Subjects -> BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (Total: 3541 journals)
    - ACCOUNTING (132 journals)
    - BANKING AND FINANCE (306 journals)
    - BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (1229 journals)
    - CONSUMER EDUCATION AND PROTECTION (20 journals)
    - COOPERATIVES (4 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SCIENCES: GENERAL (212 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SYSTEMS, THEORIES AND HISTORY (235 journals)
    - FASHION AND CONSUMER TRENDS (20 journals)
    - HUMAN RESOURCES (103 journals)
    - INSURANCE (26 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE (145 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND AID (103 journals)
    - INVESTMENTS (22 journals)
    - LABOR AND INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS (61 journals)
    - MACROECONOMICS (17 journals)
    - MANAGEMENT (595 journals)
    - MARKETING AND PURCHASING (106 journals)
    - MICROECONOMICS (23 journals)
    - PRODUCTION OF GOODS AND SERVICES (143 journals)
    - PUBLIC FINANCE, TAXATION (37 journals)
    - TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL DIRECTORIES (2 journals)

MANAGEMENT (595 journals)                  1 2 3 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 585 Journals sorted alphabetically
360 : Revista de Ciencias de la Gestión     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Academia Revista Latinoamericana de Administración     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Academy of Management Annals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 82)
Academy of Management Discoveries     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39)
Academy of Management Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 300)
Academy of Management Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60)
Academy of Management Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 269)
Academy of Strategic Management Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Administrative Science Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 157)
Advances in Management and Applied Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Africa Journal of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
African Journal of Business Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African Journal of Economic and Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Al Tijarah     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Business and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 51)
American Journal of Industrial and Business Management     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
American Journal of Mathematical and Management Sciences     Hybrid Journal  
American Journal of Operational Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
American Journal of Operations Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Aquaculture Economics & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Asia Pacific Journal of Innovation and Entrepreneurship     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asia Pacific Journal of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Asia Pacific Management Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Asia-Pacific Journal of Management Research and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription  
Asian Business & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Asian Journal of Management Cases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Asian Journal of Management Science and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Social Sciences and Management Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Asian Journal of Technology Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal on Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Law Management Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Journal of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Baltic Journal of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
BMC Journal of Scientific Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Board Leadership     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Brigham Young University International Law and Management Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
British Journal of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
BRQ Business Review Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Building & Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Built Environment Project and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Bulletin of Kyiv National University of Culture and Arts. Series in Management of Social and Cultural Activity     Open Access  
Business and Management Horizons     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Business and Management Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Business Management Analysis Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Business Management and Strategy     Open Access   (Followers: 37)
Business Perspectives and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Business Process Management Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
California Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Canadian Journal of Program Evaluation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Case Studies in Business and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Case Studies in Sport Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Central European Management Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Ciencias Administrativas     Open Access  
Coaching : Theorie & Praxis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Cogent Business & Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Collection Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Computational Management Science     Hybrid Journal  
Conference Quality Production Improvement     Open Access  
Construction Innovation: Information, Process, Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Construction Management and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Contabilidade, Gestão e Governança     Open Access  
Contaduría y Administración     Open Access  
Controlling & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Controlling & Management Review : Zeitschrift für Controlling und Management     Full-text available via subscription  
Corporate Board : Role, Duties and Composition     Open Access  
Corporate Governance and Organizational Behavior Review     Open Access  
Corporate Governance and Sustainability Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Corporate Ownership and Control     Open Access  
Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Creativity and Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Cross Cultural & Strategic Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Dalhousie Journal of Interdisciplinary Management     Open Access  
Data and Information Management     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Decision : Official Journal of Indian Institute of Management Calcutta     Hybrid Journal  
Decision Analytics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Decision Analytics Journal     Open Access  
Desenvolve : Revista de Gestão do Unilasalle     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Development Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dirāsāt : Jurnal Manajemen dan Pendidikan Islam     Open Access  
Disaster Prevention and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Ecological Management & Restoration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Economic Management Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Economics, Management, and Financial Markets     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Educational Management and Innovation Journal     Open Access  
Ekonomia i Zarzadzanie. Economics and Management     Open Access  
Electronic Government, an International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Engineering Management Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Engineering Management Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Engineering Project Organization Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Entrepreneurship Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Environmental Management     Open Access   (Followers: 54)
Environmental Quality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Estudios Gerenciales     Open Access  
EuroMed Journal of Management     Hybrid Journal  
European Financial Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
European Journal of Business and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
European Journal of Cross-Cultural Competence and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
European Journal of Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
European Journal of Management Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Management Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
European Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
European Sport Management Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Expert Journal of Business and Management     Open Access  
Financial Internet Quarterly     Open Access  
Fokus Bisnis : Media Pengkajian Manajemen dan Akuntansi     Open Access  
Foundations and Trends® in Technology, Information and Operations Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Foundations of Management     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Fundamental Management Journal     Open Access  
Future Business Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Future Studies Research Journal : Trends and Strategies     Open Access  
GECONTEC : Revista Internacional de Gestión del Conocimiento y la Tecnología     Open Access  
Gender in Management : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Gestión en el Tercer Milenio     Open Access  
Global Strategy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Group & Organization Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Care Management Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Health Services Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Human Factors : The Journal of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
Human Resource Management International Digest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Human Resource Management Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Human Resource Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
ICU Director     Hybrid Journal  
IEEE Engineering Management Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 118)
IIMB Management Review     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
IMA Journal of Management Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Impact Assessment and Project Appraisal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Independent Journal of Management & Production     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Corporate Governance     Full-text available via subscription  
Industrial Management & Data Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Industrial Marketing Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Information Resources Management Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Information Systems Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Information Technology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Innovation & Management Review     Open Access  
Innovation: Management, Policy & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
INOVATOR : Jurnal Manajemen     Open Access  
Intelligent Information Management     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intelligent Systems in Accounting, Finance & Management: International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal for Quality Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Advances in Management Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Agile Systems and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Applied Management and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Applied Management Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Aviation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Business Administration and Management Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Business and Data Analytics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Business and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Business Continuity and Risk Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Business Performance Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Business Process Integration and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Business Science and Applied Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Commerce and Management     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Comparative Management     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Complexity in Leadership and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Conceptual Structures and Smart Applications     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Conflict Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Construction Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Corporate Strategy and Social Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Cross Cultural Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Decision Sciences, Risk and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Decision Support Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Disaster Risk Science     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Educational Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Electronic Customer Relationship Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Electronic Governance     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Emergency Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Energy Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Engineering Business Management     Open Access  
International Journal of Engineering Management and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Enterprise Network Management     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
International Journal of Environment and Waste Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Environmental Technology and Management     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Event and Festival Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Financial Services Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Forensic Engineering and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Global Business and Competitiveness     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Hospitality and Event Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Hospitality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
International Journal of Human Resources Development and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Indian Culture and Business Management     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Information and Operations Management Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Information Systems and Change Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Information Systems and Project Management     Free   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Information Technology Project Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Innovation and Technology Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Integrated Supply Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Intercultural Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Internet and Enterprise Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Knowledge Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Knowledge Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
International Journal of Knowledge-Based Organizations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

