Subjects -> BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (Total: 3541 journals)
    - ACCOUNTING (132 journals)
    - BANKING AND FINANCE (306 journals)
    - BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (1229 journals)
    - CONSUMER EDUCATION AND PROTECTION (20 journals)
    - COOPERATIVES (4 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SCIENCES: GENERAL (212 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SYSTEMS, THEORIES AND HISTORY (235 journals)
    - FASHION AND CONSUMER TRENDS (20 journals)
    - HUMAN RESOURCES (103 journals)
    - INSURANCE (26 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE (145 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND AID (103 journals)
    - INVESTMENTS (22 journals)
    - LABOR AND INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS (61 journals)
    - MACROECONOMICS (17 journals)
    - MANAGEMENT (595 journals)
    - MARKETING AND PURCHASING (106 journals)
    - MICROECONOMICS (23 journals)
    - PRODUCTION OF GOODS AND SERVICES (143 journals)
    - PUBLIC FINANCE, TAXATION (37 journals)
    - TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL DIRECTORIES (2 journals)

PRODUCTION OF GOODS AND SERVICES (143 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 137 of 137 Journals sorted alphabetically
Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Marketing     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Marketing Journal (AMJ)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
BMC Health Services Research     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Capital Markets Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cleaner Environmental Systems     Open Access  
Cleaner Production Letters     Hybrid Journal  
Cleaner Waste Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Consumption Markets & Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Customer Needs and Solutions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Direct Marketing An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Disaster Prevention and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Economic & Labour Market Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Electronic Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Emerging Markets Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
European Journal of Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Financial Markets, Institutions & Instruments     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Food Packaging and Shelf Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Foundations and Trends® in Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Future Business Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Journal of Emerging Market Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Services and Outcomes Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Health Services Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Services Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
i+Diseño : Revista científico-académica internacional de Innovación, Investigación y Desarrollo en Diseño     Open Access  
Independent Journal of Management & Production     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ingeniería y Competitividad     Open Access  
International Journal of Advanced Operations Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Bank Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Business and Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Business Forecasting and Marketing Intelligence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Electronic Marketing and Retailing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Entrepreneurial Venturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Financial Services Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Information Systems and Supply Chain Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Inventory Research     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Lean Six Sigma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Logistics Economics and Globalisation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Managing Projects in Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Market Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Nonprofit & Voluntary Sector Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Planning and Scheduling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Product Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Production Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Production Management and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Production Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Productivity and Quality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Quality Innovation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Research in Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Service Industry Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Services and Standards     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Services Operations and Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Services Sciences     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Supply Chain and Inventory Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Supply Chain and Operations Resilience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Supply Chain Management     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Systems Science : Operations & Logistics     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Technology Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Trade and Global Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Internet Reference Services Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
JCMS : Journal of Common Market Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Journal of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Business Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Business Venturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Cleaner Production     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Database Marketing & Customer Strategy Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Direct Data and Digital Marketing Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Emerging Knowledge on Emerging Markets     Open Access  
Journal of Entrepreneurial Finance     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Financial Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Food Products Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Foodservice Business Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Global Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Global Operations and Strategic Sourcing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Services Research and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of International Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Loss Prevention in the Process Industries     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 50)
Journal of Marketing Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Marketing Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Marketing Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 71)
Journal of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Operations and Supply Chain Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Political Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Prediction Markets     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Product Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Production Research & Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Productivity Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Progressive Human Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Public Policy & Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Relationship Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Service Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Services Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Strategic Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Targeting Measurement and Analysis for Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Technology Management & Innovation     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Vacation Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Logistics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Logistics Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Management and Administrative Sciences Review     Open Access  
Management and Production Engineering Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Manufacturing & Service Operations Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Marketing Intelligence & Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Marketing Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Marketing Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Marketing Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Psychological Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Psychology & Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Quantitative Marketing and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Reproduction Fertility and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Review of Pacific Basin Financial Markets and Policies     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Eletrônica Academicus     Open Access  
Revue Interventions économiques     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Service Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Service Oriented Computing and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Service Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Services Marketing Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Social Marketing Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Strategy Management Logistics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Supply Chain Forum : an International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Sustainable Production and Consumption     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Technology Operation Management     Hybrid Journal  
The Journal of Futures Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
The Service Industries Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Universal Journal of Industrial and Business Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Venture Capital: An International Journal of Entrepreneurial Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
WPOM - Working Papers on Operations Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Social Marketing Quarterly
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.43
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 6  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1524-5004 - ISSN (Online) 1539-4093
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Celebrating Lessons Learned from “Unsuccessful” Social
           Marketing Interventions

