Subjects -> BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (Total: 3510 journals)
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    - CONSUMER EDUCATION AND PROTECTION (20 journals)
    - COOPERATIVES (4 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SCIENCES: GENERAL (202 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SYSTEMS, THEORIES AND HISTORY (235 journals)
    - FASHION AND CONSUMER TRENDS (20 journals)
    - HUMAN RESOURCES (103 journals)
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    - MICROECONOMICS (23 journals)
    - PRODUCTION OF GOODS AND SERVICES (143 journals)
    - PUBLIC FINANCE, TAXATION (37 journals)
    - TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL DIRECTORIES (2 journals)

PRODUCTION OF GOODS AND SERVICES (143 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 137 of 137 Journals sorted alphabetically
Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Marketing     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Marketing Journal (AMJ)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
BMC Health Services Research     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Capital Markets Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cleaner Environmental Systems     Open Access  
Cleaner Production Letters     Hybrid Journal  
Cleaner Waste Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Consumption Markets & Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Customer Needs and Solutions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Direct Marketing An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Disaster Prevention and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Economic & Labour Market Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Electronic Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Emerging Markets Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
European Journal of Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Financial Markets, Institutions & Instruments     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Food Packaging and Shelf Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Foundations and Trends® in Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Future Business Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Journal of Emerging Market Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Services and Outcomes Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Health Services Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Health Services Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
i+Diseño : Revista científico-académica internacional de Innovación, Investigación y Desarrollo en Diseño     Open Access  
Independent Journal of Management & Production     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ingeniería y Competitividad     Open Access  
International Journal of Advanced Operations Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Bank Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Business and Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Business Forecasting and Marketing Intelligence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Electronic Marketing and Retailing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Entrepreneurial Venturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Financial Services Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Information Systems and Supply Chain Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Inventory Research     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Lean Six Sigma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Logistics Economics and Globalisation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Managing Projects in Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Market Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Nonprofit & Voluntary Sector Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Planning and Scheduling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Product Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Production Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Production Management and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Production Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Productivity and Quality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Quality Innovation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Research in Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Service Industry Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Services and Standards     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Services Operations and Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Services Sciences     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Supply Chain and Inventory Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Supply Chain and Operations Resilience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Supply Chain Management     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Systems Science : Operations & Logistics     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Technology Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Trade and Global Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Internet Reference Services Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
JCMS : Journal of Common Market Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Journal of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Business Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Business Venturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Cleaner Production     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Database Marketing & Customer Strategy Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Direct Data and Digital Marketing Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Emerging Knowledge on Emerging Markets     Open Access  
Journal of Entrepreneurial Finance     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Financial Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Journal of Food Products Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Foodservice Business Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Global Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Global Operations and Strategic Sourcing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Services Research and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of International Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Loss Prevention in the Process Industries     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 54)
Journal of Marketing Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Marketing Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Marketing Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 74)
Journal of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Operations and Supply Chain Management     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Political Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Prediction Markets     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Product Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Production Research & Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Productivity Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Progressive Human Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Public Policy & Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Relationship Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Service Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Services Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Strategic Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Targeting Measurement and Analysis for Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Technology Management & Innovation     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Vacation Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Logistics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Logistics Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Management and Administrative Sciences Review     Open Access  
Management and Production Engineering Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Manufacturing & Service Operations Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Marketing Intelligence & Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Marketing Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Marketing Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Marketing Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37)
Psychological Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Psychology & Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Quantitative Marketing and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Reproduction Fertility and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Review of Pacific Basin Financial Markets and Policies     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Eletrônica Academicus     Open Access  
Revue Interventions économiques     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Service Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Service Oriented Computing and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Service Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Services Marketing Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Social Marketing Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Strategy Management Logistics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Supply Chain Forum : an International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Sustainable Production and Consumption     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Technology Operation Management     Hybrid Journal  
The Journal of Futures Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
The Service Industries Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Universal Journal of Industrial and Business Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Venture Capital: An International Journal of Entrepreneurial Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
WPOM - Working Papers on Operations Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Health Services Research and Policy
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.713
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 16  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1355-8196 - ISSN (Online) 1758-1060
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1175 journals]
  • Using arts-based research in applied health care: An example from an
           evaluation of NHS dental contract reform in Wales