        1 2 3 | Last

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Group & Organization Management
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.245
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 16  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1059-6011 - ISSN (Online) 1552-3993
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Remembering Robert W. Eisenberger: A Tribute to His Life and His Work on
           Perceived Organizational Support

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Linda Rhoades Shanock, Mindy K. Shoss, Jacqueline Coyle-Shapiro, Lynn M. Shore, Thomas J. Zagenczyk, Louis T. Buffardi, Gaëtane Caesens, Michael T. Ford, Min-Kyu Joo, Gökhan Karagonlar, Zihan Liu, Salar Mesdaghinia, Pedro Neves, Denise M. Rousseau, Florence Stinglhamber, Xueqi Wen, Jing Zhang, Dianhan Zheng
      Abstract: Group & Organization Management, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Group & Organization Management
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T06:05:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10596011221110650
       
  • Making Flexibility More I-Deal: Advancing Work-Life Equality Collectively

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ellen Ernst Kossek, Clare Kelliher
      Abstract: Group & Organization Management, Ahead of Print.
      Current research on negotiated individualized flexible work arrangements focuses on highly paid, skilled professional workers. We refer to this as “flexibility through privilege,” the ability to obtain “flexibility I-deals,” due to high labor market power. Yet as work-life tensions grow across occupations globally, most individuals need increased access to flexibility. As the COVID-19 pandemic illuminated, work-life equality, the ability of workers to have equal access to, opportunity to use, and benefit from flexible working arrangements is a rising form of job inequality. We examine how existing flexibility i-deals can be reconceptualized more broadly to include collectively bargained arrangements across many occupations, and flexible working forms. Our essay advances understanding by (1) broadening notions of the typical employee and occupation involved; (2) expanding negotiation processes beyond an organizational sphere of control; (3) identifying new forms of negotiated flexibility such as control over work-life boundaries and technological availability; and (4) addressing not only employer-employee mutual benefits, but larger societal interests concurrent with new tensions and unintended consequences of mainstreamed implementation. We propose the term “collective flexibility” as the collective right of workers to customize their work schedule, place, workload, boundaries, connectivity, and employment mode with their employer and other stakeholders to benefit employers, employees, and society. We offer a future research agenda. Expanding how we frame and study what a flexibility i-deal is with a collective approach regarding how they are accessed, negotiated, maintained, and who they serve may enhance their potential as a lever for social change to advance economic, social, and health employment rights.
      Citation: Group & Organization Management
      PubDate: 2022-06-15T07:22:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10596011221098823
       
  • Differences in I-Deals Within Groups: A Multilevel Approach

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Uriel Saldivar, Chenwei Liao
      Abstract: Group & Organization Management, Ahead of Print.
      Idiosyncratic deals (i-deals) are customized work arrangements that employees negotiate with their employer. Despite the burgeoning growth, i-deals research is primarily focused on the benefits to the recipients without sufficiently considering how differences in i-deals across group members can have implications at the group and individual levels. To better guide the nascent literature, we (a) conceptualize content, quantity, and magnitude as the three key bases upon which i-deals can differ; (b) explain why content of i-deals can reflect social or economic exchange; and (c) define relative i-deals, that is, how individual group members’ i-deals compare to coworkers, and group i-deals differentiation, that is, the degree of variability in team member i-deals, in actual and perceptual terms. In our multilevel theory development of differences in i-deals, we offer propositions on (a) effects of perceived relative i-deals on outcomes at the individual level, (b) effects of actual and perceived group i-deals differentiation on outcomes at the group level, and (c) perceived group i-deals differentiation as a moderator of the effects of perceived relative i-deals at the individual level. Lastly, we conclude with managerial implications and future directions for research.
      Citation: Group & Organization Management
      PubDate: 2022-06-15T01:45:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10596011221108546
       
  • Team Disseminative Capacity: Exploring the Role of Collaborative Processes
           in Creating, Implementing, and Embedding New Knowledge

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      Authors: Shukrullah Fassehi, Christine Soo, Julia Backmann, Martin Hoegl
      Abstract: Group & Organization Management, Ahead of Print.
      Organizations strongly rely on their teams’ abilities to absorb and disseminate knowledge to remain innovative. Prior research has focused primarily on knowledge absorption and the few studies investigating disseminative capacity (DCAP) identified disseminator and recipient characteristics as contributing factors toward effective organizational knowledge transfer. This study investigates the concept of team DCAP by shifting the focus to the role of disseminator–recipient interactions and collaborations during the dissemination process. Adopting a process perspective, we examine five technology transfer initiatives within a large multinational firm in Australia by collecting narratives from 34 members of both disseminating and recipient teams on the emergent processes through which each technology is created, transferred, and embedded at the recipient site. Findings reveal that in instances when knowledge is initially co-created through perspective taking and collective sensemaking among disseminators and recipients, such collaborations have a spill-over effect and continue throughout subsequent implementation and embedding processes, resulting in more effective transfer initiatives. This study contributes new and important insights for transforming the role of recipients from passive receivers of knowledge at the end of the transfer process as often depicted in previous studies, to active collaborators from the very beginning of the transfer process, starting with knowledge co-creation.
      Citation: Group & Organization Management
      PubDate: 2022-06-10T04:18:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10596011221098312
       
