Subjects -> BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (Total: 3541 journals)
    - ACCOUNTING (132 journals)
    - BANKING AND FINANCE (306 journals)
    - BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (1229 journals)
    - CONSUMER EDUCATION AND PROTECTION (20 journals)
    - COOPERATIVES (4 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SCIENCES: GENERAL (212 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SYSTEMS, THEORIES AND HISTORY (235 journals)
    - FASHION AND CONSUMER TRENDS (20 journals)
    - HUMAN RESOURCES (103 journals)
    - INSURANCE (26 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE (145 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND AID (103 journals)
    - INVESTMENTS (22 journals)
    - LABOR AND INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS (61 journals)
    - MACROECONOMICS (17 journals)
    - MANAGEMENT (595 journals)
    - MARKETING AND PURCHASING (106 journals)
    - MICROECONOMICS (23 journals)
    - PRODUCTION OF GOODS AND SERVICES (143 journals)
    - PUBLIC FINANCE, TAXATION (37 journals)
    - TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL DIRECTORIES (2 journals)

PRODUCTION OF GOODS AND SERVICES (143 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 137 of 137 Journals sorted alphabetically
Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Marketing     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Marketing Journal (AMJ)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
BMC Health Services Research     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Capital Markets Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cleaner Environmental Systems     Open Access  
Cleaner Production Letters     Hybrid Journal  
Cleaner Waste Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Consumption Markets & Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Customer Needs and Solutions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Direct Marketing An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Disaster Prevention and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Economic & Labour Market Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Electronic Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Emerging Markets Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
European Journal of Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Financial Markets, Institutions & Instruments     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Food Packaging and Shelf Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Foundations and Trends® in Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Future Business Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Journal of Emerging Market Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Services and Outcomes Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Health Services Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Services Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
i+Diseño : Revista científico-académica internacional de Innovación, Investigación y Desarrollo en Diseño     Open Access  
Independent Journal of Management & Production     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ingeniería y Competitividad     Open Access  
International Journal of Advanced Operations Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Bank Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Business and Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Business Forecasting and Marketing Intelligence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Electronic Marketing and Retailing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Entrepreneurial Venturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Financial Services Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Information Systems and Supply Chain Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Inventory Research     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Lean Six Sigma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Logistics Economics and Globalisation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Managing Projects in Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Market Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Nonprofit & Voluntary Sector Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Planning and Scheduling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Product Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Production Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Production Management and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Production Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Productivity and Quality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Quality Innovation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Research in Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Service Industry Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Services and Standards     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Services Operations and Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Services Sciences     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Supply Chain and Inventory Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Supply Chain and Operations Resilience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Supply Chain Management     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Systems Science : Operations & Logistics     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Technology Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Trade and Global Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Internet Reference Services Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
JCMS : Journal of Common Market Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Journal of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Business Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Business Venturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Cleaner Production     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Database Marketing & Customer Strategy Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Direct Data and Digital Marketing Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Emerging Knowledge on Emerging Markets     Open Access  
Journal of Entrepreneurial Finance     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Financial Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Food Products Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Foodservice Business Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Global Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Global Operations and Strategic Sourcing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Services Research and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of International Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Loss Prevention in the Process Industries     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 53)
Journal of Marketing Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Marketing Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Marketing Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 73)
Journal of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Operations and Supply Chain Management     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Political Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Prediction Markets     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Product Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Production Research & Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Productivity Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Progressive Human Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Public Policy & Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Relationship Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Service Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Services Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Strategic Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Targeting Measurement and Analysis for Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Technology Management & Innovation     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Vacation Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Logistics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Logistics Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Management and Administrative Sciences Review     Open Access  
Management and Production Engineering Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Manufacturing & Service Operations Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Marketing Intelligence & Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Marketing Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Marketing Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Marketing Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Psychological Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Psychology & Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Quantitative Marketing and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Reproduction Fertility and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Review of Pacific Basin Financial Markets and Policies     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Eletrônica Academicus     Open Access  
Revue Interventions économiques     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Service Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Service Oriented Computing and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Service Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Services Marketing Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Social Marketing Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Strategy Management Logistics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Supply Chain Forum : an International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Sustainable Production and Consumption     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Technology Operation Management     Hybrid Journal  
The Journal of Futures Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
The Service Industries Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Universal Journal of Industrial and Business Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Venture Capital: An International Journal of Entrepreneurial Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
WPOM - Working Papers on Operations Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Consumer Marketing
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.664
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 19  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0736-3761 - ISSN (Online) 2052-1200
Published by Emerald Homepage  [360 journals]
  • Are graphic health warnings impacting on message processing and quitting
           intentions'

