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HUMAN RESOURCES (103 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 92 of 92 Journals sorted alphabetically
Accounting and Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Accounting and the Public Interest     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Accounting Auditing & Accountability Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Accounting Education: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Afro-Asian Journal of Finance and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Finance and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 49)
Asia Pacific Journal of Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 208)
Asian Review of Accounting     Hybrid Journal  
Attachment & Human Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Australian Accounting Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
British Accounting Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Coaching : Theorie & Praxis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Contemporary Accounting Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Corporate Governance and Organizational Behavior Review     Open Access  
Critical Perspectives on Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
EURO Journal on Decision Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Accounting Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
European Journal of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Evidence-based HRM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
FOR Rivista per la formazione     Full-text available via subscription  
German Journal of Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Human Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Human Resource and Organization Development Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Human Resource Development International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Human Resource Development Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Human Resource Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
Human Resource Management Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
Human Resource Management Research     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Human Resource Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Human Resource Research     Open Access  
Intangible Capital     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Accounting and Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Accounting Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Accounting, Auditing and Performance Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Banking, Accounting and Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Behavioural Accounting and Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Critical Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Economics and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Ethics and Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Human Capital and Information Technology Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
International Journal of Human Resource Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Human Resources Development and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
International Journal of Management Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Management Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Accounting and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Accounting and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Accounting Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Accounting Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Chinese Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Contemporary Accounting & Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Enterprising Communities People and Places in the Global Economy     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of HR intelligence     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Human Capital     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Human Development and Capabilities : A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Human Resource and Sustainability Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Human Resource Costing & Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Human Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of International Accounting, Auditing and Taxation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Marketing and HR     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Organizational Effectiveness : People and Performance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Professions and Organization     Free   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Service Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Kelaniya Journal of Human Resource Management     Open Access  
New Horizons in Adult Education and Human Resource Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
NHRD Network Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Open Journal of Leadership     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
Pacific Accounting Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Personality and Individual Differences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Personnel Assessment and Decisions     Open Access  
Personnel Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Psychologie du Travail et des Organisations     Hybrid Journal  
Public Personnel Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Research in Human Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Review of Accounting Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Review of Public Personnel Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Revista Gestión de las Personas y Tecnología     Open Access  
South Asian Journal of Human Resources Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Sri Lankan Journal of Human Resource Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Strategic HR Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Personnel Review
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.586
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 16  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 2 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 0048-3486 - ISSN (Online) 1758-6933
Published by Emerald Homepage  [360 journals]
  • The influences of cross-cultural adjustment and motivation on
           self-initiated expatriates' innovative work behavior

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      Authors: Taiba Hussain , Yi Zhang
      Abstract: Drawing upon the cross-cultural adjustment (CCA) model and self-determination theory, this study investigated the influence of CCA (work, interactional, and general adjustment) and motivation (autonomous and controlled) on the innovative work behavior of self-initiated expatriates (SIEs). Multi-source data were collected from 213 SIEs and their supervisors working in the United Arab Emirates to provide an understanding of the role of SIEs' CCA and motivation and their innovative work behavior. Findings indicated that work, interactional, and general adjustment are positively related to innovative work behavior. Autonomous motivation positively predicts innovative work behavior, while controlled motivation does not. Additionally, autonomous motivation moderated the effects of work adjustment and interactional adjustment on SIEs' innovative work behavior, whereas controlled motivation moderates the effect of general adjustment on SIEs' innovative work behavior. SIEs are regarded as talents that have the skills and valuable knowledge gained from their international experience and can be utilized in organizations to perform innovative work behaviors. However, SIEs face adjustment challenges that may hinder their ability to be innovative. Despite their potential as innovation drivers in organizations, there are few studies on the factors that affect SIEs' innovative behavior. This study contributes to the literature by examining the effects of adjustment and motivation on SIEs' innovative work behavior.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-05-12
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-05-2021-0320
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Benevolent leadership and organizational citizenship behaviors in a higher
           education context: a moderated mediation model

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      Authors: Phong Dong Nguyen , Nguyen Huu Khoi , Angelina Nhat Hanh Le , Huong Xuan Ho
      Abstract: Drawing upon the conservation of resources (COR) theory, this paper investigates the moderated mediation model linking benevolent leadership to organizational citizenship behaviors towards the organization (OCBO) and towards individuals (OCBI) in the context of higher education. The mediating roles of leader-member exchange and affective commitment as well as the moderating roles of the two attachment styles—attachment anxiety and attachment avoidance—are also examined. Data were collected from a sample of 333 university lecturers and analyzed using partial least square structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM). The results demonstrate that leader-member exchange and affective commitment are mediating resources that help benevolent leaders motivate university lecturers to engage in two types of OCBs. Moreover, attachment anxiety and attachment avoidance act as the respective enhancer and inhibitor for the indirect effects of benevolent leadership on both OCBs through leader-member exchange. In contrast, the relationships between benevolent leadership and two types of OCBs through the mediating role of affective commitment are not contingent on the attachment styles of lecturers. The findings suggest that university leaders who aim at promoting OCBs among lecturers should deploy benevolent leadership style to facilitate a positive social exchange relationship as well as foster their affective commitment. Such leadership style is especially effective in influencing lecturers who possess attachment anxiety personality traits. This pioneer research develops and empirically tests a COR theory-grounded moderated mediation model pertaining to benevolent leadership and lecturers' OCBs. The findings contribute to the educational management literature by demonstrating that benevolent leadership, a crucial organizational resource, significantly motivates lecturers' voluntary and extra-role behaviors in a dynamic and contingent manner. Leader-member exchange and affective commitment are important mediating resources in the process of transforming benevolent leadership into beneficial behaviors. Further, the effectiveness of benevolent leadership largely depends on lecturers' personality traits of attachment anxiety and avoidance. These novel mediating and moderating findings demonstrate the sequential and interaction effects of various organizational and individual resources on lecturers' OCBs; thus, adding value to the COR theory's core principles, including resource caravans and resource investment behaviors.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-05-11
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-04-2021-0234
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Understanding flexibility i-deals: integrating performance motivation in
           the context of Colombia

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      Authors: Can Ererdi , Siqi Wang , Yasin Rofcanin , Mireia Las Heras
      Abstract: The goal of this study is to explore the consequences of flexibility i-deals in work and non-work domains of employees. A matched supervisor–subordinate sample context drawn from a security organization in Chile (N = 3,624 subordinates matched with 107 supervisors) was used which is an unrepresented context in research on i-deals. Results from multi-level analyses reveal that the interaction of performance motivation of subordinates and flexibility i-deals matters to performance motivation of subordinates. In turn, performance motivation reduces turnover intentions and work–family conflict of subordinates. The findings from multi-level structural equation modelling supported our hypotheses and offered interesting implications for the i-deals literature and practitioners. Our findings highlight (1) the importance of being performance driven to obtain flexibility i-deals and (2) the enabling role of performance-oriented supervisors. Flexibility i-deals act as mechanism that translate the impact of performance motivation on key work and non-work outcomes and can be considered as important HR tools for employees and managers. This research highlights the importance of performance motivation to obtain i-deals and emphasises that the motivation of supervisors is key to enable these deals. Furthermore, the context of this research, which is a security organisation, is important as research to date has been conducted in Western and corporate settings.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-04-26
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-08-2019-0419
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Job attitudes and career behaviors relating to employees' perceived
           incorporation of artificial intelligence in the workplace: a career
           self-management perspective

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      Authors: Alfred Presbitero , Mendiola Teng-Calleja
      Abstract: Artificial intelligence (AI) continues to be deployed in workplaces. While there are many positive outcomes of AI integration, understanding the extent of its consequences on employees is limited. Hence, this study examines employee perceptions of AI and the consequent influences on employee job attitudes and career behaviors. Utilizing the career self-management perspective, the authors explore the mechanisms related to employee perceptions of AI and potential career exploration behaviors. The authors tested several hypotheses using employee survey data (N = 345 call center agents) collected from a firm that recently integrated AI in their operations. The authors collected data on four occasions (one-week intervals between data collection) to determine employee perceptions of AI taking over jobs (Time 1); job insecurity (Time 2); psychological distress (Time 3); and career exploration behavior (Time 4). The findings reveal that perceptions of AI taking over jobs are significantly associated with higher career exploration behaviors. In addition, the authors found job insecurity and psychological distress as pathways that explain why employees having perceptions of AI taking over their jobs influences their career exploration behaviors. These findings fill a gap in the literature by revealing how AI integration in the workplace, despite its many positive outcomes for organizations, can have a negative influence on employees. The negative employee perceptions of AI can lead to career exploration behaviors. From the career self-management perspective, the authors offer novel insights that have practical implications for talent management, particularly the need to communicate effectively to employees about AI integration in the workplace to avoid them feeling threatened and leaving their jobs.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-04-25
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-02-2021-0103
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Ingratiating with bosses for favourable performance ratings: a serial
           mediation mechanism

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      Authors: Muhammad Ali Asadullah , Ahmad Siddiquei , Mariam Musaddiq , Rizwana Amin
      Abstract: This study examines how team-level mediating mechanisms (i.e. team psychological safety and team helping behaviour) facilitate the relationship between employees' ingratiation and performance ratings. The data were collected from 180 customer service teams working in Pakistan's hospitality industry through multiple sources using a paper and pencil questionnaire. The multi-level structural equation modelling results showed that team psychological safety and helping behaviour fully mediated the relationship between ingratiation and performance ratings. The study has offered some implications for theory and practices. This study showed that ingratiation might be a helpful impression management tool within a team context. Such an influence technique nurtures a psychologically safe climate and encourages peers to help each other perform mutual tasks within the hospitality context.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-04-25
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-05-2020-0351
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Expatriates' adjustment and performance in risky environments: the role of
           organizational support and rewards, risk propensity and resilience

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      Authors: Muhammad Sarfraz , Qasim Ali Nisar , Ali Raza
      Abstract: Drawing upon the social exchange and psychological capital literature and applying a multilevel perspective, this paper examines how personal and organizational factors contribute to expatriates' adjustment and performance of international assignments in a terrorism-induced risky environment. Data were collected using a non-probability sampling approach (e.g. purposive and subsequent snowball sampling). The authors tested the hypotheses using survey data of 138 expatriates with current international assignments in Pakistan. Expatriates' perceived organizational and risk-taking propensity influences their performance through improved adjustment. Moderating effects suggest that an individual's satisfaction with the received organizational rewards strengthens the risk-taking propensity to adjustment relationship; resilience strengthens the adjustment to performance relationship. This study extends existing expatriation literature by focusing on a specific type of risk factor pertinent to international assignments, i.e. terrorism. Integrating individual and organizational factors that influence adjustment and subsequent performance provides a clear picture rather if such factors are operationalized separately in the terrorism-induced risky environment context.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-04-25
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-05-2021-0309
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • How does the power dynamics in the information technology outsourcing
           supply chain influence supplier's talent retention: a multiple case study
           

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      Authors: Xiwei Zhang , Xiaoyan Liang
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the power dynamics between the client firm and the supplier firm in the information technology outsourcing (ITO) supplier chain influence the supplier firm's human resource management (HRM) practices, particularly talent retention. A multi-case study approach was adopted comprising four supplier firms, three client firms and a total of 53 interviews. The transaction cost economics (TCE) is the theoretical lens that guides the interpretation of our findings. The power dynamics between client and supplier firms in the ITO supply chain is one underpinned by TCE theory, characterised by an asymmetric client-dominated, transactional relationship, with the client firms controlling the “why”, the “what”, and the “how” dimensions of their collaboration. This “three-dimensional control” led to high talent turnover in supplier firms, which boomerangs to perpetuate the power dynamic, forming “vicious cycles of talent turnover” in the ITO supplier chain. No previous study has analysed power dynamics as an external factor on ITO supplier firms' talent retention. The construct of the “three-dimensional-control” offers a framework to study power dynamics in the ITO supplier chain. The study’s framework of the “vicious cycles of talent turnover” is the first that explains the mechanisms through which the power dynamics in the ITO influences supplier's talent retention.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-04-20
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-12-2020-0912
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The impact of role overload on job crafting from the perspective of
           construal level theory

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      Authors: Long Chen , Yana Du
      Abstract: Previous studies have vague views about whether employees who are required to complete large amounts of work (i.e. role overload) would proactively create a change in their job characteristics (i.e. job crafting), because the cognitive mechanism underlying the nexus between role overload and job crafting is unclear. The aim of this study is to identify why and when role overload has an impact on job crafting. This study builds a second-stage moderated mediation model. Using a two-wave panel field study of 213 employee–supervisor matched data, this study examines the proposed hypotheses. Results show that role overload decreases construal level, which can determine the tendency of employees to focus on the feasibility (low level of construal) or desirability (high level of construal) of behaviors. Goal self-concordance is the degree to which employees pursue their personal goals based on feelings of personal interests and values. The authors find that goal self-concordance guides employees who have higher levels of construal to exert more effort in job crafting. The authors further find that goal self-concordance moderates the mediating role of construal level. Specifically, for employees in pursuit of self-concordant goals, role overload reduces their construal level, resulting in less effort in job crafting. For employees who do not pursue self-concordant goals, role overload decreases their construal level, thereby improving job crafting. The findings of this study enrich the literature on role overload and job crafting by revealing the mechanism and boundary conditions of the relationship between role overload and job crafting.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-04-15
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-03-2021-0179
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Job crafting, meaningfulness and affective commitment by gig workers
           towards crowdsourcing platforms

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      Authors: Mohamed Mousa , Walid Chaouali
      Abstract: Through focusing on gig workers registered in three crowdsourcing platforms, the authors investigate how individual and collaborative job crafting may be positively related to the meaningful work and affective commitment those gig workers develop towards the crowdsourcing platforms they register in. The authors employed a quantitative research method in which they focused on date from surveys completed by 327 gig workers. They tested the hypotheses using SmartPLS 3, which is more suitable when dealing with complex models, non-normal data, small samples and higher-order constructs. The results showed that the proactive behaviour embedded within both individual and collaborative job crafting may lead to a sense of meaningfulness for gig workers and subsequently, their affective commitment towards the crowdsourcing platforms they register in. Specifically, the more gig workers undertake individual (H1) and collaborative (H2) job crafting behaviour, the greater the sense of meaningfulness they develop. Moreover, meaningfulness for gig workers positively affects their affective commitment towards the crowdsourcing platforms they register with (H3). To the best of the authors' knowledge, this study is the first of its kind in the context of France and the European Union to focus on job crafting and its effect on both meaningful work and the affective commitment of non-traditional workers. This paper contributes by filling a gap in human resource (HR) management, in which empirical studies that address gig work have been limited so far.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-04-14
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-07-2021-0495
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Human capital disclosure and the contingency view

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      Authors: Kaouthar Lajili
      Abstract: Building on an integration of strategic human resource capital management and human capital disclosure literature streams, this paper explores the associations between human resource performance and human resource disclosure in the financial services sector. Using content analysis and panel regression methods, the paper examines the extent, nature, and information content of human capital disclosures in the financial services sectors in North America during the global financial crisis period. Labor costs and marginal labor productivity are significantly associated with human resource disclosure and the latter is significantly related to both financial (explicit) and non-financial (implicit or relational) components of the employment relationship. Results show inverted effects between the US and Canadian samples. The findings support a contingency view or “best-fit” approach to human resource capital management. Differences in labor market structures and human capital attributes could have significant impacts on human capital disclosure strategies. More transparent and detailed disclosures regarding human resource capital management may provide useful and relevant information for investors and stakeholders in general. The study provides insights into how labor market structures and human capital attributes jointly affect the extent and nature of corporate disclosures with regards to rents distribution and relational governance between employers and employees.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-04-07
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-10-2020-0791
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Relative deprivation, perceived status conflict and innovative behavior of
           outsourced employees: multiple moderating effects of dual organizational
           support

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      Authors: Pengcheng Wang , Chuanyan Qin , Shanshi Liu
      Abstract: How to manage outsourced employees in interorganizational teams with triangular relationships has not yet attracted enough attention. Based on relative deprivation theory, this study explores how relative deprivation affects outsourced employees’ innovative behavior and investigates the complex moderating effects of dual organizational support. The authors tested their hypothesis by conducting a two-wave survey; responses to a questionnaire were collected from 283 outsourced employees and their managers among 52 client organizations. Results found that relative deprivation negatively influences the outsourced employees’ innovative behavior by eliciting their perceptions of status conflict. Support from client (supplier) organization attenuates (aggravates) the positive impact of relative deprivation on innovative behavior throughout status conflict. The moderating effect of client organizational support was moderated by support from supplier organization. The authors selected the outsourced employees in a Chinese context to conduct this study, and the results need to be generalized in future research. Client organizational support can alleviate the negative effect of relative deprivation on outsourced employees, whereas supplier organization support aggravates the negative effect; managers should pay attention to the different effects of the two organizations’ support and provide reasonable support for outsourced employees. This study identified the mechanism of relative deprivation’s effect on outsourced employees’ innovative behavior from the perspective of interpersonal interaction and compared the effect of support from dual organizations. This study expands the research on triangular relationships, relative deprivation, status conflict and other field.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-04-04
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-04-2021-0280
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • How the supervisor's Machiavellianism results in abusive supervision:
           understanding the role of the supervisor's competitive worldviews and
           subordinate's performance

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      Authors: Abdul Karim Khan , Imran Hameed , Samina Quratulain , Ghulam Ali Arain , Alexander Newman
      Abstract: Drawing on the dual process model of ideology and prejudice, the purpose of this paper is to examine whether, how and when a supervisor's Machiavellianism leads to subordinates' perceptions of abusive supervision. In doing so, the authors also explore the mediating role of the supervisor's competitive world views and the moderating role of subordinates' performance on this relationship. The theoretical model was tested using three sources of data from supervisors, their subordinates and the organization. Hierarchical linear model analysis was run on supervisor and subordinate dyadic data for testing whether subordinates' performance moderated the mediated relationships or not. The results suggest that the supervisors' competitive worldviews explain the positive link between their Machiavellianism and subordinates' perceptions of abusive supervision. The results highlight that the mediation effect of supervisors' competitive worldviews on the link between their Machiavellianism and their subordinates' perceptions of abusive supervision is more pronounced when subordinates' performance is low than when it is high. This research contributes to the authors’ knowledge of the link between supervisors' Machiavellianism and abusive supervision, and how the toxic influence of their Machiavellianism is mediated by supervisors' competitive worldviews. The study contributes to the literature on abusive supervision and personality by studying the role of personality as an antecedent of abusive supervision. Further, this study used subordinates' performance as a contextual variable for understanding abusive supervision.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-31
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-03-2021-0176
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Involved fathering: how new dads are redefining fatherhood

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      Authors: Christine D. Bataille , Emma Hyland
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to investigate how professional men in dual-career relationships craft and enact their fatherhood role ideologies during the transition to fatherhood. In particular, the authors focus on the impact that the development of a more involved approach to fatherhood has on the mother's ability to combine career and family. This study utilizes a longitudinal, qualitative methodology. Pre- and post-natal interviews were conducted with 18 professional men in dual-career heterosexual relationships. Although the traditional mode of fatherhood that is rooted in breadwinning continues to be the dominant approach among working fathers in the US, new modes of more involved fathering are emerging. The results of the study indicate that a general shift away from a strict, gendered division of household labor is taking place in today's dual career couples, and this is leading to an increase in men's involvement in childcare. Further, although much of the extant research conceptualizes fatherhood as a role typology, the results reveal that all fathers are involved in caring for their babies, though to varying degrees. Thus the authors propose a continuum of involvement. Finally, the authors discovered how men are finding creative ways to use official and unofficial workplace flexibility to be more involved at home. The findings offer novel insights into the factors that encourage involved fathering. The authors encourage organizations to create more supportive environments that foster involved fathering by extending paid parental leave benefits to men and providing more access to flexibility.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-30
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-06-2019-0295
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Work-life balance satisfaction in crisis times: from luxury to necessity
           – The role of organization's responses during COVID-19 lockdown