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      Authors: Ellie Overs, Chris Woods, Lynne Williams, Sion Williams, Chris Burton, Lorelei Jones, Paul R Brocklehurst
      Abstract: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveArts-based research (ABR) refers to the use of art in the research process to help generate, interpret and/or communicate knowledge. We used ABR principles to adapt a centre-staging method to complement a more traditional qualitative approach to evaluate participants’ views on dental service reform.MethodsWe asked five individuals in the dental health sector in the National Health Service in Wales to select objects to depict their views on the current reform process and their ideal reform process. This process took place alongside traditional semi-structured interviews with the participants.ResultsThere were three marked differences in the centre-staging process as compared to the interviews: (1) there was a greater use of symbolism by the participants, (2) the participants put a greater focus on the process of change and (3) the participants were more likely to reveal the emotions underlying their assessments of the reform process.ConclusionsThe arts-based approach adopted appeared to be highly accessible and has the potential to be used in a wide range of applications.
      Citation: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy
      PubDate: 2022-11-11T12:43:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13558196221137202
       
  • Trauma and resilience informed research principles and practice: A
           framework to improve the inclusion and experience of disadvantaged
           populations in health and social care research

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      Authors: Natalie L Edelman
      Abstract: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Trauma, socio-economic, cultural and structural issues are associated with poor outcomes for most health conditions and may also make research participation difficult and onerous, perpetuating intervention-generated inequalities by generating evidence from those least in need. Trauma-informed and resilience-informed approaches to care may help address these concerns across health and social care research. These approaches take an empowerment-based response to adversity, and are suitable for integration and extension as Trauma and Resilience Informed Research Principles and Practice (TRIRPP) for studies beyond the topics of resilience and trauma. Four TRIRPP aims were identified: addressing the adversity context that may underpin the lives of research participants and the phenomenon under study; improving study accessibility and acceptability for individuals and populations facing adversity; recognising and addressing traumatisation in potential participants; and recognising and promoting resilience. Recommendations include interview participant control of recording devices, over-sampling of under-represented populations in population surveys, and actively seeking to engage disenfranchised individuals in patient and public involvement from design to dissemination. The practice of research has the power to address adversity and trauma or to perpetuate it at both an individual and a societal level. It is feasible and worthwhile to integrate trauma-informed and resilience-informed approaches across research topics and designs. Further work should extend the TRIRPP recommendations and evaluate their use.
      Citation: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy
      PubDate: 2022-11-03T02:27:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13558196221124740
       
  • Financing primary health care in low- and middle-income countries: A
           research and policy agenda

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      Authors: Kara Hanson, Dina Balabanova, Nouria Brikci, Darius Erlangga, Timothy Powell-Jackson
      Abstract: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy
      PubDate: 2022-10-27T03:58:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13558196221135741
       
  • State-level heterogeneity in associations between structural stigma and
           individual healthcare access: A multilevel analysis of transgender adults
           in the United States

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      Authors: Nguyen K Tran, Kellan E Baker, Elle Lett, Ayden I Scheim
      Abstract: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveState-level variation in how restrictive policies affect health care access for transgender populations has not been widely studied. Therefore, we assessed the association between structural stigma and four measures of individual health care access among transgender people in the United States, and the extent to which structural stigma explains state-level variability.MethodsData were drawn from the 2015–2019 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and the Human Rights Campaign’s State Equality Index. We calculated weighted proportions and conducted multilevel logistic regression of individual heterogeneity and discriminatory accuracy.ResultsAn increase in the structural stigma score by one standard deviation was associated with lower odds of health care coverage (OR = 0.80; 95% CI: 0.66, 0.96) after adjusting for individual-level confounders. Approximately 11% of the total variance for insurance coverage was attributable to the state level; however, only 18% of state-level variability was explained by structural stigma. Adding Medicaid expansion attenuated the structural stigma-insurance association and explained 22% of state-level variation in health insurance. For the remaining outcomes (usual source of care, routine medical check-up, and cost-related barriers), we found neither meaningful associations nor considerable between-state variability.ConclusionsOur findings support the importance of Medicaid expansion and transgender-inclusive antidiscrimination protections to enhance health care insurance coverage. From a measurement perspective, however, additional research is needed to develop and validate measures of transgender-specific structural stigma to guide future policy interventions.
      Citation: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy
      PubDate: 2022-08-30T01:02:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13558196221123413
       
  • Mental health emergencies attended by ambulances in the United Kingdom and
           the implications for health service delivery: A cross-sectional study