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      Authors: Cuong Pham , Bo Pang , Kathy Knox , Sharyn Rundle-Thiele
      Abstract: Graphic health warnings (GHWs) on tobacco product packaging constitute one component within a multifaceted set of tobacco control measures. This study aims to understand whether consumers’ attention to GHWs will be associated with recall and quit intentions, using Australia as the case for this study. Using the 14 GHWs currently in market as visual stimuli, non-probability intercept sampling was conducted, eye tracking and post-survey datasets were collected from a total of 419 respondents across three Australian cities. Results show the front graphic image areas draw initial attention and the Quitline message area holds the longest attention duration. Attention is highly correlated with better quality of recall of health warning information, emotive responses, believability ratings among smokers and smokers’ perception of health risks and quit intentions. Associations are also noted with perceived health risk and quitting intentions. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study that has objectively tested the effectiveness of in-market tobacco GHWs in Australia and highlights eye tracking as a valid measurement approach that can enhance and drive new insights to evaluate consumer behaviour towards visual stimuli. This study extends new knowledge around the physiological relationships between viewing behaviours, health vulnerability perceptions and intentions to quit smoking, which has theoretical implications for the extended parallel process model which underpins this research.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-08-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-12-2020-4297
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Passionate about food: exploring “foodie” segmentation by
           nutritional knowledge

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      Authors: Anoma Gunarathne , Sarah Hemmerling , Naemi Labonte , Anke Zühlsdorf , Achim Spiller
      Abstract: This paper aims to empirically identify foodie features and examine their relevance in segmenting German consumers. Furthermore, this study explored potential differences between foodie segments in terms of food involvement and food knowledge. Data were collected from 500 German respondents in October 2015 by means of two online surveys using a newly developed version of the foodie instrument based on existing literature. Confirmatory factor analysis, cluster analysis, analysis of variance and post hoc tests were applied to analyse the data. Six distinct consumer segments were identified: passionate foodies (12.0%), interested foodies (21.5%); moderate foodies (21.7%), traditional foodies (17.1%), light foodies (18.2%) and non-foodies (9.5%). The nutritional knowledge questionnaire suggests that passionate foodies have only an average level of food literacy compared to other segments. Behavioural traits and socio-demographic characteristics of foodies and other culinary consumer segments could be time-sensitive, thus future research should take a longitudinal approach so that subsequent decision-making is appropriately dynamic. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this paper is a first step towards the development of a new foodie lifestyle scale which will be useful to identify, characterise and develop effective marketing strategies for targeting highly involved food consumers.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-07-26
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-10-2019-3470
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Mitigating implicit racial bias in tipping: when direct and indirect
           experience matters

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      Authors: Anne-Maree O’Rourke , Alex Belli , Frank Mathmann
      Abstract: Academic research has supported the belief that consumers undertip minority race service workers due to implicit racial biases. However, there has been less focus in examining possible moderating factors. This paper aims to fill this gap by analyzing the role of direct and indirect experience in tipping frontline service workers from a minority background. Given the prominence of customer ratings on digital service platforms and the perception that African Americans are discriminated against, the authors look at the interplay of interaction length (direct experience) and customer ratings (indirect experience) on the relationship between race and tipping. An expectancy disconfirmation framework was developed and tested with a sample of 360 US participants in an online experiment. The experiment followed a 2 × (race: African-American versus Caucasian) × 2 (direct experience: limited versus extensive) × 3 (indirect experience: absent versus positive versus negative customer rating) design. The authors found consumers who have extended direct experience (longer service interaction) and no indirect experience (absent customer ratings) tipped African Americans more than Caucasians. Interestingly, this effect is reduced in the presence of indirect experience (customer ratings). Finally, where the consumer lacks direct experience (shorter service interaction) but is exposed to positive indirect experience (positive customer ratings), consumers tip African Americans more. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first paper that examines the role of direct and indirect experience in the relationship between race and tipping. Based on the authors’ findings, the authors provide several contributions, including recommendations to reduce inequalities arising from implicit racial bias on digital service platforms.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-07-13
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-03-2021-4556
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Conversations about conducting marketing research in mental health

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      Authors: Jane E. Machin , Teri Brister , Robert M. Bossarte , Jenna Drenten , Ronald Paul Hill , Deborah L. Holland , Maria Martik , Madhubalan Viswanathan , Marie A. Yeh , Ann M. Mirabito , Justine Rapp Farrell , Elizabeth Crosby , Natalie Ross Adkins
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to inspire research at the intersection of marketing and mental health. Marketing academics have much to offer – and much to learn from – research on consumer mental health. However, the context, terminology and setting may prove intimidating to marketing scholars unfamiliar with this vulnerable population. Here, experienced researchers offer guidance for conducting compelling research that not only applies marketing frameworks to the mental health industry but also uses this unique context to deepen our understanding of all consumers. Common concerns about conducting marketing research in the area of mental health were circulated to researchers experienced working with vulnerable populations. Their thoughtful responses are reported here, organized around the research cycle. Academics and practitioners offer insights into developing compelling research questions at the intersection of marketing and mental health, strategies to identify relevant populations to research and guidance for safe and ethical research design, conduct and publication. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first instructional paper to provide practical advice to begin and maintain a successful research agenda at the intersection of mental health and marketing.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-06-07
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-02-2022-5212
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Linguistic racism in inter-culture service encounter

