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PRODUCTION OF GOODS AND SERVICES (143 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 137 of 137 Journals sorted alphabetically
Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Marketing     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Marketing Journal (AMJ)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
BMC Health Services Research     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Capital Markets Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cleaner Environmental Systems     Open Access  
Cleaner Production Letters     Hybrid Journal  
Cleaner Waste Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Consumption Markets & Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Customer Needs and Solutions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Direct Marketing An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Disaster Prevention and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Economic & Labour Market Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Electronic Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Emerging Markets Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
European Journal of Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Financial Markets, Institutions & Instruments     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Food Packaging and Shelf Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Foundations and Trends® in Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Future Business Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Journal of Emerging Market Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Services and Outcomes Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Health Services Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Services Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
i+Diseño : Revista científico-académica internacional de Innovación, Investigación y Desarrollo en Diseño     Open Access  
Independent Journal of Management & Production     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ingeniería y Competitividad     Open Access  
International Journal of Advanced Operations Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Bank Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Business and Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Business Forecasting and Marketing Intelligence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Electronic Marketing and Retailing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Entrepreneurial Venturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Financial Services Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Information Systems and Supply Chain Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Inventory Research     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Lean Six Sigma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Logistics Economics and Globalisation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Managing Projects in Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Market Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Nonprofit & Voluntary Sector Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Planning and Scheduling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Product Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Production Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Production Management and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Production Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Productivity and Quality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Quality Innovation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Research in Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Service Industry Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Services and Standards     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Services Operations and Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Services Sciences     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Supply Chain and Inventory Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Supply Chain and Operations Resilience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Supply Chain Management     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Systems Science : Operations & Logistics     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Technology Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Trade and Global Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Internet Reference Services Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
JCMS : Journal of Common Market Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Journal of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Business Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Business Venturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Cleaner Production     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Database Marketing & Customer Strategy Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Direct Data and Digital Marketing Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Emerging Knowledge on Emerging Markets     Open Access  
Journal of Entrepreneurial Finance     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Financial Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Food Products Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Foodservice Business Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Global Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Global Operations and Strategic Sourcing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Services Research and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of International Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Loss Prevention in the Process Industries     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 53)
Journal of Marketing Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Marketing Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Marketing Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 73)
Journal of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Operations and Supply Chain Management     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Political Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Prediction Markets     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Product Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Production Research & Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Productivity Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Progressive Human Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Public Policy & Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Relationship Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Service Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Services Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Strategic Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Targeting Measurement and Analysis for Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Technology Management & Innovation     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Vacation Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Logistics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Logistics Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Management and Administrative Sciences Review     Open Access  
Management and Production Engineering Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Manufacturing & Service Operations Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Marketing Intelligence & Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Marketing Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Marketing Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Marketing Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Psychological Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Psychology & Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Quantitative Marketing and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Reproduction Fertility and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Review of Pacific Basin Financial Markets and Policies     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Eletrônica Academicus     Open Access  
Revue Interventions économiques     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Service Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Service Oriented Computing and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Service Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Services Marketing Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Social Marketing Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Strategy Management Logistics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Supply Chain Forum : an International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Sustainable Production and Consumption     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Technology Operation Management     Hybrid Journal  
The Journal of Futures Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
The Service Industries Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Universal Journal of Industrial and Business Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Venture Capital: An International Journal of Entrepreneurial Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
WPOM - Working Papers on Operations Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Social Marketing Quarterly
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.43
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 6  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1524-5004 - ISSN (Online) 1539-4093
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Consumer Insights into Changing Water Consumption Behavior: A Social
           Marketing Formative Study

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      Authors: Ali Ibrahim, Sharyn Rundle-Thiele, Ra’d Almestarihi
      Abstract: Social Marketing Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Background and Situation AnalysisThe United Nations has announced serious global water crises at the beginning of the 21st century. In the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the problem of water shortage is more significant than in other parts of the world, due to lack of the natural freshwater resources and extremely harsh weather. All of this compounded with the highest individual water consumption in the world; the average consumption per capita is 500 L a day, around 82% above the global average.Focus of the ArticleThe main objectives of this study were to gain insights about factors that might impact residents water consumption behavior and open more avenues for using social marketing to influence residents’ behaviors.Research questionThe research questions are: RQ1: What beliefs are held about the UAEs current water situation' RQ2: What are the current water consumption behaviors of UoS residents' RQ3: What would facilitate lower water consumption'Importance to the Social Marketing FieldThe importance of this study is to develop a model which may be employed to change individual water consumption behavior using social marketing principlesMethodA case study methodology was applied to collect data from the University of Sharjah for this study, using the focus groups method. A convenience sample of six focus groups with a total of 39 participants of students, faculty members, administrative staff, and other stakeholders formed the basis of the current study.ResultsThis study revealed that the residents lacked accurate knowledge about the water situation inside the country. In addition, consumers showed mismatch between their religious beliefs and actual consumption behaviors.Recommendations for research/or practiceMore studies and research should take place in this field, especially in connection with personal behavior issues where individuals need encouragement and incentives to change underlying habits, such as over-consumption of water, obesity, and road accidents.
      Citation: Social Marketing Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-08-03T07:56:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15245004221117299
       