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      Authors: Silvia Ortiz-Bonnin , Joanna Blahopoulou , M. Esther García-Buades , Maribel Montañez-Juan
      Abstract: This study examines how satisfaction with work-life balance (WLB) in combination with satisfaction with organization's COVID-19 responses (SOCV19R) helps to enhance subjective well-being and performance during the lockdown due to COVID-19. The data of this time-lagged study were gathered through an online survey with three-waves between March and May 2020 in Spain (N = 167). Hierarchical multiple regression and PROCESS were used to test the hypotheses. Direct relationships between SOCV19R and subjective well-being and performance were not significant. Instead, SOCV19R increased employees' well-being and performance through a higher satisfaction with WLB (full mediation). The novelty of this study is the evaluation of SOCV19R as a form of organizational support in times of crisis. This study suggests that a good organizational reaction to face a crisis such as the pandemic, encourages employees' WLB and helps them to boost their well-being and performance. It may be concluded that work-life balance (WLB) in Spain was seen as a luxury in good times and turned out to be a necessity in bad times. The present study recommends practical implications and provides lessons for human resource management for future crises or similar work conditions.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-07-2021-0484
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • An institutional view on the relationship between high-performance work
           system and organizational performance: the role of country of origin

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      Authors: Xiaoxuan Zhai , Xiaowen Tian
      Abstract: This paper extends the institution theory to examine the relationship between high-performance work system (HPWS) and organizational performance (OP), and analyzes how country of origin interacts with performance measures and industrial affiliation in moderating the HPWS–OP relationship. The paper collects data of 60,142 firms and establishments in 252 studies published up to December 2021 and employs meta-analysis techniques to test hypotheses on the role of country of origin in moderating the HPWS–OP relationship in conjunction with performance measures and industrial affiliation. The paper finds that, firstly, there is a positive relationship between HPWS and OP, but the relationship is much stronger in developing than advanced countries. Secondly, the relationship is stronger when OP is measured in operational than financial term in both developing and advanced countries, but the moderating effect of performance measures is stronger in developing than advanced countries. Thirdly, the relationship is stronger in service than manufacturing industries in developing countries, but no such variation is found in advanced countries. The study for the first time unveils the important role of country of origin in interacting with performance measures and industry affiliation to condition the HPWS–OP relationship, and provides a coherent explanation based on institutional theory. The study sheds fresh light on the HPWS–OP relationship, and has important implications for managers.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-23
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-06-2019-0334
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Effects of trust in organizations and trait mindfulness on optimism and
           perceived stress of flight attendants during the COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Pornprom Suthatorn , Peerayuth Charoensukmongkol
      Abstract: This research adopts the conservation of resources (COR) theory to examine the effects of trust in organizations and trait mindfulness on optimism and perceived stress of flight attendants in Thailand during the COVID-19 pandemic. Online survey data were collected from 234 flight attendants who work for five low-cost airlines based in Thailand. The data were analyzed by using partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM). The results show that trust in an organization and trait mindfulness are negatively associated with the perceived stress of flight attendants. Their associations are also partially mediated by optimism. Moreover, the moderating effect analysis reveals that trait mindfulness intensifies the positive association between trust in organizations and optimism. The evidence from this research broadens COR theory by showing that different aspects of resources can be combined to strengthen the ability of individuals to gain more resources to lessen stress.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-22
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-06-2021-0396
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Insider perspectives on director remuneration governance
           deliberations

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      Authors: Marilee Van Zyl , Nadia Mans-Kemp
      Abstract: Companies around the globe increasingly receive immense shareholder scrutiny due to perceivably excessive executive director remuneration. The debate in South Africa intensifies due to severe pay inequality. The authors thus accounted for the perspectives of asset managers and listed financial services companies in South Africa pertaining to the impact of voting and engagement on director pay policies and practices. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with selected asset managers, chief executive officers, chief financial officers and remuneration committee members of listed financial services companies to gauge their views on the impact of shareholder activism endeavours on remuneration governance. The qualitative data was analysed by conducting thematic analysis. Most of the asset managers and financial services representatives preferred proactive, private engagement on pay concerns, given the impact thereof on voting outcomes, and ultimately director remuneration practices and policies. Independent remuneration committees have a prominent role in facilitating engagements with investors to ensure fair remuneration. The consequences should be clearer if organisations receive substantial votes against their pay policies and implementation reports. South African regulators can consider the “two-strikes” rule to ensure that action is taken in response to shareholder voting on director remuneration matters. Representatives of asset managers and listed financial services investee companies offered valuable insights on remuneration governance deliberations in an emerging market. This in-depth analysis highlights the importance of proactive engagement to ensure that corporate leaders are paid fairly.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-17
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-01-2021-0032
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Perceived managerial intimidation: harmful implications and potential
           buffers

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      Authors: Galit Meisler
      Abstract: Does perceived managerial intimidation result in harmful emotional and behavioral implications that impair employees' performance' If so, are there buffers against these implications' To answer these questions, the current study relies on the social exchange theory and presents a moderated mediation model in which (1) perceived managerial intimidation evokes hostility that results in both organizational counterproductive work behavior (O-CWB) and interpersonal counterproductive work behavior (I-CWB) and (2) negative affectivity, political skill, tenure with the manager and sectorial affiliation moderate these relationships. The moderated mediation model was tested using a sample of 367 subordinates. The data were collected in three waves. Perceived managerial intimidation was positively related to hostility and both forms of CWB. Moreover, hostility mediated the relationships between perceived managerial intimidation and these two outcomes and sectorial affiliation moderated these mediations. Public organizations should implement training programs to develop the awareness of the organizations' managers about the harmful implications of perceived managerial intimidation and teach the managers acceptable methods for improving employees' performance. This study investigates whether perceived managerial intimidation results in CWB. The study's findings demonstrate positive relationships between these variables, shedding light on the emotional mediating mechanism that links the variables. Moreover, the study validates sectorial affiliation as a buffer against the negative emotional and behavioral implications of perceived managerial intimidation, providing ideas for practical implications.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-17
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-07-2019-0353
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • A balanced perspective on the affordance of a gamified HRM system for
           employees' creative performance

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      Authors: Juliet Eyore Ikhide , Ahmet Tarik Timur , Oluwatobi A. Ogunmokun
      Abstract: Rather than overstating the favorable effects of gamification on work outcomes, the purpose of this paper is to present a more balanced perspective into the effects a gamified human resource management (HRM) system may have on creativity at work. This conceptual paper explores and delineates how employees' interaction with gamification features within a gamified HRM system enables and particularly undermines employees' motivation for workplace creative performance. The cross-disciplinary nature of this paper necessitates the reliance on theoretical principles, the explanatory and predictive capacities of theories central to human-computer interaction, employee motivation and creativity fields. Thus, the tenets of affordance, self-determination and dynamic componential theory were utilized to analyze the affordance of a gamified HRM system for employees' creative outcomes. It is discovered that augmenting the HRM system with gamification affordance is crucial amid global market change and increasing digitization. However, incorporating game design elements into work systems does not necessarily guarantee an increase in creative outcomes. On the contrary, the system may equally undermine employees' motivation, which in turn hampers their creative outcomes. Many gamification papers have more often than not touted the positive effects of such a system on the targeted outcome. Based on the affordance theory which shows that a user's interaction with gamification properties could produce different outcomes (not only favorable ones) and considering the intricacies of employees' motivation and behavioral outcomes at work, this paper takes a more balanced perspective to examine how gamification could generate intended as well as unintended consequences for employees' creativity, which is crucial to overall job performance.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-15
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-01-2021-0062
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Attraction and retention of employees in an Australian regional SME: the
           importance of place and scale in human resource management

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      Authors: Upamali Amarakoon , Linda Colley
      Abstract: This study examines employee attraction and retention issues and uses a case study of an Australian regional medium-sized enterprise to highlight the importance of organisational context factors such as place and scale in designing human resource (HR) solutions. The research presents a qualitative case study, with data drawn from strategic documents, interviews and focus groups, analysed thematically. A carefully constructed set of HR strategies – including purposeful use of employer branding, synchronising of human resource management (HRM) formality and informality and capitalising on the regional context – are key to employee attraction and retention and in turn the growth and competitiveness of the case study organisation. The HRM literature acknowledges the tendency to study larger corporations in metropolitan areas, at the expense of more nuanced research related to context. This research contributes to knowledge of attraction and retention through employer branding, with particular attention to scale and place, through study of a medium sized firm in a regional location. It highlights the importance of informality-formality dynamism.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-15
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-03-2021-0172
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Uncovering the intellectual structure of diversity management research: a
           bibliometric analysis (1990–2019)

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      Authors: Shatrughan Yadav , Usha Lenka
      Abstract: Diversity management has gained researchers' and practitioners' attention because of its competitive advantage and performance outcomes in an organization. Despite increasing literature, there is no common understanding of the evolution and intellectual structure of diversity management. Therefore, this study aims to identify the leading works and analyze the changes in diversity management research's knowledge structure. This study adopts a novel approach using bibliometric methods to analyze the 785 papers published between 1990 and 2019. Bibliometric analysis is applied to identify the seminal work using the bibliometrix package. The bibliometric network visualization findings have highlighted the most influential works, prominent authors, theoretical insights, current research trends and gaps. Several clusters are extracted from bibliometric networks, and cluster analysis has integrated the different unconnected subfields and highlighted the major theme explored in diversity management research. This is the first bibliometric study that explored the intellectual structure of diversity management research. This study has provided theoretical and practical contributions for academicians and human resource practitioners and suggested future research avenues.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-15
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-04-2021-0296
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Female workers' career success in the handicraft industry: a study of
           Uttarakhand, India

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      Authors: Gunjan Joshi , Rajib Lochan Dhar
      Abstract: This work is an extension of research on worker participation in achieving career success by including a prominent contextual construct, that is social capital. The present research aims to study how competency development influences the intrinsic career success of females in the handicraft industry, by considering the role of perceived employability as a mediator and social capital as a moderator. By doing so, this paper aims to fill the vacuum in the career literature that suggests that career success is not gender neutral. Data was collected from handicraft workers by adopting the survey method. CFA and SPSS macro named PROCESS were used to analyse data. Competency development influences the subjective career success of female workers, and perceived employability mediated the relationship between them. Moreover, social capital independently moderates the relationship between the participation of workers in competency development and perceived employability. The study is conducted in the Indian context alone, and therefore future studies must be conducted globally to deepen the scholarly dialogue on female workers' career success. Also, the current study measures career success, from a subjective perspective, thus future studies can measure female workers' objective career success. The current paper identifies the need to study the factors contributing to female workers' career success in small industries. Conventional industries and their workers' career success must be given equal importance by researchers, practitioners and policymakers. The paper fills the gap in career research by exploring female workers' career success through empirical evidence.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-14
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-01-2019-0003
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Individual agency and structure perceptions in intentions to withdrawal
           from work early/late in the mid-and late-career

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      Authors: Carlos-María Alcover , Mariana Bargsted , Jesús Yeves
      Abstract: In the context of an aging workforce and uncertain labor markets, it is a priority to identify and analyze what factors influence intentions regarding motivation to continue working, how and when to retire. From the life course perspective, this paper aims to capture the individual agency and structure perceptions to withdrawal from work early/late intentions in the mid- and late-career, identifying voluntary/involuntary factors underlying these intentions. Hypotheses were tested using multiple regression analyses based on a cross-sectional design, with a representative sample of 414 Chilean workers over the age of 45. The results depict several patterns of contextual factors operating at different levels underlying mid- and late-career-related intentions. Specifically, they identify how perceptions of individual agency and structure are significantly associated with voluntary and involuntary factors that guide intentions to stay working or retire early, as well as to prolong working life and to lean toward bridge employment. This study contributes to identifying perceptions of individual agency and structure in career intentions and can help individuals and organizations clarify the voluntary and involuntary factors behind work–life intentions in their middle and final career stages. In addition, the results can contribute to international research in this field by providing information on the underrepresented Ibero-American context.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-11
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-03-2021-0154
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Leader favorable feedback and withdrawal behavior: a moderated mediation
           model of gratitude and leader-member exchange

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      Authors: Zhou Jiang , Yuanmei (Elly) Qu
      Abstract: This study investigates why and when leader favorable feedback inhibits employees’ withdrawal behaviors. The authors propose that leader favorable feedback reduces employees’ withdrawal behaviors via employees’ gratitude toward the leader. The authors further posit that this mediation is contingent on leader-member exchange, arguing that as the quality of leader-member exchange increases, employees are more likely to feel grateful and are less likely to withdraw from work. Two-wave, multisource field data collected from 662 employees were used to test our hypotheses. Employees’ feelings of gratitude mediated the negative relationship between leader favorable feedback and employees’ withdrawal behavior. The negative effect of gratitude on withdrawal behavior was stronger under higher levels of leader-member exchange, as was the indirect effect of leader favorable feedback on withdrawal behavior via employees’ gratitude. These results contribute to a social exchange-based understanding of gratitude as an emotional mechanism underlying the feedback and withdrawal relationship and provide important practical implications for managers.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-11
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-04-2021-0228
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Does intraorganizational competition prompt or hinder performance' The
           risks for proactive employees who hide knowledge

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      Authors: Yunita Sofyan , Dirk De Clercq , Yufan Shang
      Abstract: This study examines whether employees' perceptions of intraorganizational competition, defined as beliefs that the organization evaluates their performance in comparison with others, result in lower supervisor ratings of their conscientiousness if the employees, particularly those with proactive personalities, respond to the resource-draining, competitive work situation with knowledge hiding behavior. Multisource data were collected from employees and supervisors in different industries at three points in time. The research hypotheses were tested with hierarchical multiple regression analysis, in combination with PROCESS macro-based bootstrapping, to assess mediation and moderated mediation. Beliefs about highly competitive organizational climates are counterproductive, in that they lead employees to conceal knowledge intentionally from other organizational members. This mediating role of knowledge concealment is particularly prominent among employees with a strong desire to take the initiative to protect themselves against the hardships created by a climate of internal competition. The research design does not allow for formal tests of causality. For human resource managers, this research pinpoints self-protective knowledge hiding as a key, detrimental mechanism. It imposes dual harms: employees feel threatened by the strict performance-oriented climate, and their defensive reactions make them appear less conscientious to supervisors. This downward spiral is particularly likely to initiate among employees who exhibit a disposition toward action. This research investigates novel connections between specific organizational elements and outcomes, by specifying why and when employees' beliefs about performance-oriented organizational climates might backfire, due to their negative behavioral responses, such as purposeful knowledge hiding.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-11
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-04-2021-0294
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Does fear-based silence mediate the nepotism–employee outcomes
           relationship'

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      Authors: Ajay K. Jain , Shalini Srivastava , Sherry E. Sullivan
      Abstract: Although common throughout the world, little is known about the mechanism by which nepotism is associated with employee outcomes. Drawing from social exchange theory, this study examines whether fear-based silence mediates the relationship between nepotism with employee workplace withdrawal and career satisfaction. In addition, whether gender moderates the relationship between nepotism and fear-based silence is also examined. Two time-lagged surveys of 330 employees in the Indian banking sector were completed. As hypothesized, nepotism was positively related to fear-based silence and employee workplace withdrawal; it was negatively related to career satisfaction. Fear-based silence partially mediated the relationships of nepotism with workplace withdraw and career satisfaction. Gender moderated the relationship between nepotism and fear-based silence. This study shows the negative impact of nepotism on employee outcomes and suggests means for reducing its prevalence in organizations. This is the first study to examine fear-based silence as a mediator of nepotism’s relationship with employee workplace withdrawal and career satisfaction. It also answers repeated calls for more research on fear-based silence and its antecedents.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-11
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-06-2021-0394
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Growth mindsets increase flexible work arrangement attractiveness: a
           policy-capturing study

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      Authors: Brandon W. Smit , Katie M. Lawson
      Abstract: Although flexible work arrangements (FWAs) are widely regarded as a desirable employee benefit, questions remain about which factors drive (or attenuate) applicant attraction to them. The authors offer a novel theoretical account by advancing the concept of lay theories (i.e. mindsets) around an individual's ability to juggle work and life responsibilities, defined as beliefs that the ability to juggle is either malleable (i.e. growth) or cannot be changed (i.e. fixed), which suggests greater efficacy increases attraction. Utilizing an experimental policy-capturing design, 86 participants each rated a series of 64 job offers (N = 5,376) with several manipulated job attributes. Participants were randomly assigned into a growth or fixed mindset condition. Multilevel regressions revealed that a growth (vs fixed) mindset caused participants to place greater weight on flexible work scheduling policies by reporting greater attraction to jobs with flexible arrangements. Organizations may increase applicant attraction by taking steps to ensure that the value of work–life benefits is salient, such as offering concrete examples of how policies have been used. This study questions the assumption that those who need flexibility are more attracted to FWAs and demonstrates that beliefs around one's ability to juggle work–life demands are a unique mechanism shaping applicant attraction.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-08
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-10-2020-0793
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Does social distancing make the heart grow fonder' The impact of work
           spouse interaction frequency on organizational outcomes

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      Authors: Rachel E. Frieder , Marilyn V. Whitman , Ashley Mandeville , Matthew Leon
      Abstract: The shift to remote work brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic dramatically limited spontaneous workplace interpersonal interactions. For one interpersonal relationship in particular, the work spouse, the sudden physical distance may impact the energy work spouses draw from one another. Drawing on interactional ritual theory, this study aims to investigate the relationship between interaction frequency and organizational outcomes mediated by relational energy amid the pandemic. During the COVID-19 pandemic, working adults who indicated they had a work spouse were recruited via Qualtrics to participate in a two-part online study. Complete data from 120 participants across both time periods revealed that more frequent interaction between work spouses is associated with increased job satisfaction and affective commitment mediated by relational energy. This study represents the first empirical examination of individual and organizational outcomes of a unique interpersonal workplace relationship. Additionally, this study enhances our understanding of the impact of relational energy in socially distanced situations between employees in a close, intimate (non-sexual) pair bond.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-03
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-05-2021-0348
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Emotional exhaustion, emotional intelligence and task performance of
           employees in educational institutions during COVID 19 global pandemic: a
           moderated-mediation model

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      Authors: George Sunil D'Souza , Francis Gnanasekar Irudayasamy , Satyanarayana Parayitam
      Abstract: The objective of the present study is to investigate the relationship between emotional exhaustion and performance. During the present coronavirus disease (COVID-19) global pandemic, as the world has come to a standstill and more than 200 countries have been seriously affected, the level of emotional exhaustion experienced by people worldwide is beyond one's imagination. But how organizations were coping with emotional exhaustion and maintaining performance has remained an important question. To address this, the authors developed a conceptual model suggesting that organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) can act as a mediator, and leadership style and emotional intelligence (EI) can act as moderators in alleviating the dysfunctional consequences of emotional exhaustion. Using a structured survey instrument, data were collected from 384 respondents from the faculty and administrative personnel in the Mangalore Diocese educational institutions. The authors used stratified sampling and tested the psychometric properties of the instrument using Lisrel software. To test the hypotheses involving two-way and three-way interactions, the authors used Hayes (2018) PROCESS as a statistical technique. The results revealed that OCB mediated the relationship between emotional exhaustion and performance. To alleviate the dysfunctional consequences of emotional exhaustion, EI and transformational leadership interact to influence OCBs. The authors found that at lower and higher levels of EI, employees exhibited OCBs when leaders exhibited a greater level of transformational leadership. Furthermore, the transactional leadership style interacted with emotional exhaustion to reduce the adverse effects of later on performance. As with any research based on self-report measures, the present study has inherent limitations of social desirability and common method bias. However, the authors have sufficient care to minimize, if not eliminate, these limitations. The research highlights the importance of EI, a contingency leadership style in organizations, to reduce the adverse effects of emotional exhaustion caused by the global pandemic. This study contributes to both organizations and literature on personnel psychology and organizational behavior. The study suggests that individuals need to invest resources in developing the skills of controlling and regulating their emotions and engaging in extra-role behaviors. In addition, leaders in organizations need to exercise transformational and transactional leadership styles to combat the present COVID-19 global pandemic situation. This study provides new insights into the importance of EI, leadership style, and OCBs in restoring the loss of resources because of emotional exhaustion. The conceptual model developed and tested is the first of its kind in India, to our knowledge, and contributes to both theory and practice.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-02
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-03-2021-0215
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • A cross-industry comparison of how women leaders experience gender bias