  • The Implications of Market-Based Versus Supportive Idiosyncratic Deal
           Pathways

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      Authors: Catherine Mackintosh, Aoife M. McDermott
      Abstract: Group & Organization Management, Ahead of Print.
      This article contributes to the idiosyncratic deals (i-deals) literature by explicating and theorizing market-based and supportive i-deal pathways. In so doing, it enhances understanding of how i-deals are negotiated, addresses gaps in theoretical understanding about how outcomes emerge and reconciles divergent narratives regarding the availability of i-deals to stars or a broader pool of employees. To achieve this, the study explores the inputs, process, and outcomes of flexibility and financial i-deal creation using a qualitative approach. It addresses a deficit in multi-stakeholder i-deals research, drawing on 42 semi-structured interviews with employees, line managers and HR representatives in a financial service and a construction company. Findings detail how market-based i-deals are premised on economic exchange. They respond to employer needs to secure star performers, while employee needs may be flexibility or financially focused. The negotiation of market-based i-deals is distributive, and their creation is perceived by employees as special treatment to which they are entitled, leading to purely functional benefits for organizations (e.g., recruitment/retention). In contrast, supportive i-deals are relational, responding to employee needs for flexibility and employer needs to build high-quality employment relationships. Their negotiation is integrative. Perceived by employees as a reflection of being valued, supportive i-deals lead to broader reciprocation. Researchers and practitioners should consider the implications of these pathways. In particular, the article emphasizes the broad benefits of supportive i-deals but serves to manage expectations regarding the potential limitations of market-based i-deals, that may lead to functional benefits (e.g., recruitment/retention) but not positive attitudes and behaviors.
      Citation: Group & Organization Management
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T11:42:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10596011221088435
       
  • Positively Deviant: New Evidence for the Beneficial Capital of Maverickism
           to Organizations

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      Authors: Ree Jordan, Terrance W. Fitzsimmons, Victor J. Callan
      Abstract: Group & Organization Management, Ahead of Print.
      Workplace mavericks are seen as highly disruptive, engaging in unconventional behavior and showing apparent disregard for organizational norms, policies, and procedures. Despite this, some organizational leaders successfully leverage maverick behaviors to progress and achieve higher order organizational agendas. This paper challenges the former view by investigating the positive value maverickism provides organizations. Guided by the conceptualization of mavericks’ non-conformity as a form of positive deviance, two studies were conducted. Study 1 analyzed secondary data sources within the scientific research field to determine organizational performance requirements and expectations. Study 2 interviewed 28 mavericks and 27 leaders of mavericks in the same field. Data collection and analysis was guided by Bourdieu’s (1990) theoretical and methodological constructs—field, capital, and habitus. Results highlight that, while mavericks challenge and often ignore many organizational norms, their disruption is driven by the desire to achieve higher order goals benefitting their organizations and communities. Operating within boundaries set by these higher order values, mavericks not only embody traditional cultural capitals expected in their field but also offer valuable capitals traditionally possessed by those more senior in the field. This powerful combination of capitals produces additional symbolic capital which allows them to influence organizational decision-making despite not conforming to lower order organizational norms. At an applied level, valuable capitals associated with maverickism can be leveraged by leaders to support transformational change. To do this, organizational leaders need to recognize mavericks’ strengths through allowing them, as positive deviants, to challenge the status quo and to find alternative pathways to achieve organizational goals.
      Citation: Group & Organization Management
      PubDate: 2022-06-03T12:48:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10596011221102297
       
  • Business Goal Difficulty and Socially Irresponsible Executive Behavior:
           The Mediating Role of Focalism

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      Authors: Ramachandran Veetikazhi, T. J. Kamalanabhan, Laura J. Noval, Akanksha Jaiswal, Andreas Mueller
      Abstract: Group & Organization Management, Ahead of Print.
      Executive social irresponsibility has received increasing research attention in recent years, following the consensus for a broader stakeholder approach to managerial decision making. Despite the importance of the subject, there remains insufficient research on contextual factors that mold executives’ orientation toward social responsibility. Through three studies, we demonstrate that difficult business goals can reduce executives’ tendency to consider social responsibility in their decision making. Further, we find that focalism—a cognitive bias based on affective forecasting theory—can mediate positive relationships between business goal difficulty and socially irresponsible executive behavior. Our findings also suggest that, expanding executives’ thought processes beyond the narrow focus of a business goal achievement can be a good strategy in reducing socially irresponsible executive behavior, even in the presence of difficult goals.
      Citation: Group & Organization Management
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T05:03:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10596011221105720
       
  • Leader Trait Self-control and Follower Trust in High-Reliability Contexts:
           The Mediating Role of Met Expectations in Firefighting

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Florian Rosing, Diana Boer, Claudia Buengeler
      Abstract: Group & Organization Management, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing from the theory of met expectations, this study aims to create new knowledge on the antecedents of follower trust in leaders in the context of high-reliability organizations. We hypothesize that highly self-controlled leaders instill more trust than leaders with less self-control, as the former tend to meet follower expectations. This work combines data from a field survey (N = 256) and a multi-wave field study (N = 106), using samples of professional firefighters to support our hypotheses that met follower expectations mediate the relationship between leader trait self-control and follower trust in the leader. Our research highlights the importance of met expectations in high-reliability contexts and demonstrates the value of leader trait self-control in building trustful relationships.
      Citation: Group & Organization Management
      PubDate: 2022-05-29T12:50:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10596011221104295
       