  • A Social Marketing Framework for the Sharing Economy

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      Authors: Amarjeet Singh
      Abstract: Social Marketing Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundSocio-economic issues; such as social economic inequality, sustainability of resources, and environmental concern are major social concerns and the call for economic reforms to address these issues is growing louder. Sharing economy, as a socio-economic system, presents a solution to the current linear economic model having the potential to address the aforementioned socio-economic issues. Sharing, being environmentally friendly and sustainable in nature, bridges the gap of social economic inequality prevalent in society. The attributes of the sharing economy are different from the traditional economic model which is more “social” in nature, hence making social marketing techniques more suitable than the conventional marketing approach.Focus of the ArticleThe conceptual paper is focused on the application of social marketing in the sharing economy to address socio-economic issues and in doing so presents a framework to achieve its goal.Research QuestionHow can social marketing effectively influence social behavioural changes as they relate to socio-economic changes'Program Design/ApproachThe framework developed outlines three levels of intervention for the successful implementation of social marketing in the sharing economy. The downstream intervention focuses on influencing consumer behavioural traits necessary for the adoption of the sharing economy by applying an appropriate marketing mix strategy. The upstream intervention focuses on policy and lawmakers, social and economic institutions, environmental groups, advocacy bodies, and lobbying organisations capable of addressing the root cause of the issue. The midstream intervention focuses on integrating upstream intervention with downstream through service providers.Importance to the Social Marketing FieldThe research paper extends social marketing application from influencing social behavioural issues to addressing and influencing socio-economic issues with its proposed application in sharing economy. The study provides a framework to address key socio-economic (social economic inequality) and consumer behavioural issues (materialism and ownership) that are prevalent in society.MethodThe proposed social marketing framework for the sharing economy is created after carrying out a systematic literature review on social marketing and sharing economy. The extant literature analysis focussed on key definitional parameters and their evolution over time. With the identification of key elements and benchmark framework, the three levels of social marketing intervention are developed and presented for the actionable implementation of a successful marketing strategy.Future ResearchThe research paper provides an initial framework for the social marketing intervention in the sharing economy and in influencing socio-economic change which opens the door for future research direction; what additional upstream and midstream social marketing intervention is necessary to bring socio-cultural and socio-economic change to tackle the issue of social economic inequality'Paper typeConceptual paper.
      Citation: Social Marketing Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-08-03T07:37:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15245004221117316
       
  • When Less is More: A Short-form Tool to Increase Segmentation
           Implementation

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      Authors: Julia Carins, Anna Kitunen, Sharyn Rundle-Thiele
      Abstract: Social Marketing Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundSegmentation remains underutilised in social marketing research and practice. Simple segmentation tools that are easy to administer and simple for audience members to complete may increase the use of segmentation across the social marketing process.Focus of the ArticleSegmentation is a foundational marketing principle which allows marketers to tailor marketing activity to the needs of specific groups (segments). Evidence shows that behaviour change is more likely when more principles are used, yet segmentation remains underutilised. Data-driven methods are used to identify segments based on several variables collected via surveys, but they take time, require large sample sizes and technical analyses; and can be costly and time consuming.Importance to the FieldSimple diagnostic tools are needed to simplify data collection and increase the use of key social marketing principles such as segmentation.MethodsThree studies were conducted to create and verify a short diagnostic segmentation tool and later refine a tool that reflects contemporary social marketing practice. The first employed multiple linear regression to predict segment membership based on previously performed two-step cluster analysis. The second applied the tool to another data set to verify whether the tool could predict segment membership accurately. The final study delivers a short diagnostic tool following the same development approach to a data set drawn from a larger sample that included objective measures ensuring focus moved beyond how individuals think and feel.ResultsSegments in the first study had been defined by five variables (derived from 16 survey questions). The tool was able to predict segment membership to a high level of accuracy from five questions. In the second study the tool was used to predict segments, which had high correspondence to the segments identified in that analysis, which was also based on five variables (16 questions). The third study extended development to an analysis using 16 defining variables, based on 40 survey questions. The final tool predicted segment membership to a high degree of accuracy based on five survey questions.Recommendations for Research or PracticeSegmentation is important for developing understanding that enables social marketers to design social change programs to meet the needs of more people. This simple tool developed and verified within and across samples has potential to simplify data collection enabling greater uptake of segmentation in social marketing practice. The final tool incorporated objective measures to ensure segmentation moves beyond the myopic consumer focus that has dominated social marketing. Future research could use the approach in this paper to derive short diagnostic tools with a broader range of behavioural contexts and with more diverse populations.LimitationsThe behavioural measures used in these studies were self-report measures, and the use of a more objective measure would further strengthen both the segmentation analysis and short diagnostic tool.
      Citation: Social Marketing Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-07-19T10:40:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15245004221116082
       