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      Authors: Amber L. Stephenson , Leanne M. Dzubinski , Amy B. Diehl
      Abstract: This paper compares how women leaders in four US industries–higher education, faith-based non-profits, healthcare and law–experience 15 aspects of gender bias. This study used convergent mixed methods to collect data from 1,606 participants. It included quantitative assessment of a validated gender bias scale and qualitative content analysis of open-ended responses. Results suggest that, while gender bias is prevalent in all four industries, differences exist. Participants in higher education experienced fewer aspects of gender bias than the other three industries related to male culture, exclusion, self-limited aspirations, lack of sponsorship and lack of acknowledgement. The faith-based sample reported the highest level of two-person career structure but the lowest levels of queen bee syndrome, workplace harassment and salary inequality. Healthcare tended towards the middle, reporting higher scores than one industry and lower than another while participants working in law experienced more gender bias than the other three industries pertaining to exclusion and workplace harassment. Healthcare and law were the two industries with the most similar experiences of bias. This research contributes to human resource management (HRM) literature by advancing understanding of how 15 different gender bias variables manifest differently for women leaders in various industry contexts and by providing HRM leaders with practical steps to create equitable organizational cultures.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-02-2021-0091
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The impact of COVID-19 on the work–life balance of working mothers:
           evidence from Nigerian academics

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      Authors: Babatunde Akanji , Chima Mordi , Hakeem Ajonbadi , Olatunji Adekoya
      Abstract: Given the limiting gender role conditions arising from the prevalence of patriarchy in Nigeria and the shift to workers staying at home due to the deadly spread of coronavirus (COVID-19), this article aims to explore the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the work–life balance of professional mothers using the work–home resources model as a conceptual lens. The qualitative data is based on telephone interviews with 28 married female university academics with children. The findings reveal that the confinement policies enforced due to the need to combat the spread of COVID-19 and patriarchal norms deeply embedded in the Nigerian culture have exacerbated stress amongst women, who have needed to perform significantly more housework and childcare demands alongside working remotely than they did prior to the pandemic. The thematic analysis showed a loss of personal resources (e.g. time, energy, and income) resulting in career stagnation, health concerns, and increased male chauvinism due to the abrupt and drastic changes shaping the “new normal” lifestyle. The study relies on a limited qualitative sample size, which makes the generalisation of findings difficult. However, the study contributes to the emerging global discourse on the profound negative consequences of COVID-19 on the lives and livelihoods of millions, with a focus on the stress and work–family challenges confronting women in a society that is not particularly egalitarian – unlike Western cultures. The article provides valuable insights on how the COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically affected professional working mothers in the sub-Saharan African context, where literature is scarce.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-08-2020-0636
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • How difficulties in upward voice lead to lateral voice: a case study of a
           Chinese hospital

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      Authors: Fenwick Feng Jing , Adrian Wilkinson , Paula K. Mowbray , Maria Khan , Huanpeng Zhang
      Abstract: The aim of this study is to explore and unpack the notion of lateral voice within the context of a Chinese hospital. A qualitative design was used, involving interviews of 24 medical personnel from a public hospital in mainland China. This included two focus groups (eight participants each) of physicians and nurses, and eight individual interviews with managers, including a chief nurse and directors of the medical centre. The findings reveal that in top-down contexts with a respect for hierarchy, direct and vertical voice is discouraged but lateral voice fills this gap and can lead in some circumstances to a pathway to collective vertical voice. Interestingly, the study finds that fear of damaging relationships with peers may also discourage lateral voice in some cases, leading to silence altogether. Contradictory lateral voice outcomes arising from employees working within this context are discussed. The study makes an original contribution to voice literature through exploring an understudied voice target, that is, voicing to peers. In doing so, the study demonstrates the importance of lateral voice as an important component of voice behaviour.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-28
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-02-2021-0075
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The instrumental role of employee voice in achieving promotability: social
           influence perspective

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      Authors: Hataya Sibunruang , Norifumi Kawai
      Abstract: Drawing upon social influence theory, this study examines employee voice as one potential form of social influence that enables employees to receive positive performance evaluations from their supervisors, further increasing their chances of being promoted to a higher positional level. Importantly, organizational politics as experienced by employees is an important boundary condition that may affect the success of voice in achieving promotability. This study obtained data from 218 independent matched subordinate-supervisor dyads from a manufacturing company in Japan. This study utilized the PROCESS macro developed by Hayes (2013) to test moderated mediation hypotheses. Employee voice positively predicts employee promotability through supervisors' evaluations of employee task performance, and organizational politics operates as a boundary condition at both the first and second stages of moderation. By speaking up at work, employees may instill an impression as a highly performing and competent individual in the eyes of their supervisors, thereby increasing their chances of being promoted within their organization. However, it is important to carefully consider the degree of workplace politics before expressing one's voice. For organizations, it is important to ensure that the policies and procedures used to demine promotion decisions are objective. This study departs from the traditional perspective that voice is primarily used for prosocial reasons by suggesting that voice can also be used for the purpose of promoting personal career objectives.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-28
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-05-2020-0332
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Informal learning and career identity formation: the mediating role of
           work engagement

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      Authors: Hossein Ali Abadi , Alan Coetzer , Hernan ‘Banjo' Roxas , Mahsa Pishdar
      Abstract: The aim of the study is to extend prior research on career identity formation by investigating whether individuals' participation in informal workplace learning activities positively relates to career identity. The study also examines whether work engagement significantly mediates the participation in informal learning and career identity relationship. Using data from a survey of 313 individuals in Iran, the study developed and tested measurement and structural models and employed partial least squares structural equation modelling to test the hypotheses. The findings suggest that work engagement substantially mediates the positive relationship between participation in informal learning and career identity. Furthermore, the learning potential of the workplace and the propensities of individuals to actively approach situations that provide them with opportunities to learn and seek feedback on their performance have positive although varying relations with levels of participation in informal learning. Human resource management and career management specialists must be cognisant of the central role that employee participation in informal learning plays in strengthening their work engagement and career identity. Learning and development specialists should seek to create conditions in the work environment that are favourable to informal learning and work engagement. Although the role of formal development programmes in career identity formation is well documented, studies that examine links between participation in informal learning activities and career identity are very rare. Furthermore, there are no known studies that examine the potential mediating role of work engagement in the relationship between participation in informal learning activities and career identity.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-24
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-02-2021-0121
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • How human resource managers can prevent perceived pandemic threats from
           escalating into diminished change-oriented voluntarism

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      Authors: Dirk De Clercq , Renato Pereira
      Abstract: For human resource (HR) managers, the harmful outcomes of employees’ ruminations about external crises, such as a pandemic, represent important, timely concerns. This research postulates that employees’ perceptions of pandemic threats might diminish the extent to which they engage in change-oriented voluntarism at work. This negative connection may be attenuated by employees’ access to two personal (work-related self-efficacy and organization-based self-esteem) and two relational (goal congruence and interpersonal harmony) resources. The theoretical predictions are tested with survey data collected among employees who work in a banking organization in Portugal. Persistent negative thoughts about a pandemic undermine discretionary efforts to alter and enhance the organizational status quo, but this detrimental effect is mitigated when employees (1) feel confident about their work-related abilities, (2) have a positive self-image about their organizational functioning, (3) share a common mindset with coworkers with respect to work goals and (4) maintain harmonious relationships with coworkers. This study pinpoints several ways HR managers can reduce the danger that employees’ worries about life-threatening crises may lead to complacent responses that, somewhat paradoxically, might undermine their ability to alleviate the suffered hardships. The findings contribute to research on the impact of external crisis situations on organizations by providing an explanation of why employees may avoid productive, disruptive work activities, contingent on their access to complementary resources.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-23
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-06-2021-0430
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • How do work–life support practices impact bank employees' subjective
           well-being'

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      Authors: Ishita Roy , Md. Shamsul Arefin , Md. Sahidur Rahman
      Abstract: Based on the social exchange theory, the paper aims to explore the effects of work–life support (WLS) practices on subjective well-being through work engagement and job satisfaction. Data of 332 bank employees were collected in three waves and analyzed using AMOS and PROCESS macro. The study revealed that WLS practices influenced employees' subjective well-being both directly and indirectly. The study's results further supported the serial mediation of the indirect effect through work engagement and job satisfaction. Organizational WLS practices are supposed to play an effective role in helping employees increase subjective well-being. Organizations should attach importance to implementing WLS practices to ensure that employees are engaged and satisfied. Furthermore, organizations should undertake and communicate favorable WLS practices to stimulate employees' work and non-work well-being. The study is the first that examines the impact of WLS practices on employees' subjective well-being. Furthermore, the study offers novel insights regarding the dual mediation effect of work engagement and job satisfaction in the relationship between WLS practices and subjective well-being.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-22
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-01-2021-0050
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Understanding the role of job quality in the association of employees’
           career change to self-employment and job satisfaction

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      Authors: Shi Shu , Ying Wang , Haiying Kang , Chia-Huei Wu , Pia Arenius
      Abstract: – While researchers have discussed the association between career change to self-employment and job satisfaction, few have considered how the association is achieved. Therefore, in this study, the authors aim to explain this relationship from the perspective of job quality. The authors build on job design theory to propose and empirically test how fluctuations in job satisfaction as associated with the transition to self-employment can be explained by changes in job quality. – The authors tested their propositions using a longitudinal, nationally representative database from Australia for the 2005–2019 period. The final sample included 108,384 observations from 18,755 employees. – In line with the literature, the authors found that job incumbents experienced low job satisfaction in the years prior to their career change to self-employment and that their job satisfaction improved after the transition. More importantly, the authors found the same change pattern for job quality – measured as job autonomy and skill variety – and the statistical results demonstrated that job quality was the key determinant of job satisfaction during the process. – This study advocates the importance of job quality in managing employee wellbeing and facilitating retention. – The authors contribute to the literature by uncovering how job quality, represented by skill variety and job autonomy, can explain fluctuations in job satisfaction during individuals’ career change from paid employment to self-employment.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-22
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-03-2021-0212
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • What if employees with intrinsic work values are given autonomy in worker
           co-operatives' Integration of the job demands–resources model and
           supplies–values fit theory

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      Authors: Rhokeun Park
      Abstract: This study explores the role of intrinsic work values as a motivator in the workplace. By integrating the job demands–resources model and supplies–values fit theory, it also investigates whether autonomy and worker co-operatives can strengthen the intrinsic motivation of employees who have strong intrinsic work values. Longitudinal surveys collected at 25 worker co-operatives and 27 corporations were analyzed with a model in which a moderated mediation model and a mediated moderation model are integrated. The results revealed that individuals with strong intrinsic work values had stronger intrinsic motivation and engaged less frequently in job search behavior. The moderation analyses demonstrated that employees with strong intrinsic work values were more strongly motivated in worker co-operatives than in corporations and that this result was obtained because more autonomy was granted in worker co-operatives than in corporations. To date, little research has examined the moderating roles of autonomy and worker co-ops in the associations of intrinsic work values with employee motivation and behavior. The present study contributes to the literature on work values and worker co-operatives by providing evidence that autonomy and worker co-operatives can accelerate intrinsic motivation of employees with intrinsic work values. Managers should grant employees enough autonomy and opportunities to participate in decision-making to stimulate their motivation, especially for employees with strong intrinsic work values. By integrating the job demands–resources model with the supplies–values fit theory, this study proposes interaction effects of a personal resource with job and organizational resources on intrinsic motivation.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-22
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-05-2021-0362
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Mentoring and coping self-efficacy as predictors of affective occupational
           commitment for women in STEM

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      Authors: Lama Blaique , Ashly Pinnington , Hazem Aldabbas
      Abstract: Despite an evident increase in the number of women joining Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) majors at universities, the recruitment and retainment of women in STEM occupations continue to be a substantial challenge. The aim of this research is to investigate several individual and contextual factors that could increase the representation of women in STEM fields. The authors report the results of a questionnaire survey of women (n = 375) working in STEM industries in the Middle East and North Africa region who have or had a mentor during their careers. Structural equation modelling is used to examine the proposed hypotheses. The results indicate that both mentoring and coping self-efficacy positively influence affective occupational commitment. Coping self-efficacy is also found to partially mediate the relationship between mentoring and affective occupational commitment. The authors recommend that researchers and practitioners give more attention to the contextual factors such as mentoring and its contribution to the coping self-efficacy and affective occupational commitment of employees in STEM occupations. In this study, the authors investigate individual and contextual factors that have potential to enhance women's occupational commitment in STEM industries based on the Career Self-Management Model.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-21
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-09-2020-0729
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Dead-end jobs or steppingstones' Precarious work in Albania

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      Authors: Elvisa Drishti , Fiona Carmichael
      Abstract: This study asks whether lower quality forms of employment lead to career transitions into higher quality forms of employment acting as steppingstones, or bridges or, whether instead they lead to dead-ends, or traps, in which workers move between unstable jobs with low prospects for upward mobility and unemployment. This study uses a unique longitudinal dataset recording monthly employment states over 3 years for 373 individuals in the Albanian city of Shkoder. The analysis uses sequence and regression analysis to investigate whether people employed in lower quality, more precarious jobs remain in these kinds of jobs or instead are able to transition into higher quality, permanent and full-time employment. In line with previous evidence for the region, the analysis confirms the precarization of many working lives particularly for women, young people and those with lower educational attainment. This evidence is more supportive of the dead-end hypothesis than the idea that a lower quality job can be a steppingstone into a better job. This study contributes to the limited knowledge of labour market functioning in developing post-socialist Western Balkans countries. Recent flexicurity policies have generated an increased prevalence of more precarious employment arrangements in Albania. This investigation addresses previous research limitations regarding point-in-time transitions and unobserved heterogeneity using retrospective longitudinal data and controlling for personality traits.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-18
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-04-2021-0275
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Is meaningful work always a resource toward wellbeing' The effect of
           autonomy, security and multiple dimensions of subjective meaningful work
           on wellbeing

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      Authors: Marjolein Lips-Wiersma , Jarrod Haar , Helena D. Cooper–Thomas
      Abstract: Using conservation of resources as a theoretical lens, the paper aims to investigate distinct objective meaningful work (OMW) and subjective meaningful work (SMW) domains as resources that contribute to wellbeing. A cross-sectional questionnaire was conducted with 879 employees, measuring OMW resources (job security and autonomy), SMW using the well-validated multidimensional Comprehensive Meaningful Work Scale (CMWS) focusing on five dimensions (integrity with self, expressing full potential, unity with others, service to others and balancing tensions), and three wellbeing outcomes (positive affect, negative affect and job stress). The authors conducted structural equation modeling, mediation analysis with PROCESS macro including bootstrapping, and dominance analysis, to identify the core relationships between OMW and SMW dimensions and three wellbeing constructs. OMW resources are largely beneficially related to SMW dimensions; both OMW and SMW resources are mostly beneficially related to wellbeing outcomes; and the overall associations of OMW with the three wellbeing constructs are partially mediated by SMW. The dominance analyses of SMW with wellbeing shows expressing full potential is the most important predictor of positive affect, and integrity with self is the most important (negatively related) predictor of negative affect and job stress. Our research, in pulling apart the different dimensions of MW, shows that to enhance wellbeing, HR professionals should not just pay attention to practices that support self-transcendent MW but also those that support the self. When not balanced, MW can lead to a loss of wellbeing. The findings highlight that (1) while the current MW literature places a lot of emphasis on SMW, OMW remains an important consideration, and (2) while the MW literature often focuses on self-transcendent meanings, such as making a difference, the self-oriented dimensions of SMW are more dominant toward wellbeing. This is valuable to employees, managers, and HR professionals considering how to improve MW and wellbeing.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-16
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-10-2020-0754
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Crafting telework: a process model of need satisfaction to foster telework
           outcomes

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      Authors: Michal Biron , Wendy J. Casper , Sumita Raghuram
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to offer a model explicating telework as a dynamic process, theorizing that teleworkers continuously adjust – their identities, boundaries and relationships – to meet their own needs for competence, autonomy and relatedness in their work and nonwork roles. This study uses the lens of job crafting to posit changes teleworkers make to enhance work-nonwork balance and job performance, including time-related individual differences to account for contingencies in dynamic adjustments. Finally, this study discusses how feedback from work and nonwork role partners and one’s self-evaluation results in an iterative process of learning to telework over time. This model describes how teleworkers craft work and nonwork roles to satisfy needs, enhancing key outcomes and eliciting role partner feedback to further recraft telework. The propositions can be translated to hypotheses. As such the dynamic model for crafting telework can be used as a basis for empirical studies aimed at understanding how telework adjustment process unfolds. Intervention studies could focus on teleworkers’ job crafting behavior. Organizations may also offer training to prepare employees to telework and to create conditions under which teleworkers’ job crafting behavior more easily translates into need satisfaction and positive outcomes. Many employees would prefer to work from home, at least partly, when the COVID-19 crisis is over. This model offers a way to facilitate a smooth transition into this work mode while ensuring work nonwork balance and performance. Most telework research takes a static approach to focus on the work–family interface. This study proffers a dynamic approach suggesting need satisfaction as the mechanism enabling one to combine work and domestic roles and delineating how feedback enables continuous adjustment in professional and personal roles.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-14
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-04-2021-0259
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The buffering role of servant leadership on the relationship between
           organizational politics and employee task performance and citizenship
           behaviors

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      Authors: Mohammad Nisar Khattak , Peter O'Connor , Noor Muhammad
      Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine whether servant leadership (SL) buffers the negative relationship between perceived organizational politics (POP) and employee performance outcomes. Time-lagged multi source data were collected from 236 supervisor-subordinate dyads in a public sector university in Pakistan. SL, POP and several control variables were measured in subordinates at time 1, and supervisor ratings of organization citizenship behaviors and task performance were measured at time 2. The authors performed moderated multiple regression analysis to test the hypotheses underpinning the study. Findings revealed that POP was negatively related to employee task performance and two types of organization citizenship behavior (individual and organizational). Findings also revealed that SL attenuated the negative effect of POP on employee task performance and the two types of organization citizenship behavior. SL is particularly important in organizational cultures characterized by high politics; therefore, managers seeking to enhance task performance and citizenship behavior in employees should adopt this style of leadership if possible. This is the first study conducted in the South Asian context that has examined whether, and how, SL buffers the negative effects of POP on employee task performance and organization citizenship behavior.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-14
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-11-2020-0848
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Perception of organizational politics, knowledge hiding and organizational
           citizenship behavior: the moderating effect of political skill

