Subjects -> BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (Total: 3541 journals)
    - ACCOUNTING (132 journals)
    - BANKING AND FINANCE (306 journals)
    - BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (1229 journals)
    - CONSUMER EDUCATION AND PROTECTION (20 journals)
    - COOPERATIVES (4 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SCIENCES: GENERAL (212 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SYSTEMS, THEORIES AND HISTORY (235 journals)
    - FASHION AND CONSUMER TRENDS (20 journals)
    - HUMAN RESOURCES (103 journals)
    - INSURANCE (26 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE (145 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND AID (103 journals)
    - INVESTMENTS (22 journals)
    - LABOR AND INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS (61 journals)
    - MACROECONOMICS (17 journals)
    - MANAGEMENT (595 journals)
    - MARKETING AND PURCHASING (106 journals)
    - MICROECONOMICS (23 journals)
    - PRODUCTION OF GOODS AND SERVICES (143 journals)
    - PUBLIC FINANCE, TAXATION (37 journals)
    - TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL DIRECTORIES (2 journals)

ECONOMIC SCIENCES: GENERAL (212 journals)                  1 2     

Showing 1 - 200 of 200 Journals sorted alphabetically
ACM Transactions on Economics and Computation     Hybrid Journal  
Acta Universitatis Lodziensis : Folia Oeconomica     Open Access  
Acta Universitatis Sapientiae, Economics and Business     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actualidad Económica     Open Access  
Advances in Management and Applied Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
AFFRIKA Journal of Politics, Economics and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
African Journal of Economic and Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Agricultural and Food Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
AgriEngineering     Open Access  
Agrosearch     Open Access  
AL-Qadisiyah Journal For Administrative and Economic sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
American Economic Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 457)
American Journal of Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Análisis Economico     Open Access  
Annales Universitatis Mariae Curie-Skłodowska, sectio H – Oeconomia     Open Access  
Annals of Financial Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Spiru Haret University. Economic Series     Open Access  
Applied Economic Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Applied Economics and Finance     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Arthaniti : Journal of Economic Theory and Practice     Full-text available via subscription  
Asia-Pacific Journal of Accounting & Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Asian Journal of Economics and Empirical Research     Open Access  
Baltic Journal of Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
BISE : Jurnal Pendidikan Bisnis dan Ekonomi     Open Access  
Botswana Journal of Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
BRICS Journal of Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
BRQ Business Review Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Buletin Studi Ekonomi     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Business Strategy and Development     Hybrid Journal  
Central European Economic Journal     Open Access  
China Economic Quarterly International     Open Access  
China Finance and Economic Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ciencias Económicas     Open Access  
Cliodynamics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cogent Economics & Finance     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Danube     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Desarrollo y Sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Divergencia     Open Access  
ECA Sinergia : Revista Especializada en Economía, Contabilidad y Administración     Open Access  
Economía     Open Access  
EconomiA     Open Access  
ECONOMÍA     Open Access  
Economia & Região     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Economic Analysis of Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Economic Geology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Económicas CUC     Open Access  
Economics : Journal for Economic Theory and Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Economics : The Open-Access, Open-Assessment Journal     Open Access  
Economics and Culture     Open Access  
Economics and Policy of Energy and the Environment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Economics of Transportation     Partially Free   (Followers: 16)
Economy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Economy and Sociology / Economie şi Sociologie     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Econosains : Jurnal Online Ekonomi Dan Pendidikan     Open Access  
Edunomic Jurnal Pendidikan Ekonomi     Open Access  
EFB Bioeconomy Journal     Open Access  
Ekonomi Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Ekonomia i Zarzadzanie. Economics and Management     Open Access  
Ekonomika (Economics)     Open Access  
Ekuilibrium : Jurnal Ilmiah Bidang Ilmu Ekonomi     Open Access  
Ekuitas : Jurnal Ekonomi dan Keuangan     Open Access  
El Trimestre Económico     Open Access  
Ensayos de Política Económica     Open Access  
Environmental & Socio-economic Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Environmental Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Equilibrium : Quarterly Journal of Economics and Economic Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Espacio Abierto     Open Access  
Estudios de Economia Aplicada / Studies of Applied Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Estudios Economicos     Open Access  
Expert Journal of Economics     Open Access  
Expresión Económica : Revista de Análisis     Open Access  
Global Business Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Health Economics Review     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
IMF Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Indian Growth and Development Review     Hybrid Journal  
Informe Econômico     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Insight on Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Intellectual Economics     Open Access  
Interfaces Brasil/Canadá     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Applied Behavioral Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Ecological Economics and Statistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Economics and Finance     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Management and Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Regional Development     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Quarterly for Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Review of Economics Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