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      Authors: Aaminah Zaman Malik , Audhesh Paswan
      Abstract: Language plays an important role in a successful service exchange, but it can become a source of discrimination if one party is a non-native speaker in the host country. This study aims to examine the linguistic racism that non-native customers experience in Inter Culture Service Encounters (ICSEs) and delves into factors that contribute to the underlying psychological responses and the behavioral outcomes. A phenomenological approach was used where 16 individuals were interviewed to discover themes through non-native customers' lens using an inductive process. Next, the emerged categories were classified based on extant literature, using a deductive approach. The findings highlight the role of language varieties as a strong social identity cue for non-native customers where the associated stigma makes them see ICSE as a stereotype threat. Most importantly, these experiences shape their future behavior by avoiding direct interactions with the servers and adopting other service channels. Several “social others” influence this process. This study explores the notion of linguistic racism in an ICSE from a non-native consumers’ lens and thus adds to this under-researched literature. Using a phenomenological approach, the authors propose a framework focusing on the perception of language-related stigma and discrimination experienced by non-native consumers’ along with possible behavioral responses.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-05-31
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-03-2021-4545
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Representation of women of color on the covers of the top three fashion
           magazines: a content analysis

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      Authors: Natalie A. Mitchell , Tony Stovall , David Avalos
      Abstract: This paper aims to assess the representation of women of color (WOC) in the top 3 fashion magazines and explore the implications of underrepresentation within marketing communications. The authors draw from diffusion theory and marketplace omission and commission to situate the research focus and highlight its application to the study findings. A content analysis was conducted on 481 cover models on the top three fashion magazines of 2018 – Vogue, Cosmopolitan and Vanity Fair during 2006–2018. The findings indicate WOC are underrepresented despite the strides of inclusion in the marketplace in America during a postracial period. Representation is as follows: white – 412 (86%); black – 41 (9%); Latina – 19 (3.9%); biracial 7 (1.5%); Asian – 1 (0.2%); and Native American – 1 (0.2%). Latina models had the lowest representation. Native and Asian women were completely excluded. When they do appear, black and Latina cover models are more likely than white models to be shown wearing sexually suggestive attire. This study makes four recommendations to promote antiracism in marketing: diversify staff hiring and editorial decision-makers for public-facing talent; solicit counsel from multicultural marketing agencies; create antiracist marketing curriculum; and cultivate a pipeline of diverse talent for future hiring. The originality of this paper centers its contribution to the dearth research investigating representation implications within the fashion marketing industry during an alleged post-racial period, and a longer time span. It also presents structured antiracist marketing solutions to mitigate underrepresentation.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-05-19
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-03-2021-4560
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Depression and consumption habits: a cross-cultural study

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      Authors: Daniela Gomes Alcoforado , Francisco Vicente Sales Melo , Renata Gomes Alcoforado
      Abstract: This paper aims to explore the interplay between consumption and depression through a cross-cultural study conducted in Brazil and Germany. Data collection was conducted through an online survey. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was used to assess depression levels from a sample of 1,627 respondents (759 Germans and 868 Brazilians). Descriptive statistics, multiple linear regression and Mann–Whitney U tests were applied. Cultural characteristics are relevant in the consumption-depression interplay. The authors identified marketplace resources and stressors consisting of products categories that influence the depression level of the depressed consumer. Additionally, individuals with some level of depression presented different consumption habits than those without. A table summarizing the findings is presented at the end of the paper. Work limitations refer to the consumption categories analyzed and the large share of students in the sample. Marketplace measures have an active role in mitigating or increasing depression levels. Thus, consumption can also be used as a transformative tool to benefit the lives of depressive individuals. Some suggestions are presented. This study contributes to the discussion that consumption impacts the daily lives of people with depression and provides recommendations on how to adapt consumption habits to help depressive individuals optimize their quality of life and well-being. This paper contributes empirically and theoretically to the discussion of mental health and consumption and introduces innovative consumption categories (from daily life) that are incipient in previous literature.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-04-11
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-02-2021-4421
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Marketing #neurodiversity for well-being

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      Authors: Josephine Go Jefferies , Wasim Ahmed
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to develop a bottom-up segmentation of people affected by neurodiversity using Twitter data. This exploratory study uses content analysis of information shared by Twitter users over a three-month period. Cultural currents affect how the label of “neurodiversity” is perceived by individuals, marketplace actors and society. The extent to which neurodiversity provides a positive or negative alternative to stigmatizing labels for mental disorders is shaped by differentiated experiences of neurodiversity. The authors identify five neurodiversity segments according to identifiable concerns and contextual dynamics that affect mental wellbeing. Analyzing Twitter data enables a bottom-up typology of stigmatized groups toward improving market salience. To the authors knowledge, this study is the first to investigate neurodiversity using Twitter data to segment stigmatized consumers into prospective customers from the bottom-up.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-03-21
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-03-2021-4520
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The impact of advertising exposure on the gendered perceptions of men with
           mental health concerns