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      Authors: Navneet Kaur , Lakhwinder Singh Kang
      Abstract: Based on the conservation of resource (COR) theory, this study investigates the association between the perception of organizational politics and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) while considering the mediating role of knowledge hiding and moderating role of political skill in this process. Data were collected in a time-lagged survey in two waves with a three-week interval from frontline employees and their peers working in private sector banks in India. The hypothesized relationships were ascertained using the PROCESS macro for SPSS. The results revealed a negative association between the perception of organizational politics and OCBs targeted at co-workers (OCBI), organization (OCBO) and customers (OCBC), both directly and indirectly, via knowledge hiding. Additionally, the negative indirect effect of the perception of organizational politics on OCB facets, via knowledge hiding, is buffered for individuals with high levels of political skill. The current study portrays a more comprehensive understanding of the dynamics between the perception of organizational politics and OCB, with a particular emphasis on identifying the unidentified factors that may impact this liaison.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-11
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-08-2020-0607
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Modelling the interaction between serious leisure, self-perceived
           employability, stress, and workplace well-being: empirical insights from
           graduates in India

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      Authors: P.M. Nimmi , William E. Donald
      Abstract: Drawing on a framework of Job Demands-Resources (JD-R), the purpose of this paper is to conceptually develop and empirically validate a moderated mediation model of serious leisure and workplace well-being. The data were collected between December 2020 and March 2021 using an online questionnaire. A total of 225 completed questionnaires were received from employees in India who graduated between 2018 and 2020. The authors’ findings indicate that serious leisure is positively associated with workplace well-being and that the relationship is mediated by self-perceived employability. Stress moderates the relationship between serious leisure and self-perceived employability in such a way that the association is stronger when levels of stress are higher. Stress also moderates the mediating effect of self-perceived employability on the relationship between serious leisure and workplace well-being such that the indirect effect of serious leisure on workplace well-being is stronger when levels of stress are higher. Theoretical implications come from drawing on leisure studies literature to differentiate casual leisure and serious leisure. The concept of serious leisure is subsequently integrated into the human resource management literature to explore the relationship between serious leisure, self-perceived employability, stress, and workplace well-being. Practical and policy implications suggest how universities and organisations can support their students and early careers talent by encouraging them to participate in serious leisure activities.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-10
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-04-2021-0305
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Time for life' The spillover effect of strain-based family-to-work
           conflict on early retirement intentions and the role of HR practice
           flexibility

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      Authors: Guodong Cui , Fuxi Wang , Jian-Min Sun , Yanyuan Cheng
      Abstract: To cope with the workforce shortages brought by population ageing, it is critical to understand the workplace micro-foundations that determine the mechanisms of older workers' early retirement intentions. Drawing on the conservation of resource theory, this study examines the spillover effect of strain-based family-to-work conflict (SFWC) on early retirement intentions, with emotional exhaustion as a mediator. Additionally, it investigates the contextual resources, HR practice flexibility, as a boundary condition for the above relationships. The study tests the hypotheses by employing a multi-sourced matching sample of 231 workers (aged 45–65) and their 49 managers. The results of cross-level analysis revealed that SFWC has a positive indirect relationship with early retirement intentions, through increased emotional exhaustion. The relationship between emotional exhaustion and early retirement intentions is weaker when older employees experience higher HR practice flexibility. This study is the first to use a resources perspective to analyse early retirement mechanisms, and it examines the spillover effect of SFWC on early retirement intentions. The findings also contribute to the literature on the role of HR practice for ageing workers.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-01
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-03-2021-0199
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Cultivating organizational attraction: a resource view on psychological
           contracts of career development among interns

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      Authors: Yinyin Cao , Junghyun Lee , Marie Waung
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between psychological contracts and subsequent internship outcomes, with a specific focus on employer obligations with regard to career development. The study also examines the potential moderating role of person–organization (P–O) fit. Online surveys were administered to 196 college students both prior to and upon completing their summer internships. Moderated mediation analyses were performed following Hayes (2018). The results show that employer fulfillment of career development is positively associated with organizational attractiveness, as mediated by intern skill acquisition. In addition, high levels of P-O fit ameliorated low developmental situations, with high P-O fit resulting in stronger attraction to the organization than low P-O fit. The study underlines the importance of career development and the associated attainment of instrumental resources in the psychological contract process between organizations and interns. For the former, the provision of career development may increase interns' attraction to the organization. For interns, such opportunities can enhance skill acquisition, with differential effects for those with high and low P-O fit. This study is the first to provide an empirical assessment of the instrumental outcomes of psychological contract fulfillment with regard to career development prior to formal organizational entry. It further sheds light on the interactive effect of skill acquisition and P-O fit in predicting individual perceptions of the organization.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-01-25
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-04-2021-0301
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Stakeholder engagement in inclusive employability management for
           employees whose health at work is impaired: empirical evidence from a
           French public organisation

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      Authors: Myriam Guillaume , Sabrina Loufrani-Fedida
      Abstract: This paper identifies the stakeholders engaged in inclusive employability management for employees whose health at work is impaired and examines how different mechanisms can be used to engage these stakeholders. The paper aims to explore the link between stakeholder engagement and inclusive employability management. The empirical study uses a qualitative approach to mobilise a case study in a French public organisation. Data collection combines four sources: 50 individual interviews, informal dialogues, 39 days of observations and 43 documents. The findings provide insights into the management of inclusive employability for vulnerable employees and reveal the multiplicity of stakeholders involved. Institutional, organisational and individual mechanisms are used to engage stakeholders in employability management for vulnerable employees. Furthermore, the implementation of inclusive structural and operational mechanisms promotes a policy that favours employability management. However, stakeholders are also faced with institutional, organisational and individual difficulties that limit their engagement. The findings have the potential to inform organisational stakeholders – human resources management (HRM) and managerial stakeholders in particular – of the support needed for employability management. The findings emphasise the value of ensuring that employability management policies and practices promote the full integration of vulnerable employees. The research fills an important gap in the HRM literature on managing employability for vulnerable employees. In doing so, the study makes a specific contribution to the literature on organisational inclusion with employability management. Our research contributes to extant knowledge of stakeholder engagement by including a bottom-up dimension to facilitate stakeholder engagement.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-01-19
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-06-2021-0404
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Authoritarian and benevolent leadership: the role of follower homophily,
           power distance orientation and employability

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      Authors: Alexei Koveshnikov , Mats Ehrnrooth , Heidi Wechtler
      Abstract: Drawing on follower-centric leadership theory, the study examines the role of perceived homophily between the leader and the follower, follower's individual-level power distance orientation (PDO) and follower's perceived employability in moderating the effects of authoritarian and benevolent paternalistic leadership (BPL) on followers' turnover intentions. The study analyzes a sample of 403 white-collar Russian employees. Whereas both leadership styles generally decrease followers' turnover intentions, they operate differently. Authoritarian leadership (AL) is more effective among followers with higher follower-leader homophily and PDO, whereas BPL is effective only among followers with low perceived homophily and PDO, and more effective among followers with higher perceived employability. The study extends research on non-participative styles of leadership, their effects and boundary conditions.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-01-18
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-02-2021-0097
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Exploring layers of context-related work-from-home demands during COVID-19

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      Authors: Laxmikant Manroop , Daniela Petrovski
      Abstract: This article identifies the contextual demands impacting the work from home (WFH) experience during the COVID-19 pandemic and considers their respective impact on employees' personal and work-related outcomes. Drawing on a qualitative methodology, the authors thematically analyzed written narratives from 41 employees who had been required to work from home during the COVID-19 pandemic. Data analysis identified four layers of contextual demands (omnibus, task, social and personal) that had resulted in participants being required to work from home. Drawing on this finding, the authors develop a conceptual process model to extend current theory and explain how the respective demands impact individual affective reactions and work-related experiences, health and wellbeing. The authors’ findings offer new insights into contexts where WFH becomes mandatory, indicating that it is characterized by a range of challenges and opportunities. This paper signals the need to provide employees with a realistic preview of working from home demands, including interventions to better prepare them to navigate the daily stressors of working from home; and provision of virtual employee assistance programs in the form of online counseling. This paper explores a unique phenomenon – the mandatory requirement to work from home during the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on employees' personal and work-related experiences and outcomes.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-01-18
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-06-2021-0459
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • What sort of collective bargaining is emerging in Nigeria'

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      Authors: John Ebinum Opute , Ali B. Mahmoud
      Abstract: Nigeria is experiencing an expanding variety of what is termed collective bargaining, which is being propelled by socio-economic challenges and the emerging political dispensation that had long eluded the country, albeit the numerous contours needing some pragmatic approaches from the state, employers of labour and the trade unions at the local and national levels. Therefore, this study represents an attempt to illustrate the rising collective bargaining pattern in Nigeria. This study drew on employee and employer sectoral associations examples together with labour union structures of the state to assess what underlined collective bargaining developments from the broad context of collective bargaining and the industrial relations implications. Content analysis was employed to analyse the secondary data (found in relevant company handbooks, policies, collective agreements, etc.) and primary data obtained through unstructured interviews. A form of collective bargaining is emerging where the trade unions are embracing symbiotic agreements at plant levels to improve conditions of employment and thus weakening the hold of the national union from collective bargaining – a move that may challenge the conceptual framework of collective bargaining as conceived by many states in developing economies. This is an investigative paper, carefully trailing the framework of collective bargaining from direct contacts with all stakeholders in the labour corridors of Nigeria – such as the Nigeria Labour Congress, Nigeria Employers’ Consultative Association, Chemical and Non-Metallic Products Employer's Federation, Metal Products Workers Union of Nigeria and Personnel Practitioners, cutting across all the segments of the political and economic development of the country.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-01-18
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-12-2020-0872
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Formalization and employee thriving at work: a moderated mediation model
           including work engagement and centralization

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      Authors: H.M. Saidur Rahaman
      Abstract: Until recently, scholars have begun to examine the contextual antecedents of employees thriving at work. A recent study has shown that one aspect of organizational structure/context (i.e. formalization) can be an important antecedent of employee thriving at work. However, scholars have urged doing research examining how different aspects of organizational structure can combinedly influence employee work outcomes such as thriving at work. Given that, the present paper proposes a theoretical model to unravel the mechanisms of how two aspects of organizational structure (i.e. formalization and centralization) may operate as the antecedents of employees thriving at work. In particular, the author draws on the Conservation of Resources Theory (COR) to hypothesize that employees' work engagement mediates the relationship between their perception of formalization and thriving at work. The author further hypothesizes that the indirect relationship between formalization and employee thriving at work is moderated by employees' perception of centralization, such that the relationship is stronger in the presence of a lower level of centralization than higher. The author gathered data by employing a time-lagged survey design involving 136 full-time employees from different organizations. Results show that employee work engagement mediates the relationship between formalization and employee thriving at work. Further, the indirect relationship between formalization and employee thriving at work is stronger when the level of centralization is relatively low. Formalization is able to enact employees' thriving at work, particularly when organization implements relatively less centralized structure. This study first introduces work engagement as a mediator in the formalization–employee thriving at work relationship and centralization as a moderator along this mediating process.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-01-17
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-03-2021-0223
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • How and when overqualification improves innovative work behaviour: the
           roles of creative self-confidence and psychological safety

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      Authors: Nasib Dar , Saima Ahmad , Wali Rahman
      Abstract: This paper aims to examine the influence of perceived overqualification on innovative behaviour in the workplace. By integrating self-efficacy and human capital theories, this study proposes that perceived overqualification improves innovative behaviour directly and indirectly by boosting employee creative self-confidence. It further investigates the boundary conditions imposed by perceived psychological safety in this process. The research utilises a quantitative research methodology through a two-wave survey of 335 employees and their 135 leaders. Moderated and mediated regression analyses were used to analyse the research data. The results revealed that perceived overqualification promotes innovative behaviour at work directly and indirectly through its positive influence on creative self-confidence. The mediating effect of creative self-confidence in the relationship between perceived overqualification and innovative behaviour is moderated by perceived psychological safety at work, such that the relationship is stronger in a higher perceived psychological safety condition compared to when it is low. This study has theoretical and practical implications for personnel management. From a theoretical perspective, it integrates human capital and self-efficacy theories to explain a mechanism through which perceived overqualification will lead to innovative behaviour in the workplace. From a managerial perspective, it mitigates the stigma associated with an overqualified workforce by suggesting that perceived overqualification can be a source of innovation at work. This is the first study that examines the creative self-confidence-based mechanism in the relationship between perceived overqualification and innovative behaviour at work. It also explores the moderating role of psychological safety in this relationship.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-01-17
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-06-2020-0429
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Innovative work behaviour: the what, where, who, how and when

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      Authors: Muhammad Farrukh , Fanchen Meng , Ali Raza , Yihua Wu
      Abstract: This study aims to analyse the current trends and set the future research agenda in employee-level innovative work behaviour (IWB) research. A portfolio of 910 publications on IWB collected from the Scopus database was systematically analysed using different bibliometric techniques. Based on the performance analysis and science mapping of innovative work behaviour research, the study identifies the most prolific sources of IWB publications and lists several future research directions. This paper could serve as one-stop information that may facilitate transdisciplinary endeavours by assisting scholars and practitioners in identifying peer-recognised publications and scholarly communities.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-01-17
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-11-2020-0854
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • A moderated mediation model of counterproductive work behaviour,
           organisational justice, organisational embeddedness and psychological
           ownership

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      Authors: Sultan Adal Mehmood , Abdur Rahman Malik , Devika Nadarajah , Muhammad Saood Akhtar
      Abstract: This study aimed to investigate the mechanisms through which organisational justice influences counterproductive work behaviour (CWB). This relationship was explained using a moderated mediation model where organisational embeddedness is a mediator between organisational justice and CWB, while psychological ownership (for the organisation) is a moderator of the relationship between organisational embeddedness and CWB. The conservation of resources (COR) theory was used as the underpinning theory to explain the interrelationships among the constructs. Data were collected by administering a quantitative cross-sectional survey to employees of Punjab Police, a large public sector, law enforcement organisation in Pakistan. The study model was analysed using PLS-SEM to address the treatment of higher-order reflective-formative constructs. The results showed that organisational justice is positively related to organisational embeddedness, while organisational embeddedness is negatively related to CWB. Organisational embeddedness was found to play a significant role in mediating the negative effects of organisational justice on CWB. Also, psychological ownership moderated the influence of organisational embeddedness on CWB in an interesting fashion. CWB was the highest when both embeddedness and ownership were low; however, CWB was not the lowest when both embeddedness and ownership were high. Reliance on self-report data, not accounting for the community embeddedness and discounting the differential effects of justice dimensions are some of the limitations of the present study. Despite these limitations, this study offers valuable insights into how the occurrence of CWB can be minimised. That is, apart from providing a work environment based on fair procedures and policies, it is critically important to manage the perceptions of embeddedness and psychological ownership of employees. Although numerous researchers have studied the link between organisational justice and CWB, few have explored the roles of organisational embeddedness and psychological ownership in this relationship. This study thus posits a novel moderated mediation mechanism, based on the COR theory, through which organisational justice is translated into CWB. Moreover, this study adds value by investigating this model in the police force context, where justice and CWB have important consequences.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-01-14
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-05-2021-0330
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Continuous learning and employee performance: a moderated examination of
           managers' coaching behavior in India

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      Authors: Sunil Budhiraja
      Abstract: By integrating organizational support theory (OST) and social cognitive theory, this study investigates types of managers' coaching behavior as experienced by the employees. Furthermore, the study examines whether employees would exhibit greater task and contextual performance when organizational learning is blended with a specific coaching behavior of their manager. Using primary data from 298 software engineers working in select information technology companies across India, the current study attempts to assess moderating effect of managers' coaching behavior in two relationships, including continuous learning and employees' task performance (CL-TP) and continuous learning and employees' contextual performance (CL-CP). Result of exploratory factor analysis suggests that managers of select organizations exhibit two major types of coaching behavior: inspiration-based coaching behavior and facilitation-based coaching behavior. On the moderating role of coaching behavior, it is documented that facilitation-based coaching behavior significantly positively moderates both stated (CL-TP and CL-CP) relationships, whereas inspiration-based coaching behavior of supervisors has positive significant effect on CL-TP relationship but negatively moderates the CL-CP relationship. The extent to which the findings of this study can be generalized is constrained by the limited sample and organizational context. The most important managerial implication for all learning organizations is that both kinds of coaching behaviors help improving the task performance of the employees, but managers should prefer facilitation-based coaching style in order to generate higher contextual performance of employees. This study contributes to practitioners and existing literature by explaining how individual performance of employees is affected by the investment made by organizations in facilitating continuous learning.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-01-13
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-04-2020-0272
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Can HRM predict mental health crises' Using HR analytics to unpack the
           link between employment and suicidal thoughts and behaviors

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      Authors: Rina Hastuti , Andrew R. Timming
      Abstract: The aim of this research is to determine the extent to which the human resource (HR) function can screen and potentially predict suicidal employees and offer preventative mental health assistance. Drawing from the 2019 National Survey of Drug Use and Health (N = 56,136), this paper employs multivariate binary logistic regression to model the work-related predictors of suicidal ideation, planning and attempts. The results indicate that known periods of joblessness, the total number of sick days and absenteeism over the last 12 months are significantly associated with various suicidal outcomes while controlling for key psychosocial correlates. The results also indicate that employee assistance programs are associated with a significantly reduced likelihood of suicidal ideation. These findings are consistent with conservation of resources theory. This research demonstrates preliminarily that the HR function can unobtrusively detect employee mental health crises by collecting data on key predictors. In the era of COVID-19, employers have a duty of care to safeguard employee mental health. To this end, the authors offer an innovative way through which the HR function can employ predictive analytics to address mental health crises before they result in tragedy.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-01-10
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-05-2021-0343
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • How and when does humble leadership enhance newcomer well-being

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      Authors: Fei Kang , Jiyu Li , Yuanyuan Hua
      Abstract: Many studies have examined the positive outcomes of humble leadership for employees. However, its impact on newcomers' well-being has been rarely investigated. In this paper, based on affective events theory and the broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions, the authors proposed a moderated mediation model to explore the effect of humble leadership on newcomer well-being. In the model, we identified newcomers' pride as a mediating variable and newcomers' proactive personality as a moderating variable. The data were from a two-wave sample containing 213 newcomers. The hypothesized model was tested using partial least squares structural equational modeling. The results demonstrated that humble leadership was positively related to newcomers' well-being, and newcomers' pride medicated this relationship. Additionally, newcomers' proactive personality moderated the relationship between humble leadership and newcomers' pride. The authors adopted a cross-sectional research design, rendering it difficult to derive causal relationships between variables. In addition, all data were from self-reports of newcomers which would suffer from common method variance. This research examined the role of humble leadership in promoting newcomers' pride and well-being.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-01-06
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-01-2021-0019
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • A qualitative investigation of the work-nonwork experiences of dual-career
           professional couples without children

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      Authors: Galina Boiarintseva , Souha R. Ezzedeen , Anna McNab , Christa Wilkin
      Abstract: This paper aims to investigate the idiosyncratic relationships between work and nonwork among dual-career professional couples (DCPCs) intentionally without children, considering individual members' role salience, nonwork responsibilities and care or career orientation. Interview data from 21 Canadian and American couples (42 individuals) was used to explore the research question: How do DCPCs without children perceive their work-nonwork balance' DCPCs without children are a heterogenous demographic. Some couples are career oriented, some care oriented, some exhibit both orientations, shaping their experience of work-nonwork balance. Unlike popular stereotypes, they do have nonwork responsibilities and interests outside of their thriving careers. Similar to their counterparts with children, they face conflicts managing work and nonwork domains. Based on theories of role salience, work-nonwork conflict, enrichment and balance, the authors suggest that analyses of work-nonwork balance should include nonwork activities other than child caring. The authors further propose that the experience of the work-nonwork interface varies according to whether couples are careerist, conventional, non-conventional or egalitarian. The study also demonstrates that work-nonwork experiences are relational in nature and should be explored beyond a strictly individual perspective.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-01-05
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-01-2021-0006
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Overcoming organizational politics with tenacity and passion for work:
           benefits for helping behaviors

