Subjects -> BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (Total: 3570 journals)
    - ACCOUNTING (132 journals)
    - BANKING AND FINANCE (306 journals)
    - BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (1248 journals)
    - CONSUMER EDUCATION AND PROTECTION (20 journals)
    - COOPERATIVES (4 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SCIENCES: GENERAL (212 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SYSTEMS, THEORIES AND HISTORY (235 journals)
    - FASHION AND CONSUMER TRENDS (20 journals)
    - HUMAN RESOURCES (103 journals)
    - INSURANCE (26 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE (145 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND AID (103 journals)
    - INVESTMENTS (22 journals)
    - LABOR AND INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS (61 journals)
    - MACROECONOMICS (17 journals)
    - MANAGEMENT (595 journals)
    - MARKETING AND PURCHASING (116 journals)
    - MICROECONOMICS (23 journals)
    - PRODUCTION OF GOODS AND SERVICES (143 journals)
    - PUBLIC FINANCE, TAXATION (37 journals)
    - TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL DIRECTORIES (2 journals)

PRODUCTION OF GOODS AND SERVICES (143 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 137 of 137 Journals sorted alphabetically
Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Marketing     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Marketing Journal (AMJ)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
BMC Health Services Research     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Capital Markets Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cleaner Environmental Systems     Open Access  
Cleaner Production Letters     Hybrid Journal  
Cleaner Waste Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Consumption Markets & Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Customer Needs and Solutions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Direct Marketing An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Disaster Prevention and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Economic & Labour Market Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Electronic Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Emerging Markets Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
European Journal of Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Financial Markets, Institutions & Instruments     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Food Packaging and Shelf Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Foundations and Trends® in Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Future Business Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Journal of Emerging Market Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Services and Outcomes Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Health Services Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Services Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
i+Diseño : Revista científico-académica internacional de Innovación, Investigación y Desarrollo en Diseño     Open Access  
Independent Journal of Management & Production     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ingeniería y Competitividad     Open Access  
International Journal of Advanced Operations Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Bank Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Business and Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Business Forecasting and Marketing Intelligence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Electronic Marketing and Retailing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Entrepreneurial Venturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Financial Services Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Information Systems and Supply Chain Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Inventory Research     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Lean Six Sigma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Logistics Economics and Globalisation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Managing Projects in Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Market Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Nonprofit & Voluntary Sector Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Planning and Scheduling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Product Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Production Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Production Management and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Production Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Productivity and Quality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Quality Innovation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Research in Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Service Industry Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Services and Standards     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Services Operations and Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Services Sciences     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Supply Chain and Inventory Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Supply Chain and Operations Resilience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Supply Chain Management     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Systems Science : Operations & Logistics     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Technology Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Trade and Global Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Internet Reference Services Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
JCMS : Journal of Common Market Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Journal of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Business Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Business Venturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Cleaner Production     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Database Marketing & Customer Strategy Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Direct Data and Digital Marketing Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Emerging Knowledge on Emerging Markets     Open Access  
Journal of Entrepreneurial Finance     Open Access  
Journal of Financial Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Food Products Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Foodservice Business Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Global Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Global Operations and Strategic Sourcing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Services Research and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of International Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Loss Prevention in the Process Industries     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51)
Journal of Marketing Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Marketing Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Marketing Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 70)
Journal of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Operations and Supply Chain Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Political Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Prediction Markets     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Product Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Production Research & Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Productivity Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Progressive Human Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Public Policy & Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Relationship Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Service Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Services Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Strategic Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Targeting Measurement and Analysis for Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Technology Management & Innovation     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Vacation Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Logistics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Logistics Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Management and Administrative Sciences Review     Open Access  
Management and Production Engineering Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Manufacturing & Service Operations Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Marketing Intelligence & Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Marketing Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Marketing Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Marketing Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Psychological Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Psychology & Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Quantitative Marketing and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Reproduction Fertility and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Review of Pacific Basin Financial Markets and Policies     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Eletrônica Academicus     Open Access  
Revue Interventions économiques     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Service Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Service Oriented Computing and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Service Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Services Marketing Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Social Marketing Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Strategy Management Logistics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Supply Chain Forum : an International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Sustainable Production and Consumption     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Technology Operation Management     Hybrid Journal  
The Journal of Futures Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
The Service Industries Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Universal Journal of Industrial and Business Management     Open Access  
Venture Capital: An International Journal of Entrepreneurial Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
WPOM - Working Papers on Operations Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Consumer Marketing
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.664
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 19  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 1 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 0736-3761 - ISSN (Online) 2052-1200
Published by Emerald Homepage  [360 journals]
  • Judging an Airbnb booking by its cover: how profile photos affect guest
           ratings

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      Authors: Hyunkyu Jang
      Abstract: This research aims to examine whether the facial appearances and expressions of Airbnb host photos influence guest star ratings. This research analyzed the profile photos of over 20,000 Airbnb hosts and the guest star ratings of over 30,000 Airbnb listings in New York City, using machine learning techniques. First, hosts who provided profile photos received higher guest ratings than those who did not provide photos. When facial features of profile photos were recognizable, guest ratings were higher than when they were not recognizable (e.g. faces too small, faces looking backward or faces blocked by some objects). Second, a happy facial expression, blond hair and brown hair positively affected guest ratings, whereas heads tilted back negatively affected guest ratings. This research is the first, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, to analyze the facial appearances and expressions of profile photos using machine learning techniques and examine the influence of Airbnb host photos on guest star ratings.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-05-12
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-01-2021-4341
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Brand love and ethnic identification: the mediating role of brand
           attachment among African American consumers