  • How, Why, and When is the Average Age of Employees Related to Climate for
           Innovation' The Role of Age Diversity, Focus on Opportunities, and
           Work Engagement

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      Authors: Cort W. Rudolph, Hannes Zacher
      Abstract: Group & Organization Management, Ahead of Print.
      Folk wisdom suggests that “you cannot teach an old dog new tricks.” Accordingly, as the average age of the workforce increases, there is a potential concern based on negative stereotypes that organizations will become less innovative. Drawing from lifespan development theories and theorizing on innovation, we explore this concern by testing, at the organization level of analysis, whether the average age of employees is indirectly related to climate for innovation through employees’ aggregate focus on opportunities (i.e., a negative indirect effect) and work engagement (i.e., a positive indirect effect). Moreover, we proposed that organizational age diversity is a protective resource that moderates these relationships, such that they are weaker in organizations with high as compared to low age diversity. Organization-level data were collected from teaching and non-teaching staff in n = 133 schools across two time points separated by 4 years (Time 1 n = 3712 respondents; Time 2 n = 5183 respondents). Results suggest that the average age of employees within schools was negatively related to employees’ aggregate focus on opportunities which, in turn, positively predicted climate for innovation above and beyond the positive effect of work engagement. Moreover, the negative indirect effect of average age on climate for innovation through aggregate focus on opportunities was weaker for organizations with high age diversity. Overall, these findings contribute to a better understanding of relationships between age and age-related characteristics and climate for innovation at the organization level, and challenge common misunderstandings regarding the role of age in the workplace.
      Citation: Group & Organization Management
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T05:40:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10596011221078666
       
  • A Multilevel Person-Centered Perspective on the Role of Job Demands and
           Resources for Employees’ Job Engagement and Burnout Profiles

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nicolas Gillet, Alexandre J. S. Morin, Ann-Renée Blais
      Abstract: Group & Organization Management, Ahead of Print.
      The present study examined the configurations, or profiles, taken by distinct global and specific facets of job engagement and burnout (by relying on a bifactor operationalization of these constructs) among a nationally representative sample of Canadian Defence employees (n = 13,088; nested within 65 work units). The present study also adopted a multilevel perspective to investigate the role of job demands (work overload and role ambiguity), as well as individual (psychological empowerment), workgroup (interpersonal justice), supervisor (transformational leadership), and organizational (organizational support) resources in the prediction of profile membership. Latent profile analyses revealed five profiles of employees: Burned-Out/Disengaged (7.13%), Burned-Out/Involved (12.13%), Engaged (18.14%), Engaged/Exhausted (15.50%), and Normative (47.10%). The highest turnover intentions were observed in the Burned-Out/Disengaged profile, and the lowest in the Engaged profile. Employees’ perceptions of job demands and resources were also associated with profile membership across both levels, although the effects of psychological empowerment were more pronounced than the effects of job demands and resources related to the workgroup, supervisor, and organization. Individual-level effects were also more pronounced than effects occurring at the work unit level, where shared perceptions of work overload and organizational support proved to be the key shared drivers of profile membership.
      Citation: Group & Organization Management
      PubDate: 2022-05-25T10:26:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10596011221100893
       
  • Do Multiple I-Deals in a Team Help or Hinder Team Outcomes' A Resource
           Scarcity Perspective

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      Authors: Lien Vossaert, Frederik Anseel, Violet Ho
      Abstract: Group & Organization Management, Ahead of Print.
      Idiosyncratic deals (i-deals) are individualized employment arrangements negotiated and agreed upon by individual employees and their organization. This study addresses an emerging conundrum in i-deals research—whether the prevalence of i-deals in teams helps or hinders team outcomes. Because teams in which i-deals are prevalent receive more resources and status, they may be more cohesive and engage in more supportive behaviors. On the other hand, because i-deals differentiate among team members, teams in which i-deals are prevalent may be less cohesive and less inclined to engage in OCB. To solve this puzzle, we draw from a resource scarcity perspective to posit that understanding intra-team i-deal dynamics requires taking into account both organizational-level (i.e., organizational i-deal scarcity) and team-level (i.e., team power structure) factors. Using data from 40 organizations, 166 teams, and 1016 employees, we disentangle the complex interplay among the prevalence of i-deals in a team, organizational i-deal scarcity, and intra-team power structure in predicting both team cohesion and intra-team OCB.
      Citation: Group & Organization Management
      PubDate: 2022-05-22T02:31:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10596011221098824
       
  • The Forgotten Working Class: A Call to Action Based upon a Repeated
           Cross-Sectional Examination of the Relationships Among Social Class,
           Financial Satisfaction, and Exhaustion

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      Authors: Stacey R. Kessler, Melissa B. Gutworth
      Abstract: Group & Organization Management, Ahead of Print.
      For several decades, working-class employees have been forgotten by policy makers and society more generally. This notion is further exacerbated in the organizational studies literature, where research mostly focuses on professional employees. In the current study, we seek to rectify this omission by examining how the experience of working-class employees has changed over time. We use a nationally representative sample of 35,771 U.S. employees collected between 1972 and 2018 as part of the repeated cross-sections of the General Social Survey Results suggest a growing disparity between working-class and middle/upper-class employees, with working-class employees reporting lower levels of financial satisfaction and higher levels of work exhaustion compared to middle/upper-class employees. Moreover, these discrepancies have increased over time, suggesting that this population of employees has indeed been forgotten.
      Citation: Group & Organization Management
      PubDate: 2022-05-21T11:47:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10596011221099797
       