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      Authors: Dirk De Clercq , Chengli Shu , Menglei Gu
      Abstract: This study unpacks the relationship between employees' perceptions of organizational politics and their helping behavior, by explicating a mediating role of employees' affective commitment and moderating roles of their tenacity and passion for work. Quantitative survey data were collected from 476 employees, through Amazon Mechanical Turk. Beliefs that the organizational climate is predicated on self-serving behaviors diminish helping behaviors, and this effect arises because employees become less emotionally attached to their organization. This mediating role of affective commitment is less salient to the extent that employees persevere in the face of challenges and feel passionate about working hard. For human resource managers, this study pinpoints a lack of positive organization-oriented energy as a key mechanism by which perceptions about a negative political climate steer employees away from assisting organizational colleagues on a voluntary basis. They can contain this mechanism by ensuring that employees are equipped with energy-boosting personal resources. This study addresses employees' highly salient emotional reactions to organizational politics and pinpoints the critical function of affective commitment for explaining the escalation of perceived organizational politics into diminished helping behavior. It also identifies buffering effects linked to two pertinent personal resources.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-01-04
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-09-2020-0699
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Threat or opportunity: accelerated job demands during COVID-19
           pandemic

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      Authors: Leila Afshari , Aamir Hayat , K.K. Ramachandran , Timothy Bartram , Bamini K.P.D. Balakrishnan
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of accelerated job demands on employee outcomes during the COVID-19 crisis. An integrated model was developed to explore the relationships between different types of job demands (learning, decision-making, work intensification), employee turnover intention (TI) and burnout (BU). Data were obtained from professionals whose work conditions were impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic crisis. An online survey was distributed anonymously. A total of 566 questionnaires were included in the analysis. Structural equation modeling was employed to analyze the data. The findings revealed that employees' perception of job demands impacts the significance and direction of the relationships between different forms of job demands and employee outcomes. Furthermore, the findings confirm that mediating role of perceived organizational support alleviates the adverse effects of job demands on employee outcomes. Finally, the present study supported the moderation effect of positive affectivity between work intensification and employee BU. This study provides employers with insights about supporting employees to cope with increased job demands in conditions where rapid changes are inevitable. The unique context of research (COVID-19) enabled this study to account for the acceleration of job demands that employees experience in rapidly changing situations. This study employed an instrument that allowed for the assessment of acceleration in job demands. Furthermore, the granular approach of the measurement model extended the perspectives of job demands and work intensification.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-01-03
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-02-2021-0098
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Understanding the development of a common social identity between
           expatriates and host country nationals

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      Authors: Sana Mumtaz , Sadia Nadeem
      Abstract: This article examines the impact of expatriates' interaction adjustment and conducive work environment (i.e. trust, shared vision and intercultural communication) on the development of a common social identity between expatriates and host country nationals (HCNs) using the social identity theory (SIT). It also investigates whether increased trust, shared vision and intercultural communication mediate the relationship between expatriates' interaction adjustment and development of a common social identity. Dyadic data were collected from 93 Chinese expatriates and 239 Pakistani HCNs using a three-wave time-lag design. A multilevel model was estimated using Bayesian estimation technique in the Mplus software. Empirical evidence suggests an inverse relationship between expatriates' interaction adjustment and the development of a common social identity between expatriates and HCNs. Further, trust and intercultural communication led to a positive impact on the group memberships between expatriates and HCNs. However, no support was found regarding the mediating role of trust, shared vision and intercultural communication in this empirical research. The existing literature focuses mainly on change experiences of expatriates during international assignments. However, the current study goes beyond this and investigates the individualized change experiences of HCNs. Further, empirical evidence in this research found a negative relationship between expatriates' interaction adjustment and the development of a common social identity between expatriates and HCNs, which needs to be examined further.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2022-01-03
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-07-2021-0535
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Neurodiversity and remote work in times of crisis: lessons for HR

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      Authors: Joanna Maria Szulc , Frances-Louise McGregor , Emine Cakir
      Abstract: The rich qualitative study builds on 11 semi-structured interviews with nine neurodivergent employees and two business professionals supportive of neurodiversity to understand the lived experiences of dealing with crisis in a remote working environment. The purpose of the reported research is to understand how neurominorities experience remote working in the times of crisis and what the implications of this are for human resource (HR) professionals. Moving to remote work resulted in a lack of routine, distractions and working long hours, which can all be difficult for line managers to monitor. Further problems with communication in a virtual environment and lack of understanding by others were found to be particularly burdensome to neurodivergent individuals. On the positive note, remote working in the times of crisis allowed for avoiding sensory overwhelm and was seen as an important step in creating a healthy work–life balance (WLB). The findings of this study point HR practitioners' attention towards building a more neurodiversity friendly post-pandemic workplace and prompt employers to offer working arrangements, which better suit employees' domestic and personal circumstances. This study addresses the lack of research on the impact of the Covid-19 crisis on neurominorities. In doing so, it answers recent calls to move away from universal HR as a route to positive employee outcomes and facilitates a more accurate reflection of organizational reality for disadvantaged members of society.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-12-24
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-06-2021-0469
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Composing the same song: when and how high-performance work systems can
           stimulate proactive behavior

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      Authors: Chiou-Shiu Lin , Ran Xiao , Pei-Chi Huang , Liang-Chih Huang
      Abstract: Drawing on signaling theory, the purpose of this study is to explore how high-performance work systems (HPWS) interact with leader–member exchange (LMX) to predict employees' proactive behavior and job engagement. Moreover, the present study also proposes the mediating role of job engagement in the interactive effects of HPWS and LMX quality on proactive behavior. The data of this study include 228 customer-contact employees and 44 store managers from chain store enterprises in the service sector in Taiwan. The proposed models were tested with hierarchical linear modeling and Monte Carlo simulation. The results show a significant interactive effect of HPWS and LMX on job engagement and proactive behavior. In addition, job engagement serves as a vital mechanism linking the interactive effect of HPWS and LMX quality on proactive behavior. This study uses signaling theory to unpack the question when and how HPWS can be more influential on employees' proactive behavior. In particular, the positive effect of HPWS on proactive behavior is more prominent only when employees enjoy high LMX quality with their respective line managers. In addition, the interactive effects of HPWS and LMX quality on proactive behavior are mediated by job engagement. The findings provide valuable theoretical and managerial contribution by integrating HRM and leadership research.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-11-08
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-11-2020-0820
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Designing innovative jobs: a fuzzy-set configurational analysis of job
           characteristics

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Nicola Cangialosi , Adalgisa Battistelli , Carlo Odoardi
      Abstract: How to design jobs to support innovation is an issue that has received plenty of consideration over the past years. Building on the job characteristics model, the present study is set up to identify configurations of perceived job characteristics for innovation. By adopting a fuzzy-set configurational approach (fsQCA), the research question is addressed through a two-wave self-report survey of 199 employees of an Italian manufacturing company. Results reveal four compatible configurations of job characteristics leading to high levels of innovative work behavior and two for low levels. The results offer guidance for managers and organizations that aim to strengthen employee-driven innovation by offering different recipes of job design to maximize the chance of boosting innovative behaviors among their workers. This research is one of the first to empirically test the relation of job characteristics for innovative behavior using a configurational approach. By doing so it contributes to the literature by advancing the notion that innovative endeavors are determined by the holistic effects of different interdependent configurations of job characteristics.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-10-27
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-02-2021-0105
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Linking proactivity to work–family enrichment: a moderated mediation
           model

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      Authors: Zilong Cui , Kaixin Zhang
      Abstract: The purpose of this research is to explore the effect of proactivity on work–family enrichment through thriving at work and the moderation of such mediation by immediate supervisor perspective-taking. Research data consisting of two-wave lagged data (N = 470) were collected from 470 employees of 17 domestic Chinese firms to examine the proposed moderated mediation model. The findings show that proactivity was positively related to work–family enrichment and that thriving at work partially mediated this relationship. Immediate supervisor perspective-taking strengthens the effect of proactivity on thriving at work, and a positive indirect relationship exists between proactivity and work–family enrichment through thriving at work when immediate supervisor perspective-taking is high. Organizations should formulate policies to motivate employees to engage in proactive behavior and stimulate employees' thriving at work. Organizations should also select leaders who are good at perspective-taking and provide training to leaders to help them take others' perspectives. These results deepen our theoretical understanding of the consequences of proactivity by demonstrating the positive associations between proactive behavior and work–family enrichment. The current study also contributes to the literature by identifying the mediating mechanism of thriving at work to explain the relationship between proactivity and work–family enrichment. Furthermore, the results show that supervisor perspective-taking moderates the above mediation.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-10-21
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-11-2020-0844
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Entrepreneurial leadership and team creativity: the roles of team
           psychological safety and knowledge sharing

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      Authors: Muhammad Shahid Mehmood , Zhang Jian , Umair Akram , Zubair Akram , Yasir Tanveer
      Abstract: Creativity is vital for the innovation and survival of organizations. The present study aimed to explore the impact of entrepreneurial leadership on team creativity through team psychological safety and knowledge sharing. Social learning theory (SLT) was used to explore the relationships in this study. Data were collected from the manufacturing sector of Pakistan, and a sample composed of 70 team leaders and 378 team members was used. The results showed the positive influence of entrepreneurial leadership on team creativity. Furthermore, team psychological safety and knowledge sharing mediated the relationship between entrepreneurial leadership and team creativity. Finally, team psychological safety and knowledge sharing sequentially mediated the relationship between entrepreneurial leadership and team creativity. A small sample size and cross-sectional research design may hinder the generalizability of the findings. The findings suggest that leaders should practice entrepreneurial leadership principles to develop team creativity. Organizations should provide training and development programmes for their leaders and employees to learn the importance of entrepreneurial behaviors and how to explore and exploit entrepreneurial opportunities. This study extends the leadership and creativity literature by exploring the role of entrepreneurial leadership in developing team creativity. Furthermore, this study was conducted in established organizations to explore entrepreneurial leadership's influence on team creativity. In contrast, earlier scholars recognized entrepreneurial leadership as a leadership style of entrepreneurs and thus examined its implications in new ventures or small and medium enterprises.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-10-07
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-07-2020-0517
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Informal learning effort and attitude toward knowledge sharing in times of
           workplace conflict: curious case of joyous exploration and deprivation
           sensitivity

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      Authors: Sharath Baburaj , Manish Kumar
      Abstract: The study examined the impact of two dimensions of curiosity: joyous exploration (JE) and deprivation sensitivity (DSv) on informal learning effort (ILE) and attitude toward knowledge sharing (ATKS). The authors further explored the mediating effect of learning culture (LC) in the organization on the relationship of the two curiosity dimensions with ILE and ATKS. Additionally, the authors investigated the moderating effect of group dynamics in the form of intragroup task conflict (ITC) and relationship conflict (IRC) on the relationship of curiosity variables with LC, ILE and ATKS. Survey instrument was distributed to 790 knowledge workers in various organizations through their HR managers. 403 responses were returned and used in the study. JE, the self-determined manifestation of curiosity, impacts all elements of ILE and ATKS, while DSv influences a few aspects of ILE. The effect of JE on the dependent variables is, however, more substantial at low levels of ITC. ITC and IRC independently impact ILE, but only ITC moderates the relationships involving JE (but not DSv). LC emerges from JE (but not from DSv) and partially mediates its association with ILE and ATKS. Through this work, we demonstrate the differential relevance of the curiosity dimensions and the intragroup conflict types – and their interaction effect – on learning effort and attitude toward knowledge sharing. The findings of the study open new avenues for interventions within the workplace learning and knowledge sharing domain.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-10-04
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-09-2020-0669
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • A multilevel model of abusive supervision climate

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      Authors: Shahid Khan , Kohyar Kiazad , Sen Sendjaya , Brian Cooper
      Abstract: Abusive supervision climate (ASC) affects not only direct subordinates of abusive supervisors but also their colleagues who work in the same group. Therefore, this study aims to examine the underlying processes and boundary conditions of ASC's effects on group members' behaviors. The study collected data from 213 employees in 51 workgroups across 13 organizations in Pakistan. Data were analyzed in MPlus version 8 (Muthén and Muthén, 1998–2017) using a random intercepts multilevel model. The authors followed the procedures for testing 2-1-1 mediation with a participant-level mediator as outlined in Pituch and Stapleton (2012). The results revealed that anger mediated the negative relationship between ASC and group members' organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs), as well as the positive relationship between ASC and group members' withdrawal. In addition, agreeableness moderated the effect of group members' anger on OCBs, such that the relationship was stronger for more agreeable group members. The findings contribute to the abusive supervision literature by elucidating anger as one mechanism through which ASC affects group members and by incorporating personality differences to better understand group members' behavioral responses.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-10-01
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-02-2021-0109
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Job autonomy and knowledge hiding: the moderating roles of leader reward
           omission and person–supervisor fit

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      Authors: Qiuping Peng , Xi Zhong , Shanshi Liu , Huaikang Zhou , Nannan Ke
      Abstract: In this paper, the moderating roles of leader reward omission and person–supervisor fit in the relationship between job autonomy and knowledge hiding are investigated. Using a sample of 248 employees in a two-wave survey, we performed a hierarchical regression analysis to test the hypotheses. The results revealed that employees with high job autonomy were less likely to engage in knowledge hiding. Moreover, when employees experienced leader reward omission, the negative relationship between job autonomy and knowledge hiding was weakened, and this interesting effect varied by person–supervisor fit. This study does not explore the mediating mechanism by which job autonomy affects employee knowledge hiding. Moreover, as this research was conducted in a Chinese context, the generalizability of our findings is unclear. This research has fulfilled its practical aims by providing advice on knowledge-relevant job characteristic factors that can be used to stage interventions regarding the provision of autonomy in jobs, and by carefully considering how to create interdependence between jobs without pushing people to engage in knowledge-hiding behaviors. Furthermore, it is important for leaders to help employees identify work goals and directions and not engage in reward omission. This study contributes to theoretical advancements in the field of knowledge hiding by revealing boundary conditions that mitigate or enhance the impact of job autonomy on knowledge hiding.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-10-01
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-03-2020-0133
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Development and validation of multi-factor employee engagement measuring
           instrument: a formative measurement model

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      Authors: Puneet Kumar , Nayantara Padhi
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to bring about an exhaustive measurement instrument of employee engagement and validate the same in Indian settings. This descriptive and cross-sectional study initiates with reviewing the available literature in the field of employee engagement to identify factors affecting and the corresponding items defining them. Following the discussion with experts and industry professionals, an instrument was, thus, obtained to administer the primary data from employees working in public and private power companies in India. The study used Partial Least Square-Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM) 3 to demonstrate employee engagement as a first-order reflective and second-order formative construct. Thereafter, reliability and convergent validity were assessed to validate the instrument. This paper conceptualized employee engagement as a multi-factor construct (nine in numbers). The factors are “Respect”, “Supervisor's support and recognition”, “Growth and development”, “Creative and challenging job”, “Job significance”, “Perceived self-worth”, “performance evaluation and recognition” and “Organizational bureaucracy”. These factors are exhaustive and collectively define employee engagement. Distortion or omission in any of these items may distort the nature of construct as well. Previous studies have defined the concept of employee engagement as unidimensional and thus observe serious lacunas. This study identified employee engagement as a multi-factor construct that incorporates the exhaustive nature of the organizational setting. Not only this study adds value to the existing body of knowledge in the field of employee engagement but also specify the measurement model as a formative one concerning employee engagement.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-09-23
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-01-2021-0014
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • It’s my luck: impostor fears, the context, gender and
           achievement-related traits

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      Authors: Shamala Kumar , Pavithra Kailasapathy , Achira Sedari Mudiyanselage
      Abstract: Although the impostor phenomenon is attributed to childhood experiences, theory on achievement motivation indicates that achievement-related fears can also be elicited by the context. Using achievement goal theory as a base, the authors investigate the effect of context-dependent predictors, job-fit, career stage and organisational tenure, on impostor fears. The authors also examined gender and the achievement-related traits, self-efficacy and locus of control, as predictors of impostor fears to advance knowledge on antecedents to impostor fears. Two studies were conducted with 270 and 280 participants, each. In Study 1, a subset of 12 respondents participated in follow-up interviews. Impostor fears tended to be predicted by organisational tenure and career stage in both studies and job-fit in Study 1. Self-efficacy and locus of control predicted impostor fears. Men and women reported similar levels of impostor fears. The authors demonstrate the importance of context in eliciting impostor fears and partially support initial descriptions of antecedents to impostor fears. The findings contribute to the development of targeted managerial practices that can help with the development of interventions, such as orientation programmes, that will enhance socialisation processes and mitigate impostor fears. The literature on imposter fears has not addressed their situational predictors, which the authors argue are important elements in the genesis and maintenance of impostor fears. The authors draw on achievement goal theory to explain the pattern of findings related to key situational characteristics and their influence on imposter fears. The findings for Sri Lanka, on personality predictors, are similar to those reported in studies focused on North America providing evidence of cross-cultural applicability of the concept.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-09-16
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-03-2021-0149
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Organising to beat the Trade Union Act (2016) voting thresholds: a case
           study of organising and tactics from the University and College Union

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      Authors: James Richards , Vaughan Ellis
      Abstract: A retrospective action-research case study of one branch of the University and College Union (UCU) is used to show how threshold requirements of the Act can be systematically beaten. The paper responds to calls for “best practice” on how trade unions may react to member voting threshold requirements of the Trade Union Act 2016 (the Act). A broader aim is to make a theoretical contribution related to trade union organising and tactics in “get the vote out” (GTVO) industrial action organising campaigns. Findings are presented as a lead organiser's first-hand account of a successful GTVO campaign contextualised in relation to theories of organising. The findings offer “best practice” for union organisers required to beat the Act's voting thresholds and also contribute to theories surrounding trade union organising tactics. Further development and adaptation of the proposed model may be required when applied to larger bargaining units and different organising contexts. The findings can inform the organising practices/tactics of trade unions in relation to statutory ballots. The findings also allow Human Resource (HR) practitioners to reflect on their approach to dealing with unions capable of mounting successful GTVO campaigns. The findings have the potential to collectively empower workers, via their trade unions, to defend and further their interests in a post-financial crisis context and in the shadow of the Covid-19 pandemic. This is the first known empirical account of organising to exceed voting thresholds of the Act, providing practical steps for union organisers in planning for statutory ballots. Further value lies in the paper's use of a novel first-hand account of a GTVO campaign, offering a new and first, theoretical model of organising tactics to beat the Act.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-09-14
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-10-2020-0756
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Subdimensions of total rewards satisfaction and creativity among R&D
           employees: a moderated mediation model

