Furthermore, we argue that the COVID-19 pandemic might have different consequences for civil servants with various role perceptions. We distinguish between traditional, NPM, and NPG civil servants. A longitudinal survey (N = 569) has shown that: (a) wellbeing decreased over a 6-months period; (b) job demands, including work pressure and work-life disbalance, negatively influence wellbeing; and job resources, including autonomy, task variety, and social support, positively influence wellbeing. In terms of personal resources, self-efficacy positively influences wellbeing; and (c) civil servants’ role perception directly influences wellbeing. Although the effect is small, we found an interaction effect in the relation between leader support and burnout for NPG civil servants. The consequences of these findings for HR strategies related to civil servants’ wellbeing are discussed.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-03-12T07:00:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X221084104
       
  • Whistleblowing in the Public Sector: A Systematic Literature Review

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      Authors: Minsung Michael Kang
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Public administration scholars have provided a variety of theoretical insights to understand bureaucratic whistleblowing, and have emphasized its ethical, legal, and practical rationales in the context of democratic bureaucracy. To enhance our understanding of this principled dissent behavior in the public sector, this study systematically reviews 71 whistleblowing articles and dissertations that address three aspects in the literature: (1) definitions and theories; (2) methods and data, and (3) factors associated with whistleblowing intention and behavior. The findings show public administration whistleblowing research typically uses Near and Miceli’s definition, grounded on psychology, ethics, and human resource management (HRM) theories. Methodologically, there is a notable recent trend in the growth of empirical research using survey data, and equal attention has been paid to both whistleblowing intention and behavior variables. Based on the review findings, the study discusses two issues—definitional and theoretical—and presents four research agendas for future bureaucratic whistleblowing scholarship.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-03-03T07:01:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X221078784
       
  • Up the Chain: Gendered Mentoring in the U.S. Army

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      Authors: Shannon Portillo, Amy E. Smith, Alesha Doan
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      For careers in public service, meritocracy is espoused and idealized with formal structures for advancement. However, career development is also relational. Scholars have long discussed the benefits of mentoring both for psychosocial support and career advancement in organizations. While mentoring is recognized as important for career advancement, less is known about the nature of mentoring in male-dominated public sector organizations. In this paper we explore how mentoring functions in the U.S. Army—a male-dominated public service organization. Using data from a mixed method study, including survey data from approximately 1,200 Army personnel and analysis of 27 focus groups with 198 participants, we find that mentoring quality matters for all employees, but it matters more for women. We also find that mentoring is gendered, shaping the career trajectories of women and men in different ways.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-02-21T09:36:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X221076770
       
  • Putting the Humanity Back Into Public Human Resources Management: A
           Narrative Inquiry Analysis of Public Service in the Time of COVID-19

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      Authors: Sarah Berry, Maren B. Trochmann, Judith L. Millesen
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Amid a global pandemic, unprecedented numbers of citizens relied on essential public employees as lifelines for their health, safety, and connectedness to the broader community. These public servants worked tirelessly through collective trauma to ensure their neighbors had what was needed to maintain some semblance of a routine in an otherwise unpredictable environment. This article uses narrative inquiry to examine the implications of the COVID-19 pandemic disruption on the public sector workplace, the quality of work life, and to investigate how employees coped during the crisis. Our research reports on interviews with 43 front-line and behind-the-scenes public employees who describe how they coped, maintained their public service motivation, and worked through increased demands for emotional labor in this new work-life environment. The findings suggest the need for human resources policies that allow for a flexible, reflective, holistic, and person-centered approach.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-01-22T09:08:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X211069656
       
  • Experience, Emotion, and Exhaustion: How Unionization Influences Emotional
           Labor

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      Authors: Randall S. Davis, Edmund C. Stazyk, Erika D. Kline, Adam C. Green
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      While HRM scholars have built a rich body of knowledge regarding emotional labor (EL), we know comparatively less about the social origins of EL components and individual outcomes in government work contexts. To address this gap, we employ conservation of resources theory to examine how one prominent social institution within government organizations, labor unions, influence the process through which EL shapes one individual-level outcome, emotional exhaustion. We also draw from the process model of EL developed by Brotheridge and Lee to evaluate one specific countervailing resource, person-job fit. Results obtained using data from the 2016 U.S. Merit Principles Survey suggest that unionization indirectly increases emotional exhaustion via increases in the perceived need for false face acting. While unionization does not have a direct relationship with person-job fit, perceived increases in the need for false face acting contributes to emotional exhaustion by reducing person-job fit.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-01-03T12:19:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X211068171
       
  • Comparing Employer Attractiveness of Public Sector Organizations to
           Nonprofit and Private Sector Organizations: An Experimental Study in
           Germany and the U.S.