  • Let’s Get Physical: Physical Activity as a Team Intervention at Work

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      Authors: Benjamin D. Blake, John E. Baur, M. Ronald Buckley
      Abstract: Group & Organization Management, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this article is to conceptualize a novel theoretical occurrence—team physical activity (PA)—and its relevance for researchers and organizations. By building a testable model of the consequences and contingencies of team PA, we integrate the science of teamwork with the scholarly domain of employee health and well-being. Hence, we clarify the construct of team PA, present a three-dimensional typology, and outline a model drawing on neuroscience, positive organizational behavior, and teams research. Our propositions and subsequent discussion proffer an outline of potential benefits for organizations when they increase the utility and frequency of team PA. We also suggest ways in which researchers can advance scholarship in this area.
      Citation: Group & Organization Management
      PubDate: 2022-05-18T07:28:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10596011221101247
       
  • Are You Asking the Correct Person (Hint: Oftentimes You are Not!)'
           Stop Worrying About Unfounded Common Method Bias Arguments and Start Using
           My Guide to Make Better Decisions of When to Use Self- and Other-Reports

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      Authors: Kevin S. Cruz
      Abstract: Group & Organization Management, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Group & Organization Management
      PubDate: 2022-05-18T06:06:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10596011221103068
       
  • Ambiguous Signals and Information Asymmetry in the Initial Public Offering
           Process: Examining Ownership Concentration, Process Time, and Underpricing
           

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      Authors: G. Tyge Payne, Lori Tribble Trudell, Curt B. Moore, Oleg V. Petrenko, Nathan T. Hayes
      Abstract: Group & Organization Management, Ahead of Print.
      Initial public offerings (IPOs) represent an important stage of development for many firms as they try to gain access to the resources needed for growth and development. Due to the information asymmetry that accompanies the process, there is extensive research examining what factors might signal quality to potential investors such that the IPO might be more optimally valuated and priced. Herein, we hypothesize and empirically explore how a mixed or ambiguous signal about a firm—the signal of ownership concentration in this case—might be overcome with more opportunities for information disclosure and, thus, lessen underpricing; IPO stocks tend to be underpriced (i.e., the offer price of a stock is lower than the inherent market value), which means that owner’s “leave money on the table.” Using a generalized structural equation model of data on 601 U.S. IPO firms, we find support for our model by demonstrating that longer IPO process times (i.e., days from the IPO firm’s filing date to the actual issue date)—representing opportunities to disclose and disseminate information—act as a mediator between ownership concentration and underpricing. Further, we show that the age of the firm also influences this process model arguing that more historical data and other information is more readily available to the potential investor with increased firm age. Overall, our study contributes to the literature by demonstrating how more disclosure and dissemination of relevant information might reduce asymmetries associated with more ambiguous or difficult-to-interpret signals and improve outcomes.
      Citation: Group & Organization Management
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T04:30:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10596011221090036
       
  • Musing about Interdisciplinary Research: Is Interdisciplinary Research
           Amusing or Bemusing'

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      Authors: Jeremy D. Mackey, Charn P. McAllister
      Abstract: Group & Organization Management, Ahead of Print.
      We seek to contribute to the ongoing discussion about interdisciplinary research by contextualizing its benefits, challenges, and realities specifically within the management field. The purpose of this Musing is to highlight the a“musing” (i.e., entertaining) and be“musing” (i.e., confusing) experiences that we have had trying to publish interdisciplinary research so we can offer some recommendations for how the management field can stop ignoring something we all claim to be of great value. In our experience, interdisciplinary research is amusing if you're intrinsically motivated to do it, but it is bemusing if you expect it to be tied to extrinsic rewards.
      Citation: Group & Organization Management
      PubDate: 2022-05-06T12:48:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10596011221093942
       
  • Generations, We Hardly Knew Ye: An Obituary

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      Authors: Cort W. Rudolph, Hannes Zacher
      Abstract: Group & Organization Management, Ahead of Print.
      Although popular in the organizational sciences, in the media, and in practice, the concepts of “generations” and “generational differences” have been increasingly scrutinized based on theoretical, methodological, and statistical concerns. Here, we present a short obituary to bid adieu to these troubled concepts, with the hopes of memorializing and “putting to rest” these controversial ideas. We encourage researchers and practitioners to think beyond the narrow scope offered by the idea of generations, adopt a more critical perspective on our science and practice, and learn from the mistakes of the past.
      Citation: Group & Organization Management
      PubDate: 2022-05-06T10:30:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10596011221098307
       
  • Managerial Pay Raise and Promotion Decisions for Workers with I-deals

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      Authors: Maria Tomprou, Maria Simosi, Denise M. Rousseau
      Abstract: Group & Organization Management, Ahead of Print.
      Managers use idiosyncratic deals (i-deals) to motivate and retain employees. Yet we know little about the subsequent effects i-deals have on decisions about pay raises and promotions. Two studies investigate how managers make pay raise and promotion decisions for workers with i-deals. Using a policy-capturing design, managers (N = 116) made pay raise and promotion allocations for workers presented as good performers, based on information provided regarding whether and what type of i-deal workers had and the extent to which they helped peers. Developmental i-deal recipients tend to be recommended for both pay raises and promotions, while such recommendations are less likely for employees with flextime i-deals (for promotions) or reduced workload i-deals (for promotions and pay raises). In addition, workers with i-deals who help their peers are viewed more favorably in both decisions. The second study surveyed managers (N = 174) regarding their actual subordinates (N = 806), both controlled for the manager’s rating of subordinate performance. It supports the positive effect of developmental i-deals on pay and promotion decisions, but not the negative effects of flextime and reduced workload i-deals. Helping effects depend on the i-deal: Managers report that unhelpful recipients of developmental i-deals are less likely to be promoted than those with such i-deals who help their peers; unhelpful recipients of reduced workload i-deals are less likely to get pay raises than those with such deals who help. We discuss the implications of our findings for future research and career management.
      Citation: Group & Organization Management
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T06:24:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10596011221086108
       