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      Authors: Harriet Elizabeth Moore, Aloysius Niroshan Siriwardena, Mark Gussy, Robert Spaight
      Abstract: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveIn the context of increasing demand for ambulance services, emergency mental health cases are among the most difficult for ambulance clinicians to attend, partly because the cases often involve referring patients to other services. We describe the characteristics of mental health emergencies in the East Midlands region of the United Kingdom. We explore the association between 999 (i.e. emergency) call records, the clinical impressions of ambulance clinicians attending emergencies and the outcomes of ambulance attendance. We consider the implications of our results for optimizing patient care and ambulance service delivery.MethodsWe conducted a retrospective observational study of records of all patients experiencing mental health emergencies attended by ambulances between 1 January 2018 and 31 July 2020. The records comprised details of 103,801 ‘999’ calls (Dispatch), the preliminary diagnoses by ambulance clinicians on-scene (Primary Clinical Impression) and the outcomes of ambulance attendance for patients (Outcome).ResultsA multinomial regression analysis found that model fit with Outcome data was improved with the addition of Dispatch and Primary Clinical Impression categories compared to the fit for the model containing only the intercept and Outcome categories (Chi-square = 18,357.56, df = 180, p < 0.01). Dispatch was a poor predictor of Primary Clinical impression. The most common predictors of Outcome care pathways other than ‘Treated and transported’ were records of respiratory conditions at Dispatch and anxiety reported by clinicians on-scene.ConclusionsDrawing on the expertise of mental health specialists may help ‘999’ dispatchers distinguish between physical and mental health emergencies and refer patients to appropriate services earlier in the response cycle. Further investigation is needed to determine if training Dispatch operatives for early triage and referral can be appropriately managed without compromising patient safety.
      Citation: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy
      PubDate: 2022-08-17T11:26:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13558196221119913
       
  • General practice managers’ motivations for skill mix change in primary
           care: Results from a cross-sectional survey in England

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      Authors: Jon Gibson, Anne McBride, Katherine Checkland, Mhorag Goff, Mark Hann, Damian Hodgson, Imelda McDermott, Matt Sutton, Sharon Spooner
      Abstract: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe objectives are to determine the factors that motivated GP practice managers in England to employ non-medical roles, and to identify an ideal hypothetical GP practice workforce.MethodsCross-sectional survey of GP practice managers in England (n = 1205). The survey focused on six non-medical roles: advanced nurse practitioner, specialist nurse, health care assistant, physician associate, paramedic and pharmacist.ResultsThe three most commonly selected motivating factors were: (i) to achieve a better match between what patients need and what the practitioner team can deliver; (ii) to increase overall appointment availability and (iii) to release GP time. Employment of pharmacists and physician associates was most commonly supported by additional funding. Practice managers preferred accessing new non-medical roles through a primary care network or similar, while there was a clear preference for direct employment of additional GPs, advanced nurse practitioners or practice nurses. The ideal practice workforce would comprise over 70% of GPs and nurses, containing, on average, fewer GPs than the current GP practice workforce.ConclusionThis study confirms that more diverse teams of practitioners are playing an increasing role in providing primary care in England. Managers prefer not to employ all new roles directly within the practice. A more detailed investigation of future workforce requirements is necessary to ensure that health policy supports the funding (whether practice or population based), recruitment, training, deployment and workloads associated with the mix of roles needed in an effective primary care workforce.
      Citation: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy
      PubDate: 2022-08-17T06:24:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13558196221117647
       
  • Immigrants’ and refugees’ experiences of access to health and social
           services during the COVID-19 pandemic in Toronto, Canada

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      Authors: Doris Leung, Charlotte Lee, Angel He Wang, Sepali Guruge
      Abstract: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveIn 2020, the World Health Organization reported that immigrants were the most vulnerable to contracting COVID, due to a confluence of personal and structural barriers. This study explored how immigrants and refugees experienced access to health and social services during the first wave of COVID-19 in Toronto, Canada.MethodsThis study analyzed secondary data from a qualitative study that was conducted between May and September 2020 in Toronto that involved semi-structured interviews with 72 immigrants and refugees from 21 different countries. The secondary data analysis was informed by critical realism.ResultsThe vast majority of participants experienced fear and anxiety during the COVID-19 outbreak but through a combination of self-reliance and community support came to terms with the realities of the pandemic. Some even found the lifestyle changes engendered by the pandemic a positive experience.ConclusionsSelf-reliance may hinder help-seeking and augment the threat of COVID-19. This is particularly a concern for the most vulnerable immigrants, who experience multiple disruptions in their health care, have limited material resources and social supports, and perhaps are still dealing with the challenges of settling in the new country.
      Citation: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy
      PubDate: 2022-08-16T04:34:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13558196221109148
       
  • Readmission trends before and after a national reconfiguration of
           emergency departments in Denmark