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      Authors: Zhenyuan Wang , Jianghong Du , Herman H.M. Tse , Jun Gu , Hui Meng , Qiuwen Zhao
      Abstract: This study aims to explore the relative importance of the subdimensions of total rewards satisfaction in predicting research and development (R&D) employee creativity. In addition, the study examines the indirect effects of the subdimensions of total rewards satisfaction on creativity via work engagement and the moderating role of challenge-related work stress in the first stage. A two-wave design was used, in which total rewards satisfaction and challenge-related work stress were measured in the first wave. Work engagement and creativity were measured in the second wave. Dominance analysis and the latent moderated mediation model were used for the data analyses. The analyses show that nonfinancial rewards satisfaction completely dominates indirect and direct financial rewards satisfaction when predicting creativity. Indirect financial rewards satisfaction completely dominates direct financial rewards satisfaction when predicting creativity. Work engagement mediates the relationships between the subdimensions of total rewards satisfaction and creativity. Challenge-related work stress moderates the relationships between the subdimensions of total rewards satisfaction and work engagement and the indirect effects of the subdimensions of total rewards satisfaction on creativity via work engagement. The results imply that managers should set challenge demands for R&D employees and try to improve their total rewards satisfaction, especially their nonfinancial and indirect financial rewards satisfaction, for them to be more creative. This empirical study contributes to the literature by comparing the relative importance of the different dimensions of total rewards satisfaction in predicting creativity. The study also clarifies how (through work engagement) and when (based on challenge-related work stress) the subdimensions of total rewards satisfaction are positively related to R&D employees' creativity.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-09-13
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-12-2019-0656
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Delivering well-being through the coronavirus pandemic: the role of human
           resources (HR) in managing a healthy workforce

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      Authors: Kay Lisa Maddox-Daines
      Abstract: This paper examines how human resources (HR) professionals in the UK have supported employee wellbeing during the coronavirus disease (COVID) pandemic. It considers the extent to which HR professionals were prepared for the crisis and their readiness in supporting the wellbeing of their people. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 senior HR professionals working across the public and private sectors in the UK. Using an in-depth interview structure, the research explored how respondents both reacted to and managed the crisis in their respective organisations. Template analysis was used to analyse the data allowing a certain degree of fluidity in the establishment of ordered relationships between the themes. This study finds that business continuity plans turned out to be useless during the pandemic because they focussed on data, not people. It highlights the tension between home-working and burn-out as online presenteeism increased due to staff changing their behaviour in response to self-surveillance. The paper emphasises the importance of soft skills and authentic leadership and the tensions in respect of equity. The study was conducted with HR professionals in the UK, not internationally. Although the sample did include HR professionals from across the public, private and third sectors, the experience may not be representative of all those working in HR. This research found that those organisations that had engaged in business continuity planning prior to the pandemic focussed on the retrieval and accessibility of data rather than people. This prioritises staff as a resource rather than emphasising people as an organisation's most valuable asset. Furthermore, the study found that staff worked harder and for longer periods of time as a consequence of self-imposed surveillance. Organisational responses were contradictory as despite implementing well-being strategies to promote physical and mental health, there was little evidence of an effective response to this online presenteeism.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-09-10
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-04-2021-0224
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Talent management: four “buying versus making” talent
           development approaches

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      Authors: Gordon B. Cooke , James Chowhan , Kelly Mac Donald , Sara Mann
      Abstract: This paper presents a typology exploring employers’ perceptions of the quality of available applicants and employers decisions to buy qualified staff vs. to hire available workers and then make i.e. develop them via employer-supported training. This study uses 2015 survey data from Southwestern Ontario, Canada, based on responses from 834 employers regarding their hiring, separations, training and other HRM policies. Among surveyed employers, 10% are “Reliants” who found the quality of available applicants to be low, yet these employers do not provide employee training. Almost half of employers (at 45%) are “Developers” who find the quality of applicants to be low but they do provide employee training. Approximately, 7% of employers are “Poachers” who find that the quality of applicants is high and do not provide employee training, while 38% are Refiners, who find the quality of applicants is high and they provide employee training. Employers need to make their training decisions in alignment with their assessment of the quality of job applicants to whom they have access. In this paper, decisions on training and applicant quality are considered concurrently. From an academic viewpoint, the findings raise the issue as to whether other stakeholders (such as educational institutions) are sufficiently helping individuals gain the skills, credentials and work experiences that employers are seeking. If job openings are remaining unfilled because employers are unwilling to hire those available, then applicants lose, employers lose and societies lose.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-09-07
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-08-2020-0621
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Fear after being fired: the moderating role of resilience in lessening the
           time between employment

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      Authors: Alex Scrimpshire , Marcia Lensges
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to study how the interplay of the emotion of fear and the personality trait of resilience affect time to reemployment after job termination. The authors carried out the research by extending affective events theory (AET) beyond the workplace. This paper is a conceptual paper intended to lay the groundwork for future analysis in the areas of fear and resilience, specifically in the time after job termination. The paper suggests that fear is a natural response to job termination, and there are two responses to fear: one of action to rid oneself of fear (“fight or flight”) and one of paralysis, in which an individual remains in a fear state. The authors put forth that one's level of resilience is a factor in determining time to reemployment. While there are numerous studies on the role emotions play in the workplace and in particular, the role of fear about potentially getting fired, there are few, if any, studies on the role of fear after losing a job. The authors feel this is a warranted area of study as fear can have both positive and negative responses. The authors also contend that a major diver of these fear responses is an individual's level of resilience, and this can be a significant predictor of the individual's time to reemployment.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-09-07
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-12-2020-0860
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Employee perceptions of HRM system strength: examining outcome and
           boundary conditions among HR and non-HR employees

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      Authors: Alfred Presbitero , Mendiola Teng-Calleja , Elaine Farndale
      Abstract: Studies have explored perceptions of human resource management (HRM) system strength and how they can relate to employee-level outcomes. However, the authors understand little about the boundary conditions for such relationships. Here, the authors apply signaling theory to explain the relationship between HRM system strength and affective commitment as well as the role of an organization's communication climate and organizational collectivism. The authors conducted an initial study among HR practitioners (N = 115) to determine their perception of HRM system strength, its outcomes and boundary conditions. The authors then conducted a second study to increase the reliability of our earlier findings by focusing on non-HR employees (N = 179). The findings in both studies indicate that employee perceptions of HRM system strength positively and significantly relate to affective commitment. Moreover, the results show support for the moderating roles of both communication climate and organizational collectivism. These findings are novel and extend the nomological network of employee perceived HRM system strength. These findings offer valuable practical insights regarding approaches to strengthen the relationship between HRM system strength and affective commitment. In particular, we offer practical recommendations pointing to the relevance of improving the communication climate as well as the sense of belonging within the organization (organizational collectivism).
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-09-07
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-12-2020-0878
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Workplace spirituality, well-being at work and employee loyalty in a gig
           economy: multi-group analysis across temporary vs permanent employment
           status

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      Authors: Nimitha Aboobaker , Manoj Edward , K.A. Zakkariya
      Abstract: This study aims to examine the influence of workplace spirituality on employee loyalty toward the organization, mediated through well-being at work. Furthermore, the study endeavors to test the difference in conceptual model estimates, across two groups of employees: those who work on contract/temporary and permanent basis. The study gains relevance particularly in the context of the emerging sharing economy, where jobs are primarily characterized by short-term contracts and freelancing. This descriptive study was conducted among a sample of 523 educators working in private educational institutions in India. Self-reporting questionnaires were administered among the respondents, who were selected through the purposive sampling method. Structural equation modeling and multi-group analysis were done to test the proposed hypotheses. The analysis revealed that workplace spirituality enriched employee well-being and loyalty toward the organization and evidence were found for indirect effects too. Variances were observed in the relationships, with respect to the different employment statuses of the personnel. Significant differences in the relationships were not found across temporary and permanent employment statuses. Interestingly, temporary employees experienced stronger influences between meaningful work, well-being and word-of-mouth. Results suggest the relevance of understanding employees' differential work experiences and attitudes and thus facilitate human resource strategies accordingly. This study is pioneering in conceptualizing and testing a theoretical model linking workplace spirituality, well-being at work and employee loyalty, particularly in the context of employees who differ in their employment status, which is a critical aspect of modern-day organizations. Unlike traditional workplaces, in recent times, people come together and work along for shorter terms, as the case of a sharing economy and the thus emergent interpersonal dynamics between each other and with the workplace has significant repercussions on the organization. Theoretical and managerial implications with regard to the experience of workplace spirituality and job outcomes are elaborated, thus striving to fill a gap in the existing literature.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-09-06
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-01-2021-0002
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The university-to-work transition: responses of universities and
           organizations to the COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: William E. Donald , Melanie J. Ashleigh , Yehuda Baruch
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to understand how universities and organizations have responded to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in terms of preparing university students and recent graduates to enter the global labor market, using the accounting, banking and finance sector as a case study. The two research questions are (1) How can university career services and organizations work individually and collaboratively to best develop early career talent following the COVID-19 pandemic' (2) What are the challenges that university career services and organizations face when working individually or collaboratively to develop early career talent following the COVID-19 pandemic' The data for thematic analysis comes from 36 semi-structured interviews with career advisors (CAs) (n = 19) and graduate recruiters (GRs) (n = 17). This study offers some of the first findings on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, helping to ensure that organizational behavior and career theory literature reflect the dramatically changing landscape in the university-to-work transition. Theoretically, our contribution comes from applying a framework of the career construction theory (CTT) within the context of a career ecosystem to understand the views of the intermediary, meso-level actors, which, to date, have lacked representation within career literature. Practically, we provide an insightful bridge between universities and organizations, offering opportunities for greater collaboration, and enhanced outcomes for all stakeholders.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-09-03
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-03-2021-0170
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Bullying and turnover intentions: how creative employees overcome
           perceptions of dysfunctional organizational politics

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      Authors: Dirk De Clercq , Tasneem Fatima , Sadia Jahanzeb
      Abstract: This study seeks to unpack the relationship between employees' exposure to workplace bullying and their turnover intentions, with a particular focus on the possible mediating role of perceived organizational politics and moderating role of creativity. The hypotheses are tested with multi-source, multi-wave data collected from employees and their peers in various organizations. Workplace bullying spurs turnover intentions because employees believe they operate in strongly politicized organizational environments. This mediating role of perceived organizational politics is mitigated to the extent that employees can draw from their creative skills though. For managers, this study pinpoints a critical reason – employees perceive that they operate in an organizational climate that endorses dysfunctional politics – by which bullying behaviors stimulate desires to leave the organization. It also reveals how this process might be contained by spurring employees' creativity. This study provides novel insights into the process that underlies the connection between workplace bullying and quitting intentions by revealing the hitherto overlooked roles of employees' beliefs about dysfunctional politics and their own creativity levels.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-09-03
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-05-2020-0326
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Work connectivity behavior after-hours and job satisfaction: examining the
           moderating effects of psychological entitlement and perceived
           organizational support

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      Authors: Ken Cheng , Xing Cao , Limin Guo , Qing Xia
      Abstract: This study aims to examine the moderating effects of psychological entitlement and perceived organizational support (POS) on the relationship between work connectivity behavior after-hours (WCBA) and job satisfaction. Data were collected from 217 full-time employees of an Internet company in China at two points in time separated by about one month. Hierarchical regression and simple slope analyses were conducted to test hypotheses. The results showed that WCBA was negatively related to job satisfaction and that this relationship could be mitigated by POS. Moreover, psychological entitlement aggravated this relationship, and this aggravating effect was stronger when POS was at low levels. Managers should avoid intervening employees' nonwork domains too much. If this is unavoidable, managers should provide adequate organizational support to help employees cope with the challenges brought by WCBA. Besides, managers need to pay close attention to highly entitled employees and take measures to modify their expectations. First, this study enriches the understanding of what WCBA is and how WCBA works by investigating the influencing mechanism of WCBA from the perspectives of effort–reward imbalance and job demands–resources. Second, by verifying the moderating effects of psychological entitlement and POS, this study provides insights into the boundaries of the WCBA–job satisfaction relationship. Third, this study contributes to the literature on psychological entitlement by identifying its one applicable condition.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-09-02
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-06-2020-0413
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Organizational goal ambiguity and public service motivation: evidence from
           Iran

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      Authors: Hassan Danaeefard , Abdolali Ahmadzahi Torshab , Masoumeh Mostafazadeh , Jalil Delkhah , Fahimeh Imanikhah
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of organizational goal ambiguity (OGA) on public service motivation (PSM) considering the mediating role of job satisfaction (JS), performance appraisal (PA) and perceived organizational fairness (POF) in the Iranian public sector. This research also seeks to answer this question: to what extent PSM confirmed in Western countries is generalizable to the Iranian public sector' A survey of 779 employees working in 16 ministries of Iran was administered. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and hierarchical regression were applied to test the model and the mediators. The results indicate that OGA negatively affects PSM, and this relationship is mediated by JS, PA and POF. Furthermore, the research findings have varied across ministries, contract type, positions and gender. Most importantly, the generalizability of the PSM construct is limited in the public sector of Iran since two of four dimensions of PSM were confirmed, that is, an attraction to public service and self-sacrifice (compassion). This paper provides managers and decision makers with a clear understanding of the effects of context (including goal ambiguity, the importance of employee's attitudes and HR systems in shaping unique intrinsic motivation for public organizations) on employee's PSM. Also, these findings show how they can manage and motivate employees to engage in PSM. By clarifying organizational goals or making an association between job tasks and higher-level goals, practitioners can stimulate PSM at work. This paper advances a new and further understanding of antecedent and mediators of PSM in Iran. Also, it provides an explanation of its generalizability and the role of organizational climate in fostering it.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-07-2020-0523
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • How do high-performance work systems affect innovation performance'
           The organizational learning perspective

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      Authors: Gholamhossein Mehralian , Mohammad Moradi , Jafar Babapour
      Abstract: Achieving organizational-level outcomes through human resource practices (HRP) as the basis of nearly all organizational improvements has remained relatively unexplored, which requires more investigations. Therefore, the present study aimed to develop a framework to theorize how high-performance work systems (HPWS) can provide organizations with critical instruments for organizational learning (OL) creation that in turn leads to innovation performance (IP). Survey-based, multisource research was designed to examine the proposed model, using the data collected from 154 pharmaceutical industry-related companies. According to the study results, HPWS concentrating on enhancing practices of abilities, motivations and opportunities (AMO) were positively associated with OL, which could in turn improve IP. Moreover, innovation culture (IC) showed a significant moderating effect on the association between OL and IP. The central originality of this research first is that HPWS acts as antecedents of OL capabilities contributing to firm-level IP; second, the relationship between OL and firm IP is contingent upon the level of IC in organizations.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-08-10
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-08-2020-0617
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Displacement-plurality (D-P) in women refugees, its influence on work
           engagement and implications for diversity practice: a critical and
           reflective review

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      Authors: Varuni Wimalasiri
      Abstract: Much of the current research on women refugees and work focuses solely on settlement, neglecting the effects of displacement within this equation, despite its significant impact. Drawing from the wider literature of international development, migration, gender, work psychology and sociology, this paper provides a framework to guide informed research within this area. This paper is a reflective and critical review of the intersection between gender, forced displacement and work. It addresses a blind spot in the current work literature, which fails to address the impact of displacement on refugee women and the consequences of displacement for vocational engagement during resettlement. This paper contributes to the current literature in four ways. First, it adds forced displacement to the peripheral-intersections literature informing Acker's theory of “inequality regimes”. Secondly, it contributes to a deeper understanding of how pluralities and intersectionality develop during forced displacement, by introducing the theory of displacement-plurality (D-P). Thirdly, it contributes to human resource management (HRM) diversity practice by explaining the relationship between D-P and related constructs, such as work engagement (WE), economic empowerment (EE), work-related factors (WRFs) and psycho-social factors (PSFs) to help improve localised diversity practices in relation to refugee populations. Fourthly, it provides a detailed framework to guide research and practice in this area, supported by a critical evaluation of the current refugee work literature. When we understand displacement-related factors, we can move towards a more emancipatory approach to intersectionality, allowing us to develop more sophisticated approaches to diversity in organisations. In turn, this helps us to understand people's lived experiences and their responses to organisational interventions more effectively.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-08-03
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-04-2020-0305
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Expatriates' dual commitment: a serial multiple mediation model of
           workplace friendships and adjustment

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      Authors: Yuwen Liu
      Abstract: The purpose of this article is to advance the understanding of expatriates' psychological attachment toward both their parent company and its foreign subsidiary by highlighting how workplace friendships enhance the process of adjustment for expatriates and how these effects on adjustment subsequently translate into expatriates' dual commitment. Hypotheses were tested using a sample of 187 expatriates, working in managerial positions, in subsidiaries of multinational corporations, all of whom were assigned expatriates. Serial multiple indirect effects were tested. The results indicated that the relationship between workplace friendships and interaction adjustment was supported, but the relationship between workplace friendships and work adjustment was not supported. The serial indirect effects of international adjustment and work adjustment on the relationship between interaction adjustment and expatriates' dual commitment were supported. This study seeks to fill a gap in the research literature on expatriates by focusing on the issue of workplace friendships and expatriates' dual commitment. The findings help bolster the literature on relational schemas in that expatriates' workplace friendships establish scripts for expatriates' expected outlines of adjustment in work domains. This study also provides insights relevant to the literature on social interaction and adjustment, as the findings support our theory that expatriate commitment is not directly contingent on workplace friendships but rather on the mediating roles of both interaction adjustment and work adjustment.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-07-30
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-02-2020-0072
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Green human resource management in nonprofit organizations: effects on
           employee green behavior and the role of perceived green organizational
           support

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      Authors: Mohammed Aboramadan , Yasir Mansoor Kundi , Annika Becker
      Abstract: Building on the theories of social exchange and organizational support, this study proposes a research model to investigate the impact of green human resources management (GHRM) on nonprofit employees' green work-related outcomes, namely green voice behavior, green knowledge-sharing behavior and green helping behavior. In the model, perceived green organizational support (PGOS) is theorized and employed as an intervening mechanism between the examined linkages. Data were collected in two different waves from 408 employees working in the Palestinian nonprofit sector. Covariance based-structural equation modeling was used to validate the study's research model and to examine the hypotheses. The results indicated that GHRM is positively associated with green voice behavior, green knowledge-sharing behavior and green helping behavior. Moreover, the results show that PGOS exhibits a significant mediation effect between the aforesaid links. This study thus provides initial empirical evidence in the field of GHRM, with particular focus on the nonprofit sector. This research provides a roadmap to nonprofit managers and practitioners on how GHRM can encourage employees to speak up, share information and help others in the environmental and green domain. By supporting nonprofit managers strengthening green employee behavior, it provides an additional source to fostering intrinsically motivated behaviors in the workplace. In response to urgent environmental threats, this study contributes to green and sustainable management research with a focus on GHRM, thereby providing initial empirical research from a nonprofit perspective.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-07-26
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-02-2021-0078
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Navigating dual-careers: the challenge for professional couples

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      Authors: Tracy Scurry , Marilyn Clarke
      Abstract: Dual-careers are an increasingly common typology among professionals yet very few studies have considered how two potentially competing career trajectories are managed in relation to the broader aspects of life, such as family and personal life. This article addresses the gap through an exploration of the strategies adopted by dual-career professional couples as they seek to navigate these challenges whilst satisfying individual and shared goals and aspirations. Semi-structured, face-to-face interviews were carried out with 18 couples (dyads) from a range of professional occupations. Interviews were conducted individually, and then responses analysed and compared for key themes. Rather than focusing on how couples manage work–life balance on a day-today basis this study shows how couples incorporate a more strategic approach to dual-careers so that both careers are able to progress, albeit within situational constraints. To satisfy personal, business and economic performance goals, organisations and governments will need to find more creative ways to support employees as they seek to navigate careers while balancing the work and nonwork needs of themselves and their partner. The challenges faced by dual-career couples have implications for human resource managers as they seek to attract and retained talent within their organisations. Demographic and social changes at the household level will ultimately require changes at an organisational and broader societal level to meet the work and family needs of this growing cohort. Rather than focusing on how couples manage work-life balance on a day-today basis this study shows how couples incorporate a more strategic approach to dual-careers so that both careers are able to progress, albeit within situational constraints.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-07-26
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-05-2020-0367
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Talking inclusion into being: communication as a facilitator and
           obstructor of an inclusive work environment