  • How Social Marketing Contributed to Expanding Size of Overall Condom
           Markets in Ethiopia, Brazil, and Indonesia

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      Authors: David J. Olson, Christopher Purdy, Rory Harrington, Dan Marun, Juan Enrique Garcia
      First page: 91
      Abstract: Social Marketing Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Background and Situation AnalysisFor more than 50 years, social marketing has been used to address a variety of health issues in the Global South, including the promotion and distribution of condoms for family planning and HIV prevention. Condom social marketers aim not just to increase sales of their own brands; they seek to increase demand for all condoms—whether it be through the commercial, non-profit or public sectors. The number of male condoms distributed through social marketing increased from 591 million in 27 countries in 1991 to more than 1.5 billion in 66 countries in 2020. Concurrent with this growth in the number of countries, the size of the condom markets also grew in most, if not all, of those countries.Target Audience(s)The primary audiences of condom social marketing programs are low income and high-risk populations in the developing countries of Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe, Latin America, and the Caribbean. They often focus on young people and high risk groups—such as sex workers and their partners, injecting drug users, soldiers, and migrant workers—who do not always have reliable access to affordable condoms. As condom social marketing programs mature, they often use market segmentation to add higher priced condoms aimed at middle-income and even higher-income consumers, and the profits are used to “cross-subsidize” the lower-priced brands.Behavioral ObjectiveTo increase purchase and use of condoms, particularly with low-income people and certain high risk individuals (such as young people, commercial sex workers, injecting drug users and men who have sex with men), by selling them through a wide variety of sales outlets at highly subsidized prices.StrategyThe authors examined mature condom social marketing programs in Ethiopia, Brazil and Indonesia where the growth in condom social marketing was accompanied by similar growth of the total condom market. They looked at the evolution and sales of these three programs, and the larger condom universes in those countries. The authors were interested to know if social marketing programs help expand the larger condom markets, and not just grow sales of their own products.ResultsBased on the evidence, the authors believe that these three programs contributed significantly to creating larger markets even though there were surely other forces at work (such as changes in government policy or fears of being infected with HIV). This article adds to the limited literature on the effect of successful condom social marketing programs on their broader markets.Recommendations for Social Marketing PracticeThe authors make five recommendations for social marketers interested in replicating the success of these programs: 1) keeping one product in each product category highly affordable, 2) applying market segmentation through cross-subsidization, 3) showing flexibility in distribution, 4) pushing the limits on behavior change communication, and 5) building the product category (Neugaard, 2008).
      Citation: Social Marketing Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-03-28T07:02:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15245004221077965
       
  • Using Community-Based Social Marketing to Reduce Pet Waste Bacteria in
           Streams