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      Authors: Søren Bie Bogh, Marianne Fløjstrup, Sören Möller, Mickael Bech, Annmarie T Lassen, Mikkel Brabrand, Christian B Mogensen
      Abstract: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveIn order to achieve better and more efficient emergency health care, the Danish public hospital system has been reconfigured, with hospital emergency care being centralised into extensive and specialised emergency departments. This article examines how this reconfiguration has affected patient readmission rates.MethodsWe included all unplanned hospital admissions (aged ≥18 years) at public, non-psychiatric hospitals in four geographical regions in Denmark between 1 January 2007 and 24 December 2017. Using an interrupted time-series design, we examined trend changes in the readmission rates. In addition to analysing the overall effect, analyses stratified according to admission time of day and weekdays/weekends were conducted. The analyses were adjusted for patient characteristics and other system changes.ResultsThe seven-day readmission rate increased from 2.6% in 2007 to 3.8% in 2017, and the 30-day rate increased from 8.1% to 11.5%. However, the rates were less than what they would have been had the reconfiguration not been introduced. The reconfiguration reduced the seven-day readmission rate by 1.4% annually (hazard ratio [CI 95%] 0.986 [0.981–0.991]) and the 30-day rate by 1% annually (hazard ratio [CI 95%] 0.99 [0.987–0.993]).ConclusionsReconfiguration reduced the rate of increase in readmissions, but nevertheless readmissions still increased across the study period. It seems hospitals and policymakers will need to identify further ways to reduce patient loads.
      Citation: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy
      PubDate: 2022-08-14T11:54:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13558196221108894
       
  • Impact of COVID-19 in mental health trusts

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      Authors: Russell Mannion, Frederick H Konteh, Rowena Jacobs
      Abstract: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveTo explore how mental health trusts in England adapted and responded to the challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic, with the aim of identifying lessons that can be learned during and beyond the pandemic.MethodsFollowing a scoping study, we undertook 52 semi-structured interviews with senior managers, clinicians, patient representatives and commissioning staff across four case study sites. These sites varied in size, location and grading awarded by a national regulatory body. We explored how services have been repurposed and reorganized in response to the pandemic and the participants’ perceptions of the impact of these changes on quality of care and the wellbeing of staff.ResultsMental health trusts have shown great flexibility and resilience in rapidly implementing new models of care and developing creative digital solutions at speed. New collaborative arrangements have been stimulated by a shared sense of urgency and enabled by additional funding and a more permissive policy environment. But there has also been a significant negative impact on the wellbeing of staff, particularly those staff from a minority ethnic background. Also, there were concerns that digital technology could effectively disenfranchise some vulnerable groups and exacerbate existing health inequalities.ConclusionsMany of the service changes and digital innovations undertaken during the pandemic appear promising. Nevertheless, those changes need to be urgently and rigorously appraised to assure their effectiveness and to assess their impact on social exclusion and health inequalities.
      Citation: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T09:25:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13558196221116298
       
  • Creating healthy hospital retail food environments: Multiple pathways to
           successful at scale policy implementation in Australia

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      Authors: Leonie Cranney, Margaret Thomas, Tarli O’Connell, Renee Moreton, Lucy Corbett, Adrian Bauman, Philayrath Phongsavan
      Abstract: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveIn 2017, the Australian state of New South Wales introduced a revised policy to provide a healthy food and drink environment for staff and visitors in the state’s publicly funded health facilities. We sought to understand how contextual factors, intervention features and the responses of diverse stakeholders affected the policy’s implementation in public hospitals.MethodsNinety-nine interviews were conducted with chief executives, implementers and retailers in the health and food retail systems after the target date for the implementation of 13 initial policy practices. Stakeholder responses were analysed to understand commitment to, engagement with and achievement of these practices and the different contexts and implementation approaches that prompted these responses.ResultsKey mechanisms that drove systemic change included stakeholders’ broad acceptance of the policy premise; stakeholders’ sense of accountability and desire for the policy to succeed; and the policy’s perceived benefits, feasibility and effectiveness. Important underpinning factors were chief executives’ commitment to implementation and monitoring, a flexible approach to locally tailored implementation and historical precedents.ConclusionsThis study provides policy and practice insights for the initial phase of state-wide implementation to achieve change in health facility food retail environments.
      Citation: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T04:23:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13558196221117650
       