  • Good Soldiers versus Organizational Wives: Does Anyone (Besides Us) Care
           that Organizational Citizenship Behavior Scales Are Gendered and Mostly
           Measure Men’s—but Not Women’s—Citizenship Behavior'

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      Authors: Diane Bergeron, Kylie Rochford
      Abstract: Group & Organization Management, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Group & Organization Management
      PubDate: 2022-05-04T08:05:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10596011221094421
       
  • Putting a Spotlight on the Ostracizer: Intentional Workplace Ostracism
           Motives

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      Authors: Christine A. Henle, Lynn M. Shore, John W. Morton, Samantha A. Conroy
      Abstract: Group & Organization Management, Ahead of Print.
      Workplace ostracism is a prevalent and detrimental type of mistreatment. To curtail this harmful behavior, researchers need to identify who is more likely to intentionally ostracize others at work and the motives that drive them to do so. Past reviews of workplace ostracism focus primarily on the outcomes of ostracism, and the few that address the antecedents often examine a limited set of variables. We examined themes in the ostracism literature and determined that employees intentionally ostracize others due to either punitive or defensive motives. Punitive motives are focused on protecting the interests of the group, whereas defensive motives pertain to defending the interests of the self. We present a model of the ostracizer based on these motives and the associated perceptions of threat and negative emotions that precipitate ostracism. Our model provides an extension of the workplace ostracism literature by presenting a testable theoretical framework, rooted in appraisal theory, to explain why and when employees are likely to ostracize others at work. We also provided suggestions for an expansion of the ostracizer motives literature, with the goal of encouraging research that provides greater understanding of the perspective of the ostracizer.
      Citation: Group & Organization Management
      PubDate: 2022-05-02T07:45:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10596011221092863
       
  • More than Follow the Leader: Expectations, Behaviors, Stability, and
           Change in a Co-Created Leadership Process

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      Authors: Ruth Sims, Frankie J. Weinberg
      Abstract: Group & Organization Management, Ahead of Print.
      This conceptual paper challenges assumptions about the primacy of leaders and leading over followers and following in the leadership process. Leadership cannot be holistically understood unless followership and leadership are researched as they are enacted—in tandem. To move toward a more complete understanding of leadership, we introduce a leadership system which involves a co-created leadership process, unfolds over time, and accounts for stability and change in partners’ expectations and behaviors. Drawing on role theory and implicit leadership (ILTs) and followership (IFTs) theories, we suggest how expectations of self and other influence leading and following behaviors and the leadership process. Personal learning acquired through the experience of leadership results in stability or change in one’s future expectations. Our framework explains how stability and change in each dyad partners’ leadership and followership expectations comes about through constructionist and constructivist mechanisms. These mechanisms occur across two timelines: The first is the microadjustments made to expectations and behaviors within a particular leadership occurrence. The second is the loop between personal learning and the expectations each member carries into future leadership occurrences and relationships. Practical implications arising from this new framework include considerations for leadership and followership development and a contribution to leadership forecasting.
      Citation: Group & Organization Management
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T07:53:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10596011221093456
       
  • The Word on the Street: Science Is Not Advocacy, but Publishing Research
           Is

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      Authors: Darryl B. Rice
      Abstract: Group & Organization Management, Ahead of Print.
      The title of this GOMusing is “The Word On The Street: Science Is Not Advocacy, But Publishing Research Is” and the goal of this GOMusing is to challenge us to re-examine our assumptions about a topic and spark debate around the phrase “science is not advocacy.” While I agree science is not advocacy, I make an argument about how the process of publishing research in peer-reviewed journals is an act of advocacy. I accomplish this by explaining five way researchers engage in advocacy. Specifically, (1) we advocate that our study’s shortcomings are common limitations rather than fatal flaws, (2) we advocate for our research methodology of choice, (3) we advocate for using best practices in our research designs and methods, (4) we advocate for our theoretical framework of choice, and (5) we advocate for a better peer-review process.
      Citation: Group & Organization Management
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T11:32:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10596011221097807
       
  • At the origin of network centrality: How to design jobs to make employees
           central

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      Authors: Lorenzo Bizzi
      Abstract: Group & Organization Management, Ahead of Print.
      Network centrality is vital for employees to attain superior performance or desired outcomes and yet we still know little of what makes employees develop central positions. A major challenge is that employees feel discomfort forming networks for opportunistic purposes that benefit them directly. This challenge can be overcome once we focus on the requirements raised by jobs. This paper posits that employees will be motivated to form networks in order to acquire the information capacity needed to satisfy the information requirements raised by the characteristics of their jobs. The study explores how the five enriching job characteristics influence the central position an employee occupies in the organizational network. Interestingly, not all job characteristics benefit networks. Evidence shows that task autonomy, task variety and task significance exercise a positive effect on network centrality but task identity and feedback from the job exercise a negative effect. Network centrality then mediates the relationship between job characteristics and performance. While dispositional determinants explain only between 3% and 5% of variance in network centrality, the model presented explains up to 32% of variance, thereby offering a solid answer to the core question of what determines network centrality.
      Citation: Group & Organization Management
      PubDate: 2022-04-24T06:16:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10596011221087494
       
  • The Whole Is Greater Than the Sum of Its Parts: Exploring Attributes of
           Team Work Engagement Climate