IQTISHODUNA     Open Access  
Istanbul Journal of Economics     Open Access  
Italian Economic Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
JEJAK : Jurnal Ekonomi dan Kebijakan     Open Access  
JEKPEND : Jurnal Ekonomi dan Pendidikan     Open Access  
Journal for Labour Market Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Accounting and Finance in Emerging Economies     Open Access  
Journal of Advanced Research in Law and Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Advanced Studies in Finance     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Business Economics and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Business-to-Business Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Developing Economies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Development Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Economic and Financial Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Economic Asymmetries     Open Access  
Journal of Economic Development Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Economics and International Finance     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Economics and Sustainable Development     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Economics Bibliography     Open Access  
Journal of Economics Library     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Economics, Finance and Administrative Science     Open Access  
Journal of Economics, Race, and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Economy Culture and Society     Open Access  
Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Finance and Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 55)
Journal of Financial Economic Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Government and Economics     Open Access  
Journal of Interdisciplinary Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Life Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Management Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Management for Global Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Markets & Morality     Partially Free  
Journal of Poverty and Social Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Research in Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Reviews on Global Economics     Open Access  
Journal of the Economic Science Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Economics of Ageing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ekonomi dan Studi Pembangunan     Open Access  
Jurnal Ekonomi KIAT     Open Access  
Jurnal Ekonomi Modernisasi     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ekonomi Pembangunan     Open Access  
Jurnal Manajemen dan Kewirausahaan     Open Access  
Jurnal Pendidikan Ekonomi     Open Access  
Klinik Einkauf     Hybrid Journal  
Korea : Politik, Wirtschaft, Gesellschaft     Open Access  
L'Actualité économique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Latin American Journal of Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Lecturas de Economía     Open Access  
Liberal Arts and Social Sciences International Journal (LASSIJ)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
List Forum für Wirtschafts- und Finanzpolitik     Hybrid Journal  
Local Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Low Carbon Economy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Management Dynamics     Open Access  
Media Ekonomi dan Manajemen     Open Access  
MediaTrend     Open Access  
Modern Economy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Mondes en développement     Full-text available via subscription  
NBER Working Paper Series     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Nordic Journal of Health Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Open Pharmacoeconomics & Health Economics Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pensamiento Crítico     Open Access  
Proceedings of Voronezh State University. Series: Economics and Management     Open Access  
Quantitative Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Quantitative Economics Research     Open Access  
Quarterly Journal of Applied Theories of Economics     Open Access  
RDE : Revista de Desenvolvimento Econômico     Open Access  
Regards économiques     Open Access  
Regional Research of Russia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Regional Science Policy & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Research in World Economy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Review of Economics and Development Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Review of Economics and Institutions     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Review of Economics and Statistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 142)
Review of Market Integration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Revista Brasileira de Desenvolvimento Regional     Open Access  
Revista CIFE : Lecturas de Economía Social     Open Access  
Revista de Análisis Económico     Open Access  
Revista de Economía     Open Access  
Revista ECONO : Facultad de Ciencias Económicas. UNLP     Open Access  
Revista Economia & Gestão     Open Access  
Revista Facultad de Ciencias Económicas: Investigación y Reflexión     Open Access  
Revista Finanzas y Política Económica     Open Access  
Revista Icade. Revista de las Facultades de Derecho y Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista Latinoamericana de Desarrollo Económico     Open Access  
Revista Panorama Económico     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Sociedad y Economía     Open Access  
Revista Teoria e Evidência Econômica     Open Access  
Revista U.D.C.A Actualidad & Divulgación Científica     Open Access  
Revue économique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ruch Prawniczy, Ekonomiczny i Socjologiczny     Open Access  
RUDN Journal of Economics     Open Access  
Russian Journal of Economics     Open Access  
Sdü Vizyoner Dergisi     Open Access  
Semestre Económico     Open Access  
Shanlax International Journal of Economics     Open Access  
Sosyoekonomi     Open Access  
Staff Studies : Central Bank of Sri Lanka     Open Access  
Statistics and Economics     Open Access  
Studia Universitatis ?Vasile Goldis? Arad ? Economics Series     Open Access  
Supreme Court Economic Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics     Open Access  
Tahghighat-e-Eghtesadi     Open Access  
Textos de Economia     Open Access  
Theoretical Economics Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Torun International Studies     Open Access  
Turkish Economic Review     Open Access  
World Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Wroclaw Review of Law, Administration & Economics     Open Access  
Œconomia     Open Access  
Науковий вісник НУБіП України. Серія: Економіка, аграрний менеджмент, бізнес     Open Access  