  • Challenges to the delivery of clinical diabetes services in Ghana created
           by the COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Eunice Twumwaa Tagoe, Justice Nonvignon, Robert van Der Meer, Itamar Megiddo, Brian Godman
      Abstract: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveThe barriers to delivering clinical non-communicable disease services in low- and middle-income countries have risen with the onset of COVID-19. Using Ghana as a case study, this article examines the changes COVID-19 has brought to diabetes service delivery and considers policy responses to deal with future such outbreaks.MethodsWe conducted 18 interviews between November 2020 and February 2021 with health professionals and administrators from primary, secondary and tertiary facilities within the Ghana Health Service. The analysis was performed using deductive and inductive methods.ResultsThere were six general themes in interviewees’ responses: (1) COVID-19 had exacerbated the problems of high medicine and service costs and medicine shortages, (2) the pandemic had exacerbated problems of poor patient record keeping, (3) COVID-19 had reduced the availability of suitably trained health providers, (4) staff had become demoralized by management’s unwillingness to make innovative changes to cope with the pandemic, (5) COVID-19 led to a reorganization of diabetes services, and (6) the country’s national health insurance scheme lacked flexibility in dealing with the pandemic.ConclusionsAccess to resources is limited in LMICs. However, our study highlights practical policy responses that can improve health providers’ response to COVID-19 and future pandemics.
      Citation: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy
      PubDate: 2022-07-04T05:59:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13558196221111708
       
  • Engagement of patient and family advisors in health system redesign in
           Canada

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      Authors: Shannon L Sibbald, Kristina M Kokorelias, Gayathri Embuldeniya, Walter P Wodchis
      Abstract: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesGlobally, there has been a shift towards integrated care delivery and patient-centredness in the design of health services. Such a transformation is underway in Ontario, which is progressively using an interprofessional team-based approach known as Ontario Health Teams (OHTs) to deliver care. During their initial development, OHTs were required to integrate patient and families’ preferences, experiences and opinions in the form of consultation and partnership with patient and family advisors (PFAs). This study aimed to understand how PFAs were involved in the early stages of planning for health system change and the perceived benefits of including PFAs in system reform.MethodsThis study used a qualitative descriptive design. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 126 participants at 12 OHTs, including PFA (n = 16) and non-PFA (n = 110) members (e.g. clinicians). Data were analysed thematically.ResultsWe identified four themes; mechanisms of engagement, motivations to engage, challenges to PFA engagement and PFAs’ impact and added value. Overall, participants viewed PFA engagement positively and PFAs felt valued and empowered. There remain logistical challenges around PFA compensation, and the amount of time and training expected of PFAs. However, all participants believed that developing an understanding of the patient, caregiver and family experience will strengthen the engagement of PFAs in OHT planning, decisions and policies.ConclusionsDiverse approaches to and stages of PFA engagement fostered meaningful and highly valued contributions to OHT development. These were considered critical to successfully achieving the mandate of patient-centred care reform.
      Citation: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy
      PubDate: 2022-07-02T11:38:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13558196221109056
       
  • Encouraging openness in health care: Policy and practice implications of a
           mixed-methods study in the English National Health Service

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      Authors: Graham Martin, Sarah Chew, Imelda McCarthy, Jeremy Dawson, Mary Dixon-Woods
      Abstract: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveThe National Health Service (NHS) in England has introduced a range of policy measures aimed at fostering greater openness, transparency and candour about quality and safety. We draw on the findings of an evaluation of the implementation of these policies in NHS organisations, with the aim of identifying key implications for policy and practice.MethodsWe undertook a mixed-methods policy evaluation, comprising four substudies: a longitudinal analysis of data from surveys of NHS staff and service users; interviews with senior stakeholders in NHS provider organisations and the wider system; a survey of board members of NHS provider organisations and organisational case studies across acute, community and mental health, and ambulance services.ResultsOur findings indicate a mixed picture of progress towards improving openness in NHS organisations, influenced by organisational history and memories of past efforts, and complicated by organisational heterogeneity. We identify four features that appear to be necessary conditions for sustained progress in improving openness: (1) authentic integration into organisational mission is crucial in making openness a day-to-day concern; (2) functional and effective administrative systems are vital; (3) these systems must be leavened by flexibility and sensitivity in implementation and (4) a spirit of continuous inquiry, learning and improvement is required to avoid the fallacy that advancing openness can be reduced to a time-limited project. We also identify four persistent challenges in consolidating and sustaining improvement: (1) a reliance on goodwill and discretionary effort; (2) caring for staff, patients and relatives who seek openness; (3) the limits of values-driven approaches on their own and (4) the continued marginality of patients, carers and families.ConclusionsVariation in policy implementation offers important lessons on how organisations can better deliver openness, transparency and candour. These lessons highlight practical actions for policymakers, managers and senior clinicians.
      Citation: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T09:18:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13558196221109053
       