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      Authors: Tianyi Li
      Abstract: Traditional masculinity ideologies dictate men should be tough, self-reliant and display restrictive emotionality. Men who seek mental health services, a behavior that typically involves expressing feelings and showing dependence, are often subject to stigma. The purpose of the study is to examine the gendered perceptions of men who seek help for mental health concerns, as well as how masculine advertisements moderate these perceptions. After viewing either masculine or control advertisements, participants read descriptions of men who sought help for psychological or physical symptoms and provided masculinity ratings in a task ostensibly unrelated to the advertisements. Across two experiments, participants perceived the male target who sought help for psychological symptoms, a behavior incongruent with the traditional masculinity ideologies, as less masculine than his counterpart seeking help for physical symptoms. Importantly, exposure to masculine advertisements attenuated the gendered perceptions for psychological help-seeking: viewing masculine advertisements led participants to deliberately reflect on society’s expectations for men to be physically masculine and tough and the extent to which men should conform to these standards. These reflections counteract the effect of stigma on the gendered perceptions of men seeking help for mental health concerns. The representation of men as masculine and rugged in advertisements is believed to contribute to public perceptions of men seeking help for mental health concerns. Yet the current research demonstrates an unexpected effect of viewing masculine advertisements in attenuating the gendered perceptions of men’s help-seeking.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-02-09
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-01-2021-4394
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The 40 years of discourse on racism in the Brazilian advertising
           self-regulation system

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      Authors: Laís Rodrigues , Marcus Wilcox Hemais , Alessandra Costa
      Abstract: This paper aims to unveil colonial racist elements related to the cases of racism in advertising judged by the Brazilian Council of Advertising Self-Regulation (Conar), from 1980 until 2020. A qualitative critical and historical research was developed, based on a decolonial perspective, with the use of critical discourse analysis (CDA). By analyzing such phenomenon, the present study can discuss how self-regulatory codes that are based on the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) 1937 Code are not equipped to deal with racist issues. Discussions that focus on how racial elements in advertising are treated by a regulatory agency are scarce. Despite the focus being on the Brazilian case, this phenomenon should not be understood as a particularity of this country, since problems related to racism in advertising in countries that also have ICC-type self-regulatory codes are frequent.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-02-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-03-2021-4558
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Rescuing marketing from its colonial roots: a decolonial anti-racist
           agenda

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      Authors: June N.P. Francis
      Abstract: This paper illuminates the mechanisms through which marketing practice and institutions produced, normalized and institutionalized systemic racism in support of imperialism, colonization and slavery to provide impetus for transformational change. Critical race research is drawn on to propose paths toward decolonial and anti-racist research agenda and practice. The paper integrates multidisciplinary literature on race, racism, imperialism, colonialism and slavery, connecting these broad themes to the roles marketing practices and institutions played in creating and sustaining racism. Critical race theory, afro pessimism, postcolonial theories, anti-racism and decoloniality provide conceptual foundations for a proposed transformative research agenda. Marketing practices and institutions played active and leading roles in producing, mass mobilizing and honing racist ideology and the imagery to support imperialism, colonial expansion and slavery. Racist inequalities in market systems were produced globally through active collusion by marketing actors and institutions in these historical forces creating White advantage and Black dispossession that persist; indicating an urgent need for transformative anti-racists and decolonial research agendas. Covering these significant historical forces inevitably leaves much room for further inquiry. The paper by necessity “Mango picked” the most relevant research, but a full coverage of these topics was beyond the scope of this paper. Marketing practitioners found themselves at the epicenter of a crisis during the Black Lives Matter protests. This paper aims to foster anti-racist ad decolonial research to guide practice. This paper addresses systemic and institutional racism, and marketplace inequalities – urgent societal challenges. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, the paper is the first in marketing to integrate multidisciplinary literature on historical forces of imperialism, colonization and slavery to illuminate marketing’s influential role in producing marketplace racism while advancing an anti-racist and de-colonial research agenda.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-02-04
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-07-2021-4752
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Co-production: a source of psychological well-being for consumers'

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      Authors: Ibtissame Abaidi , Patrice Cottet , Jamila Abaidi
      Abstract: This research aims to examine the co-production of a product as a source of psychological well-being for consumers. A quantitative experimental study on the theme of cosmetics products was conducted using a sample of 844 women. It comprised three scenarios corresponding to low (finished products), intermediate (products sold in kits) and high (the purchase of cosmetic ingredients) co-production. The results show that co-producing an offer is a source of psychological well-being. This effect can be explained by an increase in perceived benefits and perceived value. The finding of interest for management is the identification of factors that improve individuals’ psychological well-being.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-01-26
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-01-2021-4404
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Privacy considerations for online advertising: a stakeholder’s
           perspective to programmatic advertising