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sameer Deshpande
      First page: 3
      Abstract: Social Marketing Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Social Marketing Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-02-02T10:25:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15245004221077324
       
  • Social Marketing in Latin America: A Historical Overview

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Marisol Alonso Vazquez, Nathaly Aya Pastrana
      First page: 8
      Abstract: Social Marketing Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundAlthough research about the trajectory of social marketing in the Global South has recently emerged, there is still limited scientific evidence exploring the past and current state of social marketing in Latin America. Understanding how social marketing has been used broadly in Latin America can help identify areas to prioritize and further advance social marketing research in the region.Focus of the ArticleThis article provides evidence of the evolution of social marketing in Latin America from the 1960s. It offers a better understanding of the application of social marketing in this region, and focuses on identifying challenges and applications illustrative of its evolution.Importance to the Social Marketing FieldThis study provides a historical overview of the evolution of social marketing in Latin America. It explores how social marketing has been applied across time to drive positive social change in this region. Relevant studies identified during this study serve as valuable information for researchers and practitioners interested in studying and applying social marketing in Latin America and similar contexts.MethodsThis exploratory study presents a broad overview of the body of literature with a focus on illustrative examples that depict the trajectory of social marketing in Latin America across time. Evidence in English, Spanish, and Portuguese languages were collected through diverse sources including search engines, academic databases, social marketing journals, and consultation with researchers and practitioners from the region. This search was complemented with evidence from a selection of classic social marketing books.ResultsThe evidence collected shows that social marketing has been used in Latin America for four decades but still has not achieved its full potential. Findings show a predominant use of downstream social marketing approaches as opposed to midstream or upstream approaches. Results also show that international funding was a key element for grounding the use of social marketing in Latin America between the 1970s and 1990s but it appears to be less predominant after these decades.Recommendations for Research or PracticeFurther research is required to provide a more nuanced understanding of the Latin American social marketing landscape. Scholars and practitioners are invited to share experiences and further investigate conceptualizations of social marketing from their unique contexts, realities, and native languages.LimitationsThis study was delimited to provide a historical overview of the use of social marketing in Latin America based on a synthesis of the existing literature. A systematic approach to evidence synthesis is recommended for future studies on this topic.
      Citation: Social Marketing Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-02-02T12:00:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15245004211073189
       
  • Selecting High-Impact Landscape Irrigation Conservation Behaviors:
           Formative Research to Inform Behavior-Change Efforts

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Laura A. Warner, John M. Diaz, Michael D. Dukes
      First page: 28
      Abstract: Social Marketing Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundThis work addresses the increasing prevalence of water scarcity. Droughts are projected to worsen as a result of climate change and urbanization, increasing the need for all sectors to reduce the amount of water used. Home landscape irrigation represents an important opportunity to reduce water use in the United States.Focus of the ArticleThis formative research study used social marketing techniques to estimate potential impact of irrigation water conservation behaviors, weight and prioritize the behaviors to guide behavior selection in the context of residential irrigation conservation.Research ObjectiveThe objectives were to estimate (1) the potential impact of, (2) current adoption levels and likelihood of adoption of, and to (3) prioritize various landscape irrigation water conservation behaviors.Program Design/ApproachWhen addressing any issue, including water scarcity, identifying target behaviors is the first, foundational step for a successful social marketing campaign. This research focuses on formative social marketing research to inform local interventions designed to reduce the amount of water applied to residential yards across the United States.Importance to the Social Marketing FieldThis study outlines a process to compare and prioritize water conservation behaviors with the goal of reducing residential landscape irrigation usage. We demonstrate a technique for obtaining this type of formative research, the lack of which can serve as a barrier to change agents promoting behaviors in any context.MethodsWe employed a two-pronged quantitative survey research approach to collect technical experts’ impact ranking and U.S. residents’ current adoption levels and likelihood of adopting potential irrigation water conservation behaviors. The 14-member expert panel was selected using purposive and snowball sampling techniques, and the residential sample (N = 2601) was recruited using purposive sampling.ResultsMean weights ranged from −46.55 to 61.13. Singly considering impact, current adoption levels, or likelihood of adoption would result in a different behavior receiving priority for a campaign (eliminating irrigated areas in landscapes, installing smart irrigation controllers, and following local watering restrictions, respectively). However, when these values were considered together, installing drought-tolerant plants in the yard had the greatest overall weight.LimitationsA possible conceptual limitation of this case study was the national scope of our research. The findings provide valuable baseline data for behavior change practitioners working across the country, and it is advisable to replicate this process at a local scale corresponding to the targeted intervention.Recommendations for Research or PracticeThe findings underscore the importance of including technical experts and target audience members early in social marketing program planning and reveal the importance of systematically approaching behavior change selection to thoroughly consider different components of potential behaviors. Behavior change practitioners working on water issues can use the weights reported here to prioritize behaviors for targeted interventions, and those working in all areas can follow the process to prioritize behaviors at the local level. There are exciting opportunities to decompose likelihood into behavioral antecedents for both research and application.
      Citation: Social Marketing Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T03:13:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15245004211071057
       