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      Authors: Tracey Haldeman, Wesley Schmidt
      First page: 109
      Abstract: Social Marketing Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Background and Situation AnalysisBaltimore County waterways are impaired by pollution from pet waste. Baltimore County engaged in a campaign to reduce bacteria in waterways caused by dog waste. This paper explores modalities to effectuate change in pet owner behavior which will ameliorate the negative effects of dog waste on the environment.Priority AudienceDog owners living within Baltimore County who are not picking up dog waste in their backyards.Behavioral ObjectiveThe behavioral objective was to encourage people who were not currently picking up dog waste in their yards to start doing so.Strategy/Intervention Planning and DevelopmentThe study examined the effectiveness of using a community-based social marketing (CBSM) campaign to reduce bacteria in streams by encouraging dog owners to clean up properly after their pets.Our approach included all elements of the four Ps of marketing (product, price, place, promotion). The study included formative research to understand barriers and motivators of the audience and to test messages. The campaign was implemented in four targeted areas and then bacteria in waterways was measured to evaluate behavior change. Community-based social marketing strategies included interpersonal communication, securing commitments, promoting social norms, using prompts and increasing knowledge of pet waste pollution in waterways.Evaluation Methods and ResultsThe pilot compared three different delivery methods: (A) direct to household (HH) using door-to-door outreach, (B) outreach at pet-related location(s) and (C) a combination of (A) and (B) in order to determine the best use of resources for future campaigns. Results from four implementation areas were compared to two non-treatment control areas; over 12,000 HHs combined. We measured the effect of the campaign by analyzing the change in the Most Probable Number (MPN) of fecal indicator bacteria (E. coli) per 100 mL of stream water in both implementation and control areas before the campaign as compared to post-campaign. We then compared results from our campaign to any changes that may have also occurred in those same time periods in 2018 (the year prior to our campaign). Comparing 2019 changes to any changes in 2018 helped to determine whether variations in measured bacteria may have been due to seasonal fluctuations.Results showed a measured decrease in bacteria levels in 3 out of 4 targeted areas from pre-implementation to post-implementation. Our research findings suggested that CBSM contributed to decreased bacteria levels in streams.Recommendations for Social Marketing PracticeDuring this study, we learned the importance of interpersonal communication and partnerships to help promote the product. Partnerships included places where our primary audience trusted information received and places where we could reach a high concentration of our target audience. Results indicate that interpersonal communication at partner locations seemed just as effective as door-to-door outreach. A recommendation for future efforts is that human resources needed for CBSM can be concentrated in partner locations. Door-to-door efforts are still valuable and can be reserved for hot spot areas and potentially supported by volunteers.
      Citation: Social Marketing Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T01:28:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15245004221097696
       
  • A Trait-Based Consumer Segmentation for Food Waste Reduction Campaigns

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      Authors: Mustafa Bilgehan Kutlu
      First page: 130
      Abstract: Social Marketing Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Background:While there is still hunger in the world, a significant amount of food is wasted, which harms the environment. This study focuses on food waste at the consumer level and investigates the role of personality traits on food-waste-aversion.Focus of the Article:Segmentation with personality traits for food waste reduction campaigns.Research Question:Is there a link between personality traits and food-waste-aversion' Are there any associations among consumers’ levels of food-waste-aversion, frugality, conscientiousness, and religiosity'Importance to the Social Marketing Field:Segmentation is a neglected marketing tool in designing campaigns against food waste. This study identifies possible market segments of social marketing campaigns against food waste. In addition, associations among food-waste-aversion and personality traits of conscientiousness, frugality, and religiosity are shown in this study.Methods:This study adopts a cross-sectional research design. A convenience sample of 301 consumers in Turkey is surveyed via an online questionnaire.Results:Results of Chi-Square Automatic Interaction Detector (CHAID) analysis indicate five distinct consumer segments, namely frugal believers, frugal seculars, conscientious individuals, casual females, and casual males. Moreover, positive associations (p < 0.001) among food-waste-aversion and personality traits of conscientiousness, frugality, and religiosity are shown.Recommendations for Research or Practice:This study provides a segmentation procedure with the trait perspective. Frugality, conscientiousness, and religiosity traits can play an essential role in food waste reduction. Targeting individuals with communications fit with their personality is likely to increase the success of food waste reduction interventions.Limitations:Due to a lack of behavioral data, this study investigates food waste at the attitudinal level. Further study could use behavioral measures. In addition, the majority of participants in the survey are Muslim. In order to validate research findings across different cultures, it should be carried out in other countries.
      Citation: Social Marketing Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T09:07:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15245004221097752
       
  • Understanding the Audience for a Digital Capacity-Building Platform for
           Micro-Retailers in Nairobi, Kenya: A Latent Class Segmentation Analysis