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      Authors: Dylan A. Cooper , Taylan Yalcin , Cristina Nistor , Matthew Macrini , Ekin Pehlivan
      Abstract: Privacy considerations have become a topic with increasing interest from academics, industry leaders and regulators. In response to consumers’ privacy concerns, Google announced in 2020 that Chrome would stop supporting third-party cookies in the near future. At the same time, advertising technology companies are developing alternative solutions for online targeting and consumer privacy controls. This paper aims to explore privacy considerations related to online tracking and targeting methods used for programmatic advertising (i.e. third-party cookies, Privacy Sandbox, Unified ID 2.0) for a variety of stakeholders: consumers, AdTech platforms, advertisers and publishers. This study analyzes the topic of internet user privacy concerns, through a multi-pronged approach: industry conversations to collect information, a comprehensive review of trade publications and extensive empirical analysis. This study uses two methods to collect data on consumer preferences for privacy controls: a survey of a representative sample of US consumers and field data from conversations on web-forums created by tech professionals. The results suggest that there are four main segments in the US internet user population. The first segment, consisting of 26% of internet users, is driven by a strong preference for relevant ads and includes consumers who accept the premises of both Privacy Sandbox and Unified ID (UID) 2.0. The second segment (26%) includes consumers who are ambivalent about both sets of premises. The third segment (34%) is driven by a need for relevant ads and a strong desire to prevent advertisers from aggressively collecting data, with consumers who accept the premises of Privacy Sandbox but reject the premises of UID 2.0. The fourth segment (15% of consumers) rejected both sets of premises about privacy control. Text analysis results suggest that the conversation around UID 2.0 is still nascent. Google Sandbox associations seem nominally positive, with sarcasm being an important factor in the sentiment analysis results. The value of this paper lies in its multi-method examination of online privacy concerns in light of the recent regulatory legislation (i.e. General Data Protection Regulation and California Consumer Privacy Act) and changes for third-party cookies in browsers such as Firefox, Safari and Chrome. Two alternatives proposed to replace third-party cookies (Privacy Sandbox and Unified ID 2.0) are in the proposal and prototype stage. The elimination of third-party cookies will affect stakeholders, including different types of players in the AdTech industry and internet users. This paper analyzes how two alternative proposals for privacy control align with the interests of several stakeholders.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-01-26
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-04-2021-4577
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Emotional intelligence and materialism: the mediating effect of subjective
           well-being

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      Authors: Aušra Rūtelionė , Beata Šeinauskienė , Shahrokh Nikou , Rosita Lekavičienė , Dalia Antinienė
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to examine the nature of the relationship between emotional intelligence and materialism by exploring how subjective well-being mediates this link. Data was collected from surveying 1,000 Lithuanians within random sampling, and structural equation modelling (SEM) techniques using SmartPLS were used to analyze the data. The results show that emotional intelligence not only has a negative indirect effect on materialism but also a positive impact on both dimensions of subjective well-being (satisfaction with life and affect balance). In addition, the findings indicate that both satisfaction with life and affect balance predict a decrease in materialism. Finally, the SEM analyzes show that the path between emotional intelligence and materialism is partially mediated by both satisfaction with life and affect balance. The results of this study expand the understanding to what extent and how emotional intelligence is able to assist in adjusting materialistic attitudes, which have become more prevalent with the respective growth of consumerism and consumer culture worldwide. In the light of unsustainable consumption patterns threatening the survival of humankind and nature, the opportunities that could reverse this trend are presented for marketers and policy makers. This study gives insight into the potential pathways for diminishing consumer materialism, which is considered detrimental to subjective well-being and mental health. The relationship between emotional intelligence and subjective well-being has been well documented, as has the link between materialism and subjective well-being. However, the simultaneous examination of the relationship between emotional intelligence, subjective well-being and materialism is lacking. The current study adds to the understanding of materialism not only by examining the effect of under-researched antecedent such as emotional intelligence but also by explaining the underlying mechanism of subjective well-being by which emotional intelligence connects to materialism.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-01-18
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-01-2021-4386
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Regret and self-peer-brand frustration in masstige collaborations: the
           case of missed purchases because of stock-out

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      Authors: Monica Mendini
      Abstract: Partnerships between luxury brands and mass-market retailers, termed masstige collaborations, are the last frontier of promoting brand popularity. The new products launched during these partnerships are offered at premium prices and characterized by limited duration and supply, and hence rapid stock-out. Given the importance of this practice and the predominant focus in the literature on the managerial aspects, this study aims to investigate consumer reactions to masstige collaborations, especially in the case of missed purchases because of stock-out. This paper analyzes how consumers evaluate masstige collaborations in the fashion industry using a mixed-method research design, triangulating data from different sources, analyzing Twitter comments and press articles, and then conducting different experiments to replicate the main findings. Results reveal that missed purchases of masstige collaboration products lead to feelings of frustration (vs regret). In addition, they show that these reactions are stronger in the case of masstige (vs non-masstige) collaborations, especially when consumers experience stock-out. Different themes emerge that trigger regret and/or frustration, suggesting some frustration recovery strategies. This work provides a new consumer perspective on the masstige collaboration branding practice, especially after missed purchases. The study offers insights on the critical pitfalls of this practice to help managers leverage this popular form of alliance.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-07-18
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-12-2019-3538
      Issue No: Vol. 39 , No. 5 (2022)
       