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Daniel Wolfgruber , Lina Stürmer , Sabine Einwiller
      Abstract: The purpose of this article is to examine the communicative factors that facilitate or hamper the development of an inclusive work environment with an emphasis on the communication about equality, diversity, and inclusion (EDI), while taking diversity characteristics of employees into account. In total, 84 persons employed in Austria and Germany, who feature various observable and non-observable diversity characteristics, were interviewed following a problem-centered approach. The results indicate that employees with (observable) diversity characteristics, who tend to feel less included, observe more excluding and marginalizing communication and practices in their organizations. Moreover, formal interpersonal communication appears to be more important to develop a highly inclusive workplace than informal interpersonal communication and other forms of communication about EDI. The sample was rather imbalanced and comprised only employees in Austria and Germany, which limits the study's explanatory power. However, the findings stress the significance of formal interpersonal communication as the cornerstone of an inclusive workplace, which should be followed up in future research. In terms of the development of an inclusive work environment the findings suggest that strategic (i.e. formal) organizational communication about EDI issues is key to increase the perception of inclusion. This paper contributes to the literature by demonstrating the importance of interpersonal communication as a key factor that facilitates, but also hampers an inclusive work environment.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-07-20
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-01-2021-0013
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • High-performance work systems and thriving at work: the role of cognitive
           appraisal and servant leadership

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      Authors: Zhining Wang , Shuang Ren , Lijun Meng
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to provide a balanced and nuanced understanding of the relationship between high-performance work systems (HPWS) and employee thriving at work by aiming to consider the “dark-side” of HPWS and to uncover the “black box.” This research draws from data from 377 employees nested in 77 work teams and tests a multilevel moderated mediation model using multilevel path analysis. The findings indicate that employees appraise HPWS as both a challenge and a hindrance simultaneously. The challenge appraisal associated with HPWS positively influences employees' thriving at work whereas hindrance appraisal of HPWS negatively influences thriving experience. The results also support the hypothesized relationships in which servant leadership moderates the indirect effect of HPWS on employee thriving via challenge and hindrance appraisals accordingly. This research demonstrates both positive and negative sides of HPWS as evaluated by employees in relation to an important employee outcome of thriving at work. It enriches the strategic HRM literature by identifying the “black box” of HPWS-employee outcomes and associated boundary condition from the theoretical perspective of cognitive appraisals.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-07-20
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-10-2019-0561
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Who will pay for customers' fault' Workplace cheating behavior,
           interpersonal conflict and traditionality

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      Authors: Chenghao Men , Weiwei Huo , Jing Wang
      Abstract: Despite workplace cheating behavior is common and costly, little research has explored its antecedents from customers' perspective. The current study aims to investigate the indirect mechanisms between customer mistreatment and cheating behavior, and exam the moderated role of traditionality. Drawing on conservation of resources theory, the authors examine how customer mistreatment affects workplace cheating behavior. They test their hypotheses using a time-lagged field study of 183 employees. The results show that customer mistreatment is positively related to interpersonal conflict with customers, which positively affects workplace cheating behavior. Traditionality moderates the indirect effect of customer mistreatment on workplace cheating behavior. This study calls for researchers' attention to exploring the antecedents of workplace cheating behavior from customers' perspective, and first provides empirical evidence on the relationship between customer mistreatment and workplace cheating behavior, which has never been examined.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-07-19
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-05-2020-0309
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Paternity leave: stepchild of family-friendly policies moderating role of
           traditional masculinity ideology

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      Authors: Bhawana Maheshwari , Jatin Pandey , Aditya Billore
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the importance and influence of paternity leave on individual level organizational outcomes. Drawing on signaling theory, the study examines the relationship between paid paternity leave entitlement (PPLE) and organizational attractiveness (OA) through a mediating path of anticipated organizational support (AOS). Furthermore, the study proposes that this mediated relationship would be conditional on traditional masculinity ideology (TMI) such that the relationship would be stronger for individuals who score low on TMI. The study analyzed a moderated mediation model using the data from a survey experiment. Data were collected from 264 professionals enrolled in an executive education course and will soon be looking for employment. The findings supported the mediating role of AOS between PPLE and OA. As predicted, the positive impact of PPLE on AOS and OA is stronger for individuals scoring low on TMI. This study takes a multidisciplinary approach to understand the underlying mechanisms that impact decisions related to employers. It is one of the few studies that study paternity leave in the Indian context and makes important contributions to theory and practice.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-07-19
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-07-2020-0519
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Give full play to the talent: exploring when perceived overqualification
           leads to more altruistic helping behavior through extra effort

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      Authors: Chao Ma , (George) Zhen Xiong Chen , Xinhui Jiang
      Abstract: This paper aims to build a moderate mediation model to delineate when and how employee with perceived overqualification will exert extra effort and therefore engage in more altruistic helping behavior. The research hypotheses were empirically tested using multitime and multisource survey data. Given the nested nature of data (i.e. 52 immediate supervisors rated 143 subordinates), multilevel structural equation modeling analyses within Mplus were conducted to test the proposed model. The results support the proposed moderated mediation effect and indicate that perceived overqualification is positively related to extra effort on a condition that there is either strong desire for higher workplace status or more developmental job opportunities. The extra effort will subsequently lead to more altruistic helping behavior. Based on the findings of this paper, human resource managers should consider the job applicant’s desire for workplace status and the organizational context the employer can provide when hiring overqualified employees. Second, organizations should carefully conduct job design to improve overqualified employees’ on-the-job developmental experiences. Third, training programs should be conducted to help satisfy needs and improve workplace status of overqualified employees, so that they can exert extra job effort and engage in pro-organizational behaviors. Drawing on motivation–opportunity–ability theory, this paper extends the limited understanding of important boundary conditions under which perceived overqualification can be beneficial. The findings add to the knowledge on extant literature by identifying altruistic helping behavior as a new outcome of perceived overqualification.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-07-16
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-03-2020-0164
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • When can felt accountability promote innovative work behavior' The
           role of transformational leadership

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      Authors: Che-Chun Kuo , Ying-Lien Ni , Chia-Huei Wu , Rong-Ruey Duh , Mei-Yen Chen , Chiachi Chang
      Abstract: Studies have reported negative effects of felt accountability on employees' extra-role behavior. Deviating from that focus, this study proposes that leadership plays a role in shaping the implications of felt accountability for employees' extra-role behavior. We propose that under high transformational leadership, felt accountability can motivate employees to engage in task-relevant information elaboration and facilitate innovative work behavior, a form of extra-role behavior that seeks to improve the work environment. We conducted a pilot study to validate measurements of felt accountability and task-relevant information elaboration in a sample of 202 employees. We then conducted the main study using a time-lagged, multisource survey design with a sample of 120 supervisor–employee pairs. The results from the main study reveal that the association between felt accountability and task-related information elaboration is positive and stronger when transformational leadership is higher. Furthermore, task-relevant information elaboration positively predicts innovative work behavior. Finally, when transformational leadership is higher, the mediation effect of task-relevant information elaboration on the association between felt accountability and innovative work behavior is stronger. Our study indicates that felt accountability can have positive implications for employees' extra-role behavior contingent on leadership styles. In contrast to previous studies that emphasize the negative implications of felt accountability on employees' behavior, our study depicts when and why felt accountability can have positive implications on employees' behavior.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-07-16
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-03-2021-0174
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Leading Machiavellians on the road to better organizational behavior

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      Authors: Syed Imad Shah , Asad Shahjehan , Bilal Afsar
      Abstract: Studies highlighting negative behavioral influences of Machiavellians are plentiful; however, those prescribing their management are scarce. Machiavellians are intelligent, adaptable and resourceful people with negative, self-serving and unethical persona traits. Their abundance in organizations poses a challenge for managers in minimizing negative consequences of Machiavellian's manipulative behaviors and tap into their true potential. Leadership can play a crucial role in this regard. This purpose of this paper is to investigate the moderating effects of transformational leadership (TFL) versus transactional leadership (TSL) styles on the relationship between subordinates' Machiavellianism and their organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) and counterproductive work behavior (CWB). The aim was to highlight the style that better adept in managing high-Mach subordinates. This cross-sectional study used multiple surveys administered to 90 managers and their 269 subordinates from 56 organizations. Multiple regression was used for testing and hypothesize linear and supplementary nonlinear relationships between the study variables. After a detailed data analysis, authors posit that, as compared to TFL, the TSL style is better suited for managing Machiavellian subordinates. By employing transactional tactics, leaders can reign in the divergent behavior of Machiavellians, thus, transforming them into useful organizational assets. This study expands on limited body of knowledge on managing Machiavellians. It advocates using TSL for improving the OCB of Machiavellians while countering their CWBs. Furthermore, this study contributes to transactional/transformational theories as it lends credence to the situational theory of leadership.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-07-16
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-04-2020-0304
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Linking organisational values and sustainability: the role of AMO
           practices

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      Authors: Francisco Rincon-Roldan , Alvaro Lopez-Cabrales
      Abstract: The aim of this study was to analyse the link between the values that govern the functioning of cooperatives and their sustainability. Furthermore, the authors propose that this relationship is mediated by AMO (ability, motivation and opportunity) practices, which generate different behaviours and attitudes in their employees, thus strengthening the message of sustainable management that the directors of this kind of companies aim to transmit. This article presents a theoretical and empirical research model about the relationship between organisational values, AMO practices and sustainability in social economy firms. The proposed model was tested using the multivariate method of partial least squares structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) with a sample of 124 cooperative companies. The information was gathered through a questionnaire with questions composed of measurement scales that had been previously validated by the reference literature. This work empirically demonstrates that the perceived support, respect and responsibility values are strongly related to sustainability, and that ability and opportunity-enhancing practices mediate the association of perceived support and responsibility with the sustainability of cooperatives. This work contributes to covering the lack of studies about which values support and impact the sustainability of organisations, and it provides information about the mediating role of certain AMO practices in the search for a more sustainable organisation, demonstrating that some practices are more relevant than others.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-07-16
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-06-2020-0414
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • I'm difficult, but not impossible: how millennials view international
           assignments and the implications for human resource management (HRM)

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      Authors: Iris Kollinger , Riina Koris
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to identify what (de)motivates millennial students from undertaking mobility upon graduation and whether this depends on gender, region of origin, prior work experience, level of studies, or international mindset and how. The paper provides insights on the preferred length of mobility and the most (un)attractive regions. The sample consists of 1,001 millennial students from 77 countries. Data from a quantitative self-reported survey were analysed employing exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory data analyses. Factors that motivate mobility are personal development, learning about foreign cultures and the opportunity to travel and those that demotivate are a preference for short-term assignments, unwillingness of family to move and disruption of home country life. Factors differ by region, gender, level of current studies and the student's international mindset. The cohort included only students pursuing a business or technical education. A willingness to accept an international assignment may not necessarily translate into accepting an international assignment due to the effect of the attitude–behaviour gap. The authors do not aim to generalise on the basis of the results since the sample was fairly disproportionate in terms of world regions. We do, however, invite further studies to treat ours as potential input for new and emerging studies of either a quantitative or qualitative nature. Due to a strong attachment to home, short-term assignments are preferred. Salary and financial benefits remain hygienic factors and motivating factors remain on the “soft” side. Motivating millennials to engage in mobility requires an individualised approach, dependent on region of origin, gender, the level of education, work experience and international mindset. This study indicates that the factors that (de)motivate millennial students to engage in international assignments differ on the basis of various socio-demographic variables.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-07-15
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-01-2021-0042
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Dynamics of millennial employees' communicative behaviors in the
           workplace: the role of inclusive leadership and symmetrical organizational
           communication

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      Authors: Yeunjae Lee
      Abstract: With a focus on millennial employees, this study investigates how employees engage in two types of employees' communicative behaviors (ECBs), that is, their voluntary communicative efforts to acquire and circulate tasks and managerial information (i.e. scouting) and to share and discuss positive and negative aspects of their organization with internal members (i.e. internal megaphoning). Through the lens of social exchange theory (SET) and symmetrical communication model, this study examines the effects of inclusive leadership and internal communication on active information behaviors of employees within their companies. An online survey was conducted with fulltime millennial employees working across various industry sectors in the US. Symmetrical internal communication influenced by inclusive leadership enhances employees' scouting behavior as well as positive internal megaphoning behavior. Positive and negative internal megaphoning with supervisors increases the scouting behavior of employees, whereas negative internal megaphoning with peers does not have a significant effect. This study is among the first attempts to examine the effectiveness of leadership and strategic internal communication on millennial employees' diverse types of communicative behaviors.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-07-13
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-09-2020-0676
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Woes of silence: the role of burnout as a mediator between silence and
           employee outcomes

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      Authors: Razia Shaukat , Asif Khurshid
      Abstract: This paper aims to investigate the impact of employee silence on performance and turnover intentions. In addition, it seeks to explore the mediating role of burnout in the link between employee silence, and three employee outcomes-supervisor-rated task/contextual performance and self-reported turnover intentions. Using survey questionnaire design, this paper collected data from 508 telecom engineers and their immediate supervisors and analyzed the result using structural equation modeling (SEM) technique, bootstrapping. Results reveal that employee silence leads to burnout which results in debilitating employee performance, increase in withdrawal behaviors and turnover intentions; burnout mediates these direct relationships. The findings have implications for organizational behavior (OB) research. Moreover, the study found that silence has more pronounced negative effect on employee performance and positive impact on turnover intentions through mediation of job burnout. The study helps managers identify the psychological ramifications of defensive silence and the underlying mechanism that connects this to employee outcomes. It also highlights the plausible danger zones in which the employees lose self-expression and show symptoms of exhaustion and cynicism, thus ultimately affecting their performance and withdrawal behaviors. The current study contributes to employee behavior literature by considering silence as an organizational loss in the backdrop of the COR theory which initiates loss process that leads to further losses in individuals.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-07-06
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-07-2020-0550
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The role of supervisor support for strengths use in promoting perceived
           employability and career satisfaction

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      Authors: Makoto Matsuo
      Abstract: This study aims to examine how perceived supervisor support for strengths use (PSSSU) directly and indirectly facilitates career satisfaction and perceived employability as mediated by strengths use behavior. A two-wave questionnaire survey was administered to nurses (n = 221) and analyzed using structural equation modeling. Results indicated that PSSSU directly enhanced career satisfaction and indirectly enhanced perceived employability through strengths use behavior. As the sample was limited to nurses in a Japanese hospital, it is possible that the characteristics of the national culture and occupation affected the results. Support for strengths use is important especially in stressful work environments in order to retain professional employees by enhancing their employability and career satisfaction. This study extends the literature by identifying the different effects of PSSSU on the two types of career-related well-being. The present research is the first study to show the mediating role played by strengths use behavior in linking PSSSU to perceived employability.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-07-01
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-01-2021-0026
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Yesterday's workers in Tomorrow's world

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      Authors: Nirit Toshav-Eichner , Liad Bareket-Bojmel
      Abstract: This study sought to examine the attitudes of blue-collar workers toward job automation. The study examined the relations between job automation, fear of job loss and self-actualization. Using mixed methods (qualitative and quantitative analysis) with 539 participants overall, we examined employees' attitudes toward job automation through two separate studies conducted in a large public organization that employs blue-, white- and pink-collar employees. The blue-collar workers who participated consisted of waste collectors, gardeners and parking supervisors whose work is at risk of job automation. We found that 74% of the blue-collar employees described technology as a “replacer” that simplifies and reduces human work activities, while only 3% perceived it as an “enabler” that could enrich their jobs and expand human potential. Fifty-three percent of the employees in the white-collar professions described technology as a “replacer,” and 36% perceived it as an “enabler.” Among pink-collar workers, 51% perceived technology as an “enabler,” while only 14% perceived it as a “replacer.” A positive relationship between job automation and self-actualization was evident for pink- and white-collar workers, but not for blue-collar workers. This study sheds light on how employees in different types of jobs perceive technological advancements at work. A classification of the perception of technology as an “enabler” vs a “replacer” is presented. The relationships between job automation and self-actualization in different job types are explored.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-06-14
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-02-2020-0088
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The mediating role of fairness on the effectiveness of strategic
           performance measurement systems

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      Authors: Kevin Baird , Sophia Xia Su , Nuraddeen Nuhu
      Abstract: This study examines the mediating role of the fairness of performance appraisal on the association between the extent of use of strategic performance measurement systems (SPMSs) with SPMS effectiveness. Data were collected using an online survey distributed to 656 Australian middle and lower level managers. The findings reveal that informational fairness mediates the association between SPMSs (link to value drivers and the use of multidimensional performance measures) with performance-related outcomes; procedural fairness mediates the association between SPMSs (link to strategy and the use of multidimensional performance measures) with staff-related outcomes and distributive fairness mediates the association between the use of SPMSs (all three types) with both performance and staff-related outcomes. The study provides a unique insight into the importance of fairness (the distributive, informational and procedural fairness of the performance appraisal system) in mediating the associations between the extent of use of SPMSs and SPMS effectiveness. The findings contribute to the human resource management (HRM) “black box” literature by providing an insight into the behavioural mechanism through which a specific human resource management practice (i.e. the SPMS) influences organisational performance.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-06-14
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-07-2020-0573
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Team reward interdependence and team performance: roles of shared
           leadership and psychological ownership

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      Authors: Qinxuan Gu , Dongqing Hu , Paul Hempel
      Abstract: Drawing on the motivated information processing in groups (MIP-G) model, the purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between team reward interdependence and team performance, treating shared leadership as a mediator and team average job-based psychological ownership as a moderator. Data were collected from a field sample of 72 knowledge-based work teams comprised of 466 team members and their team leaders. Data were analysed using hierarchical regression analysis and moderated path analysis. Team reward interdependence was positively related to team performance through shared leadership. Team average job-based psychological ownership moderated both the relationship between team reward interdependence and shared leadership, and the indirect relationship between team reward interdependence and team performance. The shared leadership literature is extended by exploring the antecedents of shared leadership from the perspective of team incentives and by examining the moderating role of team average job-based psychological ownership. Organizations and managers should pay attention to team pay system design and be aware of the importance of employees’ psychological ownership toward their jobs in promoting shared leadership in teams. This study sheds light on the antecedents of shared leadership from motivated information processing perspective and examines antecedent boundary conditions through the moderating role of team average job-based psychological ownership.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-06-11
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-06-2020-0403
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Should I stay or should I go' Skilled immigrants' perceived
           brain-waste and social embeddedness

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      Authors: Farveh Farivar , Roslyn Cameron , Jaya A.R. Dantas
      Abstract: Drawing on embeddedness theory, we examine how skilled immigrants' perceived brain-waste affects their social embeddedness. Social embeddedness facilitates the acquisition of host country-specific human capital, which, in return, can accelerate the transfer of immigrants' human capital in the workplace. In total, 397 skilled immigrants in Australia participated in this study. We applied a set-theoretic approach to decode the complexity and interplay among the key concepts used in this study. We found the impacts of psychological workplace wellbeing and workplace discrimination on social embeddedness differ between skilled immigrants who experience perceived brain-waste and skilled immigrants whose skills were recognized by employers. The results suggest that job satisfaction is the most critical factor contributing to social embeddedness among skilled immigrants who did not report brain-waste. Furthermore, we found that married skilled male immigrants who reported brain-waste still could embed socially if they did not directly experience workplace discrimination. The majority of previous studies have compared skilled immigrants with their local-born colleagues, but we compared two groups of skilled migrants in the current study. We adopted fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis to test how unique configurations of several variables can ease their social embeddedness into the host society.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-06-08
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-06-2020-0412
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Managers' responses to the initial stages of the Covid-19 pandemic: an
           executive coaching perspective