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      Authors: Rozbeh Madadi , Ivonne M. Torres , Reza Fazli-Salehi , Miguel Ángel Zúñiga
      Abstract: From a distinctiveness theory and elaboration likelihood model (ELM) perspective, this study aims to investigate the determinants, the direct and indirect effects of ethnic identification on brand attachment, brand love and behavioral outcomes. The authors examine two types of products (high- vs low-involvement). In a survey, participants were randomly assigned to four conditions consisting of two high-involvement (i.e. a smart watch and a car) and two low-involvement (i.e. a soda/soft drink and a shampoo) stimuli. A total of 192 respondents participated in this study; 39% were male, 61% were female and 90% were 18-22 years old. In line with ELM, the authors offer evidence that ethnic advertising is more effective for low-involvement products targeted at African American consumers. Results also showed that brand attachment partially mediates the effect of ethnic identification with the ad (EthIdenAD) and brand love. In summary, the structural equation modeling (SEM) results support the efficacy of ethnic-targeted ads for developing brand attachment, brand love and behavioral outcomes. Using ethnically targeted ads to target minority groups may not be sufficient to increase the efficacy of ads. According to distinctiveness theory, African Americans with different levels of ethnic identification will respond differently to ad attitudes, brand attachment, brand love, identification with the model in the ad and varying degrees of belief that the ad was targeted toward them. This study examines the effect of ethnically targeted advertising on brand love, and behavioral outcomes with the mediation effect of brand attachment and moderation effect of product involvement. The results of this study suggest several theoretical and practical implications for marketing and brand management, including directions for advertising strategy and consumer–brand relationships.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-05-12
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-06-2020-3922
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Expanding the experiential advantage model: exploring the mediating roles
           of a sense of meaning and moderating effects of motivational autonomy

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      Authors: Bin Li , Sijun Wang , Li Lei , Fangjun Li
      Abstract: This study aims to test the experiential advantage argument from both the hedonic and eudaimonic well-being perspectives and seeks to explore the mediating roles of a sense of meaning, as well as the moderating effects of consumers’ motivational autonomy, in a novel context – China. Study 1 (n = 203) used a between-subject experiment where participants role-played an imaginary purchase with experiential versus material focus; Study 2 (n = 290) used a recall method where participants were asked to recall their past experiential purchase or material purchase that cost more than RMB500 (about US$70); Study 3 (n = 185) used a between-subject experiment where participants were assigned to one of the four scenarios (two types of purchases (experiential vs material) × 2 levels of motivational autonomy (high vs low). The authors find that the experiential advantage argument holds true for eudaimonic well-being as well as hedonic well-being in three studies with Chinese consumers. In addition, the authors find that a sense of meaning serves as an additional mediator for the experiential advantage argument. Further, the authors find that the level of motivational autonomy positively moderates the effect size of experiential advantages and the mediating roles of a sense of meaning. The authors only address the two ends of the experiential–material purchase continuum. Whether the discovered mediation roles of a sense of meaning and the moderation roles of motivational autonomy hold for hybrid experiential products remain unknown. The authors enriched the experiential advantage literature through exploring the mediation roles of a sense of meaning and the moderating effects of motivational autonomy in the experiential advantage model.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-04-26
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-09-2020-4140
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The moderating impact of product shadows on ad effectiveness perceptions
           for gestalt versus component product frames, product presentation color,
           and consumer visual processing modes

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      Authors: Nazuk Sharma , James R. Stock
      Abstract: This research aims to investigate the moderating impact of product shadows in gestalt versus component product frames on ad effectiveness perceptions. It offers insights on shadow-compatible and incompatible modes of product presentation color as well as consumer visual processing modes that offer optimal advertising effectiveness. This research begins with a content analysis of some popular print magazines and builds on qualitative findings from interviews conducted with two industry executives. It then undertakes four experiments to test the proposed hypotheses following a more deductive approach. Results reveal that incorporating product shadows increase ad effectiveness for gestalt products presented in black-and-white, but lower ad effectiveness for component products presented in color. Additionally, ad effectiveness for a gestalt (component) product presented in black-and-white (color) increases (decreases) in the presence of product shadow when consumers are currently processing in a compatible, gestalt (component) visual mode. In addition to extending the limited marketing research on product shadows, this research contributes to the literature studying information communication theory (ICT) and advertising effectiveness, Construal-Level Theory (CLT), Heuristic–Systematic Model (HSM) of information processing and stylistic visual cues used in advertising. This research is focused on advertising effectiveness, providing a tangible outcome of interest to practitioners. An optimal use of this simple, inexpensive and stylistic ad element can help managers design effective communications without forgoing established brand equity. Limited marketing research on product shadows has only looked at their impact on product luxury implications (Sharma, 2016), experiential versus functional brand evaluations (Sharma, 2018) and product heaviness perceptions (Sharma and Romero, 2020). To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this work is the first to investigate specific gestalt versus component product contexts and the role of black-and-white and colored product presentations, along with specific consumer visual processing modes where shadows either increase or decrease the overall ad effectiveness.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-04-25
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-04-2020-3776
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • An integrated framework examining sustainable green behavior among young
           consumers