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      Authors: Marieke E. Gersdorf-Van den Berg, Jos Akkermans, Ludwig H. Hoeksema, Svetlana N. Khapova
      Abstract: Group & Organization Management, Ahead of Print.
      Despite growing interest in the concept of team work engagement (TWE), relatively little is known about the conditions that allow it to emerge. Based on the literature on work engagement and team climate, this study introduces the concept of TWE climate and examines its conceptual attributes. Based on a one-and-a-half-year qualitative investigation of eight Dutch self-steering project teams, we discovered that TWE climate comprises eight attributes, both (a) personal and (b) shared. Personal attributes include team members' commitment and drive toward the team and a personal feeling of being respected within the team. Shared attributes include a shared ability to overcome challenges and a shared sense of accomplishment, community, drive, and focus. Our findings indicate that personal and shared attributes are both critical elements of a team climate conducive to team work engagement. We conclude this paper by discussing what these findings mean for the concept of TWE climate in light of future research and practice.
      Citation: Group & Organization Management
      PubDate: 2022-04-09T08:38:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10596011211073218
       
  • What Does Your I-deal Say About Me' A Social Comparison Examination of
           Coworker Reactions to Flexibility I-deals

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      Authors: Thomas Van Waeyenberg, Lieven Brebels, Sophie De Winne, Elise Marescaux
      Abstract: Group & Organization Management, Ahead of Print.
      We focus on the implications of flexibility i-deals, that is, individually negotiated employment conditions regarding when, where and/or how to work, for i-dealers’ coworkers. Drawing on social comparison theory, we examine how coworkers’ attributions regarding the basis for flexibility i-deals (i.e., needs or performance) and perceptions of procedural fairness concerning the allocation of flexibility i-deals predict the display of organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) via feelings of competence. The results, based on two independent and complementary studies (n1 =260; n2=211), are consistent with our hypothesized moderated-mediation model. Whereas need attributions are positively related to competence feelings and subsequent OCB, performance attributions are negatively related to these variables. The effects are more pronounced at high than at low levels of procedural fairness. This suggests that fair procedures do not always benefit coworker reactions as they can enlarge the negative impact of performance attributions on feelings of competence and subsequent OCB. Furthermore, we provide evidence for the explanatory mechanisms by revealing that the attribution (needs vs. performance) drives opposing social comparisons (downward vs. upward, respectively) and that procedural fairness can increase coworkers’ felt personal accountability for these comparisons, thereby triggering a matching emotional response. Our results show that flexibility i-deals can have a bright side, but also a dark side, depending upon the basis and fairness of the allocation. As such, they enrich the academic conversation about the effectiveness of flexibility i-deals and guide practitioners.
      Citation: Group & Organization Management
      PubDate: 2022-03-25T02:19:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10596011221076637
       
  • Source-Target Misalignment in Employees’ Destructive Voice Responses to
           Perceived Organizational and Supervisor Unfairness

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      Authors: Jack E. Carson, Jeremy D. Mackey, Charn P. McAllister, H. Jack Walker
      Abstract: Group & Organization Management, Ahead of Print.
      Working people differentiate between their relationships with their organizations and their relationships with their supervisors. To better understand how these simultaneous relationships influence each other, we examined the effects of organizational unfairness on subordinates’ supervisor-directed destructive voice behaviors, as well as the effects of supervisor unfairness on subordinates’ organization-directed destructive voice behaviors. We examined supervisor organizational embodiment as a boundary condition and perceived obstruction as a mediating mechanism within these relationships. We tested the hypothesized model with an online survey study and an experimental vignette study. Study 1 indicated that organizational unfairness was positively and indirectly related to supervisor-directed destructive voice through perceived supervisor obstruction when supervisor organizational embodiment was higher rather than lower. Study 2 indicated that supervisor unfairness was positively and indirectly related to organization-directed destructive voice through perceived organizational obstruction when supervisor organizational embodiment was higher rather than lower. Although study results differed in the observed significance of organization-to-supervisor and supervisor-to-organization effects, together they demonstrate the importance of controlling for source-target aligned relationships when examining source-target misaligned effects, and extend source-target misalignment research by examining the effect of supervisor organizational embodiment as a moderator of misaligned supervisor- and organization-directed workplace unfairness perceptions and destructive voice behaviors.
      Citation: Group & Organization Management
      PubDate: 2022-03-24T08:40:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10596011221074155
       
  • Withstanding Moral Disengagement: Moral Self-Efficacy as Moderator in
           Counterproductive Behavior Routinization

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      Authors: Marinella Paciello, Roberta Fida, Irene Skovgaard-Smith, Claudio Barbaranelli, Gian Vittorio Caprara
      Abstract: Group & Organization Management, Ahead of Print.
      Moral disengagement plays an important role in the routinization of counterproductive work behavior (CWB) as a key mediator. What remains unclear are the factors that could attenuate the power of moral disengagement in this process. Building on social-cognitive theory, we hypothesize the moderating role of moral self-efficacy and suggest the importance of two different dimensions: self-reflective and behavioral moral self-efficacies. While the former should buffer the CWB-moral disengagement path over time, the latter should buffer the moral disengagement-CWB path. After presenting the psychometric properties of the moral self-efficacy scale in two independent samples (Study 1: United Kingdom, N = 359; Study 2: Italy, N = 1308), we test the posited multi-wave moderated-mediated model. Results from a structural equation model supported our hypotheses. Results demonstrate that the routinization of CWB through the mediation of moral disengagement over time is conditionally influenced by the two moral self-efficacy dimensions. Employees high in capability to look back and question the assumptions that affected their behavior (i.e., self-reflective moral self-efficacy) are less likely to morally disengage as a result of previous engagement in CWB. Employees high in capability to morally self-regulate (i.e., behavioral moral self-efficacy) are less likely to engage in CWB as a result of their moral disengagement. Results of the conditional indirect effect suggest that previous engagement in CWB is not translated in future engagement in CWB for those individuals high in both moral self-efficacy dimensions.
      Citation: Group & Organization Management
      PubDate: 2022-03-01T04:40:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10596011221078665
       