  • Using Formative Research to Develop a Social Marketing Campaign to
           Understand Food Shopping Behaviors in Young Mothers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Judit Sarai Alvarado, Ximena Perez-Velazco, Victoria Gregorio, Mike Newton Ward, Molly De Marco
      First page: 44
      Abstract: Social Marketing Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundThe Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as food stamps, serves as the primary method of governmental-funded defense against food insecurity in the USA through the provision of food-purchasing assistance to eligible low-income people and families. However, participation in SNAP has been associated with dietary disparities and increased risk of chronic disease associated with overweight and obesity. Low-income individuals are more vulnerable to diet-related chronic disease, as they often have limited resources, are unable to afford healthier foods, such as fruits and vegetables, experience a lack of geographic access to healthy foods, and find themselves without time to prepare healthy meals. As a result, financially marginalized populations are less likely to adhere to Federal Dietary Guidelines for Americans.ObjectiveThe purpose of this study was twofold: first, to gain insight into factors influencing food choices and grocery shopping behaviors of women with children, on a limited budget, who utilize or are eligible for SNAP; second, to develop and implement interventions based on these insights to enable participants to better adhere to the Federal Dietary Guidelines for Americans.MethodsWe conducted independent formative interviews with 19 women in Spring 2018 to develop a social marketing campaign to promote a behavior change associated with healthy grocery shopping practices. These participants were interviewed using a loosely guided interview that gauged barriers, benefits, motivators, competition, and influencers of using a food budget. Of these participants, we identified those who were actively practicing the selected behavior of budgeting for and purchasing healthy foods, like fruits and vegetables. To empower women within this community by drawing from the experiences and knowledge of other women from this same community, participants were selected to participate in a more thorough interview process, followed by a journey mapping exercise. Data collected from the interviews and journey mapping exercise were analyzed for barriers and facilitators to developing and maintaining the adoption and use of a healthy food budget. In response, the research team conducted a search for interventions that aligned with the outlined barriers noted from the interviews and developed a social marketing campaign. This social marketing campaign was then delivered in a series of sessions where pre- and post-surveys were administered to assess grocery shopping behaviors and budgeting practices.ResultsSpecific topics yielded from the journey mapping exercise included tips and tricks mothers used to successfully budget for and purchase healthy foods. Additionally, mothers who participated in the social marketing intervention reported grocery shopping at least one to two times a week. When asked about their habits related to purchasing fruits and vegetables through pre- and post-surveys, 60% of the participants reported intentionally purchasing fruits and vegetables every time they went grocery shopping. Seventy nine percent (79%) of women reported creating a budget allocated for groceries before shopping, while 42% reported sticking to this budget.ImplicationsThe study identified three domains of determinants that influence budgeting and shopping for healthy groceries that can inform future formative research and development of interventions among women with children who utilize or are eligible for SNAP.
      Citation: Social Marketing Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-01-31T11:54:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15245004211073187
       