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      Authors: Siti Aqilah Jahari , Ashley Hass , Izian Binti Idris , Mathew Joseph
      Abstract: Promoting sustainable behavior is an elusive task as it is not an innate and natural response of individuals. While a conducive environment that promotes sustainability arguably plays a prominent role in influencing individuals’ belief structure and norms, not much has been done to examine the interplay between environmental, personal and behavioral domains in sustainable consumption. Drawing on the theoretical perspectives of the social cognitive theory (SCT) and value–beliefs–norms (VBN), this study aims to contribute to the literature by proposing an integrated framework that examines sustainable consumption. This study uses a partial least squares structural equation modeling model based on 313 young consumer responses from an eco-friendly institution in Malaysia. The findings from this study advance sustainable literature by establishing the multidimensionality concept of the personal domain of SCT. Interestingly, an enabling environment that promotes sustainability was found to be more influential in determining young consumers’ beliefs and norms, as opposed to their competencies. This is demonstrated by the sequential mediation of attribution of responsibility and personal norms on the relationship between campus advertisements and pro-environmental behaviors. Previous research has investigated SCT and VBN as two separate streams of research in examining green behaviors. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that integrates SCT and VBN by examining the multidimensionality aspect of the personal construct to provide a more holistic perspective of examining sustainable behaviors.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-04-25
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-04-2021-4593
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Depression and consumption habits: a cross-cultural study

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      Authors: Daniela Gomes Alcoforado , Francisco Vicente Sales Melo , Renata Gomes Alcoforado
      Abstract: This paper aims to explore the interplay between consumption and depression through a cross-cultural study conducted in Brazil and Germany. Data collection was conducted through an online survey. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was used to assess depression levels from a sample of 1,627 respondents (759 Germans and 868 Brazilians). Descriptive statistics, multiple linear regression and Mann–Whitney U tests were applied. Cultural characteristics are relevant in the consumption-depression interplay. The authors identified marketplace resources and stressors consisting of products categories that influence the depression level of the depressed consumer. Additionally, individuals with some level of depression presented different consumption habits than those without. A table summarizing the findings is presented at the end of the paper. Work limitations refer to the consumption categories analyzed and the large share of students in the sample. Marketplace measures have an active role in mitigating or increasing depression levels. Thus, consumption can also be used as a transformative tool to benefit the lives of depressive individuals. Some suggestions are presented. This study contributes to the discussion that consumption impacts the daily lives of people with depression and provides recommendations on how to adapt consumption habits to help depressive individuals optimize their quality of life and well-being. This paper contributes empirically and theoretically to the discussion of mental health and consumption and introduces innovative consumption categories (from daily life) that are incipient in previous literature.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-04-11
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-02-2021-4421
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Marketing #neurodiversity for well-being

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      Authors: Josephine Go Jefferies , Wasim Ahmed
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to develop a bottom-up segmentation of people affected by neurodiversity using Twitter data. This exploratory study uses content analysis of information shared by Twitter users over a three-month period. Cultural currents affect how the label of “neurodiversity” is perceived by individuals, marketplace actors and society. The extent to which neurodiversity provides a positive or negative alternative to stigmatizing labels for mental disorders is shaped by differentiated experiences of neurodiversity. The authors identify five neurodiversity segments according to identifiable concerns and contextual dynamics that affect mental wellbeing. Analyzing Twitter data enables a bottom-up typology of stigmatized groups toward improving market salience. To the authors knowledge, this study is the first to investigate neurodiversity using Twitter data to segment stigmatized consumers into prospective customers from the bottom-up.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-03-21
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-03-2021-4520
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The impact of advertising exposure on the gendered perceptions of men with
           mental health concerns

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      Authors: Tianyi Li
      Abstract: Traditional masculinity ideologies dictate men should be tough, self-reliant and display restrictive emotionality. Men who seek mental health services, a behavior that typically involves expressing feelings and showing dependence, are often subject to stigma. The purpose of the study is to examine the gendered perceptions of men who seek help for mental health concerns, as well as how masculine advertisements moderate these perceptions. After viewing either masculine or control advertisements, participants read descriptions of men who sought help for psychological or physical symptoms and provided masculinity ratings in a task ostensibly unrelated to the advertisements. Across two experiments, participants perceived the male target who sought help for psychological symptoms, a behavior incongruent with the traditional masculinity ideologies, as less masculine than his counterpart seeking help for physical symptoms. Importantly, exposure to masculine advertisements attenuated the gendered perceptions for psychological help-seeking: viewing masculine advertisements led participants to deliberately reflect on society’s expectations for men to be physically masculine and tough and the extent to which men should conform to these standards. These reflections counteract the effect of stigma on the gendered perceptions of men seeking help for mental health concerns. The representation of men as masculine and rugged in advertisements is believed to contribute to public perceptions of men seeking help for mental health concerns. Yet the current research demonstrates an unexpected effect of viewing masculine advertisements in attenuating the gendered perceptions of men’s help-seeking.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-02-09
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-01-2021-4394
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The 40 years of discourse on racism in the Brazilian advertising
           self-regulation system