  • Understanding the factors influencing implementation of a new national
           

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      Authors: Mirza Lalani, Sarah Morgan, Anamika Basu, Helen Hogan
      Abstract: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveA new patient safety policy, ‘Learning from Deaths’ (LfD), was implemented in 2017 in National Health Service (NHS) organisations in England. This study examined how contextual factors influenced the implementation of LfD policy and the ability of the programme to achieve its goals.MethodsSemi-structured interviews were undertaken with key policymakers involved in the development of the policy, along with interviews with managers and senior clinicians in five NHS organisations responsible for implementing the policy at the local level. We also undertook non-participant observation of relevant meetings and documentary reviews of key organisation procedures and policies pertaining to LfD.ResultsThe study findings suggest several factors that hinder or support patient safety policy implementation at a local level. These include: (a) an organisation’s capacity and capability to support data collation, analysis and synthesis, (b) the dissemination of the resulting information, (c) the learning culture and hence perceptions of the purpose of LfD within an organisation, and (d) the extent of engagement in cross-organisational approaches to learning.ConclusionsExtra and intra-organisational contextual factors influence all stages of the policy implementation process from preparation and tracking to implementation support and review affecting its chances of success or failure. Successful adoption of a national patient safety policy within health care organisations can be informed by taking into consideration those factors.
      Citation: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy
      PubDate: 2022-05-06T10:11:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13558196221096921
       
  • Corrigendum to Measuring with quality: The example of person-centred care

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      Abstract: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T05:57:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13558196221096744
       
  • Towards sustainability for medical devices and consumables: The radical
           and incremental challenges in the technology ecosystem

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      Authors: Saba Hinrichs-Krapels, Jan-Carel Diehl, Nicole Hunfeld, Erik van Raaij
      First page: 253
      Abstract: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy
      PubDate: 2022-06-24T02:21:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13558196221110416
       
  • Operating room waste management: A case study of primary hip operations at
           a leading national health service hospital in the United Kingdom

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      Authors: Melissa Pegg, Rebecca Rawson, Uchechukwu Okere
      First page: 255
      Abstract: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveThis research examines current waste management within an operating room at a large United Kingdom National Health Service (NHS) hospital. The study measured the volume and type of waste produced for primary hip operations (PHOs) and estimated the total waste produced across the United Kingdom by the procedure.MethodsThree PHOs were audited to measure and compare the waste volumes generated.ResultsThe average volume of waste per surgical procedure was 10.9 kg, consisting of clinical (84.4%), recyclable (12.8%) and bio-bin (2.8%) waste. This research also found that single-use devices contribute significantly to operating room waste. In addition, it was estimated that there is a missed opportunity to reduce clinical waste volume in each procedure, where approximately 15% of clinical waste disposal consisted of visibly clean recyclable waste material, including cardboard and plastics.ConclusionsIt was estimated that in the NHS approximately 1043 tonnes of waste is produced annually by PHOs alone. A significant volume of this waste could be prevented through improved recycling and reduced use of single-use devices.
      Citation: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy
      PubDate: 2022-05-30T01:20:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13558196221094488
       
  • Implementing joint training sessions of general practitioners and
           specialists aimed at improving clinical coordination in Colombia:
           Contributions from participatory action research

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      Authors: Heisel G León-Arce, Josefina Chávez Chávez, Amparo-Susana Mogollón-Pérez, Ingrid Vargas, María-Luisa Vázquez
      First page: 261
      Abstract: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveTo analyse the contribution of participatory action research (PAR) in designing and implementing joint training sessions as a means to improve clinical coordination in a public health care network in Bogotá, Colombia.MethodsA qualitative, descriptive-interpretative study using semi-structured individual interviews and focus groups with 40 professionals (GPs, specialists, members of the local steering committee (LSC) and network middle managers) involved in designing and implementing joint training sessions to improve cross-level clinical coordination. The intervention consisted of two forms of joint training sessions for GPs and specialists, implemented through two PAR cycles.ResultsThe PAR approach in designing and implementing joint training sessions led to greater awareness of clinical coordination problems and helped adapting sessions to the local health care context. Study participants highlighted the role of LSC leadership during the PAR process and the importance of ensuring the necessary resources for adopting the intervention. Limited institutional support and differences between joint training sessions affected doctors’ participation and reduced the time available to conduct the sessions. The use of a reflexive method was essential in enhancing doctors’ participation, along with session duration, the facilitator’s role and session content.ConclusionsThe study provides evidence regarding the contribution of a PAR process to designing and implementing joint training sessions for improving clinical coordination. The findings can inform similar approaches in other health systems.
      Citation: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy
      PubDate: 2022-05-22T01:46:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13558196221094676
       