  • “Do you eat insects'” Acceptance of insects as food by
           children

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      Authors: Valérie Hémar-Nicolas , Gaëlle Pantin-Sohier , Céline Gallen
      Abstract: While recent academic research on entomophagy has predominantly focused on adults, the purpose of this child-centred research is to obtain a better understanding of young consumer acceptance of insect-based foods. Two qualitative studies were conducted with a total of 43 French children aged 8–13 years. Study 1 (n = 22), based on semi-directive interviews, and Study 2 (n = 21), based on focus groups, included projective techniques and exposure to different types of insect-based products to help children express their feelings and thoughts. The evidence shows that in Western children’s minds, insects are considered as culturally non-edible. Children predominantly reject insects as food because of their sensory properties and the disgust they arouse. However, their interest in eating insect-based food is embedded within experiential contexts specific to childhood, in particular the peer group, which makes insect-eating fun and challenging, and the family, which offers a protective and reassuring setting. The authors advocate changing children’s sensory perception of insect-eating food through sensory and participatory activities. Manufacturers and policymakers should also draw on children’s peer culture to associate insect-eating with positive social experiences and foster peer influence. Drawing on cognitive psychology theories and the literature in food science on food rejection, the authors contribute to emerging consumer research on alternative food consumption (AFC) focusing on cognitive, emotional and social factors of acceptance or rejection of insect-based foods by children.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-07-15
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-12-2020-4289
      Issue No: Vol. 39 , No. 5 (2022)
       
  • You’re getting warmer: examining a “warmth effect” as antecedent to
           cause-related purchase intentions for sport-themed CRM

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      Authors: Ron G. Christian , Samer N. Sarofim , Brian S. Gordon , Piotr S. Bobkowski
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to examine how exposure to a cause-related marketing (CRM) initiative involving sport teams affects attitude formation for the team and its amplification of purchase intention for team-branded merchandise. Specifically, this paper assessed the role of distinct measures (warmth, brand attitude, admiration and success) on purchase intention. The hypothesized model was tested using a 2 (promotion: CRM vs non-CRM) × 2 (team: successful vs unsuccessful) between-subjects design. Following MANCOVA analysis, the moderating effect of success was explored within the sequential moderated mediation model where perceived warmth and brand attitude explicated the effect of CRM exposure on purchase intention. The results of this paper suggest that a “Warmth Effect” played a prominent role in shaping consumer perception for sports teams when partnered with a non-profit brand in a CRM appeal. Perceived team success was revealed as moderator, while warmth, brand attitude served as serial mediators on purchase intention. This paper provides evidence-based insights to sport marketers to leverage CRM strategy in strengthening brand-related outcomes. Sport marketers may find the CRM strategy useful for engaging “casual” fans. Further analysis is needed to determine the generalizability of this consumer response to CRM in other product domains. Practical implications include leveraging CRM strategy to strengthen brand-related outcomes (i.e. perceived warmth, brand attitude and purchase intention), while also being mindful of the timing of CRM initiatives to optimize engagement. Sport marketers may find the CRM strategy useful for engaging “casual” fans. This paper lends clarity to brand attitude formation in the context of CRM. The findings of this paper demonstrate the influence of perceived warmth, brand attitude and success on purchase intention.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-07-15
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-11-2020-4234
      Issue No: Vol. 39 , No. 5 (2022)
       
  • How fakes make it through: the role of review features versus consumer
           characteristics

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      Authors: Shabnam Azimi , Kwong Chan , Alexander Krasnikov
      Abstract: This study aims to examine how characteristics of an online review and a consumer reading the review influence the probability that the consumer will assess the review as authentic (real) or inauthentic (fake). This study further examines the specific factors that increase or decrease a consumer’s ability to detect a review’s authenticity and reasons a consumer makes these authenticity assessments. Hypothesized relationships were tested using an online experiment of over 400 respondents who collectively provided 3,224 authenticity assessments along with 3,181 written self-report reasons for assessing a review as authentic or inauthentic. The findings indicate that specific combinations of factors including review valence, length, readability, type of content and consumer personality traits and demographics lead to systematic bias in assessing review authenticity. Using qualitative analysis, this paper provided further insight into why consumers are deceived. This research showed there are important differences in the way the authenticity assessment process works for positive versus negative reviews and identified factors that can make a fake review hard to spot or a real review hard to believe. This research has implications for both consumers and businesses by emphasizing areas of vulnerability for fake information and providing guidance for how to design review systems for improved veracity. This research is one of the few works that explicates how people assess information authenticity and their consequent assessment accuracy in the context of online reviews.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-07-14
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-04-2021-4597
      Issue No: Vol. 39 , No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Green brand ambidexterity and consumer satisfaction: the symmetric and
           asymmetric approach