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      Authors: Laís Rodrigues , Marcus Wilcox Hemais , Alessandra Costa
      Abstract: This paper aims to unveil colonial racist elements related to the cases of racism in advertising judged by the Brazilian Council of Advertising Self-Regulation (Conar), from 1980 until 2020. A qualitative critical and historical research was developed, based on a decolonial perspective, with the use of critical discourse analysis (CDA). By analyzing such phenomenon, the present study can discuss how self-regulatory codes that are based on the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) 1937 Code are not equipped to deal with racist issues. Discussions that focus on how racial elements in advertising are treated by a regulatory agency are scarce. Despite the focus being on the Brazilian case, this phenomenon should not be understood as a particularity of this country, since problems related to racism in advertising in countries that also have ICC-type self-regulatory codes are frequent.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-02-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-03-2021-4558
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Rescuing marketing from its colonial roots: a decolonial anti-racist
           agenda

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      Authors: June N.P. Francis
      Abstract: This paper illuminates the mechanisms through which marketing practice and institutions produced, normalized and institutionalized systemic racism in support of imperialism, colonization and slavery to provide impetus for transformational change. Critical race research is drawn on to propose paths toward decolonial and anti-racist research agenda and practice. The paper integrates multidisciplinary literature on race, racism, imperialism, colonialism and slavery, connecting these broad themes to the roles marketing practices and institutions played in creating and sustaining racism. Critical race theory, afro pessimism, postcolonial theories, anti-racism and decoloniality provide conceptual foundations for a proposed transformative research agenda. Marketing practices and institutions played active and leading roles in producing, mass mobilizing and honing racist ideology and the imagery to support imperialism, colonial expansion and slavery. Racist inequalities in market systems were produced globally through active collusion by marketing actors and institutions in these historical forces creating White advantage and Black dispossession that persist; indicating an urgent need for transformative anti-racists and decolonial research agendas. Covering these significant historical forces inevitably leaves much room for further inquiry. The paper by necessity “Mango picked” the most relevant research, but a full coverage of these topics was beyond the scope of this paper. Marketing practitioners found themselves at the epicenter of a crisis during the Black Lives Matter protests. This paper aims to foster anti-racist ad decolonial research to guide practice. This paper addresses systemic and institutional racism, and marketplace inequalities – urgent societal challenges. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, the paper is the first in marketing to integrate multidisciplinary literature on historical forces of imperialism, colonization and slavery to illuminate marketing’s influential role in producing marketplace racism while advancing an anti-racist and de-colonial research agenda.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-02-04
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-07-2021-4752
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Co-production: a source of psychological well-being for consumers'

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      Authors: Ibtissame Abaidi , Patrice Cottet , Jamila Abaidi
      Abstract: This research aims to examine the co-production of a product as a source of psychological well-being for consumers. A quantitative experimental study on the theme of cosmetics products was conducted using a sample of 844 women. It comprised three scenarios corresponding to low (finished products), intermediate (products sold in kits) and high (the purchase of cosmetic ingredients) co-production. The results show that co-producing an offer is a source of psychological well-being. This effect can be explained by an increase in perceived benefits and perceived value. The finding of interest for management is the identification of factors that improve individuals’ psychological well-being.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-01-26
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-01-2021-4404
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Privacy considerations for online advertising: a stakeholder’s
           perspective to programmatic advertising

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      Authors: Dylan A. Cooper , Taylan Yalcin , Cristina Nistor , Matthew Macrini , Ekin Pehlivan
      Abstract: Privacy considerations have become a topic with increasing interest from academics, industry leaders and regulators. In response to consumers’ privacy concerns, Google announced in 2020 that Chrome would stop supporting third-party cookies in the near future. At the same time, advertising technology companies are developing alternative solutions for online targeting and consumer privacy controls. This paper aims to explore privacy considerations related to online tracking and targeting methods used for programmatic advertising (i.e. third-party cookies, Privacy Sandbox, Unified ID 2.0) for a variety of stakeholders: consumers, AdTech platforms, advertisers and publishers. This study analyzes the topic of internet user privacy concerns, through a multi-pronged approach: industry conversations to collect information, a comprehensive review of trade publications and extensive empirical analysis. This study uses two methods to collect data on consumer preferences for privacy controls: a survey of a representative sample of US consumers and field data from conversations on web-forums created by tech professionals. The results suggest that there are four main segments in the US internet user population. The first segment, consisting of 26% of internet users, is driven by a strong preference for relevant ads and includes consumers who accept the premises of both Privacy Sandbox and Unified ID (UID) 2.0. The second segment (26%) includes consumers who are ambivalent about both sets of premises. The third segment (34%) is driven by a need for relevant ads and a strong desire to prevent advertisers from aggressively collecting data, with consumers who accept the premises of Privacy Sandbox but reject the premises of UID 2.0. The fourth segment (15% of consumers) rejected both sets of premises about privacy control. Text analysis results suggest that the conversation around UID 2.0 is still nascent. Google Sandbox associations seem nominally positive, with sarcasm being an important factor in the sentiment analysis results. The value of this paper lies in its multi-method examination of online privacy concerns in light of the recent regulatory legislation (i.e. General Data Protection Regulation and California Consumer Privacy Act) and changes for third-party cookies in browsers such as Firefox, Safari and Chrome. Two alternatives proposed to replace third-party cookies (Privacy Sandbox and Unified ID 2.0) are in the proposal and prototype stage. The elimination of third-party cookies will affect stakeholders, including different types of players in the AdTech industry and internet users. This paper analyzes how two alternative proposals for privacy control align with the interests of several stakeholders.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-01-26
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-04-2021-4577
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Emotional intelligence and materialism: the mediating effect of subjective
           well-being