  • Caught in the Act: Detecting Respondent Deceit and Disinterest in On-Line
           Surveys. A Case Study Using Facial Expression Analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Robert W. Hammond, Claudia Parvanta, Rahel Zemen
      First page: 57
      Abstract: Social Marketing Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Much social marketing research is done on-line recruiting participants through Amazon Mechanical Turk, vetted panel vendors, social media, or community sources. When compensation is offered, care must be taken to distinguish genuine respondents from those with ulterior motives. We present a case study based on unanticipated empirical observations made while evaluating perceived effectiveness (PE) ratings of anti-tobacco public service announcements (PSAs) using facial expression (FE) analysis (pretesting).This study alerts social marketers to the risk and impact of disinterest or fraud in compensated on-line surveys. We introduce FE analysis to detect and remove bad data, improving the rigor and validity of on-line data collection. We also compare community (free) and vetted panel (fee added) recruitment in terms of usable samples. Methods: We recruited respondents through (Community) sources and through a well-known (Panel) vendor. Respondents completed a one-time, random block design Qualtrics® survey that collected PE ratings and recorded FE in response to PSAs. We used the AFFDEX® feature of iMotions® to calculate respondent attention and expressions; we also visually inspected respondent video records. Based on this quan/qual analysis, we divided 501 respondents (1503 observations) into three groups: (1) Those demonstrably watching PSAs before rating them (Valid), (2) those who were inattentive but completed the rating tasks (Disinterested), and (3) those employing various techniques to game the system (Deceitful). We used one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) of attention (head positioning), engagement (all facial expressions), and specific facial expressions (FE) to test the likelihood a respondent fell into one of the three behavior groups. Results: PE ratings: The Community pool (N = 92) was infiltrated by Deceitful actors (58%), but the remaining 42% was “attentive” (i.e., no disinterest). The Panel pool (N = 409) included 11% deceitful and 2% disinterested respondents. Over half of the PSAs change rank order when deceitful responses are included in the Community sample. The smaller proportion of Deceitful and Disinterested (D&D) respondents in the Panel affected 2 (out of 12) videos. In both samples, the effect was to lower the PE ranking of more diverse and “locally made” PSAs. D&D responses clustered tightly to the mean values, believed to be an artefact of “professional” test taking behavior. FE analysis: The combined Valid sample was more attentive (87.2% of the time) compared to Disinterested (51%) or Deceitful (41%) (ANOVA F = 195.6, p < .001). Models using “engagement” and specific FEs (“cheek raise and smirk”) distinguished Valid from D&D responses. Recommendations: False PE pretesting scores waste social marketing budgets and could have disastrous results. Risk can be reduced by using vetted panels with a trade-off that community sources may produce more authentically interested respondents. Ways to make surveys more tamper-evident, with and without webcam recording, are provided as well as procedures to clean data. Check data before compensating respondents! Limitations: This was an accidental finding in a parent study. The study required computers which potentially biased the pool of survey respondents. The community pool is smaller than the panel group, limiting statistical power.
      Citation: Social Marketing Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-02-05T05:19:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15245004221074403
       
  • The Pandemic-Induced Personal Data Explosion

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ana Isabel Canhoto, Aaron R. Brough
      First page: 78
      Abstract: Social Marketing Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Government and private responses to the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in the generation and dissemination of personal data not previously available in the public sphere. This “Notes from the Field” paper reflects on the implications of this surge of new data for the study and practice of social marketing. The paper examines how this phenomenon impacts on the following aspects of social marketing: (1) Setting of explicit social goals; (2) citizen orientation and focus; (3) value proposition delivery via the social marketing intervention mix; (4) theory-, insight-, data-, and evidence-informed audience segmentation; (5) competition/barrier and asset analysis; and (6) critical thinking, reflexivity, and being ethical. The paper investigates the research question "How are the government and private responses to the pandemic shaping the generation and use of personal data, and what are the implications of this eruption of data for the social marketing scholarly community'" We draw on the Core Social Marketing Concepts framework to explore how the aforementioned data explosion impacts on the six dimensions of this central framework. We find that the data explosion creates conflicting social marketing goals, and that inequalities in access to digital technology are increasingly impacting what voices are heard, and which concerns are prioritized. Moreover, new innovations may be enabled or needed, leading to the improvement of firms’ ability to create value for individual citizens; the creation of new datasets—particularly among demographics that previously had a limited digital footprint—enhances the ability to segment markets and target social marketing activities. Furthermore, the pandemic-induced data explosion may lead to the identification of additional barriers to positive social behaviors that have emerged, diminished, or even disappeared during the pandemic; but researchers need to critically examine the consequences of the government and private behaviors at the macro, meso, and micro levels. We propose a research agenda for the social marketing community, consisting of 21 research questions. Our analysis focuses on the behavior of government and citizens in North America and Western Europe.
      Citation: Social Marketing Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-01-28T01:12:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15245004221076858
       