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      Authors: Jing A. Zhang , Shijiao Chen , Sara Walton , Sarah Carr
      Abstract: Consumer satisfaction towards a brand is one of a firm’s important performance outcomes. However, building a strong green brand to foster consumers’ satisfaction is often challenging for firms. Drawing on the dynamic capability and mechanism-enabling perspectives of ambidexterity. The purpose of this research is to explore mechanisms of perceived brand performance and green trust through which green brand ambidexterity acts as a facilitator of consumer satisfaction. The hypothesized relationships were tested by both partial least squares structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM; symmetric approach) and fuzzy set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA; asymmetric approach) with data collected from a green consumer questionnaire survey in Hong Kong. The results from PLS-SEM indicate that green brand ambidexterity affects consumer satisfaction through multiple mediating paths of perceived brand performance, green trust-consumer and the sequential integration of perceived brand performance and green trust. Results from fsQCA further reinforced these findings. The present research provides a nuanced understanding of how ambidexterity enhances consumer satisfaction in the context of a green brand by identifying multiple mechanisms. There is a lack of research on how green brand ambidexterity affects green brand outcomes from the perspective of value creation for consumers. The present research fills this gap by providing more comprehensive explanations of mechanisms for green brand ambidexterity to facilitate consumer satisfaction. It also offers a better understanding of how the effects of green brand ambidexterity are viewed on a path-dependency that is aligned with the dynamic capability perspective of ambidexterity and how green trust forms a critical path to enable green brand ambidexterity and perceived brand performance to enhance consumer satisfaction.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-07-12
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-02-2021-4483
      Issue No: Vol. 39 , No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Antecedents of sustainable fashion apparel purchase behavior

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      Authors: Pradeep Kautish , Arpita Khare
      Abstract: This study aims to examine cosmopolitanism, global social identity, green peer and social media on green apparel knowledge and sustainable fashion perception. Further, it explored the mediating effect of green apparel knowledge and sustainable fashion perception on behavioral intentions and electronic Word-of-Mouth (eWOM). Data was collected through a mall intercept method across five cities adjoining the national capital region in India. The results indicated that social identification with online (social media) and offline (cosmopolitanism, global self-identity and green peer influence) groups predicted Indian consumers’ perception of sustainable fashion, behavioral intentions and eWOM. A better discernment between social identity versus self-identity and social media influence versus peer influence may be considered in future studies. Sustainable fashion designers can use social media to create awareness and promote sustainable apparel. The information about novelty, design and style attributes of sustainable fashion can help overcome the skepticism regarding sustainable clothing. This study extends the earlier research on online and offline influences by examining their role on green apparel perception, purchase and eWOM.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-06-14
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-04-2020-3733
      Issue No: Vol. 39 , No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Fanning the flames: understanding viral content after brand transgressions

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      Authors: Kimberly V. Legocki , Kristen L. Walker , Meike Eilert
      Abstract: This paper aims to contribute to the emerging body of research on firestorms, specifically on the inflammatory user-generated content (UGC) created in response to brand transgressions. By analyzing and segmenting UGC created and shared in the wake of three different events, the authors identify which type of inflammatory message is most likely to be widely shared; thus, contributing to a possible online firestorm. Tweets were collected involving brand transgressions in the retail, fast food and technology space from varying timeframe and diverse media coverage. Then, the tweets were coded for message intention and analyzed with linguistics software to determine the message characteristics and framing. A two-step cluster analysis identified three types of UGC. The authors found that message dimensions and the framing of tweets in the context of brand transgressions differed in characteristics, sentiment, call to action and the extent to which the messages were shared. The findings contradict traditional negative word-of-mouth studies involving idiosyncratic service and product failure. During online brand firestorms, rational activism messages with a call to action, generated in response to a firm’s transgression or “sparks,” have a higher likelihood of being shared (virality). This research provides novel insights into UGC created after brand transgressions. Different types of messages created after these events vary in the extent that they “fan the flames” of the transgression. A message typology and flowchart are provided to assist managers in identifying and responding to three message types: ash, sparks and embers.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-06-06
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-02-2021-4473
      Issue No: Vol. 39 , No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Why do consumers free ride' Investigating the effects of cognitive
           effort on postpurchase dissonance

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      Authors: Costanza Nosi , Lamberto Zollo , Riccardo Rialti , Cristiano Ciappei
      Abstract: Building on the theoretical paradigms of consumer free-riding and cognitive dissonance, this study aims to evaluate whether consumers’ cognitive effort when making a purchase decision impacts upon the relationship between free-riding habits and postpurchase cognitive dissonance. To explore the relationship between cross-channel free-riding, cognitive efforts and cognitive dissonance, a framework was conceptualized and empirically tested on a sample of 518 Italian consumers. Covariance-based structural equation modeling and bootstrapped mediation analysis was performed with the PROCESS macro. Results show that the more cognitively involved a free-riding consumer is, the more he/she will experience postpurchase cognitive dissonance. Modern consumers habitually finalize their purchase activities through multiple different channels. The abundance of e-commerce/online platforms does indeed offer consumers a plethora of alternatives to physical/offline stores. Hence, consumers have been seen to act as “free-riders.” It is becoming more and more common for consumers to seek information in physical stores and then purchase a product online more conveniently. This notwithstanding, it has emerged that free-riding consumers tend to experience cognitive dissonance – which is a sensation of emotional discomfort – after making their purchases. The causes of this phenomenon are yet to be fully unpacked.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-05-31
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-02-2021-4436
      Issue No: Vol. 39 , No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Using mobile while shopping in-store: a new model of impulse-buying
           behaviour