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      Authors: Jana Cordes, Rick Vogel
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Sector preferences in job choice have rarely been tested empirically across different administrative systems. We address this gap and apply a between-subject experimental design to examine the attractiveness of public, private, and nonprofit employers in two countries in different administrative traditions. Respondents (n = 362) from an Anglo-Saxon (i.e., the U.S.) and continental European country (i.e., Germany) were exposed to job advertisements that only differed in the employer’s sector affiliation, with other job attributes, such as payment and working hours, held constant. Contrary to expectations, and consistently across the two country samples, respondents evaluated public sector jobs more positively compared to vacancies in the private sector. In contrast, we found no such comparative advantage of public over nonprofit employers. By providing counterevidence to the prevalence of negative attitudes toward public organizations, our study warns against overgeneralizing previous findings on negativity biases to the context of employer attractiveness.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-01-03T12:13:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X211065349
       
  • “I Expected More From You”: The Effect of Expectation-Disconfirmation
           on Employees’ Satisfaction With Supervisory Support

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      Authors: Julia Penning de Vries, Eva Knies
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Are employees less satisfied with supervisor support when their expectations are disconfirmed' In this study, we examine this question for both predictive expectations (what will happen) and normative expectations (what should happen). Results from two preregistered experiments suggest that expectation-disconfirmation does not affect satisfaction with supervisor support. Instead, we find that expectation-disconfirmation as perceived by participants affects satisfaction with supervisor support. We conclude that even though supervisor support seems to be the most important predictor of satisfaction, perceived disconfirmation of expectations also influences employees’ satisfaction with supervisor support.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-01-03T12:06:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X211065348
       
  • Explaining High Performance Among Indian Administrative Service (IAS)
           Officers: A Job Demands-Resources Perspective

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      Authors: Surya Prakash Pati, Ram Kumar Kakani
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Indian Administrative Service (IAS) officers are careerist senior civil servants (SCS) in the world’s largest democracy, holding senior roles of policymaking and implementation. Therefore, identifying exceptionally performing SCS to unravel their “job demands” along with “personal resources” should help with understanding how best to manage these critical human resources. Employing a qualitative approach, we interviewed 11 high performing IAS officers identified through a unique career progression index. Our data analysis revealed that the IAS suffers from the following job demands: difficulty in coordination with other departments and stakeholders, financial inadequacy, and dishonest subordinates or coworkers. This study also found that self-directed learning, personal reputation, empathy, and service orientation are essential personal resources for high-performing SCS. While expanding the list of job demands and personal resources in the public administration context, our research provides a deeper insight into the challenges confronting careerist SCS in lower-middle income developing countries.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-01-03T11:59:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X211062481
       
  • Managerial Challenges of Emotional Labor Disruption: The COVID-19 Crisis
           in Mexico

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      Authors: Samanta Varela Castro, Elizabeth Pérez-Chiqués, Oliver Meza, Sergio A. Campos González
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this article is to contribute to the knowledge of managing emotional labor during a crisis. The COVID-19 pandemic has been a disrupting event, particularly affecting frontline healthcare workers and their supervisors who faced pressures to manage emotions during their interactions with patients. Emotional labor has been studied in emergencies; however, the case of Mexico offers insights into an understudied context and a long and singular crisis. Drawing from multi-level storytelling interviews with medical managers, physicians, and nurses in hospitals in different states of Mexico, this article argues that COVID-19 blurred relationships between performance and outcomes of emotional labor. As the organizational goal focused mainly on saving lives, some workers intensified and performed emotional labor innovatively, but others deviated from feeling rules. Managers’ role became crucial for employees to abide by affective requirements facing disruption.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-01-03T11:55:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X211060735
       
  • I’m Only Human: A New E-road to Advancing Social Equity Through a
           Humanist Approach to Mentoring in Public Service

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      Authors: Sue M. Neal, Angela Kline, Amanda M. Olejarski, Michelle Gherardi
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      This research reviews how mentoring has manifested in public service and how it can evolve to be better positioned to address key diversity, equity, and inclusion objectives. This work inventories the current understanding of public sector mentoring, highlighting the contrast between the classical mentoring approach of functionalism with the emerging humanist approach. Barriers to implementing meaningful humanist mentoring are reviewed, and e-mentoring is presented as a modality well situated to overcome these obstacles. The humanist e-mentoring model provides a process and modality to advance social equity by removing existing barriers to opportunities. Finally, best practices and outcomes for successfully implementing e-mentoring humanist and relationships in public service are presented and an updated model of critical outcomes is advanced. A brief agenda for future scholarship on this topic is presented.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-01-03T11:52:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X211058180
       
  • Book Review

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      Authors: Jessica N. Terman
      First page: 786
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-01-03T12:01:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X211063615
       
  • The Stay Interview: A Tool for Retention

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      Authors: Mark D. Bradbury, Meridith Martin, Elizabeth Yokley-Krige
      First page: 789
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2022-05-06T09:45:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X221093612
       
 
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