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      Authors: Aušra Rūtelionė , Beata Šeinauskienė , Shahrokh Nikou , Rosita Lekavičienė , Dalia Antinienė
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to examine the nature of the relationship between emotional intelligence and materialism by exploring how subjective well-being mediates this link. Data was collected from surveying 1,000 Lithuanians within random sampling, and structural equation modelling (SEM) techniques using SmartPLS were used to analyze the data. The results show that emotional intelligence not only has a negative indirect effect on materialism but also a positive impact on both dimensions of subjective well-being (satisfaction with life and affect balance). In addition, the findings indicate that both satisfaction with life and affect balance predict a decrease in materialism. Finally, the SEM analyzes show that the path between emotional intelligence and materialism is partially mediated by both satisfaction with life and affect balance. The results of this study expand the understanding to what extent and how emotional intelligence is able to assist in adjusting materialistic attitudes, which have become more prevalent with the respective growth of consumerism and consumer culture worldwide. In the light of unsustainable consumption patterns threatening the survival of humankind and nature, the opportunities that could reverse this trend are presented for marketers and policy makers. This study gives insight into the potential pathways for diminishing consumer materialism, which is considered detrimental to subjective well-being and mental health. The relationship between emotional intelligence and subjective well-being has been well documented, as has the link between materialism and subjective well-being. However, the simultaneous examination of the relationship between emotional intelligence, subjective well-being and materialism is lacking. The current study adds to the understanding of materialism not only by examining the effect of under-researched antecedent such as emotional intelligence but also by explaining the underlying mechanism of subjective well-being by which emotional intelligence connects to materialism.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-01-18
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-01-2021-4386
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The ultimate escape: escapism, sports fan passion and procrastination
           across two cultures

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      Authors: Marina Astakhova , Ethan B. Leonard , D. Harold Doty , Jie Yang , Mingchuan Yu
      Abstract: This study aims to examine escapism as the explanatory mechanism that can account for distinct outcomes of harmonious and obsessive sports fan passion among US and Chinese fans. The study uses cross-cultural data collected among sports fans in the USA and China. Using structural equation modeling and PROCESS model, the authors test the mediating role of escapism and the moderating role of indulgence on the relationships between sports fan passion and procrastination. The authors found that positive escapism mediates the relationship between harmonious sports fan passion and procrastination, whereas negative escapism mediates the relationship between obsessive sports fan passion and procrastination. While individual-level indulgence was not a significant moderator, post hoc analyses revealed that the interaction of indulgence and uncertainty avoidance played a moderating role. The use of sports fan samples from both the USA and China enables a cross-cultural comparison of the proposed model, thereby extending the model’s generalizability. By advancing the dual model of escapism, the authors hope to stimulate a research dialogue that identifies more nuanced (both positive and negative) predictors and outcomes of passion for an activity and escapism in the broader context of other passion-inducing activities (e.g., Internet use, work, etc.). Marketers promoting sports events can use this study's results to highlight the benefits of harmonious sports fan passion in terms of positive escapism and reduced procrastination. Organizations promoting sports fandom need to also be aware that sports fans can have obsessive passion for sports that can lead to procrastination. Therefore, it is important to be vigilant and distinguish between “healthy” and “unhealthy” passion early to avoid “unhealthy” passion turning into negative escapism and by extension, procrastination. Socially responsible marketers should understand a potential negative effect that obsessive sports fan passion may entail and prevent or minimize its negative consequences. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study that explains why sports fan passion can(not) be associated with procrastination. It does so by using the dual escapism as the explanatory mechanism linking harmonious and obsessive sports fan passion and procrastination.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-04-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-11-2020-4242
      Issue No: Vol. 39 , No. 3 (2022)
       
  • What to believe, whom to blame, and when to share: exploring the fake news
           experience in the marketing context

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      Authors: Ali Mahdi , Maya F. Farah , Zahy Ramadan
      Abstract: The spread of fake news on social networking sites (SNS) poses a threat to the marketing landscape, yet little is known about how fake news affect consumers’ perceptions, attitudes and behaviors. This study aims to explore when consumers believe fake news, whom they blame for it (e.g. negative attitudes toward brands or SNS) and when they choose to share it. Data obtained from 80 open-ended, semistructured interviews, conducted with SNS consumers and experts, is analyzed following the principles of grounded theory and the Gioia methodology. Factors affecting consumers’ perceptions of fake news include skepticism, awareness, previous experience, appeal and message cues. Consumers’ brand- and SNS-related attitudes are affected by consumers’ blame, which is determined by consumers’ perceptions of the vetting efforts, role and ethical obligation of SNS. Consumers’ motives for sharing fake news include duty, retaliation, authentication and status-seeking. Theoretical and practical implications derived from the study’s novel conceptual framework are discussed. This study identifies communication strategies that marketing professionals can use to mitigate and counter the negative effects of fake news. By simultaneously considering consumers’ perceptions of the source, information and medium (i.e. SNS), this study presents a novel conceptual framework providing a marketing-centered, dynamic view on consumers’ fake news experience and connecting consumers’ perceptions, attitudes and behaviors in the context of fake news.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-04-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-05-2020-3863
      Issue No: Vol. 39 , No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Food waste perceptions: vice versus virtue foods