        1 2     

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Local Economy
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.407
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0269-0942 - ISSN (Online) 1470-9325
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • All hubs and no spokes' Exploring the potential of hubs to sustain
           rural and regional development

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gary Bosworth, Koen Salemink
      Pages: 543 - 550
      Abstract: Local Economy, Volume 36, Issue 7-8, Page 543-550, November 2021.
      In the arena of rural development, a number of initiatives have adopted the idea of a hub to deliver improved services, promote business development and support local communities. This editorial sets out the rationale for a Special Issue that seeks to understand the additional value that hubs can provide. In particular, we assess their overlapping social and economic goals and the implications for networks and strategies to create, develop and sustain successful hubs. Additionally, we explore opportunities for innovation and new collaborations among different types of hubs with different organisational models and conceptualise how best to develop the ‘spokes’ that are essential for connecting hubs to both their local communities and to wider stakeholders.
      Citation: Local Economy
      PubDate: 2022-05-27T06:47:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02690942221097027
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 7-8 (2022)
       
  • The changing fortunes and future prospects of a traditional industrial
           cluster: Woollen textile production in the Scottish Borders

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      Authors: Allen J Scott
      Abstract: Local Economy, Ahead of Print.
      I examine the development and current situation of the woollen knitwear and woven fabric industry in the Scottish Borders. The paper opens with a brief theoretical exposition of the logic and dynamics of industrial clusters. An overview of the consolidation of the industry as a multifaceted spatial cluster or agglomeration in the 19th century is presented. I then describe changes in the locational structure and productive capacities of the industry over the last several decades. I provide a diagnosis of the industry’s decline in recent years together with an assessment of relevant stocks of region-based resources and capabilities. I argue that the Scottish Borders region lacks many of the pooled competitive advantages typically found in successful clusters but that carefully modulated policy could do much to improve local economic performance in the future. A number of specific policy guidelines focussed on inter-industrial relations, labour markets and institutional infrastructures are examined.
      Citation: Local Economy
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T06:23:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02690942221093039
       
  • Rich cities, poor countryside' Social structure of the poor and
           poverty risks in urban and rural places in an affluent country

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      Authors: Oliver Hümbelin, Lukas Hobi, Robert Fluder
      Abstract: Local Economy, Ahead of Print.
      This paper contributes to the field of regional poverty literature by using linked tax data to examine poverty in a large district in Switzerland with one million inhabitants and rural and urban parts. We measure poverty using income and asset-based approaches. Our regional comparison of the social structure of the poor shows that poor people in rural areas are more likely to be of retirement age. Among the workforce, the share of poor is larger for those who work in agriculture compared to those working in industry or the service sector. In urban areas, the poor are more often freelancers and people of foreign origin. Despite where they live, people with little education, single parents, and people working in gastronomy/tourism are disproportionately often poor. We then use a random forest based variable importance assessment to clarify whether the importance of poverty risks factors differs in urban and rural locations. It shows little regional differences among the major poverty risk factors, and it demonstrates that the opportunity structure, like density of workplaces or aggravated access in mountain areas, seem to be of minor importance compared to risk factors that relate to the immediate social situation.
      Citation: Local Economy
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T04:45:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02690942221104774
       
  • Towards a conceptual framework of enterprise support for pro-environmental
           small and medium-sized enterprises: A contextualised review of diverse
           knowledge domains

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      Authors: Fred Paterson, Polina Baranova, Bruno Gallotta
      Abstract: Local Economy, Ahead of Print.
      Whilst there are well-established bodies of knowledge about enterprise support and the role of entrepreneurial learning for SMEs (Small and medium-sized enterprises) in general and a growing body of evidence relating to environmental capabilities, green/eco-innovation, sustainable supply chains and green skills for SMEs in particular, there is little empirical and peer reviewed literature that address approaches to enterprise support specifically focussed on the needs of the growing number of pro-environmental SMEs. This study undertakes a contextualised review of diverse knowledge domains to identify the key features of enterprise support for pro-environmental SMEs. In doing so, the paper plots the knowledge journey of experienced academic programme providers, from the initial design of an enterprise support programme for pro-environmental SMEs, through a thematic review of academic, grey and other related literature and finally presents a propositional and normative conceptual framework that proposes eight key features of enterprise support for pro-environmental SMEs. The resulting ‘framework for action’ aims to offer a practical tool for providers of pro-environmental enterprise support to review and improve their own provision, an analytical frame for other researchers in this field and a benchmark for SMEs seeking guidance on their pathway to net-zero business performance.
      Citation: Local Economy
      PubDate: 2022-05-21T04:05:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02690942221097373
       