  • How Social Marketing Contributed to Expanding Size of Overall Condom
           Markets in Ethiopia, Brazil, and Indonesia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: David J. Olson, Christopher Purdy, Rory Harrington, Dan Marun, Juan Enrique Garcia
      First page: 91
      Abstract: Social Marketing Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Background and Situation AnalysisFor more than 50 years, social marketing has been used to address a variety of health issues in the Global South, including the promotion and distribution of condoms for family planning and HIV prevention. Condom social marketers aim not just to increase sales of their own brands; they seek to increase demand for all condoms—whether it be through the commercial, non-profit or public sectors. The number of male condoms distributed through social marketing increased from 591 million in 27 countries in 1991 to more than 1.5 billion in 66 countries in 2020. Concurrent with this growth in the number of countries, the size of the condom markets also grew in most, if not all, of those countries.Target Audience(s)The primary audiences of condom social marketing programs are low income and high-risk populations in the developing countries of Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe, Latin America, and the Caribbean. They often focus on young people and high risk groups—such as sex workers and their partners, injecting drug users, soldiers, and migrant workers—who do not always have reliable access to affordable condoms. As condom social marketing programs mature, they often use market segmentation to add higher priced condoms aimed at middle-income and even higher-income consumers, and the profits are used to “cross-subsidize” the lower-priced brands.Behavioral ObjectiveTo increase purchase and use of condoms, particularly with low-income people and certain high risk individuals (such as young people, commercial sex workers, injecting drug users and men who have sex with men), by selling them through a wide variety of sales outlets at highly subsidized prices.StrategyThe authors examined mature condom social marketing programs in Ethiopia, Brazil and Indonesia where the growth in condom social marketing was accompanied by similar growth of the total condom market. They looked at the evolution and sales of these three programs, and the larger condom universes in those countries. The authors were interested to know if social marketing programs help expand the larger condom markets, and not just grow sales of their own products.ResultsBased on the evidence, the authors believe that these three programs contributed significantly to creating larger markets even though there were surely other forces at work (such as changes in government policy or fears of being infected with HIV). This article adds to the limited literature on the effect of successful condom social marketing programs on their broader markets.Recommendations for Social Marketing PracticeThe authors make five recommendations for social marketers interested in replicating the success of these programs: 1) keeping one product in each product category highly affordable, 2) applying market segmentation through cross-subsidization, 3) showing flexibility in distribution, 4) pushing the limits on behavior change communication, and 5) building the product category (Neugaard, 2008).
      Citation: Social Marketing Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-03-28T07:02:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15245004221077965
       
  • Using Community-Based Social Marketing to Reduce Pet Waste Bacteria in
           Streams