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      Authors: Joon Yong Seo , Sukki Yoon
      Abstract: Food waste has strong ecological, economical and social implications. Focusing on waste perceptions and behavior according to food types, this paper aims to propose that vice or virtue food categories determine cognitive and behavioral reactions to food waste. The authors examine the psychological mechanism underlying the differential waste perceptions and behavior. The authors conduct five studies, including a field study, to provide converging evidence that supports this theorization. This study demonstrates that consumers feel that trashing vice food is more wasteful than trashing virtue food. They are less willing to waste vice food and more comfortable with wasting virtue food. Consequently, they waste more virtue than vice foods. The authors demonstrate that counterfactual thinking explains the food type effect on waste. This paper provides a conceptual framework for understanding and explaining food waste perceptions and behavior across vice and virtue food categories. This paper identifies counterfactual thinking as underpinning the psychology of waste perceptions and behaviors. The findings extend the growing research on subconscious and unintentional food waste, the food consumption literature and the psychology of waste literature. The differential waste perceptions and behavior provide several implications for waste interventions and consumer education. By expanding theories of consumer food waste, this paper provides material for educational campaigns aimed at reducing waste and improving healthful eating. Consumers can benefit from understanding their tendency to avoid wasting vice foods but will waste virtue foods with little compunction. Waste aversion may be a reason people consume vice foods beyond satiation. Consumers may overconsume vice foods because they are so acutely averse to wasting them, with detrimental consequences for health and welfare. To reduce consumer food waste, one must gain deeper insights into factors shaping consumer food waste perceptions and behavior. Food waste studies have been increasing but have overlooked the power of consumer perceptions in driving food waste consequences. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no prior study has examined how food type affects waste perceptions and behavior. This research fills this gap.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-04-04
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-07-2020-3997
      Issue No: Vol. 39 , No. 3 (2022)
       
  • If tomorrow never comes: the impact of anxiety, materialism and attitude
           on consumption behavior in a pandemic

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      Authors: Anubhav Mishra , Radha Govind Indwar , Sridhar Samu
      Abstract: This research aims to examine the impact of consumers’ anxiety on the three types of consumption activities (sharing, hoarding and regular buying) during the coronavirus pandemic. Further, it aims to investigate the moderating role of materialism on anxiety and how attitude toward the pandemic affects consumers’ consumption behavior. An online survey was conducted to test the proposed research model. The data were analyzed using SmartPLS and PROCESS tools. Higher levels of anxiety lead to less sharing and more hoarding of resources but do not impact consumers’ regular buying intentions. A positive attitude toward an external event such as lockdown and intrinsic materialism can help individuals to cope with the anxiety successfully. Furthermore, consumers are more likely to share and less likely to hoard when they develop a positive attitude toward pandemic. Future research can explore the role of health-efficacy and attitude toward health as coping strategy toward pandemic. A longitudinal research can explore the gradual changes in consumers’ attitudes and consumption behavior. Governments, marketers and policymakers should focus on reducing consumers’ anxiety and to build a positive attitude toward pandemic to avoid the issues of hoarding and enable sharing of resources with others. This study contributes to the literature on terror management theory and crisis management during a pandemic using a consumption context.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-02-2021-4439
      Issue No: Vol. 39 , No. 3 (2022)
       
  • League of Legends or World of Warcraft' The effect of political
           ideology on consumers game choice

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      Authors: Cony M. Ho
      Abstract: The majority of research to date has focused on how to leverage the effectiveness of in-game marketing campaigns. However, the author’s understanding of how to segment consumers for game consumption is limited. This research aims to focus on how consumers’ political ideology could influence consumers’ game choices. This study used one state-level Google trend data and two experiments to show the effect of political ideology on consumers’ game choice. This study found that liberals prefer non-persistent world games and conservatives prefer persistent world games. These effects occur because consumers’ political ideology alters their motivation to search for new opportunities, and this motivation, in turn, determines their choices. Finally, this study demonstrates the moderating role of brand familiarity in the effect of political ideology on game choice. This study offers a new angle for game and marketing research about how consumers’ beliefs such as political ideology can change consumers' thoughts and preferences about games. This study offers new insight into the gaming industry and marketers. They can use political ideology as a new and effective way to segment consumers. These findings offer important insights into the ubiquitous nature of games in consumers’ everyday lives by detailing how political ideology influences game choice. This paper fulfills an identified need to study how an important industry such as gaming can be effectively segmented through an important factor such as political ideology.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-03-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-12-2020-4298
      Issue No: Vol. 39 , No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Designing servicescapes for transformative service conversations: lessons
           from mental health services