  • “Too Much” Self-Efficacy' Understanding the Curvilinear
           Consequences of Between-Person Self-Efficacy through a Moderated-Mediation
           Model of Perceived Proximity and Employee Effort

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      Authors: Daniel G. Bachrach, Tammy L. Rapp, Adam A. Rapp, Jessica Ogilvie
      Abstract: Group & Organization Management, Ahead of Print.
      Building from a paradox frame, we argue that at the between-person level the relationship between self-efficacy and effort may be nonlinear. We bound our conceptual model with a focus on perceived proximity, reflecting employees’ perceptions of how close they feel to their organization and colleagues. We test our model in a lagged, multi-source field study, with matching employee survey data from 1502 employees, and archival effort, and performance, metrics collected several months later. The results from our analyses reveal a curvilinear association between self-efficacy and effort, which is moderated by perceived proximity. We also find that the relationship between self-efficacy and performance is mediated by effort for individuals with low self-efficacy (Low SEs), but not for individuals with moderate (Moderate SEs) or high self-efficacy (High SEs). Implications for theory and practice are discussed.
      Citation: Group & Organization Management
      PubDate: 2022-02-28T02:50:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10596011211070098
       
  • How Does Ethical Leadership Relate to Team Creativity' The Role of
           Collective Team Identification and Need for Cognitive Closure

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      Authors: Sejin Keem, Gamze Koseoglu, Inseong Jeong, Christina E. Shalley
      Abstract: Group & Organization Management, Ahead of Print.
      We investigate how and when ethical leadership predicts team creativity. With its strong compliance with organizational norms and procedures, ethical leadership can be seen as antithetical to creativity. Similarly, collective need for cognitive closure can negatively impact creativity as this is a motivational tendency toward making quick decisions and avoiding open-ended processes. However, we argue that they both can have a positive effect on team creativity when collective team identification is considered as an underlying mechanism. Accordingly, we hypothesize that ethical leadership fosters team creativity via strengthening collective team identification, and collective need for cognitive closure positively moderates the indirect relationship between ethical leadership and team creativity via collective team identification. We studied 55 teams in a food-services organization in South Korea in a multi-wave and multi-source design and found support for our hypotheses.
      Citation: Group & Organization Management
      PubDate: 2022-02-23T08:05:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10596011211072951
       
  • From Speculation to Substantiation: Empirically-Testing Societal Changes
           in Impact of Fit on Job Satisfaction from 1989, 1998, 2006, and 2016

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      Authors: Mindy K. Shoss, Clair Reynolds Kueny
      Abstract: Group & Organization Management, Ahead of Print.
      Against the backdrop of large-scale changes in work over the past few decades, both business leaders and academics have speculated that employees’ job satisfaction is increasingly tied to the extent to which their jobs meet their desires for meaning and other reinforcers. However, empirical evidence has not yet been brought to bear on these arguments. In order to provide insights into potential socio-temporal changes in how employees derive job satisfaction from job characteristics, we analyzed repeated large-scale population surveys in the United States to examine the impact of fit between desiring and receiving job characteristics on job satisfaction across four time points (1989, 1998, 2006, and 2016). Moderated polynomial regression analyses indicated that employees in more recent years experience greater dissatisfaction by deficiencies in intrinsically-rewarding job characteristics. We interpret these findings against broader discussions of the changing employment narrative theorized to have occurred in the United States over the past several decades.
      Citation: Group & Organization Management
      PubDate: 2022-02-02T03:11:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10596011211058545
       
  • Knowledge-Intensive HRM Systems and Performance of Knowledge-Intensive
           Teams: Mediating Role of Team Knowledge Processes

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      Authors: Khuram Shahzad, Ying Hong, Yuan Jiang, Hina Niaz
      Abstract: Group & Organization Management, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigates whether and how knowledge-intensive HRM systems (KIHRS) impact the performance of knowledge-intensive teams (KITs). We integrate the ability-motivation-opportunity theory with the knowledge management literature to hypothesize that KIHRS affect KIT performance through team knowledge exploration and knowledge exploitation processes. A total of 543 responses (408 team members and 135 team leaders) from 135 KIT of 119 firms were collected in two waves with a time lag of 3 months. The findings indicate that KIHRS relate positively to KIT performance. Furthermore, team knowledge exploration and knowledge exploitation work in a sequence to mediate the relationship between KIHRS and KIT performance.
      Citation: Group & Organization Management
      PubDate: 2022-02-01T03:11:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10596011211063667
       
  • Advancing Theory and Practice on Managing Dysfunctional Turnover:
           Developing an Improved Measure of Turnover Reasons

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      Authors: Carl P. Maertz, Melissa G. Keith, Sumita Raghuram, Caitlin M. Porter, Glenn L. Dalton
      Abstract: Group & Organization Management, Ahead of Print.
      We examine turnover reasons for dysfunctional (i.e., high-performing or high-competency) leavers versus functional (i.e., low-performing or low-competency) leavers. In a United States retail bank, high performers reported wanting better advancement or development opportunities as their top turnover reason, whereas low performers mentioned wanting different job tasks, job insecurity, work stress, problems with coworkers, and generic problems with management more frequently than high performers. In an Indian IT consultancy firm, job performance and competency level were positively related to reporting problems with leadership/upper management, whereas performance was negatively related to reporting a specific alternative job offer. Through these studies, we develop a novel turnover reason measure for scholars and practitioners that assesses reason importance, enables the vital accumulation of data across studies, and increases diagnostic potential in exit or stay interviews/surveys. Finally, we offer directions for building theory and improving the management of high-performer turnover.
      Citation: Group & Organization Management
      PubDate: 2022-01-31T03:46:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10596011211065880
       
 
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