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tracey Haldeman, Wesley Schmidt
      First page: 109
      Abstract: Social Marketing Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Background and Situation AnalysisBaltimore County waterways are impaired by pollution from pet waste. Baltimore County engaged in a campaign to reduce bacteria in waterways caused by dog waste. This paper explores modalities to effectuate change in pet owner behavior which will ameliorate the negative effects of dog waste on the environment.Priority AudienceDog owners living within Baltimore County who are not picking up dog waste in their backyards.Behavioral ObjectiveThe behavioral objective was to encourage people who were not currently picking up dog waste in their yards to start doing so.Strategy/Intervention Planning and DevelopmentThe study examined the effectiveness of using a community-based social marketing (CBSM) campaign to reduce bacteria in streams by encouraging dog owners to clean up properly after their pets.Our approach included all elements of the four Ps of marketing (product, price, place, promotion). The study included formative research to understand barriers and motivators of the audience and to test messages. The campaign was implemented in four targeted areas and then bacteria in waterways was measured to evaluate behavior change. Community-based social marketing strategies included interpersonal communication, securing commitments, promoting social norms, using prompts and increasing knowledge of pet waste pollution in waterways.Evaluation Methods and ResultsThe pilot compared three different delivery methods: (A) direct to household (HH) using door-to-door outreach, (B) outreach at pet-related location(s) and (C) a combination of (A) and (B) in order to determine the best use of resources for future campaigns. Results from four implementation areas were compared to two non-treatment control areas; over 12,000 HHs combined. We measured the effect of the campaign by analyzing the change in the Most Probable Number (MPN) of fecal indicator bacteria (E. coli) per 100 mL of stream water in both implementation and control areas before the campaign as compared to post-campaign. We then compared results from our campaign to any changes that may have also occurred in those same time periods in 2018 (the year prior to our campaign). Comparing 2019 changes to any changes in 2018 helped to determine whether variations in measured bacteria may have been due to seasonal fluctuations.Results showed a measured decrease in bacteria levels in 3 out of 4 targeted areas from pre-implementation to post-implementation. Our research findings suggested that CBSM contributed to decreased bacteria levels in streams.Recommendations for Social Marketing PracticeDuring this study, we learned the importance of interpersonal communication and partnerships to help promote the product. Partnerships included places where our primary audience trusted information received and places where we could reach a high concentration of our target audience. Results indicate that interpersonal communication at partner locations seemed just as effective as door-to-door outreach. A recommendation for future efforts is that human resources needed for CBSM can be concentrated in partner locations. Door-to-door efforts are still valuable and can be reserved for hot spot areas and potentially supported by volunteers.
      Citation: Social Marketing Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T01:28:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15245004221097696
       
  • A Trait-Based Consumer Segmentation for Food Waste Reduction Campaigns

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mustafa Bilgehan Kutlu
      First page: 130
      Abstract: Social Marketing Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Background:While there is still hunger in the world, a significant amount of food is wasted, which harms the environment. This study focuses on food waste at the consumer level and investigates the role of personality traits on food-waste-aversion.Focus of the Article:Segmentation with personality traits for food waste reduction campaigns.Research Question:Is there a link between personality traits and food-waste-aversion' Are there any associations among consumers’ levels of food-waste-aversion, frugality, conscientiousness, and religiosity'Importance to the Social Marketing Field:Segmentation is a neglected marketing tool in designing campaigns against food waste. This study identifies possible market segments of social marketing campaigns against food waste. In addition, associations among food-waste-aversion and personality traits of conscientiousness, frugality, and religiosity are shown in this study.Methods:This study adopts a cross-sectional research design. A convenience sample of 301 consumers in Turkey is surveyed via an online questionnaire.Results:Results of Chi-Square Automatic Interaction Detector (CHAID) analysis indicate five distinct consumer segments, namely frugal believers, frugal seculars, conscientious individuals, casual females, and casual males. Moreover, positive associations (p < 0.001) among food-waste-aversion and personality traits of conscientiousness, frugality, and religiosity are shown.Recommendations for Research or Practice:This study provides a segmentation procedure with the trait perspective. Frugality, conscientiousness, and religiosity traits can play an essential role in food waste reduction. Targeting individuals with communications fit with their personality is likely to increase the success of food waste reduction interventions.Limitations:Due to a lack of behavioral data, this study investigates food waste at the attitudinal level. Further study could use behavioral measures. In addition, the majority of participants in the survey are Muslim. In order to validate research findings across different cultures, it should be carried out in other countries.
      Citation: Social Marketing Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T09:07:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15245004221097752
       