  • Mobilizing ‘communities of practice’ for local development and
           accleration of the Sustainable Development Goals

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      Authors: Eunice Annan-Aggrey, Godwin Arku, Kilian Atuoye, Emmanuel Kyeremeh
      Abstract: Local Economy, Ahead of Print.
      The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) set out to achieve the ambitious goal of addressing all forms of poverty, fighting inequality, tackling climate change, while ensuring that no one is left behind. Five years into the implementation of the SDGs, though progress has been recorded in some places, significant challenges persist globally. In 2019, the UN Secretary-General declared a “Decade of Action” commencing in 2020 until 2030. In the light of this campaign, it is important that all effort is garnered to accelerate action towards achieving the goals. The local government level is increasingly being recognized as the key locus of development effort, particularly because the SDGs are relevant to local jurisdictions and change can be tangibly measured at smaller scales. This paper contributes to the ongoing discourse on how best to localize the global goals. Reflecting on the Ghanaian context, the paper discusses guiding principles for effective communities of practice at the local government level. Overall, the paper underlines the advantages of coordination among stakeholders, which constitute essential ingredients for accelerating action towards the SDGs especially as we commence the “Decade of Action.”
      Citation: Local Economy
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T03:51:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02690942221101532
       
  • Implementation perspectives of solar energy irrigation policy in water
           deficient regions: A case of Rajasthan state in India

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      Authors: Pragati Jain, Prerna Jain, Pratyush Jain
      Abstract: Local Economy, Ahead of Print.
      Groundwater extraction through subsidized solar power has flared up a number of issues in water resource planning in water deficient regions. Previous studies and research suggests ‘buy back solutions’ to check indiscriminate exploitation of ground water reserves; however, the present study is an attempt to put forward a theoretical incentive framework analysing the condition in Rajasthan state to justify why farmers would not opt to sell excess electricity generated to the grid rather choose to sell solar irrigation. The study validates the inappropriateness of simple buy back solution to check excessive groundwater extraction and concludes that one-way approach in policy implementation regarding groundwater extraction can be a misnomer and region-specific policies should be adopted looking to the water deficiency or abundance in the region.
      Citation: Local Economy
      PubDate: 2022-05-12T09:33:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02690942221099400
       
  • Innovation networking in aspirational subnational innovative regions:
           Exploring experiences from Frances Baard municipality, South Africa

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      Authors: Peter T Jacobs, Olebogeng Molewa, Kgabo Hector Ramoroka
      Abstract: Local Economy, Ahead of Print.
      How underdeveloped localities or subnational regions build the capabilities to realise and spread the benefits of innovation is a longstanding puzzle in innovation studies. To address this puzzle, this study explores the prospects of innovation networking among state and non-state actors in Frances Baard District Municipality, South Africa. In-depth analysis of extensive interviews with key informants across local industry sectors reveals insights about the properties of innovation networks, such as composition and structure, as well as options of network adaptation and combining sectoral networks operating in the same locality. Non-formal networking was far more prevalent across well-established and newer industry clusters, which is similar to examples from elsewhere in the Global South. Networks established to coordinate institutional governance without an explicit innovation intent could trigger learning, adaption and serendipitous innovations. Further research could extend our findings through deeper investigations on network adaption and coordination for the promotion of innovation in aspiring subnational regions.
      Citation: Local Economy
      PubDate: 2022-04-24T03:22:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02690942221085190
       
  • Corrigendum to “Bottom-up strategies, platform worker power and local
           action: Learning from ridehailing drivers”

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Local Economy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Local Economy
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T04:43:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02690942221074436
       
  • Editorial: Levelling up the United Kingdom' A useful mantra but too
           little substance or delivery'

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      Authors: Joyce Liddle, John Shutt, Gareth Addidle
      First page: 3
      Abstract: Local Economy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Local Economy
      PubDate: 2022-05-28T05:23:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02690942221099835
       
  • Will the Levelling Up White Paper (LUWP) drive reform of national
           innovation policy and practice'