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      Authors: Nicky H.D. Terblanche
      Abstract: This research investigates how the Covid-19 pandemic initially affected organisational managers, as seen from their executive coaches' perspective by asking: (1) What challenges did managers experience during the initial stages of the Covid-19 pandemic' and (2) How did coaching foster crisis management skills during this time' Executive coaches are in a unique, confidential and professionally intimate position to observe their clients' thoughts, emotions and behaviours. Using an interpretivist approach, interviews conducted with 26 executive coaches from the USA, UK, Australia and South Africa during the initial stages of the pandemic (first three weeks of April 2020) were analysed using thematic analysis. Coaches observed how the Covid-19 pandemic caused managers to experience a tension between managing their staff, their own bosses and themselves. Ranging from logistical challenges to personal fear, uncertainty and loss of identity, managers confided in and relied on their coaches to help them to reflect, provide support, but also challenge them to take a forward-looking stance. Findings were interpreted through the lenses of crisis management and coaching efficacy theory. Crisis management theory is extended by suggesting that greater priority must be given to managers' personal well-being and by adding coaching as a new intervention to develop crisis management skills. Coaching theory is extended by showing that executive coaching can foster certain crisis management skills and that the benefits of coaching in non-crisis times are also relevant during a crisis. Managers, their leaders, executive coaches and purchasers of coaching services, such as human resource practitioners, should take note of the challenges managers face during crises. They should consider executive coaching as a support intervention to foster requisite crisis management skills. The findings provide novel, empirical evidence suggesting that executive coaching could foster crisis management skills. The unique Covid-19 context provides rare insights into managerial thinking, emotions and behaviour during extreme crisis situations, contributing to the design of appropriate support interventions.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-06-08
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-07-2020-0540
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Drivers of intrapreneurship: an affective events theory viewpoint

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      Authors: Yariv Itzkovich , Sibylle Heilbrunn , Niva Dolev
      Abstract: In the current study framework, the authors test the underlying assumptions of affective events theory concerning the impact of job satisfaction and job insecurity driven by incivility on intrapreneurial behaviour. Data were collected with a sample of 510 employees from five organisations. All hypotheses were tested via SmartPLS3. Additionally, a distinction between formative and reflective measures was performed. Findings revealed that incivility decreases intrapreneurial behaviour, mediated by job satisfaction and job insecurity. Additionally, this study’s results show that the relationship between job satisfaction and job insecurity and intrapreneurial behaviour distinguishes unionised employees from employees who are not unionised. The cross-sectional nature of the present data precluded definitive statements about causality. Additionally, further studies should increase the sample size and include an international perspective to ensure the overall generalisability of the results. Practically, this study’s findings point to the need for organisational management to understand better underlying employees' perceptions and their antecedents and consequences. The study results contribute to the literature by testing the core assumptions of affective events theory and by extending the affective events theory model, incorporating contextual influences on the relationship between attitudes and behaviours. The authors also show for the first time that incivility can be directly (compared to indirectly) linked to emotional-based responses, but not to those responses driven by cognitive appraisals. Thus, the study also contributes to the incivility literature and the understanding of various antecedents and consequences of incivility. Additionally, this study addressed the notion of formative versus reflective measurement models for the first time relating to incivility and intrapreneurial behaviour, allowing for more sensitive and less biased results. Herein lies an additional methodological contribution.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-06-15
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-09-2019-0483
      Issue No: Vol. 51 , No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Trickle-down effect of moral leadership on unethical employee behavior: a
           cross-level moderated mediation model

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      Authors: Rui Jiang , Xinqi Lin
      Abstract: Moral leadership is a common leadership style in Chinese society and is of great significance to Chinese organizations. Unethical employee behavior also widely exists in all kinds of social organizations and brings great harm. The research on the relationship between moral leadership and unethical employee behavior has not been involved yet, but it is important. This paper studies how moral manager (senior leader) leadership trickles down to unethical employee behavior through moral supervisor (employee direct supervisor) leadership, and discusses the moderating effect of LMX and ethical climate. Through the questionnaire survey of 406 pairs of leaders and employees, and use multilevel path analysis, we test the hypothesis in this paper. The research results show that (1) Moral manager leadership is negatively related to unethical employee behavior. (2) Moral supervisor leadership mediates the relationship between moral manager leadership and unethical employee behavior. (3) LMX positively moderates the relationship between moral manager leadership and moral supervisor leadership, and moderates the mediating effect of moral supervisor leadership. (4) Ethical climate positively moderates the relationship between moral supervisor leadership and unethical employee behavior, and moderates the mediating effect of moral supervisor leadership. First, this study further proves that moral leadership is a popular positive leadership among the three dimensions of paternalistic leadership that extends its influence to unethical employee behavior. Second, this study traces the source of the moral leadership of employees' supervisors and reveals the action mechanism of how moral manager leadership affects unethical employee behavior. Finally, LMX provides the organizational context of the trickle-down effect and the occurrence of unethical employee behavior.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-06-09
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-04-2020-0257
      Issue No: Vol. 51 , No. 4 (2021)
       
  • The impact of workplace loneliness on employee outcomes: what role does
           psychological capital play'

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      Authors: Mantasha Firoz , Richa Chaudhary
      Abstract: With little empirical attention devoted to the consequences of loneliness in the workplace, the present study investigated the effect of workplace loneliness on creative performance, organizational citizenship behaviors and work-family family conflict. Furthermore, psychological capital was examined as a moderator of these relationships. The proposed model was tested in two different studies on a sample of employees from manufacturing (Sample 1: n = 379) and service (Sample 2: n = 559) organizations in India. Data were collected using self-administered questionnaires at two different points in time. Confirmatory factor analysis and multiple hierarchical regressions were used to test the hypothesized model. While workplace loneliness was found to negatively affect creative performance and organizational citizenship behavior, its impact on work-family conflict was positive. Results revealed a significant moderating effect of psychological capital on these relationships. Psychological capital buffered the impact of loneliness in a way that the detrimental effect of loneliness on performance behaviors was less severe for the individuals with high psychological capital. The study makes an original and noteworthy contribution to the loneliness and negative emotions literature by advancing the understanding around the consequences and boundary conditions of loneliness in the workplace. It carries important implications for managing loneliness in the organizations by identifying psychological capital as an important personal resource for mitigating the effects of workplace loneliness on creativity and extra-role behaviors.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-06-07
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-03-2020-0200
      Issue No: Vol. 51 , No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Human resources strategy as a catalyst for the success of the competitive
           strategy: an analysis based on alignment

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      Authors: Javier Gonzalez-Benito , Isabel Suárez-González , Daniel González-Sánchez
      Abstract: Competitive strategy is one of the key factors traditionally related to performance, but research explaining the mechanisms through which this strategy improves business results is scant. This study aims to shed light on this relationship by analyzing human resource management (HRM) strategy as an essential tool for transforming business strategy into results. Focusing on two generic competitive strategies, the authors establish hypotheses on the need for alignment among four echelons: business strategy, HRM system objectives, HRM system capabilities and business performance. The authors test these hypotheses with structural equation modeling techniques using data provided by 204 industrial companies. The results show that to get the most out of a competitive strategy based on quality differentiation, HRM system objectives and capabilities must be focussed on quality. In the same way, a competitive strategy based on innovation differentiation requires HRM system objectives and capabilities focussed on flexibility to achieve the maximum impact on performance. In this second case, alignment is fundamental in low dynamic environments. This research not only provides additional evidence for the strategic relevance of the human resources (HR) function but also reveals the potential benefits of focusing on objectives and capabilities rather than on practices. Moreover, it shows that the role of HRM objectives and capabilities in the implementation of a competitive strategy can be shaped by factors beyond the company's control, such as environmental dynamism.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-05-24
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-04-2020-0254
      Issue No: Vol. 51 , No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Returnee status, academic staff rewards and psychological contract
           fulfilment in China's higher education sector

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      Authors: Jun Gu , Chris Nyland , Xin Fan , Dan Wu
      Abstract: China's universities have decoupled academic staff rewards and returnee status (scholars with a higher degree or substantial work experience gained outside China). This development possibly poses a threat to returnees' psychological contract fulfilment (PCF), i.e. the extent to which employees perceive their employer has fulfilled their promises or obligations regarding the employment relationship. Drawing on the efficiency–flexibility balance theory, the authors predict Chinese universities would institutionalise human resource management (HRM) practices intended to countervail the decoupling's potentially negative influence. Furthermore, the positive effect of returnee status on PCF would subsequently manifest as higher job satisfaction and lower turnover intention. Utilising a mixed-method approach, the authors first undertook a large-scale multi-time field survey of Chinese business school academics from a group of non-elite universities located in Southern China. The authors then conducted a series of in-depth interviews with a subsample of the surveyed cohort, which was then analysed using multivariate regression analyses and machine-aided qualitative content analysis (i.e. NVivo 10). The authors find that, despite the decoupling of returnee status and faculty rewards, returnee status is positively associated with PCF. This positive association further manifests as an indirect effect on job satisfaction and a negative indirect effect on turnover intention. The authors also determine that returnees experience higher PCF because universities have revised HRM practices to reward evidenced job activities. Returnees can gain a competitive advantage by using their skills gained overseas. This study makes four original contributions. First, the authors investigate a neglected yet essential issue, namely, how returnee status relates to PCF in China's universities. Second, the authors enrich the theoretical understanding by introducing the efficiency–flexibility balance theory into the employee PCF literature. Third, the authors provide new insights on how China's universities maximise the effectiveness of academic returnees' talents and skills. Finally, by focusing on non-elite universities, the authors provide insights relevant to a broader faculty population than is available in the existing literature.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-05-21
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-08-2020-0612
      Issue No: Vol. 51 , No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Supervisor-directed OCB and deviant behaviors: the role of LMX and
           impression management motives

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      Authors: Fenika Wulani , Tarsisius Hani Handoko , Bernardinus Maria Purwanto
      Abstract: This study investigates the effect of supervisor-directed organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) on leader–member exchange (LMX), the moderating role of impression management motives on this relationship, the effect of LMX on organizational and interpersonal deviance and the mediating effect of LMX on the relationship between supervisor-directed OCB and deviant behaviors. This study uses a survey questionnaire to collect data. Respondents were 342 nonmanagerial employees working in Surabaya Raya, Indonesia. Hypothesis testing is done using Partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM). The results show that supervisor-directed OCB is positively related to LMX, and LMX is negatively related to organizational deviance but not significantly related to interpersonal deviance. The study also finds that impression management motives moderate the positive relationship between supervisor-directed OCB and LMX. Furthermore, LMX mediates the relationship between supervisor-directed OCB and organizational deviance, but not interpersonal deviance. This study suggests the importance of human resource management (HRM) activities and managers being aware of subordinate OCB motives and the impact of LMX on interpersonal and organizational deviance, as well as what supervisors need to do to reduce these negative effects. Few studies examined the relationship between supervisor-directed OCB and workplace deviance behaviors (WDBs). This study provides a mechanism of their relationship by considering LMX as a mediator. Also, heretofore the existing studies tend to focus more on LMX as an antecedent of OCB. This study provides an understanding of OCB as an antecedent of LMX with the moderating effect of impression management motives.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-05-21
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-06-2020-0406
      Issue No: Vol. 51 , No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Cross-border and sedentary workers' job satisfaction

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      Authors: Sophie Wodociag , Valentina Dolce , Monica Molino
      Abstract: This study aims to explore cross-border and sedentary workers' job satisfaction, analyzing the role played by employability dimensions (occupational expertise, anticipation/optimization and personal flexibility), a job resource (autonomy) and job demands (job insecurity and toxic leadership), using the job demands–resources (JD-R) model as a theoretical framework. Moreover, this study tried to detect possible discrepancies between the two subsamples. The study involved a sample of 250 employees, 40% of whom were frontier workers. Data were collected with a self-report questionnaire and analyzed with SPSS 25. A hierarchical regression analysis and t-test for independent samples were performed. The findings evidenced differences between the two subsamples concerning the job satisfaction predictors. Specifically, for cross-border workers, optimization/anticipation appeared significantly positively related to job satisfaction. For sedentary workers, toxic leadership and job insecurity were significantly negatively related to job satisfaction. Autonomy was positively related to the outcome for both samples. Furthermore, cross-border workers reported a higher level of optimization/anticipation, personal flexibility and job satisfaction than sedentary workers. This paper contributed to fill a gap currently present in the literature on the cross-border population, with a specific focus on job satisfaction. This study confirmed the existence of peculiar working dynamics for cross-border workers.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-05-20
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-04-2020-0303
      Issue No: Vol. 51 , No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Service-oriented human resource practices and customer outcomes: the
           service-profit chain perspective

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      Authors: Pei-Chi Chen , Nai-Wen Chi
      Abstract: Based on the service-profit chain perspective, this study investigates whether service-oriented human resource practices can enhance customer outcomes through motivational mechanisms (i.e. intrinsic/extrinsic satisfaction) as well as emotional mechanisms (i.e. emotional labor strategies). This study collected paired data from 220 service workers and their customers at different time points from 80 service firms. Multilevel path-analysis was conducted to test the proposed hypotheses. Our results indicate that firm-level extensive training is positively related to service workers' intrinsic job satisfaction, which in turn increases deep acting. In addition, firm-level incentive compensation is positively associated with service workers' extrinsic job satisfaction, which in turn reduces surface acting. Finally, service employee's deep acting enhances customer loyalty and willingness to recommend via customer satisfaction. The service organization should (1) stress the importance of incentive compensation to decrease surface acting via enhancing extrinsic job satisfaction and (2) provide extensive service training to improve service employees' intrinsic satisfaction and deep acting, leading to favorable customer outcomes. The present study identifies the critical roles of motivational and emotional mechanisms in transferring service-oriented human resource practices to customer outcomes and employing rigorous research design to enhance the internal/external validity of our findings.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-05-20
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-06-2020-0495
      Issue No: Vol. 51 , No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Policy and practical implications for workforce nationalization in the
           Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries

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      Authors: Said Elbanna
      Abstract: This study aims to advance practice and research on workforce nationalization in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries through identifying relevant policy and practical implications needed to implement nationalization initiatives effectively. The author followed a two-stage approach. Stage 1 reviewed the literature to identify relevant papers on workforce nationalization in the GCC region. Stage 2 used a thematic analysis to propose relevant implications for both policy makers and employers. Through the lens of four perspectives at different levels, i.e. legal, organizational, human development and socio-cultural perspectives, the author has identified ten policy and practical implications. Both governments and employers need to consider these when developing holistic strategies for effective workforce nationalization. Over several decades, the GCC countries have been implementing several nationalization initiatives to increase the percentage and qualifications of their national employees. The significance of these initiatives stems from the fact that the GCC countries lack adequately trained citizens. Moreover, regardless of political attitudes toward foreigners, development plans for modernization, industrialization or urbanization heavily relies on foreign employees. This is because nationals represent the minority of employees and are largely employed in the public sector. This phenomenon needs the attention of scholars to discuss different aspects of nationalization and how to effectively implement it.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-05-19
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-11-2020-0835
      Issue No: Vol. 51 , No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Effects of person-organization fit objective feedback and subjective
           perception on organizational attractiveness in online recruitment

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      Authors: Jui-Chieh Huang
      Abstract: This study applies a person-environment fit (PEF) framework to examine the extent to which organizational attractiveness may be influenced by person-organization fit (POF) feedback and person-job fit (PJF) feedback in web-based recruitment. Furthermore, the potential mediating roles of subjective POF and subjective PJF perceptions were examined. Senior undergraduate business administration students participated in a two-stage experiment by completing a paper-and-pencil survey during a campus career fair and then reviewing a recruitment website. Research findings showed that online assessment feedback on PJF was positively related to organizational attractiveness. The higher the level PJF, the more organizational attractiveness participants reported. Second, both POF and PJF feedback information can affect organizational attractiveness indirectly through subjective POF and PJF perceptions, respectively. Fresh graduates were more sensitive to PJF feedback in deciding organizational attractiveness. This study contributes to the recruitment literature in at least three ways. First, online recruitment messages concerning can affect organizational attractiveness. Second, in support of the PEF framework, fresh graduates can distinguish subjective POF perceptions from subjective PJF perceptions. Third, fresh graduates are more sensitive to PJF information and perceptions in deciding organizational attractiveness.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-05-18
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-06-2020-0449
      Issue No: Vol. 51 , No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Quantifying human resource management: a literature review

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      Authors: Clotilde Coron
      Abstract: With a focus on the evolution of human resource management (HRM) quantification over 2000–2020, this study addresses the following questions: (1) What are the data sources used to quantify HRM' (2) What are the methods used to quantify HRM' (3) What are the objectives of HRM quantification' (4) What are the representations of quantification in HRM' This study is based on an integrative synthesis of 94 published peer-reviewed empirical and non-empirical articles on the use of quantification in HRM. It uses the theoretical framework of the sociology of quantification. The analysis shows that there have been several changes in HRM quantification over 2000–2020 in terms of data sources, methods and objectives. Meanwhile, representations of quantification have evolved relatively little; it is still considered as a tool, and this ignores the possible conflicts and subjectivity associated with the use of quantification. This literature review addresses the use of quantification in HRM in general and is thus larger in scope than previous reviews. Notably, it brings forth new insights on possible differences between the main uses of quantification in HRM, as well as on artificial intelligence and algorithms in HRM.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-05-18
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-05-2020-0322
      Issue No: Vol. 51 , No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Empowering leadership: balancing self-determination and accountability for
           motivation

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      Authors: David O'Donoghue , Lisa van der Werff
      Abstract: This study set out to investigate the role of self-determination and accountability in the relationship between empowering leadership, motivation and performance. Data were collected from 172 participants working in an international software development organization. Hypotheses were tested in PROCESS using the Preacher and Hayes (2008) bootstrapping method. Results indicate that empowering leadership played a significant role satisfying basic psychological needs. As expected, the satisfaction of needs is related to autonomous motivation. Crucially, perceived accountability was also positively related to autonomous motivation. The cross-sectional design of this study limits the ability to rule out the possibility of reverse causation. The results suggest that traditional management practices such as accountability can be successfully utilized in conjunction with self-determination theory without undermining autonomous motivation. This study highlights two key opportunities for human resources (HR) professionals. Specifically, by equipping managers with the skills to display empowering leadership behaviors, and by communicating organizational values and individual job meaning to enhance identified forms of motivation, HR can fully realize the benefits of autonomous employee motivation. This paper offers valuable insight into how leaders can balance the satisfaction of basic psychological needs with accountability to influence autonomous motivation in employees. The model presented demonstrates the potential of empowering leadership in achieving this balance and highlights the importance of identified motivation as a powerful correlate of work performance.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-05-17
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-11-2019-0619
      Issue No: Vol. 51 , No. 4 (2021)
       
  • A sustainable career for interim managers: the role of career communities

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      Authors: Sophie Hennekam , Pauline de Becdelièvre , François Grima
      Abstract: This study examines how the collective construction of career sustainability takes place through a career community of interim managers. We draw on 31 interviews with interim managers who are part of a career community in the form of a professional association of interim managers in France. The findings show the importance of career communities as a vehicle through which to create a sustainable career. More specifically, we show that occupational career communities provide mutual and reciprocal career support, collective being and belonging through sense-making as well as collective learning leading to the collective creation of a sustainable career. We add to the literature on sustainable careers by providing a collective community-level analysis and make a theoretical contribution by using the concept of career communities in shedding light on the career sustainability of interim managers. In the light of the increase in non-standard forms of employment, career communities might become an interesting vehicle for career management and development.
      Citation: Personnel Review
      PubDate: 2021-05-17
      DOI: 10.1108/PR-09-2020-0670
      Issue No: Vol. 51 , No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Personnel Review

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