  • Understanding the Audience for a Digital Capacity-Building Platform for
           Micro-Retailers in Nairobi, Kenya: A Latent Class Segmentation Analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Evelyn Kumoji, Olamide Oyenubi, Alice Rhoades, Jarret Cassaniti, Fred Rariewa, Saori Ohkubo
      First page: 147
      Abstract: Social Marketing Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Background: Digital programs need to understand the characteristics of their audiences to develop services that meet the needs of different user groups.Focus of the Article: This manuscript is related to research and evaluation, and to four social marketing benchmarks: Consumer Research, Segmentation and Targeting, Consumer Orientation, and Exchange.Research Question: What are the behavioral characteristics and user profiles among duka owners who are using a digital business capacity-building platform in Nairobi, Kenya.Design/Approach: Survey assessment of use of a mobile-friendly online platform for promoting business growth among underserved micro-retail shop (duka) owners in Nairobi, Kenya. The UJoin platform offers duka owners access to business and financial courses, online mentoring, networking opportunities, and access to product information.Importance to the Field: The research will provide critical insights into program and audience needs for use of digital platforms, including promoting, scaling, and strengthening digital services.Methods: 805 shop owners in Nairobi, Kenya participated in a survey about perceptions and use of the internet. Latent class analysis identified homogeneous “classes” within the sample, and behavioral profiles and predictors of platform use.Results: Analysis yielded a 3-class model. Class 1 Endorsers endorsed community norms, social support, learning, networking, and perceived business benefits from websites. Class 2 Skeptics did not support collaboration and learning. Class 3 Unengaged lacked support to use online platforms. Predictors of frequent use of digital platforms were self-efficacy (OR: 5.95, p < .001), Endorser (OR: 3.13, p < .001) and Unengaged (OR: 2.42, p < .055) class, and agreeing that connections to duka owners is important (OR: 3.02, p < .003).Conclusion: Diversified strategies to promote use of online platforms may meet different needs of sub-groups among user groups.Recommendations for Research and Practice: Multiple strategies are needed to address different needs of sub-groups within a larger audience. Programs may benefit from investments to characterize the audience during recruitment to better understand attitudes towards, and efficacy to use, the internet, level of motivation, technology and support needs, and attitudes towards learning and networking.Limitations: The survey sample was a non-random selection of duka owners and relied on self-reported data which may be subject to social-desirability bias and recall. Some of the survey questions about perceptions were derived from single-item variables rather than an index or scale. The cross-sectional design of the survey precludes causal inferences.
      Citation: Social Marketing Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T07:55:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15245004221097715
       
  • Using Social Marketing to Demystify the Myths Surrounding Covid-19
           Vaccination: The Mediating Role of Important Others

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Isaac Sewornu Coffie, Atsu Nkukpornu, William Adomako Kankam, Chosniel Elikem Ocloo
      First page: 169
      Abstract: Social Marketing Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundThe misconceptions and conspiracy theories against the Covid-19 vaccines have been identified as potential factors that could negatively impact herd immunity for the Covid-19 vaccination.Focus of the articleFrom the perspectives of the Health Belief Model and the Theory of Planned Behavior, the study sought to determine an effective social marketing intervention to address the misconceptions about the Covid-19 vaccines.Research HypothesesThe hypotheses stipulate that perceived susceptibility, perceived severity, perceived benefit, and perceived barriers of the coronavirus will positively influence Covid-19 vaccination behavior. The study further hypothesized that subjective norms (important others) would significantly mediate the relationships.MethodsStructured questionnaires were used to collect data from 821 individuals from three administrative regions, which constitutes 65% of the population of Ghana. The quota and convenience sampling technique was used in selecting the respondents due to the lack of a sampling frame.ResultsThe study’s findings show that only perceived susceptibility and the perceived barrier directly influence the Covid-19 vaccination behavior. The result, however, shows a significant improvement when important others were introduced as a mediating variable. Thus, all four constructs had a positive and significant influence on Covid-19 vaccination behavior through subjective norm (important others) as an intervening variable. The study shows the value of using opinion leaders as a communication channel in addressing the misperceptions and conspiracy theories against the Covid-19 vaccines.Recommendation for Research/PracticeTo effectively address the misconceptions about the Covid-19 vaccines and improve herd immunity, social marketers should identify key influencers in various communities and cities and use them in promoting the vaccination program. The study examined and found subjective norms (perceived social pressure from important others in society on an individual to perform or not to perform a behavior) as a significant mediator for promoting the Covid-19 vaccination behavior.LimitationsThe current study examined the mediating role of subjective norm and the HBMs' constructs. Future studies could also consider integrating subjective norm as a mediator in other behavioral change theories to predict the target audience’s behavior.
      Citation: Social Marketing Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-04-24T05:14:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15245004221097802
       
  • Tribute to Philip D. Harvey: A Social Marketing Founding Father and Titan

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Christopher Purdy
      First page: 184
      Abstract: Social Marketing Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Social Marketing Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-04-23T01:57:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15245004221097830
       
  • RETRACTION NOTICE: Resilience, Parenting Style, and Children’s
           Eating Behavior

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      First page: 87
      Abstract: Social Marketing Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Social Marketing Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-08-03T10:37:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1524500420945546
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 44.192.47.87
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-