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      Authors: David Marlow
      First page: 13
      Abstract: Local Economy, Ahead of Print.
      The Levelling Up White Paper (LUWP) is intended to drive local economic growth and development, particularly in left-behind places. It proposes policies and investments in innovation infrastructure and services as an explicit mission and key component of the LU reform agenda. This paper, however, suggests that, without systemic behaviour and culture change in national innovation institutes and their funders, the LUWP will produce few if any results of game-changing significance. Based on a project to explore how a Research Council and one of its core funded institutes should improve local impact and prepare for the LUWP, the paper explores practical changes that need to be considered to make LUWP place-based innovation ambitions a reality. It discusses the structures and processes that national institutes and programmes might need to transition from interventions that have local impacts incidentally by accident of where they are taking place, to purposeful place-based growth and development. It then suggests the capabilities required to deliver this well – which has major implications for innovation funders. The LUWP’s good intentions for more impactful place-based innovation requires new tools and techniques, experimentation and learning-by-doing, and proper resourcing – robustly tested and evaluated by Local Economy research and practitioner communities.
      Citation: Local Economy
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T02:48:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02690942221097366
       
  • Levelling up – Is it the right cure'

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      Authors: Simon Bridge
      First page: 21
      Abstract: Local Economy, Ahead of Print.
      In medicine, treatment normally starts with an examination of symptoms followed by a diagnosis of their likely cause and then a ‘cure’ to counter that cause. In the case of ‘Levelling Up’, the symptoms presented appear to be significant disparities in economic vitality between different areas – but a diagnosis of the cause is not clearly indicated. However, if the recommendation amounts essentially to encouraging private sector growth in under-performing places by pump-priming infrastructure schemes, (for instance, investment funds, education, skills, health care, local leadership and community pride), that might suggest a diagnosis that the under-performance occurs because entrepreneurial endeavour is constrained by infrastructural deficiencies. That diagnosis fits the conventional wisdom but is it correct' The rationale appears to be based on an assumption that the better the infrastructure the more entrepreneurial endeavour there will be – but many commentators indicate that humans are more influenced by historic, cultural and/or social norms than by such considerations. Therefore, continuing to fund infrastructure is unlikely to change the situation. Although that does not itself indicate what might be the answer – or even that a quick solution is possible. But it does suggest both the necessity to look and possible avenues to explore.
      Citation: Local Economy
      PubDate: 2022-05-06T05:43:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02690942221098617
       
  • From EU Structural Funds to Levelling Up: Empty signifiers, ungrounded
           statism and English regional policy

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      Authors: Paul Copeland, Patrick Diamond
      First page: 34
      Abstract: Local Economy, Ahead of Print.
      This paper argues that EU structural policy administered through the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) and the European Social Fund (ESF) had a relatively limited impact in addressing competitiveness and productivity weaknesses in the English regions due to the emphasis on supply-side policies and deficiencies within the institutional framework for governing economic development. By analysing projects supported by the ERDF and the ESF in England from 2007 to 2013, we demonstrate that funding was used to shape self-organising networks of private and public sector actors, notably local councils, to encourage the development of entrepreneurship, research and development, the creative industries, transport services, and universities and educational providers. In the absence of an overarching strategic vision, and given long-standing socio-economic and political weaknesses, the effect of EU structural funding on the English regions was nonetheless marginal at best. Our case-study highlights that England’s path-dependent and ungrounded statism combined with a neoliberal supply-side logic Structural Funds to create an empty signifier of regional development that failed to adequately respond to the structural needs of less affluent regions. Meanwhile, the post-Brexit approach to regional development, namely the levelling up agenda, represents a continuation of this empty signifier rather than a significant break with the past.
      Citation: Local Economy
      PubDate: 2022-05-09T07:53:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02690942221088828
       
  • ‘Levelling up’ in post-Brexit United Kingdom: Economic realism or
           political opportunism'

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      Authors: Ray Hudson
      First page: 50
      Abstract: Local Economy, Ahead of Print.
      Following the 2019 general election, the Prime Minister claimed that leaving the EU would enable him to ‘get Brexit done’ and introduce policies to “level up” inequalities in a post-EU UK. There still is, however, considerable uncertainty as to exactly what the government means by this, though it seemingly includes reducing differences in economic performance and opportunities between North and South in England, how it will achieve this goal and how ‘levelling up’ relates to the policy objective of restoring national economic growth, and with the added complication of also seeking a transition to a zero-carbon green economy and society. This ambition to ‘level up’ became even more challenging as COVID-19 both further revealed and reinforced existing deep socio-spatial inequalities. A more fundamental question is whether such an ambition is realisable within the context of a capitalist economy. Even so, despite the ambiguities and uncertainties surrounding it, ‘levelling up’’ is undoubtedly a politically important message, directed at those voters, newly converted to the Conservative vision and who caused the former ‘red wall’ of Labour support partially to crumble. Some of these constituencies had not returned a Conservative MP for decades, others had never before returned a Conservative to Parliament.
      Citation: Local Economy
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T03:05:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02690942221099480
       