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      Authors: Ahir Gopaldas , Anton Siebert , Burçak Ertimur
      Abstract: Dyadic services research has increasingly focused on helping providers facilitate transformative service conversations with consumers. Extant research has thoroughly documented the conversational skills that providers can use to facilitate consumer microtransformations (i.e. small changes in consumers’ thoughts, feelings and action plans toward their well-being goals). At the same time, extant research has largely neglected the role of servicescape design in transformative service conversations despite some evidence of its potential significance. To redress this oversight, this article aims to examine how servicescape design can be used to better facilitate consumer microtransformations in dyadic service conversations. This article is based on an interpretive study of mental health services (i.e. counseling, psychotherapy and coaching). Both providers and consumers were interviewed about their lived experiences of service encounters. Informants frequently described the spatial and temporal dimensions of their service encounters as crucial to their experiences of service encounters. These data are interpreted through the lens of servicescape design theory, which disentangles servicescape design effects into dimensions, strategies, tactics, experiences and outcomes. The data reveal two servicescape design strategies that help facilitate consumer microtransformations. “Service sequestration” is a suite of spatial design tactics (e.g., private offices) that creates strong consumer protections for emotional risk-taking. “Service serialization” is a suite of temporal design tactics (e.g., recurring appointments) that creates predictable rhythms for emotional risk-taking. The effects of service sequestration and service serialization on consumer microtransformations are mediated by psychological safety and psychological readiness, respectively. The article details concrete servicescape design tactics that providers can use to improve consumer experiences and outcomes in dyadic service contexts. These tactics can help promote consumer microtransformations in the short run and consumer well-being in the long run. This article develops a conceptual model of servicescape design strategies for transformative service conversations. This model explains how and why servicescape design can influence consumer microtransformations. The article also begins to transfer servicescape design tactics from mental health services to other dyadic services that seek to facilitate consumer microtransformations. Examples of such services include career counseling, divorce law, financial advising, geriatric social work, nutrition counseling, personal styling and professional organizing.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-12-28
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-01-2021-4402
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • How does dataveillance drive consumer online payment resistance'

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      Authors: Amit Shankar , Rambalak Yadav , Abhishek Behl , Manish Gupta
      Abstract: This study aims to examine the effect of dataveillance on resistance towards online payment. Using a moderated-mediation framework, the study also investigates the mediating effects of perceived privacy and security concerns and how these mediating effects are moderated by corporate credibility, consumer scepticism and consumer empowerment. A scenario-based experimental design was performed to examine the proposed hypotheses. Analysis of covariance and PROCESS macro were used to examine the hypotheses by analysing 312 collected responses. The results indicated the dataveillance positively affects consumer resistance towards online payment. The results also suggested that corporate credibility and consumer scepticism significantly moderates the association between dataveillance and resistance towards online payment. The findings of this study will help online retailers to reduce consumers’ perceived privacy and security concerns, thereby reducing consumers’ resistance towards online payment. Theoretically, the study contributes to privacy, consumer behaviour, online payment and cognitive-motivational-relational theory literature.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-12-28
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-03-2021-4555
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • In/acceptable marketing and consumers' privacy expectations: four tests
           from EU data protection law

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      Authors: Gianclaudio Malgieri
      Abstract: This study aims to discover the legal borderline between licit online marketing and illicit privacy-intrusive and manipulative marketing, considering in particular consumers’ expectations of privacy. A doctrinal legal research methodology is applied throughout with reference to the relevant legislative frameworks. In particular, this study analyzes the European Union (EU) data protection law [General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)] framework (as it is one of the most advanced privacy laws in the world, with strong extra-territorial impact in other countries and consequent risks of high fines), as compared to privacy scholarship on the field and extract a compliance framework for marketers. The GDPR is a solid compliance framework that can help to distinguish licit marketing from illicit one. It brings clarity through four legal tests: fairness test, lawfulness test, significant effect test and the high-risk test. The performance of these tests can be beneficial to consumers and marketers in particular considering that meeting consumers’ expectation of privacy can enhance their trust. A solution for marketers to respect and leverage consumers’ privacy expectations is twofold: enhancing critical transparency and avoiding the exploitation of individual vulnerabilities. This study is limited to the European legal framework scenario and to theoretical analysis. Further research is necessary to investigate other legal frameworks and to prove this model in practice, measuring not only the consumers’ expectation of privacy in different contexts but also the practical managerial implications of the four GDPR tests for marketers. This study originally contextualizes the most recent privacy scholarship on online manipulation within the EU legal framework, proposing an easy and accessible four-step test and twofold solution for marketers. Such a test might be beneficial both for marketers and for consumers’ expectations of privacy.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-12-21
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-03-2021-4571
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Privacy concerns with COVID-19 tracking apps: a privacy calculus approach

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      Authors: Teresa Fernandes , Marta Costa
      Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic represents a unique challenge for public health worldwide. In this context, smartphone-based tracking apps play an important role in controlling transmission. However, privacy concerns may compromise the population’s willingness to adopt this mobile health (mHealth) technology. Based on the privacy calculus theory, this study aims to examine what factors drive or hinder adoption and disclosure, considering the moderating role of age and health status. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a European country hit by the pandemic that has recently launched a COVID-19 contact-tracing app. Data from 504 potential users was analyzed through partial least squares structural equation modeling. Results indicate that perceived benefits and privacy concerns impact adoption and disclosure and confirm the existence of a privacy paradox. However, for young and healthy users, only benefits have a significant effect. Moreover, older people value more personal than societal benefits while for respondents with a chronical disease privacy concerns outweigh personal benefits. The study contributes to consumer privacy research and to the mHealth literature, where privacy issues have been rarely explored, particularly regarding COVID-19 contact-tracing apps. The study re-examines the privacy calculus by incorporating societal benefits and moving from a traditional “self-focus” approach to an “other-focus” perspective. This study further adds to prior research by examining the moderating role of age and health condition, two COVID-19 risk factors. This study thus offers critical insights for governments and health organizations aiming to use these tools to reduce COVID-19 transmission rates.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-11
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-03-2021-4510
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Usage of smartphone for financial transactions: from the consumer privacy
           perspective