  • Processes supporting effective skill-mix implementation in general
           practice: A qualitative study

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      Authors: Sharon Spooner, Imelda McDermott, Mhorag Goff, Damian Hodgson, Anne McBride, Katherine Checkland
      First page: 269
      Abstract: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesHealth policy and funding initiatives have addressed increasing workloads in general practice through the deployment of clinicians from different disciplinary backgrounds. This study examines how general practices in England operate with increasingly diverse groups of practitioners.MethodsFive general practices were selected for maximum variation of the duration and diversity of skill-mix in their workforce. Individual interviews were recorded with management and administrative staff and different types of practitioner. Patient surveys and focus groups gathered patients’ perspectives of consulting with different practitioners. Researchers collaborated during coding and thematic analysis of transcripts of audio recordings.ResultsThe introduction of a wide range of practitioners required significant changes in how practices dealt with patients requesting treatment, and these changes were not necessarily straightforward. The matching of patients with practitioners required effective categorization of health care patients’ reported problem(s) and an understanding of practitioners’ capabilities. We identified individual and organizational responses that could minimize the impact on patients, practitioners and practices of imperfections in the matching process.ConclusionsThe processes underpinning the redistribution of tasks from GPs to non-GP practitioners are complex. As practitioner employment under the Primary Care Network contracts continues to increase, it is not clear how the necessarily fine-grained adjustments will be made for practitioners working across multiple practices.
      Citation: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T04:00:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13558196221091356
       
  • Age-varying effects of repeated emergency department presentations for
           children in Canada

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      Authors: Rhonda J Rosychuk, Anqi A Chen, Andrew McRae, Patrick McLane, Maria B Ospina, X iaoqiong Joan Hu
      First page: 278
      Abstract: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesRepeated presentations to emergency departments (EDs) may indicate a lack of access to other health care resources. Age is an important predictor of frequent ED use; however, age-varying effects are not generally investigated. This study examines the age-specific effects of predictors on ED presentation frequency for children in Alberta and Ontario, Canada.MethodsThis retrospective study used population-based data during April 2010 to March 2017. Data were extracted from the National Ambulatory Care Reporting System for children aged
      Citation: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy
      PubDate: 2022-05-06T10:13:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13558196221094248
       
  • Staff perspectives on barriers to and facilitators of quality of life,
           health, wellbeing, recovery and reduced risk for older forensic
           mental-health patients: A qualitative interview study

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      Authors: Kate Walker, Jen Yates, Tom Dening, Birgit Völlm, Jack Tomlin, Chris Griffiths
      First page: 287
      Abstract: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThere is a lack of research informing service delivery for older forensic mental health patients. This study explored service provision in forensic mental health inpatient and community services in England, investigating what is required for progress in terms of quality of life, health, wellbeing, recovery and reduced risk, and the barriers and facilitators associated with this.MethodsSemi-structured interviews were undertaken with 48 members of staff working with older forensic mental health patients in secure inpatient units or the community in England. Data were analysed using thematic analysis.ResultsTwo global themes ‘What works’ and ‘What doesn’t work’ were identified comprising themes representing environmental, interpersonal and individual factors. ‘What works’ included: positive social support and relationships; individualised holistic patient-centred care; hub and spoke approach to patient care; and suitable environments. ‘What doesn’t work’ included: absence of/or maladaptive relationships with family and friends; gaps in service provision; and unsuitable environments.ConclusionsFor older patients to progress to improved quality of life, health, wellbeing and reduced risk, multilevel and comprehensive support is required, comprising a range of services, interventions, and multidisciplinary input, and individualised to each patient’s needs. The physical environment needs to be adapted for older patients and provide a social environment that seeks to include supportive families, friends and expert professional input. A clear patient progression pathway is required; this must be reflected in policy and provision.
      Citation: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy
      PubDate: 2022-05-18T08:07:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13558196221094512
       
  • Loss associated with subtractive health service change: The case of
           specialist cancer centralization in England