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      Authors: Simone Aiolfi , Silvia Bellini , Benedetta Grandi
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to develop a comprehensive model of impulse-buying that considers the impact of mobile device use on shopping behaviour as a tool for shopping preparation or as a tool for self-regulation. Data were obtained through a single-stage mall intercept survey method using a structured questionnaire involving 406 respondents interviewed after checkout. Data analysis was conducted using a structural equation modelling approach with LISREL 8.8. The results support most elements of the hypothesis of the proposed conceptual framework. Specifically, findings show the impact of mobile usage on shopping behaviour, which results in fewer impulse purchases. The research demonstrates how shoppers using mobile devices in-store felt less of an urge to purchase during shopping, resulting in fewer unplanned purchases. The effects of mobile device use on in-store purchasing decisions are designed to create a new scenario for the practice of shopper marketing, and retailers and manufacturers will have to seek new ways to capture consumers’ attention in-store and to influence shoppers’ perceptions early in the shopping cycle without diminishing the role of in-store marketing levers. Prior research found the antecedents of impulse-buying in individual characteristics, situational variables and endogenous variables. However, it did not consider mobile pre-shopping factors or mobile usage. Filling the gap in the existing literature, this work sets out to develop a comprehensive model of impulse-buying that considers the impact of mobile usage on shopping behaviour.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-05-31
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-05-2020-3823
      Issue No: Vol. 39 , No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Moral identity and engagement in sustainable consumption

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      Authors: Laura Salciuviene , Jūratė Banytė , Mantas Vilkas , Aistė Dovalienė , Žaneta Gravelines
      Abstract: This study aims to identify the effects of moral identity on consumer engagement in sustainable consumption, and discover any moderating gender effects. The authors deploy regret and identity theories to propose hypotheses and explain research findings. Data collection was via online survey, and analysed using partial least squares structural equation modelling to test hypotheses. Symbolization and internalization dimensions of moral identity are positively associated with five dimensions of engagement. Moreover, the relationship between moral identity and specific dimensions of engagement in sustainable consumption is stronger among males than females. This study suggests a novel mechanism in a hitherto under-researched area in the sustainability and moral identity literature, viz. consumer engagement in sustainable consumption when moral identity is present. This research also adds to current knowledge regarding gender effects in the link between the symbolization and internalization dimensions of moral identity and engagement in sustainable consumption.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-05-31
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-03-2021-4506
      Issue No: Vol. 39 , No. 5 (2022)
       
  • What social media sentiment tells us about why customers churn

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      Authors: James Lappeman , Michaela Franco , Victoria Warner , Lara Sierra-Rubia
      Abstract: This study aims to investigate the factors that influence South African customers to potentially switch from one bank to another. Instead of using established models and survey techniques, the research measured social media sentiment to measure threats to switch. The research involved a 12-month analysis of social media sentiment, specifically customer threats to switch banks (churn). These threats were then analysed for co-occurring themes to provide data on the reasons customers were making these threats. The study used over 1.7 million social media posts and focused on all five major South African retail banks (essentially the entire sector). This study concluded that seven factors are most significant in understanding the underlying causes of churn. These are turnaround time, accusations of unethical behaviour, billing or payments, telephonic interactions, branches or stores, fraud or scams and unresponsiveness. This study is unique in its measurement of unsolicited social media sentiment as opposed to most churn-related research that uses survey- or customer-data-based methods. In addition, this study observed the sentiment of customers from all major retail banks across 12 months. To date, no studies on retail bank churn theory have provided such an extensive perspective. The findings contribute to Susan Keaveney’s churn theory and provide a new measurement of switching threat through social media sentiment analysis.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-05-26
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-12-2019-3540
      Issue No: Vol. 39 , No. 5 (2022)
       
  • “Dear diary … the covid-19 is turning us into hybrids”: exploring
           consumers’ hybridity facets during the pandemic

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      Authors: Manel Hakim Masmoudi , Arij Jmour , Nibrass ElAoud
      Abstract: This study aims to examine different levels of consumer’s hybridity, which is gaining popularity during the current COVID-19 pandemic. A qualitative approach was adopted using two main data collection methods: netnography and semistructured interviews. Three main communities and 20 semistructured interviews with hybrid consumers were performed to fully understand new levels of consumers’ bipolarity. Thematic analysis was used to identify groups representing different facets of new hybridity. Similarity index and co-occurrences (Jaccard coefficient) were interpreted through QDA Miner software. Four main facets of consumers’ hybridity were highlighted during the current COVID-19 pandemic: “up vs down,” “utilitarian vs hedonic,” “impulsive vs planned” and “responsible vs irresponsible.” These findings have practical implications for marketing managers seeking to design and to improve their branding strategies and their positioning. Businesses usually offer a coherent mix targeted to specific consumers. However, these results show that providing and highlighting some contradictions in their offerings may be interesting for consumers who are trying to cope with this pandemic. The study extends the contemporary consumer literature by investigating paradoxical behaviors that are still fertile. The marketing literature examines consumers’ profiles as a homogeneous concept without allowing for contradictions in consumers’ preferences. Additionally, this study recognizes important changes in consumer behavior elicited by COVID-19 pandemic. It fills that research gap by examining not only “up vs down” hybridity but new levels of hybridity as well.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-05-23
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-01-2021-4381
      Issue No: Vol. 39 , No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Journal of Consumer Marketing

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