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      Authors: Evelyn Kumoji, Olamide Oyenubi, Alice Rhoades, Jarret Cassaniti, Fred Rariewa, Saori Ohkubo
      First page: 147
      Abstract: Social Marketing Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Background: Digital programs need to understand the characteristics of their audiences to develop services that meet the needs of different user groups.Focus of the Article: This manuscript is related to research and evaluation, and to four social marketing benchmarks: Consumer Research, Segmentation and Targeting, Consumer Orientation, and Exchange.Research Question: What are the behavioral characteristics and user profiles among duka owners who are using a digital business capacity-building platform in Nairobi, Kenya.Design/Approach: Survey assessment of use of a mobile-friendly online platform for promoting business growth among underserved micro-retail shop (duka) owners in Nairobi, Kenya. The UJoin platform offers duka owners access to business and financial courses, online mentoring, networking opportunities, and access to product information.Importance to the Field: The research will provide critical insights into program and audience needs for use of digital platforms, including promoting, scaling, and strengthening digital services.Methods: 805 shop owners in Nairobi, Kenya participated in a survey about perceptions and use of the internet. Latent class analysis identified homogeneous “classes” within the sample, and behavioral profiles and predictors of platform use.Results: Analysis yielded a 3-class model. Class 1 Endorsers endorsed community norms, social support, learning, networking, and perceived business benefits from websites. Class 2 Skeptics did not support collaboration and learning. Class 3 Unengaged lacked support to use online platforms. Predictors of frequent use of digital platforms were self-efficacy (OR: 5.95, p < .001), Endorser (OR: 3.13, p < .001) and Unengaged (OR: 2.42, p < .055) class, and agreeing that connections to duka owners is important (OR: 3.02, p < .003).Conclusion: Diversified strategies to promote use of online platforms may meet different needs of sub-groups among user groups.Recommendations for Research and Practice: Multiple strategies are needed to address different needs of sub-groups within a larger audience. Programs may benefit from investments to characterize the audience during recruitment to better understand attitudes towards, and efficacy to use, the internet, level of motivation, technology and support needs, and attitudes towards learning and networking.Limitations: The survey sample was a non-random selection of duka owners and relied on self-reported data which may be subject to social-desirability bias and recall. Some of the survey questions about perceptions were derived from single-item variables rather than an index or scale. The cross-sectional design of the survey precludes causal inferences.
      Citation: Social Marketing Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T07:55:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15245004221097715
       
  • Using Social Marketing to Demystify the Myths Surrounding Covid-19
           Vaccination: The Mediating Role of Important Others

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      Authors: Isaac Sewornu Coffie, Atsu Nkukpornu, William Adomako Kankam, Chosniel Elikem Ocloo
      First page: 169
      Abstract: Social Marketing Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundThe misconceptions and conspiracy theories against the Covid-19 vaccines have been identified as potential factors that could negatively impact herd immunity for the Covid-19 vaccination.Focus of the articleFrom the perspectives of the Health Belief Model and the Theory of Planned Behavior, the study sought to determine an effective social marketing intervention to address the misconceptions about the Covid-19 vaccines.Research HypothesesThe hypotheses stipulate that perceived susceptibility, perceived severity, perceived benefit, and perceived barriers of the coronavirus will positively influence Covid-19 vaccination behavior. The study further hypothesized that subjective norms (important others) would significantly mediate the relationships.MethodsStructured questionnaires were used to collect data from 821 individuals from three administrative regions, which constitutes 65% of the population of Ghana. The quota and convenience sampling technique was used in selecting the respondents due to the lack of a sampling frame.ResultsThe study’s findings show that only perceived susceptibility and the perceived barrier directly influence the Covid-19 vaccination behavior. The result, however, shows a significant improvement when important others were introduced as a mediating variable. Thus, all four constructs had a positive and significant influence on Covid-19 vaccination behavior through subjective norm (important others) as an intervening variable. The study shows the value of using opinion leaders as a communication channel in addressing the misperceptions and conspiracy theories against the Covid-19 vaccines.Recommendation for Research/PracticeTo effectively address the misconceptions about the Covid-19 vaccines and improve herd immunity, social marketers should identify key influencers in various communities and cities and use them in promoting the vaccination program. The study examined and found subjective norms (perceived social pressure from important others in society on an individual to perform or not to perform a behavior) as a significant mediator for promoting the Covid-19 vaccination behavior.LimitationsThe current study examined the mediating role of subjective norm and the HBMs' constructs. Future studies could also consider integrating subjective norm as a mediator in other behavioral change theories to predict the target audience’s behavior.
      Citation: Social Marketing Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-04-24T05:14:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15245004221097802
       
  • Tribute to Philip D. Harvey: A Social Marketing Founding Father and Titan

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      Authors: Christopher Purdy
      First page: 184
      Abstract: Social Marketing Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Social Marketing Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-04-23T01:57:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15245004221097830
       
 
JournalTOCs
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