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      Authors: Georgia B Black, Victoria J Wood, Angus I G Ramsay, Cecilia Vindrola-Padros, Catherine Perry, Caroline S Clarke, Claire Levermore, Kathy Pritchard-Jones, Axel Bex, Maxine G B Tran, David C Shackley, John Hines, Muntzer M Mughal, Naomi J Fulop
      First page: 301
      Abstract: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveMajor system change can be stressful for staff involved and can result in ‘subtractive change’ – that is, when a part of the work environment is removed or ceases to exist. Little is known about the response to loss of activity resulting from such changes. Our aim was to understand perceptions of loss in response to centralization of cancer services in England, where 12 sites offering specialist surgery were reduced to four, and to understand the impact of leadership and management on enabling or hampering coping strategies associated with that loss.MethodsWe analysed 115 interviews with clinical, nursing and managerial staff from oesophago-gastric, prostate/bladder and renal cancer services in London and West Essex. In addition, we used 134 hours of observational data and analysis from over 100 documents to contextualize and to interpret the interview data. We performed a thematic analysis drawing on stress-coping theory and organizational change.ResultsStaff perceived that, during centralization, sites were devalued as the sites lost surgical activity, skills and experienced teams. Staff members believed that there were long-term implications for this loss, such as in retaining high-calibre staff, attracting trainees and maintaining autonomy. Emotional repercussions for staff included perceived loss of status and motivation. To mitigate these losses, leaders in the centralization process put in place some instrumental measures, such as joint contracting, surgical skill development opportunities and trainee rotation. However, these measures were undermined by patchy implementation and negative impacts on some individuals (e.g. increased workload or travel time). Relatively little emotional support was perceived to be offered. Leaders sometimes characterized adverse emotional reactions to the centralization as resistance, to be overcome through persuasion and appeals to the success of the new system.ConclusionsLarge-scale reorganizations are likely to provoke a high degree of emotion and perceptions of loss. Resources to foster coping and resilience should be made available to all organizations within the system as they go through major change.
      Citation: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T02:42:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13558196221082585
       
  • Implementing patient navigator programmes within a hospital setting in
           Toronto, Canada: A qualitative interview study

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      Authors: Kristina M Kokorelias, Sarah Gould, Tracey Das Gupta, Naomi Ziegler, Dan Cass, Sander L Hitzig
      First page: 313
      Abstract: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives:This study sought to identify the organisation and system level barriers and facilitators influencing the implementation of patient navigator programmes in one acute care hospital system in Toronto, Canada.Methods:A qualitative descriptive approach informed by the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research. Data were collected using in-depth interviews and analysed thematically.Results:Thirty-eight individuals participated in interviews (17 community, 21 acute care hospital), including 24 frontline clinicians and 14 programme directors, health care leaders and managers. Implementation of patient navigator programmes was dependent on: (1) a clear consensus on the unique need for patient navigators; (2) champions to promote patient navigation; (3) programme ownership and accountability; (4) external system and organisational landscape and (5) implementation climate. Appropriate mechanisms of communication were found to have impacted each factor as a barrier or facilitator to programme implementation.Conclusion:Strategies for implementing patient navigator programmes into hospital clinical practice should include incorporating evidence to support the programme, considering mechanisms to enable collaborative communication, and the integration of frameworks to facilitate programme integration into the current practices within the organisation.
      Citation: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T11:36:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13558196221103662
       
  • The experience of informal caregivers in providing patient care in
           hospitals in low- and middle-income countries: A qualitative
           meta-synthesis

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      Authors: Unarose Hogan, Amanda Bingley, Hazel Morbey, Catherine Walshe
      First page: 321
      Abstract: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveIn low- and middle-income countries, informal caregivers frequently stay in hospitals and perform patient care tasks typically performed by nurses in other contexts. This article reviews qualitative research on these informal caregivers, to gain insight and understanding of their experiences.MethodsWe undertook a qualitative meta-synthesis. Relevant literature was identified through searches of electronic databases in 2021. Thematic analysis was conducted to facilitate the identification of conceptual relationships to formulate synthesised findings.ResultsTwenty-four studies met the inclusion criteria – 13 from Sub-Saharan Africa, five from Bangladesh, two from India, two from Iran, one from Brazil and one from Peru. Three themes were generated from the meta-synthesis: (1) The unwelcome but tolerated guest, (2) Enduring personal sacrifice and (3) Fulfilling familial obligations. These themes emphasised the significant burden associated with the hospital caregiving experience and highlighted the implicit reliance on informal caregivers in low- and middle-income countries.ConclusionsInformal caregivers perform an essential caregiving role, yet occupy a peripheral and voluntary space in hospitals. There is a clear need to support informal caregivers so that they can safely perform their tasks.
      Citation: Journal of Health Services Research & Policy
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T06:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13558196221101968
       
 
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