  • The role of the private sector in subnational governance: Learning lessons
           from England’s local enterprise partnerships

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      Authors: Jack Newman, Nigel Gilbert
      First page: 66
      Abstract: Local Economy, Ahead of Print.
      This paper seeks to learn lessons about the role of the private sector in subnational governance by analysing the UK’s Local Enterprise Partnerships (LEPs). The paper outlines the public justifications for LEPs using documentary analysis, and then considers these against findings from interviews and network analysis, concluding that the justifications are problematic. LEPs were established on the assumption that civic and business leaders needed to be brought together in business-led institutions. However, network analysis shows most civic leaders also hold private sector roles, undermining the assumed need for a ‘bringing together’. Three further justifications of the LEP model are also challenged. Firstly, business leaders were supposed to enable knowledge flows, but analysis shows that this knowledge is skewed by unrepresentative LEP boards. Secondly, it was assumed that LEPs would catalyse networks, but the networks have been built around individual interests, without transparency. Finally, LEPs were meant to mirror business structures, but this has undermined democratic accountability. Taken together, these findings suggest that the creation of LEPs has attempted to solve the wrong problem in the wrong way. The paper concludes by proposing guiding principles for the role of the private sector in the Levelling Up agenda: representation, transparency and accountability.
      Citation: Local Economy
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T07:42:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02690942221098615
       
  • Understanding resilient places: Multi-level governance in times of crisis

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      Authors: Kate Broadhurst, Nicholas Gray
      First page: 84
      Abstract: Local Economy, Ahead of Print.
      When countries are impacted by a crisis, comparisons at the national level are often drawn. Whilst useful, this approach fails to explore how local measures are enacted alongside centralised responses. This paper addresses that gap by examining England’s intergovernmental response to the Covid-19 pandemic. With a focus on multi-level governance (MLG) and resilience theories the paper explores how tiers of government respond to the demands of the crisis. The focus is primarily on the responses of those involved with responding to the economic crisis with a recognition of the interlinked health and environmental crises. Adopting a case study approach, which included some of the areas hardest hit by the pandemic, the paper asks whether the application of MLG provided a resilient system to the shock of the pandemic. The findings illustrate local government sought to respond quickly, but decision-making was too often centrally controlled rather than devolved to the most appropriate scale. The paper draws lessons for how England might think constructively about its post pandemic reorientation considering the adaptation of intergovernmental roles and subnational governance that permits greater devolution to facilitate place-based recovery. Drawing on the knowledge gained throughout the pandemic, the paper argues that to Level Up in England and address the long-term economic and societal imbalances will demand a place-based recovery model.
      Citation: Local Economy
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T03:24:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02690942221100101
       
  • Young people, youth work & the ‘levelling up’ policy
           agenda

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      Authors: Jon Ord, Bernard Davies
      First page: 104
      Abstract: Local Economy, Ahead of Print.
      ‘Levelling UP’ has taken on considerable significance in the policy discourses of the Johnson conservative government, particularly regarding the English regions. However, what is meant by Levelling up has been far from clear, although if it is to mean anything it must at least in part mean addressing the needs of disadvantaged and left behind communities. Key premises of this paper are that young people must be considered valued members of those communities; and that, to meet their expressed needs, youth work can be the best placed service for (re)investment, not least because it has demonstrated that it consistently enables a wide variety of outcomes in their lives. The investment required must be seen in the context of the huge austerity cuts to youth services in England which disproportionately affected disadvantaged communities. To make the case for ‘levelling up’ to completely rebuild as well as further develop those services. This paper brings together an analysis of past and current youth policies with a range of relevant empirical data.
      Citation: Local Economy
      PubDate: 2022-05-21T02:55:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02690942221098971
       
  • Book Review: Local economy book review: Value (s) building a better world
           for all

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      Authors: Joyce Liddle
      First page: 118
      Abstract: Local Economy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Local Economy
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T06:30:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02690942221099837
       
  • Book Review

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      Authors: John Shutt
      First page: 120
      Abstract: Local Economy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Local Economy
      PubDate: 2022-06-07T05:25:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02690942221099842
       
  • Rural service hubs and socially innovative rural-urban linkages: A
           conceptual framework for nexogenous development