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      Authors: Sheshadri Chatterjee , Ranjan Chaudhuri , Demetris Vrontis , Zahid Hussain
      Abstract: This study aims to empirically examine how consumer privacy concerns (CPC) impact smartphone usage for financial transactions. The study also investigates the moderating impact of regulations on this action. With the inputs from literature and related privacy theories, a theoretical model was developed. The model was later empirically validated using the partial least squares structural equation modeling technique with 367 respondents from India. The study finds that CPC significantly impacts on consumer behavior in using smartphones for financial transactions. The study also highlights that regulation has a moderating impact on consumer usage of smartphones for financial transactions. This study provides valuable inputs to smartphone service providers, practitioners, regulatory authorities and policymakers on appropriate and secure usage of smartphones by consumers, ensuring privacy protection while making financial transactions. This study provides a unique model showing the antecedents of CPC to impact the behavioral reaction of smartphone users mediated through the ingredients of privacy calculus theory. Besides, this study analyzes the moderating effects of regulation on the use of smartphones for financial transactions. This is also a novel approach of this study.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-06
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-03-2021-4526
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Individual costs and societal benefits: the privacy calculus of
           contact-tracing apps

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Jeanette Carlsson Hauff , Jonas Nilsson
      Abstract: During 2020, governments around the world introduced contact-tracing apps to fight the COVID-19 pandemic. In order for contact-tracing apps to be efficient tools in combatting pandemics, a significant proportion of the population has to install it. However, in many countries, the success of apps introduced during the COVID-19 pandemic has been limited due to lack of public support. This paper aims to better understand why consumers seem unwilling to install and use a contact-tracing app. In this study, the authors test a number of determinants hypothesized to influence acceptance of contact-tracing apps based on the theory of privacy calculus (Dinev and Hart, 2006). Both perceived privacy concerns, as well as perceived hedonic, utilitarian and pro-social benefits are included. The hypotheses are tested through SEM analysis on a representative sample of 1,007 Swedish citizens. The results indicate significant privacy concerns with using contact-tracing apps. However, this is to some extent offset by perceived hedonic and pro-social positive consequences of using the app. This study further shows that a general positive attitude towards innovation increases acceptance of the app. The study contributes to research on consumer privacy, both in general in its application of the calculus model but also specifically in the context of contact-tracing apps. Moreover, as the results highlight which aspects that are important for consumers to accept and install an app of this kind, they also represent an important contribution to policymakers in countries around the world.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-09-07
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-03-2021-4559
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The digital traveller: implications for data ethics and data governance in
           tourism and hospitality

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      Authors: Anca C. Yallop , Oana A. Gică , Ovidiu I. Moisescu , Monica M. Coroș , Hugues Séraphin
      Abstract: Big data and analytics are being increasingly used by tourism and hospitality organisations (THOs) to provide insights and to inform critical business decisions. Particularly in times of crisis and uncertainty data analytics supports THOs to acquire the knowledge needed to ensure business continuity and the rebuild of tourism and hospitality sectors. Despite being recognised as an important source of value creation, big data and digital technologies raise ethical, privacy and security concerns. This paper aims to suggest a framework for ethical data management in tourism and hospitality designed to facilitate and promote effective data governance practices. The paper adopts an organisational and stakeholder perspective through a scoping review of the literature to provide an overview of an under-researched topic and to guide further research in data ethics and data governance. The proposed framework integrates an ethical-based approach which expands beyond mere compliance with privacy and protection laws, to include other critical facets regarding privacy and ethics, an equitable exchange of travellers’ data and THOs ability to demonstrate a social license to operate by building trusting relationships with stakeholders. This study represents one of the first studies to consider the development of an ethical data framework for THOs, as a platform for further refinements in future conceptual and empirical research of such data governance frameworks. It contributes to the advancement of the body of knowledge in data ethics and data governance in tourism and hospitality and other industries and it is also beneficial to practitioners, as organisations may use it as a guide in data governance practices.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-09-03
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-12-2020-4278
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Impact of fake news on social image perceptions and consumers’
           behavioral intentions

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      Authors: Anubhav Mishra , Sridhar Samu
      Abstract: This paper aims to examine how content relevancy influences consumers’ preference to receive and share fake news. Further, it investigates how these receivers perceive the social image of the people who share fake news. Finally, this study examines how brand strength and valence and credibility of fake content influence consumer’s word-of-mouth recommendations, purchase intentions and attitude toward the brand. Three experiments were conducted to test the hypotheses. The data was analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance and PROCESS techniques. Findings indicate that people prefer to receive and share relevant content, even if it is fake. Sharing fake news conveys the sender’s sociability but also creates a negative perception of narcissism. Individuals are more likely to recommend a brand if the fake news is perceived as credible and positive (vs negative). Finally, brand-strength can help brands to negate the harmful effects of fake news. Future research can explore the role of group dynamics, tie-strength and media richness (text, image and videos) in the dispersion of fake news and its impact on brands. Marketers should communicate and educate consumers that sharing fake content can harm their social image, which can reduce information dispersion. Marketers should also improve brand-strength that can protect the brand against the adverse impact of fake news. This study contributes to the emerging literature on fake news by studying the impact of fake news on consumer intentions and attitudes toward the brand, which are critical for the success of any brand.
      Citation: Journal of Consumer Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-08-18
      DOI: 10.1108/JCM-05-2020-3857
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Journal of Consumer Marketing

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