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      Authors: Bryonny Goodwin-Hawkins, Theresia Oedl-Wieser, Ulla Ovaska, Aimee Morse
      First page: 551
      Abstract: Local Economy, Ahead of Print.
      Co-locating services has become a common solution to the many longstanding challenges of service access and provision in rural areas. Rural service hubs – which offer two or more services at the same outlet – take many forms, typically responding to triggers for social innovation. Despite their growing ubiquity, however, rural service hubs have been little studied in comparative perspective. This article shifts the lens on service hubs from place-based solutions towards a broader, multi-scalar and multi-level perspective on rural connectivity. We propose a five dimension conceptual framework in contribution to the emerging theorisation of nexogenous rural development a model for resourceful reconnection beyond place and across rural–urban space. Drawing on examples from Austria, Finland and Wales, we illustrate how diverse service hub models mobilise social innovation, networks, scale and proximity to support service access and provision.
      Citation: Local Economy
      PubDate: 2022-03-01T04:40:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02690942221082040
       
  • The rural social economy, community food hubs and the market

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      Authors: Nigel R Curry
      First page: 569
      Abstract: Local Economy, Ahead of Print.
      The nature of the UK rural social economy is described as an appropriate context in which rural food hubs develop. Through an empirical study of Local Industrial Strategies of the English Local Enterprise Partnerships (LEPs), local area policies are found to provide a sympathetic social economy framework for such development. Rural food hubs are described. A distinction is drawn between producer and community hubs as a means of exploring the second of these more fully. Community hubs are found to address a number of market failures of the growth economy in the areas of community cohesion, voluntary effort, locality, the environment, food waste, health and food poverty. Despite some positive policy signals, dominant national economic policy in the areas of rural GVA productivity, the reform of the LEPs and a national rural strategy, is considered to limit the potential of rural community food hubs because of its ‘growth’ orientation. In this context, conclusions are drawn about survival strategies for such hubs.
      Citation: Local Economy
      PubDate: 2022-02-24T03:09:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02690942211070798
       
  • ‘Honey pot’ rural enterprise hubs as micro-clusters: Exploring their
           role in creativity-led rural development

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      Authors: Ian Merrell, Frances Rowe, Paul Cowie, Menelaos Gkartzios
      First page: 589
      Abstract: Local Economy, Ahead of Print.
      Rural enterprise hubs are physical infrastructures designed to help rural businesses access tangible and intangible benefits. They generally operate within two main business models: ‘Honey Pots’ (i.e. targeting business-to-customer tenants) and ‘Hives’ (i.e. targeting business‐to‐business tenants). This paper focuses on the former type, Honey Pot hubs, which are best suited to tenants who sell their products/services directly to the general public, such as some creative sectors, retail and tourism. Honey Pot hubs are designed to cater to such needs by attracting footfall to the space, providing cafes and facilities for the general public and hosting events. This paper explores how these Honey Pot hubs contribute to rural and regional development, through the creative practices of their tenants. The paper draws on qualitative interviews with Honey Pot managers and tenants in remote rural locations of the North East of England. The findings are useful for Hub practitioners, policy makers and rural creative businesses who want to develop similar initiatives in their locales.
      Citation: Local Economy
      PubDate: 2022-03-30T01:35:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02690942221085498
       
  • How rural coworking hubs can facilitate well-being through the
           satisfaction of key psychological needs

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      Authors: Ian Merrell, Anita Füzi, Emma Russell, Gary Bosworth
      First page: 606
      Abstract: Local Economy, Ahead of Print.
      Once considered an urban phenomenon, rural enterprise hubs (REH) and rural coworking spaces (RCWS) are now increasing in popularity to support entrepreneurial rural communities. Whilst previous research has examined economic and community benefits, a focus on well-being benefits has been overlooked. Framed by self-determination theory, this empirical research investigates whether rural coworking is reported to enhance user’s well-being by fulfilling key psychological needs for autonomy, competence and relatedness. By applying a well-being focus, we found that potential key drivers of rural coworking uptake and durability could be elucidated, in terms of these three needs. In addition, we identified another category of well-being that was fulfilled through engagement with RCWS and REH – namely – ‘communion with nature’. We suggest that considerations of well-being are important to understand how rural coworking can attract and sustain local workers and suggest a future research agenda to further conceptualise well-being effects.
      Citation: Local Economy
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T04:02:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02690942221075598
       
  • Rural arts entrepreneurs’ placemaking – how ‘entrepreneurial
           placemaking’ explains rural creative hub evolution during COVID-19
           lockdown

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      Authors: Inge Hill, Louise Manning, Richard Frost
      First page: 627
      Abstract: Local Economy, Ahead of Print.
      This article critically evaluates the development and impact of a new online ‘dance practice’ service in a rural creative hub Remote. The research asks: ‘How does entrepreneurial placemaking contribute to the evolution of rural creative hubs during the COVID-19 pandemic'’ To answer this question, the article critically evaluates the business activities of one artisan entrepreneur, applying placemaking and resilience. Using a case study strategy, this research employs online qualitative research. Creative hub development is explained as a result of ‘entrepreneurial placemaking’, forming the main contribution of this article. This term subsumes multi-layered exchanges. ‘Entrepreneurial placemaking’ is conceptualised as continuous becoming, and illustrated by Remote’s adaption processes to lockdown phases. Remote is turned into a stage for digital placemaking during the COVID-19 lockdown via the ‘open dance practice’ service provided by a performance dance artist. Findings highlight that to enact entrepreneurial placemaking, creative professionals need to draw upon adaptive capacity, which includes the ability to develop exchange relationships and business-related digital skills. Peer-learning is a recommended solution for developing such digital skills across artist entrepreneurial communities. This article contributes to the ongoing conversation on the role of creative hubs for socio-economic development foregrounding the activities of hub users.
      Citation: Local Economy
      PubDate: 2022-03-31T12:22:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02690942221083838
       
  • Hubs, hopes and high stakes for a relatively disadvantaged low tech place

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      Authors: Christina Rundel, Koen Salemink
      First page: 650
      Abstract: Local Economy, Ahead of Print.
      The transition to a digitally inclusive and knowledge-based rural society can be challenging. Digital hubs are often proposed as a way of overcoming digital exclusion in rural and small-town contexts, yet studies into how to set up such a hub in these challenging contexts are scarce. While hubs are usually associated with an urban environment, this case study deals with the development of a rural digital hub over several years in a small town in East Groningen (NL). In the context of an Interreg project, observations during project meetings, in-depth interviews and document analysis were conducted to closely monitor the hub’s development process. Initially, the hub initiators aimed at stimulating business activities and innovation linked to digital technologies. Thereby, an originally urban digital hub concept was copied into a rural context without a rural translation. Along the way, they were forced to adapt and scale down the scope of the project while at the same time, a broader target group had to be formulated. Moreover, the municipality lacked an overarching digital strategy, which compromised demand aggregation and supply synchronisation – two essential ingredients for rural digital hubs.
      Citation: Local Economy
      PubDate: 2022-02-15T02:38:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02690942221077120
       
  • Public support for collaborative workspaces: Dispersed help to a
           place-based phenomenon'

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      Authors: Vasilis Avdikos, Antigoni Papageorgiou
      First page: 669
      Abstract: Local Economy, Ahead of Print.
      The paper maps a range of policy initiatives for the support of collaborative workspaces (hereafter CWS) by examining the different ways such spaces have been funded, through what instruments, as well as what are the dominant reasons for receiving public support of any kind in urban and rural areas. Our analysis explores policy intentions as well as the funding tools of specific policy programmes that have supported CWS. This contribution aims to provide a categorization of existing policy initiatives about CWS and wishes to connect such policies with wider creative and urban and regional policy debates regarding the turn towards entrepreneurial forms of work and development in an era of economic uncertainty. The paper traces the evolution of CWS by examining the three overlapping waves of CWS and the specific reasons for their emergence. Then, it turns its focus on existing funding schemes and instruments for CWS, identifying five distinct categories of public support. It concludes by testifying in favour of understanding – and thus, supporting – CWS as place-based and site-specific phenomena. Thus, it calls for a new positioning of CWS into place-based development agendas, whilst taking into consideration the singularity of the place, the multiplicity of the actors and the particular institutional conditions and socio-economic characteristics involved.
      Citation: Local Economy
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T05:25:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02690942221074941
       
  • A guide to developing a rural digital hub

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      Authors: Liz Price, Jane Deville, Fiona Ashmore
      First page: 683
      Abstract: Local Economy, Ahead of Print.
      This paper outlines the development of a Rural Digital Hub Guide. Digital hubs comprise one of a range of solutions that policymakers can implement in rural regions to promote digital engagement among communities and businesses. The guide was developed as part of an Interreg VB North Sea Europe Programme which focussed on testing innovative solutions to the Urban-rural digital divide by improving digital skills, services and infrastructure. This paper explains how the Rural Digital Hub Guide was researched and developed, the creation of a typology of digital hubs and the key steps that policymakers need to consider when establishing a digital hub in their region.
      Citation: Local Economy
      PubDate: 2022-03-02T09:25:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02690942221077575
       
 
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